Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Telegram From the Embassy in Kuwait to the Department of


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet42/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   ...   95

116. Telegram From the Embassy in Kuwait to the Department of

State

1

Kuwait, January 12, 1977, 0955Z.



210. For the Secretary and Asst. Sec. Atherton. Subject: Suggested

Consideration of Policy Options and Actions To Support Saudi

Arabia/UAE in OPEC Price Increase Dispute.

1. Summary: The uncertainty and confusion resulting from the

two-tier oil pricing system which emerged from the Doha OPEC meet-

ing


2

are being compounded by the prospect of reduced liftings by some

oil companies from OPEC eleven countries. Despite the great wealth of

many of the eleven, their industrial and development commitments

continue to require a high level of financing supplied by oil sales. The

Doha meeting produced a crack in the facade of OPEC solidarity which

is possibly worthwhile exploiting now in order to counteract the irre-

sponsible trend displayed in OPEC actions. The USG should study

carefully and consider seriously what policy options are open to sup-

port Saudi Arabia’s effort to hold the oil price increase to five percent

and to persuade the OPEC eleven to settle for the same increase level by

a variety of actions, including reduced liftings, increased non-OPEC

production, drawdown of stocks and reserves, and conservation meas-

ures, as well as renewed diplomatic “jawboning.” Failure of this

Saudi/UAE bold action due to lack of support from consuming nations

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D770011–0988. Se-



cret; Priority; Exdis. Repeated to Abu Dhabi, Caracas, Doha, Jakarta, Jidda, London, Teh-

ran, Tokyo, Baghdad, USOECD Paris, USEC Brussels, and Dhahran.

2

See Document 113.



365-608/428-S/80010

406 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

could lead to eventual economic confrontation as well as damage to the

political position of the West in the Middle East. End summary.

2. I have reviewed the spate of messages (including those from Ku-

wait) on post-Doha OPEC meeting developments and am prompted to

offer the following observations and suggestions. Although most mes-

sages have stressed firm intention of OPEC eleven to hold firmly to

their agreed oil price increase (at least the initial ten percent), with the

expectation that Saudi Arabia (and the United Arab Emirates) would

eventually fall into line, a current of uncertainty and confusion about

the impact of the two-tier price system has been registered throughout.

Another factor which emerges is the apparently serious determination

of Saudi Arabia to maintain the lower five percent price increase by

raising its oil production level.

3. Reduced Liftings: More recent developments have indicated

that various oil companies, both small and large, have indicated to a

number of producers among the OPEC eleven that they would be re-

ducing or—in the case of a few smaller buyers—suspending their nor-

mal liftings in the first quarter of 1977. Here in Kuwait, two of the three

major purchasers, Gulf and Shell, have reduced liftings; BP apparently

will follow suit shortly. Oil Minister al-Kazemi has already announced

publicly that Kuwait’s crude production would be lowered because of

such reduced liftings. Iran, too, has reported a one-third reduction in

normal liftings and has threatened publicly to “blacklist” those oil com-

panies involved. A wire service report indicated that Exxon was plan-

ning to supply some Saudi Arabian crude to its Aruba refinery, hereto-

fore reportedly run on Venezuelan crude.

4. Production Requirements. While one might assume that Kuwait,

with its surplus wealth, could manage quite well on a lower output,

this is not necessarily so. Kuwait is dependent upon associated gas for

the generation of power, the demand for which is increasing rapidly

and hit its high point during summer. Moreover, Kuwait is con-

structing a billion dollar gas utilization plant for production of LPG

which will require by 1978 at least a two million B/D crude production

if it is to obtain the necessary associated gas to commence partial opera-

tion. I am not fully familiar with the situation in the other OPEC eleven

countries, but I am aware that a number of them, such as Iran, have ex-

tensive development programs which will need a continued high level

of financing. It is therefore clear that the combination of the high level

of oil purchases during the last quarter of 1976 in anticipation of the

price rise, and reduced liftings in the first quarter of 1977 will put a cer-

tain squeeze on some of the OPEC eleven producers.

5. OPEC Threat to World Economy. Simple analysis shows that the

trend in OPEC, as demonstrated by the actions of the OPEC eleven, is

one which points toward continued irresponsible behavior on the part



365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 407

of the OPEC majority in respect to oil pricing. Continuation of such ar-

bitrary price increases as have been levied by the cartel can only lead to

eventual serious global economic consequences or even conflict. Re-

peated distortion of the world’s economic structure as the result of con-

tinuing price increase jolts will have far-reaching repercussions of a po-

litical as well as economic nature. Efforts to improve the lot of the

developing countries in the framework of the North-South dialogue

will prove fruitless if deliberations are continually upset by the intro-

duction of a new set of economic equations and political problems—

both in the developed and developing countries—brought on by a

senseless succession of OPEC price increases. Moreover, the disarray in

the industrialized world will afford an unsurpassed opportunity for

the Soviet Union to tilt the global balance in its favor.

6. Consideration of Policy Options and Actions. Although one

cannot say that there has been an irrevocable split in OPEC, the results

of the Doha meeting have certainly produced a crack in its facade. We

should therefore take this opportunity to examine what policy options

and actions this development offers the US and the other industrialized

countries to counter the potentially unfavorable future impact of OPEC

policies and actions.

7. Support for Saudi Arabia. In the first instance, it is clearly in our

interest to support the Saudi/UAE effort to restrict the oil price in-

crease to five percent. This support may be demonstrated in a number

of ways. Some have been suggested by Yamani himself, i.e., movement

toward a Middle East peace settlement and progress in the North-

South dialogue. I have not viewed these as conditions—indeed such

progress would support our own policy objectives in these fields. Other

ways to support Saudi determination in the matter could take the form

of favorable response to further requests for arms—provided these are

reasonable and do not disturb the military balance in the Middle East

which is already considerably weighted in Israel’s favor.

8. Complexities of Situation. Although I assume consideration is

already being given in the Dept. and elsewhere to possible steps the

USG might take in this situation, I am not privy to any information in

this regard. Nor is it easy to discern from this vantage point what ac-

tions, if any, may even be possible and effective. I am broadly aware of

the complexities of the oil distribution and marketing system, and of

the severe limitations placed on the flexibility of oil companies by their

contractual purchase commitments and refinery supply requirements

as well as of governments by domestic legislation and politico/

economic pressures and demands in both the US and, especially, in

Western Europe. I am also fully cognizant of the fact that the complexi-

ties of the situation will tend to dilute the effectiveness of any possible

actions which may come in mind.



365-608/428-S/80010

408 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

9. Possible Courses of Action. Nonetheless, with these caveats in

mind, clearly I would like to outline below a few courses of action

which could merit consideration:

A. USG might examine, in the context of the International Energy

Agency (IEA), ways in which non-OPEC oil production could be rap-

idly maximized during this year, with emphasis on what measures

might have some effect in the initial six months prior to the next OPEC

meeting scheduled July 12. Emergency measures by the USG to in-

crease our domestic production could also be considered: North Sea

production, particularly Norway’s, might be expanded, etc.

B. Temporary measures to restrict both purchases and consump-

tion of OPEC eleven oil should be undertaken, e.g. stocks which are

now at a high level should not be replenished as early as usual, reserves

might be drawn down, etc. Above all, restraint should be exercised so

that the buying spree which preceded the present price rise does not oc-

cur again before the next price increase scheduled for July 1. There are

already indications of prospects that the additional five percent in-

crease raising the total oil price by fifteen percent might be abandoned

in the hope of attracting a by-that-time disillusioned Saudi Arabia back

in order to restore OPEC unity.

C. IEA governments should seek to coordinate with their oil com-

panies to ensure that the latter make every effort to limit their pur-

chases of OPEC eleven oil to the greatest extent possible. Reduced pur-

chasing pressure should be brought on those countries among the

OPEC eleven which might be more vulnerable, such as Kuwait, which

is already uneasy about its being at odds with Saudi Arabia over this

issue, and whose oil is already more difficult to market because of its

high sulfur content and its gravity. Indonesia, which has increased the

price of its key Minas crude by only 5.9 percent, might be amenable to

friendly pressure to bring the rest of its crudes down to the five percent

level, if liftings of those were to be reduced. Conversely, the oil compa-

nies might try to increase their purchases from Iraq, which in the past

has demonstrated its willingness to ignore OPEC price strictures by

granting favorable discounts in order to increase its sales volume. In

addition, assurances should be obtained that Saudi Arabia and UAE

will give sympathetic consideration to requests for crude from those oil

companies which are not regular customers.

D. In the diplomatic field, USG and its allies should be willing to

undertake a much more vigorous diplomatic campaign of “jawboning”

members of the OPEC eleven. For example, we should make a maxi-

mum effort to counsel restraint to our ally, Iran, which because of its

importance as large oil producer, has probably been the most irrespon-

sible of all the OPEC members in demanding higher and higher price

increases over the years. (My Saudi Ambassadorial colleague has al-



365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 409

ready wryly commented on the minimal pressure exerted by the USG

on Iran in this question.) While I recognize our dependence on Iranian

purchases of US products and services (including the military cate-

gory) as well as on Iranian oil in certain instances, I believe the time has

come for the USG to demonstrate its displeasure with Iranian actions in

OPEC in a firmer and sharper manner. Irresponsible threats to blacklist

American oil companies which choose to buy oil at the lower Saudi

price should not be meekly accepted.

10. Extent of Impact. The actions outlined, if feasible, should be

taken with least fanfare possible. I do not suggest that we seek to en-

gage in direct economic confrontation with the OPEC eleven. I do be-

lieve, however, that the uncertainty and confusion prevailing among

them can be utilized to shake the arrogance and self-confidence

brought on by the headiness of their great wealth to a sufficient extent

to enable us to profit from the responsible attitude displayed by Saudi

Arabia and the UAE. Even if such measures as proposed are only par-

tially effective, the cumulation of their impact, if it comes early enough,

could possibly be enough to persuade the OPEC eleven to settle for a

five percent increase—or at least not raise the increase to 15 percent.

11. Recommendation. After weighing all the complications that are

easy to foresee as well as the difficulties of discreetly organizing such

an effort, I still feel that this situation presents an opportunity which

should not be missed. Indeed, the price-conscious oil companies have

already shown the way by their initial reactions. They should be sup-

ported by their governments. So should Saudi Arabia and the UAE for

their politically independent stand. If the Saudi/UAE effort fails for

want of support from the nations their action would benefit, I fear for

the future behavior of OPEC which might indeed lead to a future eco-

nomic conflict that could only be damaging to the position of the West

in the Middle East. I therefore urge that Washington study carefully

and give rapid and serious consideration to what early actions might be

taken to exploit this disarray in OPEC to the advantage of both the in-

dustrialized and developing nations and in the interest of protecting

the political position of the US and the West in the Middle East.



Maestrone

365-608/428-S/80010

Strategies To Cope With High Oil Prices,

February 1977–January 1979

117. Briefing Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of State

for Economic and Business Affairs (Katz) to the Under

Secretary of State for Economic Affairs-Designate (Cooper)

1

Washington, February 19, 1977.



PRM #8—North/South Energy Issues

Issues:

The attached paper frames North/South energy issues in

the context of our overall energy policy.

2

The paper focuses on two



key issues: 1) whether we should take new initiatives to ensure ade-

quate quantities of energy at manageable prices until domestic and

consumer-coordinated action can cause a shift in the global energy bal-

ance, and 2) whether some initiative on financing LDC energy develop-

ment would be useful to our energy and North/South objectives and, if

so, the nature of that initiative.



Summary of Paper’s Analysis and Conclusions

Toward Saudi Arabia: OPEC will continue to be the residual sup-

plier for world energy demand for at least two decades. Saudi Arabia

will remain the decisive force within the cartel on both production and

pricing policies. With its massive oil reserves, Saudi Arabia has the po-

tential to raise production substantially and ensure that sufficient sup-

ply is available for world needs without a major increase in real prices.

Whether it will do so is problematic. Saudi Arabia can meet current

revenue needs with production levels considerably lower than present

ones. The paper assesses possible policy measures open to us to sup-

port our interest in Saudi Arabia (1) rebuilding an excess production

capacity to maximize its influence within OPEC; and (2) continuing to

produce at a level which constrains the ability of the revenue-hungry

members of OPEC to raise prices.

In particular, the paper identifies Saudi concern over the status

and value of its surplus assets as a potential constraint in Saudi produc-

tion decisions. The paper recommends that we not get out in front on

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P850109–2221.



Confidential. Drafted by Creekmore on February 18.

2

Attached but not printed. PRM 8, “North-South Strategy,” January 21, directed a



study of U.S. policy options on relations between developed and developing nations. The

Department of Energy was tasked with leadership on energy issues, the Department of

State on relations with OPEC and other LDCs, and the Department of the Treasury on re-

lated financial issues. (Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material)

410


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 411

this issue but that we be prepared to discuss it if the Saudis raise it. Our

opening position would be to avoid appearing willing to give special

treatment for these assets. But since future production levels might

later depend on the assets issue, the paper examines the advantages

and disadvantages of:

—Offering preferential treatment for OPEC (Saudi) assets in re-

turn for 1) a Saudi commitment to progressively increase production

levels, to continue to moderate price decisions within OPEC, and to

produce enough oil to prevent future tight market situations, or 2) a

Saudi commitment to enforce within OPEC an oil price agreement that

provides for small, gradual price increases over a limited time period

(5–6 years).

Toward Mexico: Mexico has enormous oil reserves. It plans to in-

crease production and exports, though at a slower rate than is tech-

nically feasible. It is in our interest to encourage and facilitate the devel-

opment of the Mexican oil industry because most of its exports would

flow to us and because these additional supplies on the world market

would reduce somewhat OPEC’s pricing leverage. However, we must

be sensitive to Mexico’s suspicion about foreign involvement in its oil

industry.

Our paper recommends that we periodically advise the Mexicans

of our willingness to help if they want our aid; that we be prepared to

respond promptly to facilitate Mexican access to US technology, exper-

tise, and/or finance for energy development; and that we study within

the USG the merits of a bilateral oil agreement in the event that such an

arrangement would subsequently appear attractive to Mexico.

Toward the Energy Deficient Developing Countries: Imported oil is a

major source of energy for most EDDCs. Development of indigenous

energy supply would enhance their development prospects and mar-

ginally affect the global energy balance.

IBRD studies show many EDDCs have economically recoverable

energy resources. Large amounts of capital are required, most of which

must come from the private sector. However, increased financial par-

ticipation by the IBRD in LDC energy projects could catalyze develop-

ment (not exploration) of proven energy resources. IBRD participation

would reduce the political risk to private investment and improve the

investment climate. The Bank might provide essential funds for

projects of utility to the host country but without export potential.

Aside from a status-quo position, the paper examines two options:

—to seek CIEC endorsement for increasing the financing capabil-

ity of the IBRD for LDC energy development, and

—without providing new funds, to seek a CIEC recommendation

that the IBRD give greater priority to lending for energy development.


365-608/428-S/80010

412 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



118. Briefing Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of State

for Economic and Business Affairs (Katz) to the Under

Secretary of State for Economic Affairs-Designate (Cooper)

1

Washington, February 24, 1977.



SUBJECT

Status of NSSM 237 on US International Energy Policy

The original NSSM request

2

called for a review of international en-



ergy policy in order to help develop measures to ensure a reliable sup-

ply of required energy imports at reasonable prices over the next five

years. At a review by principals on July 14,

3

it was decided to expand



the NSSM’s scope and economic analysis.

A revised draft

4

was prepared and went through a round of inter-



agency consultation, prior to the November election. A new draft was

then completed but not circulated

5

since it treated long-range issues not



requiring immediate attention by the outgoing administration.

The NSSM draft comprehensively analyzes our supply and price

vulnerability, our collective vulnerability with other major consuming

countries, likely future supply/demand/price paths, internal OPEC

dynamics, and the impact of the energy crisis on non-oil LDCs. It con-

cludes that, in the absence of new energy measures domestically and

by other major consuming countries, our shared vulnerability will in-

crease over the next decade, and we will face substantial upside price

risk. The NSSM evaluates numerous possible policy actions and singles

out several areas for attention by principals: the essentiality of a strong

domestic energy program to undergird our international energy policy;

the need for US leadership in the IEA’s reduced dependence exercise;

6

the desirability of tactfully assisting Mexican oil development; the need



to examine seriously the Saudi surplus asset question as well as the is-

sue of an oil price agreement; the effect of energy technology assistance

and political risk guarantees on LDC energy development; and specific

energy issues related to CIEC. All of these issues are now being ad-

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, S/S Files: Lot 80D212, NSSM 237. Confiden-



tial. Drafted by Bullen and cleared by Bosworth, Creekmore, and Richard R. Martin

(EB/ORF/FSE).

2

Document 93.



3

See Document 99 and footnote 4 thereto.

4

See Document 104.



5

Not found.

6

See footnote 2, Document 100 and Document 105.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 413

dressed in either the PRM on North/South issues or the one on the Eco-

nomic Summit.

There was general interagency agreement on the analytical work

in the NSSM but considerable divergence as to appropriate policy re-

sponses. These differences were particularly pronounced regarding as-

pects of the IEA reduced dependence exercise, the Saudi assistance,

and the need for new domestic actions other than price decontrol. Some

of these differences disappeared with the change of Administrations;

others will, as mentioned, be resolved in the PRM context.


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling