Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Memorandum From the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet38/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   ...   95

104. Memorandum From the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State

for International Resources and Food Policy (Bosworth) to

Robert Hormats of the National Security Council Staff

1

Washington, September 29, 1976.



SUBJECT

First Draft of Expanded NSSM/CIEPSM 237 on US International Energy Policy

Attached is the new first draft of the expanded NSSM 237 on inter-

national energy policy.

2

The NSSM follows closely the outline agreed to



at the interagency working group meeting following consideration of

the earlier NSSM by the meeting of principals chaired by Frank Zarb

and the subsequent meeting of Under Secretary Rogers and his inter-

agency counterparts.

3

We believe that this expanded NSSM answers all



the questions raised in these meetings and fulfills the requirement that

the NSSM be comprehensive in nature.

During the writing of individual chapters, there have been some

suggestions to reorder the structure of the NSSM. We think the current

structure is the most logical way to present all of the arguments in a

comprehensive manner, as requested by principals. However, at our

meeting next week, one of the matters we should discuss is whether

this structure or some other would be more appropriate.

As now written, the NSSM is structured in two major parts. The

first part (Chapters I–X) analyzes the various issues and describes

measures that might be appropriate to address the issues. The second

part discusses three comprehensive energy strategies and policy op-

tions to implement the strategies, and requests decisions by principals.

A brief description of the individual chapters follows. The intro-

ductory chapter (I) sets the stage by indicating our level of dependence

and demonstrating that OPEC market power did not result solely from

the ’73 embargo, but was a phenomenon that had been growing since

1970. This is relevant in answering the question of what we can or can-

not do to manipulate future OPEC decisions. The collective vulnerabil-

ity chapter (II) defines the context for our consideration of all other as-

pects of the NSSM. The price/supply chapter (III) uses econometric

and judgmental models to establish the parameters of future produc-

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Council, Institutional Files, Box 41, NSSM



237—U.S. International Energy Policy (2). Secret. Drafted by Creekmore on September

29. Also sent to the other members of the interagency working group drafting the NSSM

237 study. NSSM 237 is Document 93.

2

Attached but not printed.



3

No records of these meetings have been found. See Document 99 and footnote 4

thereto.


365-608/428-S/80010

368 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

tion and pricing possibilities. Though the numbers generated by these

two models are not the same, the general thrust of both is that we prob-

ably face increasing real prices between now and 1985. Chapter IV (Em-

bargo Vulnerability) analyzes the possibilities for new politically-

inspired supply disruptions and describes measures that might be

taken to reduce the impact of such disruptions. Chapters V–X concen-

trate on the long-term global energy balance and in this connection

look separately at our domestic policy (V), our policy toward other con-

sumers in the IEA (VI), our policies toward OPEC (VII), the role of the

international oil companies (VIII), our policies toward the non-oil

LDCs (IX), and the role of CIEC in our overall energy policy (X).

The final chapter pulls together the pertinent analyses of the earlier

chapters and poses for decision by principals three comprehensive

strategies, and policy options to accomplish them, that the nation can

follow in the next 10–15 years. The first of these strategies is driven by a

more vigorous domestic energy program than has thus far been

adopted. Adoption of this strategy, however, requires a realistic con-

viction on the part of the policy-makers that such a domestic program

is really feasible. A number of initiatives in other areas flow from the

decision on the domestic program.

The second comprehensive strategy involves recognition that we

will not get a stronger domestic program than measures already

adopted and that we will become more dependent on imports. It, there-

fore, concentrates on (1) trying to ensure adequate global production

levels in the future and (2) increasing our protective measures against

politically-inspired supply disruptions.

The third strategy recognizes our current inability to get stronger

domestic energy measures than we now have but relies on production

and pricing decisions by OPEC (restricted production, higher prices) to

force us gradually to take actions for which we do not have the political

will at present. Selection of this option would make it unwise for us to

seek special arrangements on production or pricing with the Saudis

and other producers. We would instead go through the motions to pro-

test price increases but not really push the producers on this.

I would like us to meet on Monday at 3:00 pm in Room 1205 at

New State to discuss this first draft of the NSSM.

4

At this meeting, I



would hope to evaluate the first draft along two lines: (1) Have all the

substantive issues been appropriately addressed? (2) Is the current

structure acceptable or should it be modified? Once these decisions are

made, we can focus on language modifications that may be needed to

make the presentation of the substance more precise and digestible.

4

No record of this meeting has been found.



365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 369



105. Telegram From the Department of State to Selected

Diplomatic Posts

1

Washington, October 27, 1976, 1846Z.



264714. Subject: IEA: US Position on Reduced Dependence Objec-

tives Proposal. Ref: State 263497.

2

Brussels pass to Davignon.



1. All addressees should seek earliest possible opportunity to

convey following text of message on US reduced import dependency

proposal

3

from Assistant Secretary Katz to host government officials



concerned with IEA matters, and report reactions by return cable

ASAP. You should inform host governments that Mr. Katz will head

US delegation to November 8–9 GB meeting.

2. For Bonn: FRG position will be crucial in developing IEA sup-

port for reduced dependency concept. You should ensure, therefore,

that text is delivered to both Rohwedder and Hermes and report their

personal reactions soonest to position outlined.

3. For London, Tokyo, Ottawa, and Oslo: Host governments in

your capitals have all expressed significant reservation about one or

more major elements of reduced dependency proposal. You should

therefore ensure text is delivered to highest appropriate level con-

cerned with international energy policy making and IEA. (Note: For To-

kyo: We have already discussed text with Kinoshita (MITI and Karita

(Gaimusho) at CIEC meeting in Paris.)

4. Begin text: At its meeting on November 8–9, the Governing

Board is scheduled to take a formal decision on the process and time-

table for establishing objectives for the reduction of IEA dependence

on imported oil. The United States considers this decision, and the

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D760401–0400.



Confidential; Immediate. Drafted by Raicht; cleared by Bosworth and in EUR/RPE, the

Treasury Department, and FEA; and approved by Katz. Sent to Ankara, Athens, Bern,

Bonn, Brussels for the Embassy and USEC, Copenhagen, Dublin, London, Luxembourg,

Madrid, Oslo, Ottawa, USOECD Paris, Rome, Stockholm, The Hague, Tokyo, Vienna,

and Wellington. Repeated to the Embassy in Paris.

2

Telegram 263497 to the same addressees, October 23, transmitted the text of an



issues or “process” paper prepared by the Standing Group on Long-Term Cooperation

“bringing together energy demand and supply projections as submitted by countries for

the conservation and accelerated development review process.” (Ibid., D760398–0790)

3

See footnote 2, Document 100. At a restricted IEA meeting on September 8, Bos-



worth proposed establishing individual national objectives for reduced dependence.

Telegram 26657 from USOECD Paris, September 13, transmitted a summary of the meet-

ing. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D76345–0436)


365-608/428-S/80010

370 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

process it will launch, to be of fundamental importance to the viability

and future effectiveness of industrialized country cooperation in

energy.

The updated version of the OECD’s Long-Term Energy Assess-



ment, and similar studies by other sources, project a total world de-

mand for OPEC oil in 1985 of at least 40 MMBD, on the basis of the en-

ergy policies now in place in our countries and relatively conservative

assumptions for our economic growth. In the US view, the degree

of vulnerability to unilateral oil price increases and threats of supply

interruptions which such dependency would entail is clearly

unacceptable.

There are, of course, several reasons why industrialized country

consumption will probably never reach these projected levels. First, it is

very doubtful that OPEC would be willing, or able, to produce that

much oil by 1985: OPEC surplus production capacity has declined and,

while a few countries, most notably Saudi Arabia, have the potential to

increase capacity to meet the projected demand, we cannot assume

they will choose to do so, particularly since, as they have stated repeat-

edly, their revenues at present production levels far exceed even their

projected future financial requirements.

Of more immediate significance, however, is the fact that as our

demand for OPEC oil increases during the short term future, the real

price of oil will almost certainly increase either as a result of OPEC’s

monopolistic exploitation of our vulnerability, or simply because of the

operation of traditional market forces. Whichever the reason, if present

trends continue, the resulting higher costs for energy within our econo-

mies will have a significant adverse impact on economic growth. As a

result, our actual demand for oil over the medium and long-term prob-

ably will be held to levels considerably lower than projected. But there

is little cause for comfort in such an assessment when we consider the

economic costs to our societies, and to the world economy generally, of

such a reduced growth scenario.

There is, however, an alternative to this profoundly worrying fore-

cast for the future: An alternative which hopefully will ensure a con-

tinued satisfactory increase in our economic growth, while at the same

time avoiding the dangers of the “boom-and-bust” energy use patterns

just described. But this will come about only if we act quickly to im-

prove the efficiency of our energy consumption and develop our own

sources of energy so as to bring about a more acceptable long-term

global balance of supply and demand for energy. Current studies indi-

cate that the implementation of a series of more vigorous energy pol-

icies could reduce the demand of the OECD countries for imported oil

in 1985 by as much as one third. Whether or not a swing of this magni-

tude in our requirements for imported oil would be feasible cannot, at



365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 371

this point, be determined. However, it is essential that we begin now to

determine:

—how much of a change in our combined requirements for im-

ported oil is both possible and practical, given essential economic, so-

cial and other goals; and

—how individual IEA countries, operating within our cooperative

framework and taking account of individual economic and social goals

and diverse levels of resource endowment and patterns of energy use,

can contribute to this shift in the global energy balance.

Bearing in mind the preliminary discussions on this subject which

have already taken place in the IEA, the US believes several key points

concerning issues and procedures have emerged which should be en-

dorsed by the Governing Board at its next meeting:

—First, it is clear that each individual country must retain sole con-

trol over its own energy decisions: An exercise in which supranational

decisions are imposed on governments is not envisioned. However, the

assessment of the current and potential performance of individual

countries must be a mutual one. This is a further step towards the nec-

essary interlocking (although not the integration) of our national en-

ergy programs. In the end, we must each be satisfied that the accep-

tance of responsibility for contributing to the desired shift in our

collective energy balance reflects equitable sharing of costs and

benefits.

—Second, we need a quantitative group objective for reduced de-

pendency, supported by individual country acceptance of responsi-

bility for meeting their fair share of that objective, including the con-

crete policy measures that will be required. For its part, the US could

itself envision accepting a quantified national reduced dependency ob-

jective expressed in terms of millions of barrels of imported oil by 1985.

Other countries may choose to express their share of responsibility for

meeting the group’s target in a different manner. Regardless of the spe-

cific method chosen, however, it should provide a quantifiable stand-

ard against which individual country performance can be measured.

The sum of all of these individual national commitments, when ex-

pressed in terms of quantified impact on oil consumption for the group,

should be able to be described in terms of a projected import depend-

ency objective for the group as a whole.

—Third, national commitments to these objectives must be cred-

ible, and of a roughly parallel nature. This is a difficult issue in view of

the differences among our various governmental systems. The US

would envision a process of political undertakings, not legally binding

commitments. However, we have already begun the process of con-

sulting with the US Congress concerning the establishment of the US


365-608/428-S/80010

372 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

national objective within the IEA in order to help ensure that the goal

chosen is a national goal, with Congressional support for the concom-

itant policy measures required to reach it. The review of national per-

formance through the IEA’s annual review procedures would ensure

that there is parallelism in the carrying out of such national

commitments.

—And fourth, the establishment of these objectives and their reg-

ular review in terms of actual performance must take place at the

policymaking, not the technical, level within the IEA and national

governments themselves. Therefore, we believe that while initial devel-

opment of these objectives would be done at Governing Board levels,

their formal establishment and the ultimate enunciation of the political

commitments underlying them should take place at the Ministerial

level.


The US believes that the “process” paper circulated recently by the

SLT Chairman is generally consonant with the US position outlined

above. We would agree, however, with the statement by Chairman

Davignon at the last Governing Board meeting (GB (76) 38 Add.1)

4

that “although the evaluation of government measures is always a dif-



ficult exercise, such evaluation and the development of yardsticks

are unavoidable.” The US believes such yardsticks must be quantitative

in nature and that the “process” adopted by the IEA should

make this clear. We therefore believe an additional step should

be inserted between steps B and C of the present draft to read as

follows:


“Countries may choose to express their share of responsibility for

meeting the group target in different ways. Regardless of the specific

method chosen, however, it should provide a quantifiable standard

against which individual country performance can be measured. The

sum of all of these individual national commitments, when expressed

in terms of quantified impact on oil consumption for the group, should

be able to be described in terms of a projected import dependency ob-

jective for the group as a whole.”

With this amendment, the US believes the “process” paper could

serve as an appropriate basis for the development of an agreed IEA

process for the establishment of reduced dependency objectives. We

strongly believe, therefore, that the Governing Board, at its November

8–9 meeting, should reach agreement along these lines, and that the

process described in the SLT Chairman’s note for the articulation of the

4

The text of Davignon’s statement was transmitted in telegram 31468 from



USOECD Paris, October 25. (Ibid.)

365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 373

reduced dependency objectives should begin promptly thereafter. End

text.

5

Robinson

5

According to telegram 33425 from USOECD Paris, November 10, the IEA Gov-



erning Board “took important step November 9 and adopted satisfactory decision to ini-

tiate process for establishing reduced dependence objectives by 1985 for IEA, as pro-

posed by Secretary Kissinger during last OECD Ministerial,” despite “efforts by some

delegations (particularly UK) to weaken exercise.” (Ibid.)



106. Memorandum From the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Scowcroft) to President Ford

1

Washington, October 28, 1976.



SUBJECT

Possible Oil Price Increase: Letters to Key OPEC Leaders

We have been receiving increasing indications [less than 1 line not

declassified

] through public statements of officials of various OPEC

countries, that a decision to increase the price of oil may be taken at the

meeting of OPEC Petroleum Ministers in December.

It is important that you make known to key OPEC leaders, force-

fully and unequivocally, your opposition to any such price increase. It

would have serious and perhaps even catastrophic effects in both de-

veloped and developing countries.

—In the case of the developed countries, an increase would have a

significant inflationary and recessionary impact. Our analysis indicates

that a 15 percent increase in oil prices would cost the developed coun-

tries $15 billion directly and $32 billion in reduced GNP. Even in coun-

tries where economic recovery is well underway, its continuation is by

no means assured. In other developed countries, the recovery remains

fragile and uneven, while in still others it has scarcely begun. The criti-

cal balance of payments difficulties of Italy and the United Kingdom

would of course be made significantly more severe, with consequent

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Subject File, Box 5,



Energy (17). Secret. Sent for action. A stamped notation on the first page reads: “The Pres-

ident has seen.”



365-608/428-S/80010

374 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

additional strain on the economic and political stability of those

countries.

—In the case of the oil-importing developing countries, the cost

would be $3.5–$4 billion, roughly half in direct costs and the other half

from oil-related increases in import prices. Some of the healthier econ-

omies have been able to begin to adjust to the quadrupling of oil prices

since 1973, and are also feeling the positive effects of increased eco-

nomic activity in the developed countries. Other developing countries,

however, remain in desperate financial straits and are politically un-

able to further curtail their imports. Their increased oil bills represent a

direct burden on the already strained international financial system.

The attached letters to the Shah of Iran, King Khalid of Saudi

Arabia, and President Perez of Venezuela

2

point out how disruptive a



price increase would be, both politically and economically, and also

rebut the argument that a price increase is necessary to offset the in-

creased price of OPEC imports from the developed countries. The let-

ters are somewhat firmer in tone than your previous communications

on this subject,

3

as is appropriate given the apparent willingness of the



oil producers to continue to maximize their short-term income at the

expense of the global community. The letters also point out that an in-

crease would negatively affect the images of the producers in this coun-

try at a critical time.

Saudi Arabia’s position on oil prices has been consistently more

moderate and responsible than that of the other oil producers. They

singlehandedly blocked the last attempt at increase by walking out of

the Bali OPEC meeting. We have recently had indications, including

your recent conversation with Prince Saud,

4

that the Saudis remain



concerned about the effects of a price increase but need our help in re-

ducing pressure on them from other oil producers. Your letter to King

Khalid reflects this distinction. It also reassures those Saudis who re-

portedly believe we are not sufficiently appreciative of what they have

done to date in holding the line on price increase.

I have requested development of an overall strategy paper on this

issue,

5

to include diplomatic options for complementing these letters. I



will report to you separately on the recommendations of this strategy

paper.


2

See Document 110.

3

See Document 80.



4

See footnote 6, Document 103.

5

The strategy paper, “Policy Actions to Attempt to Influence the Saudis to Hold



Price Line in December OPEC Meeting,” is attached to an October 25 memorandum from

Executive Secretary of the Department of State C. Arthur Borg to Scowcroft. (Ford Li-

brary, National Security Adviser, Presidential Subject File, Box 5, Energy (17))


365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 375



Recommendation:

That you approve the letters to the Shah of Iran, King Khalid of

Saudi Arabia, and President Perez of Venezuela, which are attached at

Tab A. If the letters are satisfactory, I propose dispatching them by

cable and following up with originals which you can sign on your re-

turn to Washington. (Secretary Kissinger, Alan Greenspan and Clem-

ent Malin of FEA concur)

6

6



Ford approved the recommendation. The Department sent instructions to Ambas-

sadors in OPEC capitals—not including Jidda, Caracas, and Tehran—to “make early ap-

proach at highest available level to host governments to convey our concerns over the im-

pact of a further oil price increase.” (Telegram 279392, November 12; National Archives,

RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D760424–0298) The Department also sent guidance to

all diplomatic posts “for use in any conversations with host government officials in

which the December OPEC price decision is raised.” (Telegram 278391, November 11;

ibid.) Kissinger also sent a personal message regarding U.S. concerns about an oil price

rise to the Foreign Ministers of Brazil, Peru, India, Sri Lanka, Yugoslavia, Congo, and

Zambia. (Telegram 281096, November 16; ibid., D760426–0833)



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling