Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet44/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   ...   95

Turner

4

Carter addressed nuclear power policy on April 7 in remarks to reporters. See



ibid., pp. 581–587. In a news conference on April 22, he also commented: “There are other

aspects of the energy question, though, that must be addressed. One is atomic energy, re-

processing of spent nuclear fuels, a move toward nonproliferation of atomic explosive ca-

pability. So, there will be a very complicated interrelationship involving trade.” The text

of the news conference is ibid., pp. 695–701.


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 425



123. Memorandum From Secretary of State Vance to

President Carter

1

Washington, June 7, 1977.



SUBJECT

Summit Follow-up on Energy

The Summit Communique´

2

includes three energy items which re-



quire follow up:

1. National and joint efforts to limit energy demand and increase

and diversify energy supplies;

2. Exchange of technology and joint research and development in

energy; and

3. The two-month nuclear study to develop terms of reference for

the international fuel cycle evaluation, and the subsequent longer-term

evaluation.



I. Limitation of Demand and Increase Supply

Our international efforts to limit energy demand and increase and

diversify energy supplies will focus primarily on the Paris-based Inter-

national Energy Agency (IEA) which was established in 1974, follow-

ing the oil embargo and price rise. The 19 country IEA is the principal

forum for energy cooperation among industrialized countries. Six of

the seven Summit participants are IEA members. Although France is

not a member, it has shown some willingness to associate itself with

IEA activity through its membership in the European Community. We

will work with France and its EC partners to increase the level of

French participation.

The IEA member countries have agreed to reduce dependence on

imported oil through national and joint efforts. The Summit communi-

que´ and the prior announcement of the U.S. National Energy Program

3

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P770118–1948.



Confidential. The memorandum was sent under cover of a June 7 memorandum from

Vance to Owen. (Ibid., P770118–1947) On May 20, Owen had sent a memorandum to the

Secretary requesting an outline for the President of “plans for following up the Summit

decisions about energy.” (Ibid., P770118–1953)

2

The Joint Declaration issued on May 8 at the conclusion of London Economic



Summit included sections on “World Economic Prospects,” “Balance of Payments Fi-

nancing,” “Trade,” “Energy,” and “North/South Relations.” For the text, see Public



Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Jimmy Carter, 1977

, pp. 819–824.

3

See footnote 3, Document 122.



365-608/428-S/80010

426 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

have given strong political impetus to this cooperative action. Member

countries have tentatively agreed on a Ministerial meeting this fall. We

plan to work for agreement on the following measures at that meeting:

—A joint commitment to hold total oil import demand by member

countries to not more than 26 million barrels a day by 1985 (if no addi-

tional energy measures are enacted, member countries are projected to

import 31 to 36 million barrels a day by 1985).

—Agreement on a set of general principles aimed at the elimina-

tion of wasteful use of energy, greater coal utilization, expansion of nu-

clear power with appropriate controls, and increased energy research

and development.

—Agreement to review the group objective annually and the con-

tribution of each country towards achieving it.

The National Energy Plan will be the U.S. contribution to this co-

operative venture.

There are uncertainties surrounding future oil production levels of

OPEC members, particularly Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia has accom-

modated to the demand of the industrialized world for oil over the last

few years by substantially increasing production and it is essential that

they continue to do so. Our ongoing bilateral contacts with Saudi Ara-

bia including the recent visit by Prince Fahd indicate such energy poli-

cies will continue if the industrialized countries make serious efforts to

conserve energy.

In the North-South dialogue we are attempting to convince oil pro-

ducing countries of their responsibility to provide adequate and stable

supplies of energy during the energy transition period and to increase

their sense of interdependence with the industrialized countries and

their economic viability.

If oil importing developing countries can develop their indigenous

energy resources, this will add marginally to the world energy supply.

To spur such development, we are working to enable the World Bank

to expand its lending for energy development. This new bank lending

would also induce greater flows of private capital for the same

purpose.


II. Research and Development

Summit participants agreed on the need for more exchange of

technology and joint research and development directed at more effi-

cient energy use, improved recovery and use of coal and other conven-

tional resources, and the development of new energy sources.

In the IEA, we have said we are ready to intensify cooperation with

industrialized countries in conservation, coal combustion and conver-

sion, and renewable sources, such as solar energy.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 427

We now need to develop concrete research proposals for coordina-

tion at the fall IEA Ministerial. We are considering the possibility of in-

vestment in key energy research and development projects in other

countries in return for agreement to make similar contributions to U.S.

programs.

We also want to achieve intensified coordination of national en-

ergy research and development programs to enable countries to share

the high cost of research and development and avoid needless overlap

and duplication of efforts. Such cooperation will be difficult because

our ability to influence private companies’ decisions on access to their

technology is severely limited. We will wish to maintain discretion re-

garding the transfer of government-owned technology, particularly re-

lating to nuclear energy.

We want to try to involve OPEC countries and more advanced de-

veloping countries, such as Brazil and India, in expanded energy re-

search and development cooperation with industrialized countries in

the IEA. The new participants in IEA projects would be asked to share

equitably in the costs and benefits of these projects.

To meet the needs of LDC’s for technical assistance, the U.S. has

proposed as part of the North-South dialogue the establishment of an

International Energy Institute (IEI). The IEI would address the need for

increased flows of energy technology to LDCs by providing up-to-date

information on relevant technology and facilitating access to it. It

would also provide needed technical assistance in assessing resource

potential, developing energy strategies, training technicians and man-

agers, and promoting and facilitating exploration.

A program proposal for the examination of non-nuclear alterna-

tives of energy for developing countries has been submitted to you in

support of the U.S. non-proliferation policy. This program has the ele-

ments of an energy research cooperation program plus a broader con-

ventional energy resource definition element. This program would ad-

vance our non-proliferation goals, demonstrate concern about the

quality of life in developing countries, and improve our knowledge of

conventional energy resources.

[Omitted here is discussion of international fuel cycle evaluations.]


365-608/428-S/80010

428 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



124. Telegram From the Department of State to Selected

Diplomatic Posts

1

Washington, June 7, 1977, 0004Z.



130415. Subject: Fahd Visit and Oil Prices. Ref: Abu Dhabi 1623;

State 124499.

2

1. The following is for your background information and guidance



in dealing with the oil price question. Fahd’s visit provided an oppor-

tunity for highest level USG officials to express appreciation for the

price and production policies being pursued by Saudi Arabia and

to stress the importance of continued moderation. We and the

Saudis agreed that energy price increases have a particularly dam-

aging effect on poorer developing countries, on certain of the

weaker economies among the industrialized countries, and on world

economy generally. The Saudis affirmed their commitment to mod-

eration and specifically assured us that they would not use price

and production decisions to try to leverage the Middle East political

process.

2. Our prime objective in bilateral dealings with Saudi Arabia and

other producers remains that of discouraging future OPEC price in-

creases. We gave no signal that we favor a price compromise within

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D770201–0952.



Confidential; Priority. Drafted by Donald F. Hart, Officer-in-Charge of Producer Country

Affairs (EB/ORF/FSE), cleared by Cooper, Sober, Bosworth, and in S/P, ARA, FEA, and

the Treasury Department; and approved by Katz. Sent to Cairo, Caracas, Dhahran, Doha,

Jakarta, Jidda, Kuwait, Lagos, Libreville, London, Manama, Paris, Quito, Tehran, Tripoli,

Tokyo, Baghdad, Algiers, and Abu Dhabi.

2

In telegram 1623 from Abu Dhabi, May 31, Ambassador Dickman asked the De-



partment to “promptly” give him “something to tell the UAE authorities regarding Fahd

visit, particularly as it relates to energy.” (Ibid., D770193–0030) In telegram 124499 to

Jidda, May 28, and repeated to other posts, the Department reported that Carter’s May

24–25 meetings with Fahd in Washington not only focused on “the Middle East prob-

lem,” but also on “a number of international and bilateral economic issues and matters

affecting Saudi and regional security.” (Ibid., D770191–1151) The memoranda of conver-

sation of their meetings are scheduled for publication in Foreign Relations, 1977–1980, vol-

ume XVIII, Middle East Regional; Arabian Peninsula. Vance’s May 24 luncheon with

Fahd is described in telegram 122169 to Jidda, May 26. (National Archives, RG 59, Central

Foreign Policy Files, D770189–0081) Schlesinger met with the Crown Prince on May 26

and expressed “his appreciation for the great contribution” that Saudi Arabia had made

“to stabilizing the price of oil.” (Memorandum of conversation, May 26; Library of

Congress, Manuscript Division, Schlesinger Papers, Box 1, Saudi Arabia)


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 429

OPEC.

3

Although the Saudis have been pressured by the upper tier



producers to increase prices by five percent in July, they are holding

their options open. We favor no price increase. If the Saudis raise their

prices at all, we expect they would seek an understanding that would

call for a period of stability in the prices of the upper tier producers be-

yond the end of 1977.

3. The President’s proposals to Congress

4

to move US domestic oil



prices toward world levels through phased-in tax and price increases

do not constitute a shift in US policy toward endorsement of OPEC

price increases. The purpose of the President’s plan is to promote con-

servation by charging oil and gas users more realistic prices, recogniz-

ing the reality though not the propriety of high world oil prices.

4. US acceptance of the need to conserve energy does not indicate a

lessening of our concern about OPEC price decisions and their impact.

On the contrary, the interests of industrialized countries, LDCs and the

OPEC nations themselves, require world economic stability and thus

stability in the price of oil.



Vance

3

On May 20, the Embassy in Jakarta reported that Indonesia and “at least nine



members” of OPEC agreed to freeze oil prices for the remainder of 1977 instead of raising

prices by 5 percent on July 1 as had been decided at the December 15–17, 1976, meeting in

Doha. According to Indonesian Director of Oil and Gas Wijarso, a recent visit by Vene-

zuelan President Pe´rez had been the “chief catalytic agent” for the agreement. Wijarso

added that Carter’s new energy policy persuaded some OPEC members to defer an addi-

tional price hike. (Telegram 6619 from Jakarta, May 20; National Archives, RG 59, Central

Foreign Policy Files, D770180–0461) The Indonesian Minister of Mines, Mohammad

Sadli, explained the rationale behind the price freeze as a “unilateral gesture by OPEC

eleven to pave way for eventual price unity with Saudi Arabia.” He said that a compro-

mise was necessary to “preserve OPEC solidarity, maintain Third World unity, and elim-

inate differences prior to Paris CIEC meetings.” (Telegram 6738 from Jakarta, May 24;

ibid., D770184–0677)

4

See footnote 3, Document 122.



365-608/428-S/80010

430 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



125. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

Switzerland

1

Washington, June 17, 1977, 1908Z.



141244. Subject: CIEC;

2

Energy Policy after CIEC; Continuing En-



ergy Consultation. Ref: Bern 2578.

3

1) When replying to Jolles’ questions posed reftel re energy policy



in wake of CIEC, you should make the following points.

2) The US is now reassessing, in the light of the recently concluded

CIEC, the advisability of continuing to seek an on-going energy dia-

logue between producers and consumers. We intend to consult fully

with other industrialized countries on this before deciding whether to

continue to pursue an on-going energy dialogue, and if so, the tactical

considerations of how and in what forum it should be pursued. (The

June 27–28 meeting of the IEA Governing Board

4

should provide an ini-



tial opportunity for such consultations.) We also believe that low-key

consultations with some major oil-importing LDCs, and perhaps key

producing countries, on these questions would be beneficial.

3) While it may or may not be advisable to continue seeking an

on-going energy dialogue, industrialized countries should realize that

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D770218–1059.



Confidential. Drafted by Milam; cleared in EUR/RPE, EB/ORF/FSE, the White House,

Treasury Department, and FEA; and approved by Bosworth. Repeated to Ankara, Ath-

ens, Bonn, Brussels for the Embassy and USEEC, Canberra, Dublin, Copenhagen, Hel-

sinki, Lisbon, London, Luxembourg, Madrid, Paris for the Embassy and USOECD, Oslo,

Ottawa, Reykjavik, Rome, Stockholm, The Hague, Tokyo, Vienna, and Wellington.

2

The final CIEC Ministerial meeting was held in Paris May 30–June 3. While the



countries representing the Northern and Southern Hemispheres “reached agreement on

a number of issues” regarding the CIEC’s four areas—energy, raw materials, develop-

ment, and financial affairs—a “lack of agreement on on-going energy consultation pro-

cess” signified a “gap” in the overall package. (Telegram 16350 from Paris, June 3; ibid.,

D770198–0487) Telegram 16351 from Paris, June 3, transmitted the CIEC’s final commu-

nique´. (Ibid., D770206–0274) Telegram 17849 from Paris, June 16, contains an informal pa-

per by the IEA Secretariat on the implications of the CIEC meeting’s outcome for the

Agency. (Ibid., D770215–0780)

3

In telegram 2578 from Bern, June 8, Ambassador Davis reported that Swiss State



Secretary for Foreign Economic Affairs Paul R. Jolles had expressed concern over the

failure of the CIEC to achieve “any continuing dialogue on energy questions with the

producing countries.” Consequently, Davis requested information on how the United

States envisioned the future role of the IEA and, more generally, on the future of U.S. for-

eign energy policy. (Ibid., D770204–0022)

4

At the June 27–28 meeting, the Governing Board agreed to forward for Ministerial



approval a draft decision “encompassing a group oil import objective for 1985 of 26

MMBD, endorsement of a set of 12 principles for energy policy, and strengthened na-

tional review procedures designed, inter alia, to monitor progress toward achievement of

the group objective.” The Governing Board’s endorsement of the 12 principles repre-

sented a “firm political commitment” but was “not legally binding.” (Telegram 19301

from Paris, July 1; ibid., D770252–0903)



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 431

such a dialogue does not hold the key to reducing the strain on avail-

able oil supplies now forecast for early 1980’s and the concomitant up-

ward pressure on the oil price. The only effective solution to this

problem lies in action by consuming countries to reduce dependence

on imported oil. (In fact, action to reduce dependence is a key to a suc-

cessful dialogue with producers.) For industrialized countries this

entails conservation and to increase production of alternative con-

ventional and non-conventional energy sources. For consuming devel-

oping countries it mainly entails efforts—assisted through the coopera-

tion program outlined at CIEC—to increase exploration for and

development of indigenous energy resources.

4) Our interest in and support of the IEA is undiminished. It re-

mains, in our view, the principal vehicle for industrialized country en-

ergy cooperation. We believe the reduced dependence program now in

final stages of preparation in the IEA to be a key step in our collective

progress toward that goal.



Vance

126. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

Saudi Arabia

1

Washington, June 18, 1977, 1828Z.



142372. Subject: Oil Prices: Message From the Secretary to Crown

Prince Fahd.

1. Please deliver the following letter from the Secretary to Fahd:

2. Begin text:

Your Royal Highness, your recent visit here

2

did much to reaffirm



and strengthen the relationship between our two countries. The Presi-

dent and the others of us who were privileged to meet with you bene-

fitted greatly from your views and counsel on a wide variety of issues.

We shall wish to keep in close touch with you on the broad range of

matters affecting the common interests of our nations.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D770218–1164. Se-



cret; Immediate. Drafted by Sober; cleared by Katz, Cooper, and in the NSC and White

House; and approved by Vance.

2

See Document 124 and footnote 2 thereto.



365-608/428-S/80010

432 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

I would like to raise with you at this time one subject of very high

and continuing importance to both of our countries and also to the

global economy: the question of oil prices. When you were here, the

President expressed our appreciation for the policy of your gov-

ernment on this subject, and we were extremely pleased to hear your

reaffirmation of the determination of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to

continue its course of moderation with regard to oil prices.

Following your visit, there have been some reports to the effect

that your government intends to increase the price of Saudi oil by five

percent within the coming month, in the context of the forthcoming

OPEC meeting. These same reports state that the eleven members of

OPEC which increased their prices by ten percent last January would

forego any additional price increase until the end of 1977. We do not

know whether these reports are correct.

From our point of view, it appears clear that the interests of the

global economy would be best served by avoiding further increases in

the price of oil. With regard to any possible price increases which your

government might be planning for the remaining months of this year,

we trust that you are also considering the desirability of achieving an

understanding that would call for a period of stability in the prices of

the other producers beyond the end of 1977.

3

I would value greatly your sharing with me your thoughts at this



time on the prospects for oil pricing in the months ahead.

4

As we



agreed during your visit here, continued cooperation between our two

countries on energy matters will remain of the highest importance. For

our part, the President is continuing to press his proposals for a United

States energy program that places special emphasis on the need for

maximum conservation, and we will wish to keep you informed of the

progress of our efforts in this regard.

3

On June 29, OPEC announced: “In the interest of unity and solidarity of OPEC, the



following member countries of the organization: Algeria, Ecuador, Gabon, Indonesia,

Iran, Kuwait, Nigeria, Qatar and Venezuela have resolved to forego the application of the

5 percent increase in the price of oil as of 1 July 1977, a decision which was taken in Doha

in December 1976.” (Telegram 6143 from Vienna, June 29; National Archives, RG 59, Cen-

tral Foreign Policy Files, D770232–0451)

4

On June 26, Fahd replied that Saudi Arabia was “following with concern the fluc-



tuating oil prices in OPEC producing states.” He continued: “Saudi Arabia believes that

such fluctuations do not serve the common interests of the producing states themselves;

that wisdom and moderation call for an end to this situation, and thence for an attempt to

create a positive dialogue in the light of which a single formula for oil might be reached

during the coming period.” A unified price for oil, Fahd wrote, was “definitely in the in-

terest of consumers,” even if that entailed “an increase in the price of oil exported from

Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates” due to “the absence of an oil price hike” by

the other OPEC members. However, Fahd concluded, “the prices—as Your Excellency is

aware—are basically subject to the law of supply and demand.” (Telegram 4503 from

Jidda; ibid., D770228–0548)



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 433

The President has asked me to convey to you, and through you to

King Khalid, his warmest wishes and his hopes for your good health. I

join in these wishes and hopes. Sincerely, Cyrus Vance End text.


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling