Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Telegram From the Department of State to All Diplomatic


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet41/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   ...   95

113. Telegram From the Department of State to All Diplomatic

Posts

1

Washington, December 22, 1976, 1922Z.



309057. Subject: OPEC’s Split Decision at Doha.

2

The following is an INR special assessment:



1. Summary. The two-tier oil price system which emerged from the

Doha OPEC meeting appears to create an unstable situation. While it

evidences the international strains on the cartel, particularly those be-

tween Saudi Arabia and such price hawks as Iran and Iraq, we do not

believe it means that OPEC is likely to break up, nor necessarily that the

Saudis can or will always want to dictate moderate increases. With eco-

nomic activity in the West still soft and with large stocks on hand, it

seems likely that the majority of OPEC will not be able to impose an im-

mediate ten percent price increase, especially if Saudi Arabia increases

production to capacity. If the two-tier price structure were to be main-

tained, it would raise the free world’s oil bill in 1977 by about 13 billion

dollars above that with frozen prices. A flat five percent increase would

add 6.3 billion dollars on to the free world’s oil bill. The two-tier price

structure would also cost the oil-importing LDCs 1.3 billion dollars, or

500 million dollars above the 800 million dollars additionally pledged

by OPEC at Doha. Later in the year, Saudi Arabia might go along with a

higher oil price, especially if demand for oil turns firm and a lower

price for Saudi oil would merely mean higher profits for the oil

companies.

2. OPEC’s Split Decision at Doha. It was generally expected that

the December 15–17 OPEC Oil Ministers’ conference in Doha, Qatar

would cause spirited debate, but that the differences would be negoti-

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D760469–1220.



Confidential; Priority. Drafted by David H. Vance (INR/REC), cleared by Creekmore and

in INR/RNA, and approved by the Director of INR/REC. Also sent Priority to Toronto,

Hamburg, Munich, Frankfurt, Milan, Marseille, Bombay, Melbourne, and Sydney.

2

A summary of the December 15–17 meeting and excerpts from the December 17



Department of State press conference were sent to all diplomatic posts in telegram

306331, December 18. (Ibid., D760465–0702) The White House released a statement re-

garding the price rise on December 17 that begins: “We deeply regret OPEC’s decision to

raise, once again, the price of oil. We very much appreciate the efforts of those OPEC

members, particularly Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, whose sense of inter-

national responsibility and concern for the adverse impact of an oil price increase on the

world economy led them to advocate restraint and to refuse to go along with the increase

proposed by the others. Unfortunately, however, the majority of OPEC members, citing

artificial economic justifications and ignoring the destructive consequences of their ac-

tions, chose to take a course which can only be termed irresponsible.” For the full text of

the statement, see Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Gerald R. Ford, 1976–77,

p. 2873.


365-608/428-S/80010

398 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

ated and compromised. To everyone’s surprise a compromise between

the Saudis on the one hand and the large faction led by Iran on the

other hand was not achieved. The result is a two-tier price for OPEC oil.

The majority decision, accepted by only 11 of the 13 OPEC states, was

to increase prices by 15 percent in two stages—ten percent effective Jan-

uary 1st and another five percent on July 1st. Saudi Arabia and the

United Arab Emirates decided to increase their prices by only five

percent.


3. The announced prices, represented as is OPEC’s usual practice

in terms of “marker crude,” are 12.70 dollars per barrel as of January 1st

and 13.30 dollars per barrel as of July 1st for the eleven, and 12.08 dol-

lars per barrel as of January 1st for Saudi Arabia and the UAE. There is

a strong paradox in the eleven’s use of this practice at Doha, since the

marker crude is Saudi light, and the majority could not in fact control

the Saudi price this time.

4. The split-price decision allowed a statement to be issued

3

and


prevented the meeting from ending in even greater disarray—impor-

tant in preserving OPEC unity—but it papers over a wide gulf. Saudi

Arabia originally insisted on a six-month price freeze while Iran, Iraq,

and most of the other countries insisted the increase should be at least

15 percent.

5. Saudi Arabia modified its position only after Oil Minister

Yamani flew back for consultation with Crown Prince Fahd, who was

acting as Regent, and by phone with King Khalid who was in Switzer-

land. After Yamani’s return, the Saudi delegation simply stated five

percent as its final position and made little further attempt to persuade

any other delegations to switch over. The UAE had already promised

to follow the Saudis’ lead on whatever increase they finally proposed.

6. Iran, and most of the other ten countries which finally stuck with

them were not prepared to settle for less than ten percent for 1977 as a

whole, and there was considerable bitterness about both the Saudis’

position and Yamani’s tactics.

7. In a press conference at the end of the meeting, Yamani said:

—Saudi Arabia would lift all restraints on oil production and let

the market decide how much it would produce.

—He expects the West, especially the United States, to show its

“appreciation” for Saudi Arabia’s oil pricing restraint by helping bring

about a Middle East peace settlement at Geneva and by conceding

something to LDC demands in the North-South dialogue.

—The Saudi action does not mean the breakup of OPEC.

3

The final press release was transmitted in telegram 1393 from Doha, December 17.



(National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D760464–1147)

365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 399

—The five percent increase will only take from the oil companies

the extra profit they have been making recently in the open market be-

cause spot prices have been above the OPEC “marker crude” price.

(Spot market crude prices are notoriously volatile and and unrepre-

sentative of the prices at which nearly all crude moves under contract.

Since spot prices have risen in large part in anticipation of OPEC’s price

increase, they would probably have dropped in the absence of such an

increase. Had no increase at all been voted, it is unlikely that the oil

companies would have been able to reap the extra profit Yamani

claims.)


8. Other OPEC countries have also emphasized that cartel solidar-

ity is not threatened, but all express the hope that Saudi Arabia will not

hurt them by significantly increasing production to cut into their mar-

ket shares. Many also warn against “games” by the oil companies to

buy at the lower price and sell at the higher one.

9. While consumer countries may be tempted to take comfort from

the display at Doha of the traditional difficulties which face cartels, it

would certainly be a mistake to assume that OPEC is likely to break up

or that the Saudis can or will always sharply restrain price increases.

All of the members recognize the benefits they obtain from the cartel

and none have any interest in seeing it break up. However bitter they

may be, they will strive to paper over their differences and present as

solid a front to the world as before.

10. The situation which emerged from Doha, however, seems

clearly unstable, and it appears highly unlikely that the dual oil price

system can be sustained for long. Saudi Arabia seems serious in its in-

tent to increase production as called for to bring the OPEC price down

to its five percent increase. It probably will not be able to bring enough

production on stream fast enough to limit the overall price increase to

five percent, but with economic activity in the West soft and large

stocks on hand, it should be able to compel substantial shaving from

the ten percent increase adopted by the remaining OPEC countries, if it

follows through on its stated intention to do so.

11. Saudi Arabia is estimated to have excess producing capacity of

two to three million barrels per day at present, and can easily push up

production by at least one million B/D in a matter of days and by more

in a matter of months. Thus failure to meet Saudi prices could mean a

substantial loss in market shares for the eleven, and once any price re-

duction takes place in one or more countries, other countries would

find holding out progressively more difficult.

12. There are certain contractual agreements which the companies

have with various members of the eleven, and these members can be

expected to apply as much pressure on the companies as possible to

keep up their liftings on pain of loss of future access. On the other hand,



365-608/428-S/80010

400 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

many of these countries have been the regular “discounters” in the past

and there are indications some, particularly Indonesia, probably will

not even try to implement the full ten percent to begin with.

13. It is, therefore, probable that the eleven will have to moderate

their announced higher increases, although they will use various de-

vices, such as manipulation of differentials, extending longer credits,

etc., to put a “fig leaf” on their actions and avoid any formal

declaration.

14. The next regularly scheduled meeting of OPEC Ministers was

set at the Doha meeting for July 12, 1977, but there is nothing to prevent

them from calling a special meeting at any time. There will certainly be

pressure for an early meeting to work out their differences and reach a

compromise single price.

15. If the two-tier structure were to be maintained and the per-

centages produced by the two group of OPEC countries were to remain

the same as they have been recently the effective increase for the first

half of 1977 would be 8.3 percent, for the last half 11.6 percent, and the

average for 1977 around ten percent. If the percentages received from

each group of OPEC countries by each of the consuming countries were

to remain the same as they have been recently (as shown below) and if

demand grows at current rates, the impact on the major industrialized

countries would be as follows:

Recent Percent of OPEC Imports

Projected Increase

From Saudi Arabia From Other

in Oil Bill

Country

and UAE


OPEC

(billion dollars)

United States

31.7


68.3

3.8


Canada

28.8


71.2

0.1


Japan

52.2


47.8

1.8


United Kingdom

26.4


73.6

0.5


West Germany

26.8


73.2

1.5


France

48.9


51.1

0.9


Italy

37.0


63.0

0.9


Avg for EEC “Big Four”

35.4


64.6

Average Percent Effective Price Increase



Country

1st Half


2nd Half

1977


United States

8.4


11.8

10.1


Canada

8.6


12.1

10.4


Japan

7.4


9.8

8.6


United Kingdom

8.7


12.4

10.6


West Germany

8.7


12.3

10.5


France

7.6


10.1

8.8


Italy

8.2


11.3

9.8


Avg for EEC “Big Four”

8.2


11.5

9.9


365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 401

For the Free World as a whole, the increase in oil import bills over

what they would be with the price of oil frozen is estimated at 12.7 bil-

lion dollars if the two-tier price is maintained, as against 6.3 billion

dollars for an across-the-board five percent increase.

16. The Oil Ministers also decided unanimously at Doha to in-

crease OPEC’s assistance to oil-importing developing countries by 800

million dollars, citing their desire “to enhance solidarity with other

LDCs and their efforts to attain a new international economic order.”

The 800 million dollars only represents around six percent of the addi-

tional revenues OPEC nations can expect from the price increase. Fur-

thermore, if the oil-importing LDCs were to find themselves paying the

world average for their oil imports and if their demand grows at recent

rates, their oil bill will increase by about 1.3 billion dollars, 0.5 billion

dollars or 62.5 percent more than the additional aid voted them by

OPEC.

17. While it is difficult to say exactly what the situation will be in



six months from now, the Saudis may decide or feel forced to go along

with a larger increase by that time. If the Western economies rebound

strongly and the demand for oil becomes very strong, they may decide

that the market calls for an increase and that if they don’t take the profit

the oil companies will. Further moderation on their part may be forth-

coming for political reasons, however, if they feel good progress is

being made toward a Middle East peace settlement.

Robinson


365-608/428-S/80010

402 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



114. Letter From President Ford to Saudi King Khalid

1

Washington, December 29, 1976.



Your Majesty:

I wish to express to you directly my personal admiration for Saudi

Arabia’s demonstration of responsible leadership at the OPEC Ministe-

rial Conference in Doha.

2

While I continue to fear that even a modest



increase may lead to unfortunate setbacks among developed and de-

veloping economies, your own example of restraint was most com-

mendable and, I am sure, very difficult under the circumstances.

I regret that most of the other OPEC nations were not motivated by

the same sense of shared concern for the health of the world economy

upon which we all depend. However, Your Majesty’s determination to

stand firmly against the many pressures for a larger price rise and to in-

crease your country’s oil production has made an important contribu-

tion to the cause of international cooperation which is an important

goal for both our nations. It has also moderated significantly what

could otherwise have been a dangerous blow to the world economy at a

particularly difficult time.

I know that my feelings are shared by countless Americans and

others throughout the world who see in your decision a further ex-

ample of the responsible approach to world problems which has been a

characteristic of Saudi Arabian foreign policy and which has so ably

and conscientiously been maintained under your leadership. I am con-

fident that the United States will, for its part, continue to work closely

with Your Majesty’s Government for the solution of global economic

problems within a framework of cooperation between developed,

oil-producing and developing nations. The United States will also con-

tinue to work with Saudi Arabia as it pursues its efforts to bring about

further progress in this coming year toward our shared objective of a

just and lasting peace in the Middle East.

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Correspondence



with Foreign Leaders, Box 4, Saudi Arabia—King Khalid. No classification marking. Ford

sent a similar letter to UAE President Zayed on the same day. (Ibid., United Arab Emi-

rates—President Zayid bin Sultan al-Nuhayan) Scowcroft informed Ford in a December

29 memorandum that the Department of State recommended sending the letters. Scow-

croft concurred with the recommendation, noting: “This would be both a useful political

gesture, wrapping up the efforts we made to help the moderates hold the line at the Doha

meeting, and a further vehicle for reassuring both leaders of our respect and admiration

for the decision they took against the majority vote of OPEC.” (Ibid., NSC Middle East

and South Asian Affairs Staff: Convenience Files, Box 36, Middle East—Oil (7))

2

See Document 113.



365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 403

In closing, I wish to reaffirm my appreciation for Your Majesty’s

wise leadership and for the contributions which you and Your Maj-

esty’s Government have made to the enhancement of relations between

our two countries—a relationship of such immense importance to re-

gional and world peace and stability. May Your Majesty continue to

enjoy the fullest blessings of health, happiness and prosperity in the

future.

With warm good wishes,



Gerald R. Ford

115. Briefing Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of State

for Economic and Business Affairs (Katz) to Secretary of

State Kissinger

1

Washington, January 3, 1977.



Preliminary Strategy for Dealing with the OPEC Price Increase

Our intensive diplomatic efforts prior to the Doha meeting

2

favor-


ably influenced the final OPEC price decision. As late as October, there

was a general expectation that prices would be increased on January 1

by about 15 percent.

Because of the Doha decision to establish a two-tier price regime, it

is impossible now to predict precisely at what level the price is likely to

stabilize during the first half of 1977. Nor is it certain that the eleven

producers, which decided on an immediate ten percent increase, will

go forward with their announced additional five percent in July. The

Saudis have moved promptly to increase production and appear to be

very serious in their determination to limit the price increase to 5 per-

cent. Increased Saudi production, along with the anticipated lower de-

mand for liftings because of the pre-Doha buildup of stocks, should put

considerable pressure on the other producers to lower their prices.

Some of the eleven are already considering how they could lower their

effective price by altering their credit terms and quality and transporta-

tion differentials. On the other hand, the eleven will undoubtedly

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P770013–0590.



Confidential. Drafted by Creekmore on December 30.

2

See Documents 109, 110, 111, and 112.



365-608/428-S/80010

404 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

threaten the companies that they risk their future access to assured

supply if they shift purchases now to the cheaper producers.

Our evolving price strategy over the first six months of 1977 has

two objectives: 1) to intensify pressure on the eleven to lower their

prices to the level established by the Saudis and the UAE, and 2) to mo-

bilize world opinion against a new price increase in July. We will be de-

veloping a full set of initiatives with other relevant agencies over the

next weeks, but we intend to undertake the following actions soon:

—Document publicly the adverse impact of the Doha price deci-

sion on the global economy and particularly on the LDCs. I will make

this point in my testimony before the Senate Banking Committee on

January 5. In addition, we are coordinating in the IEA a common line

and agreed projections on the Doha impact for use by member gov-

ernments in discussions with LDCs and OPEC producers.

—Jawbone the Aramco partners to implement the lower Saudi and

UAE price decision by passing the full savings through to their cus-

tomers. The Saudis have indicated that they will scrutinize the com-

panies’ behavior closely and hinted that they would raise prices if the

companies try to circumvent the Doha decision by pocketing “wind-

fall profits”.

—Continue our efforts to intensify LDC pressures on OPEC by

making them more conscious of the adverse impact of high oil prices on

their development. Our embassies have been given a series of studies

that provide guidance for discussions with LDC governments, which

we will update regularly. We will also continue to push this issue in up-

coming CIEC sessions.

—Request the World Bank to undertake for the first time a study

on the impact of high oil prices on LDC development. The Bank has re-

fused to single out the price issue in the past largely because of its need

for OPEC funds. However, because its reliance on OPEC funding is re-

duced now and because of the wide international discussion of the ad-

verse impact of oil price increases, the Bank may be prepared to under-

take such a study at this time. If so, its results will reinforce the case that

we have been making.

—Work with CIA to develop an analysis of the impact of another

price increase on the industrialized and developing countries in prepa-

ration for major diplomatic de´marches prior to the OPEC meeting in

July.


—Use the Doha decision as the basis for mobilizing Congressional

and public support for a firm commitment to new tough measures to

reduce our import dependence and to support the reduced depend-

ency exercise in the IEA. A strong commitment to new energy initia-

tives would jar the perceptions of the OPEC producers, many of whom

believe they will be able to control oil prices with impunity in the fore-



365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 405

seeable future. I will make a strong pitch in this direction in my January

5 testimony.

To force the eleven to lower prices, it is imperative that Saudi

liftings be maximized. The price differential should be a powerful in-

centive to induce companies to purchase all the oil the Saudis will pro-

duce. But should this not be the case, some form of USG encourage-

ment to our companies or to the Saudis might be called for. We will

continue to monitor the situation closely over the next several weeks to

determine what if any action might be needed.


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling