Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Vance 137. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet47/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   ...   95

Vance

137. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

Saudi Arabia

1

Washington, November 5, 1977, 2242Z.



265882. Subject: President’s Energy Speech and Oil Price Freeze.

1. The President will make a nationwide address on energy on

Tuesday, November 8.

2

After you receive text, you should convey to



King Khalid a copy of the speech and make the oral presentation below.

We leave it to you whether this can best be done in audience with King

or conveyed, for example, through Prince Fahd.

2. Begin oral presentation. The President has asked me to deliver to

you a copy of his recent speech on energy, as well as to express once

again his regret that he was unable to visit the Kingdom as planned be-

cause of the need to complete passage of the energy legislation. Secre-

tary Blumenthal has told the President of the detailed and useful nature

of the talks on energy and other subjects which the Secretary had with

Your Majesty, Crown Prince Fahd and others in the Kingdom.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P840072–1958. Se-



cret; Immediate; Nodis. Drafted by Leonard Ross, Cooper’s Special Assistant; cleared by

Blumenthal, Owen, Atherton, and Katz; and approved by Cooper. The telegram was re-

peated to the White House for Brzezinski on November 6. (Ibid.)

2

In his speech, Carter announced that Congressional conference committees were



in the process of resolving the differences between the House and Senate energy bills,

which were based on the administration’s National Energy Plan (see footnote 2, Docu-

ment 122). He stated that “we simply use too much and waste too much energy” and that

“unless we act quickly, imports will continue to go up” and existing problems would

“grow even worse.” The purpose of the energy legislation, he said, was to “cut back on

consumption,” “shift away from oil and gas to other sources of energy,” and “encourage

production of energy here in the United States.” He also said: “We must face an un-

pleasant fact about energy prices. They are going up, whether we pass an energy pro-

gram or not, as fuel becomes more scarce and more expensive to produce.” For the full

text of the speech, delivered on nationwide television and radio, see Public Papers of the



Presidents of the United States: Jimmy Carter, 1977

, pp. 1981–1987.



365-608/428-S/80010

458 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

3. The President is especially grateful for the reception given to

Secretary Blumenthal, who told the President of the extraordinary hos-

pitality accorded him.

4. The President is greatly encouraged at the common view shared

by the USG and SAG on energy problems. He had looked forward to

discussing these questions, among others, personally with His Majesty

and with Crown Prince Fahd during his visit to the Kingdom. Since

that opportunity has unfortunately been delayed, the President has

asked Ambassador West to convey the views he would have conveyed

personally.

5. The President strongly agrees that energy conservation is the

first order of business for the industrialized world, especially the

United States. He is telling Congress and the American people that the

energy question is a two-way street. The United States must take tough

measures to curb its consumption if it is to expect a freeze on oil prices.

And oil producers should, as the SAG has so clearly indicated, act on

prices and production with an understanding of the interrelationship

between the prosperity of the developed world, the non-oil developing

world, and that of the producers themselves.

6. On the forthcoming OPEC price decision, the President appreci-

ates the Saudi commitment, as expressed to Secretary Blumenthal, to

work for a price freeze through 1978 and is confident that this goal can

be obtained. He believes that the Iranians share our understanding of

the fragile nature of the world economic recovery and that they, with

the encouragement of other consuming nations as well as the USG and

the SAG, could support a freeze. He would appreciate the SAG’s assist-

ance and advice on the best way to accomplish this goal.

7. The President suggested the importance of stating our shared

objective of a 1978 price freeze explicitly and publicly to avoid confu-

sion arising from the numerous newspaper reports on the forthcoming

price decision. End oral presentation.

3

Christopher

3

West delivered the text of Carter’s speech and made the oral presentation to



Prince Saud on November 9. Repeating an argument previously used by Yamani, Saud

said that a “rational economic basis” for a price freeze was “difficult to justify, especially

to those countries having little interest in political aspects of decision.” In his report to the

Department, West commented: “Any indication of support for price freeze from other

countries should be passed on to Saudis without delay to strengthen their resolve. Im-

pression now loud and clear is that Saudi opposition to a price increase is not sufficiently

strong to hold the line against pressures from other OPEC members and Saudis are not

prepared to break ranks again with other OPEC member states. An increase of five to

seven percent would be minimum we would expect barring new developments between

now and Caracas meeting.” (Telegram 7733 from Jidda, November 9; National Archives,

RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P840072–1969)


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 459



138. Memorandum From the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Brzezinski) to President Carter

1

Washington, November 12, 1977.



SUBJECT

Oil Price Strategy

I wrote you earlier about our strategy to avert an oil price increase

in 1978.


2

Below is an update on our efforts:

1. Cy Vance sent messages to Foreign Ministers in key consuming

countries outlining the economic arguments against any price increase

and urging those governments to make representations to OPEC mem-

bers on their own behalf.

3

We have also suggested that the French



and Italians consider making a special approach to Iraq and Libya,

respectively.

2. State instructed our Ambassadors in nine OPEC capitals and in

selected developing countries to make similar de´marches.

4

3. Cy Vance presented our case personally to Algerian Foreign



Minister Bouteflika.

5

Foreign Responses—

The developing countries contacted have ex-

pressed sympathy and support for our position but appear unwilling

to approach OPEC states, citing political factors as their reason. Still,

they are likely to provide some support in the form of press statements,

corridor contacts in the UN, etc.; these are unlikely to influence OPEC

decision-makers.

We have received no formal replies from the key industrial coun-

tries, but when Vance’s letter was delivered in Bonn, Paris, and Tokyo,

officials there expressed agreement with our position and noted that

they planned similar approaches.

Responses in OPEC capitals have been mixed. The Indonesians

said that inflation justified a moderate increase in prices, whereas

United Arab Emirates’ (UAE) representatives said they would continue

to pursue a policy of price moderation and would, in any event, coordi-

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Subject File,



Box 48, Oil. Secret. Sent for information. Carter initialed the memorandum.

2

See Document 135.



3

See footnote 6, Document 136.

4

See Document 136.



5

Vance urged Bouteflika “as strongly as possible” that “there be no price increases

agreed upon at Caracas meeting.” A summary of the discussion is in telegram 270642 to

Algiers, November 11. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D770418–

0040) The telegram is scheduled for publication in Foreign Relations, 1977–1980, volume

XVII, Africa.



365-608/428-S/80010

460 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

nate their position with Saudi Arabia. Indonesia and Kuwait noted a

seeming lack of concern on the part of other developed countries. In ad-

dition, a number of OPEC states believe Iran will seek a price increase,

although we have no information that the Shah has changed his posi-

tion since his meeting with Mike Blumenthal.

6

OPEC countries have not yet reached a consensus on oil prices;



and urgent consultations are currently underway. Saudi Petroleum

Minister Yamani made quick trips this past week to the UAE and Qa-

tar. Venezuelan Minister Hernandez is visiting three OPEC capitals.

Reportedly, the Saudis are arguing for a price freeze, but there is no

sign that they have won any converts. In the meantime, industry

sources and intelligence reports indicate that a price increase of 5–7% is

likely.

Next Steps—

We are confident that the Saudis will do what they can

within OPEC to lobby for a price freeze. But in the end they will possi-

bly support a modest increase if the alternative is a two-tiered price

structure as in early 1977. As we draw closer to the Caracas meeting, we

may recommend that you communicate directly with King Khalid of

Saudi Arabia to emphasize our position on prices.

We are less certain about Iran and Venezuela. The Shah has given

us his commitment not to push for a price increase. But, that may not be

enough, particularly since other OPEC states allege that Iran is still a

price hawk. Consequently, it would be useful if the Shah would agree

to support actively a price freeze in the next round. Your discussion

with him next week will be crucial in that regard.

Venezuela will be a problem. Perez will listen to you, but perhaps

to no one else. Venezuela’s role on the price issue is critical. If the Vene-

zuelans take a hard line at the Caracas meeting, there is almost no

chance for a freeze. Consequently, we may recommend dispatching a

special emissary to Venezuela who would carry a personal message

from you outlining our position. Cy Vance will be traveling to Argen-

tina later this month and would thus be one logical candidate.

7

We will


forward our recommendations to you shortly.

6

See footnote 2, Document 134.



7

Vance met with Pe´rez on November 23 and delivered a letter from Carter on the

subject of an oil price freeze. The Secretary said that the United States was worried about

the impact of an increase in oil prices not only on the industrial world but also on the

LDCs. He added that “any increase at all” would worsen inflation and unemployment

and decrease investor confidence, thereby jeopardizing growth and affecting OPEC in

the long run. Finally, Vance said that the United States had conveyed the same concerns

to Iran, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, Algeria, and Indonesia. A summary of the meeting is in

telegram 11456 from Caracas, November 25. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign

Policy Files, D770438–0145) A copy of Carter’s letter to Pe´rez is in Carter Library, Na-

tional Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, President’s Correspondence with Foreign

Leaders File. See also footnote 1, Document 141.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 461



139. Memorandum of Conversation

1

Washington, November 16, 1977, 10:30–11:35 a.m.



SUBJECT

President’s Meeting with The Shah of Iran, November 16, 1977, 10:30 a.m. to

11:35 a.m., The Cabinet Room

PARTICIPANTS

The President

The Vice President

The Secretary of State

Ambassador William Sullivan

Alfred L. Atherton, Jr.

Zbigniew Brzezinski

Gary Sick

Jody Powell

Hamilton Jordan

His Imperial Majesty Mohammad Reza Pahlavi Aryamehr, The Shahanshah of

Iran

His Excellency Abbas Ali Khalatbari, Iranian Minister of Foreign Affairs



His Excellency Ardeshir Zahedi, Iranian Ambassador to the United States

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to oil.]

The President then turned to the price of oil. He was encouraged

by statements by Saudi Arabia and by the statement of the Shah the day

before that he would not press for an increase in the price of oil at the

upcoming conference in Caracas. The President said he hoped Iran

would do whatever was possible to hold down the price of oil. Our

country was strong enough to absorb some increase, although we will

have a $30–35 billion deficit this year, largely as the result of our pur-

chase of imported oil. He noted that according to our assessment, since

1974 there has been a 20 percent increase in the price of goods going

into OPEC whereas there has been a 27 percent increase in the price of

oil. This price increase has worked a great hardship on other nations as

well. Some of our friends, such as the Germans, French and others, are

rather timid on this issue and are unwilling to take a tough stand. They

don’t want to antagonize their friends in the oil-producing nations.

And the President understood this, since they needed the resources.

The President noted that the weakening of the dollar hurts Iran and the

other oil-producing countries as well. The President understood that

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Subject File,



Box 36, Memoranda of Conversation, 11–12/77. Top Secret; Sensitive. The Shah visited

Washington November 15–16. This memorandum of conversation and others with the

Shah during his visit are scheduled to be printed in full in Foreign Relations, 1977–1980,

volume X, Iran: Revolution, January 1977–November 1979.



365-608/428-S/80010

462 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Iran needs the oil revenues but there have been substantial increases

since 1973. In our contacts with Saudi Arabia, they have progressed

from not proposing an increase to actively opposing an increase at the

next OPEC meeting. We are working directly with a number of na-

tions—Tunisia (as heard), Kuwait, and others. Venezuela is the most

eager for a price increase. We have absorbed approximately a $30 bil-

lion deficit. We are strong enough to do that. But this weakens the

structure of the economy and we would like to ask for your help if you

can.

The Shah replied that since the last increase a year ago, which was



10 percent, with Saudi Arabia setting its own level of five percent for six

months, the average increase has obviously been between five and 10

percent. According to Iran’s figures, world inflation during that period

has been rather high. The Shah said that he can notice that the cost of

items which he has been buying since 1973 and the present have some-

times gone up as much as five times in price. He was giving these

figures simply for the sake of speaking about facts. However, as far as

Iran’s policy is concerned he knows that the Western economies are not

in such good shape, especially in Europe, and if they were brought

under more pressure they might not be able to solve their problem of

unemployment. This could in turn affect the situation in France, Italy

and other countries. Iran would feel it very badly if something hap-

pened in Europe. Therefore, Iran’s attitude was to be silent and, if nec-

essary, to tell them what we think, i.e. “let’s give the Western nations a

break,” and even to work for a freeze. But we have to realize that the

same problem is going to be in front of us next year and the next year

and the next year. The Shah mentioned that he had talked to Dr. Schle-

singer on this very issue. Why not form an energy bond which could be

sold to some people who don’t know what to do with all of their

money? This investment could be repaid with interest, but in the mean-

time we could use the hundreds of billions of dollars of funds for the

development of new energy sources. The only way we can find new

sources of energy is to develop an equilibrium between the price of

new sources of energy and the price of oil. If the price of oil remains so

much cheaper, then people are not going to go for new sources. As far

as the effect of lower prices on the oil companies, the Shah said that he

didn’t mind. The oil in his country was completely controlled by the

government, and he thought that perhaps it would be better if all oil

deals were made on a government-to-government basis. But if the oil

companies make distribution arrangements in private, it is never-

theless necessary that governments must be certain that they are not

the losers in this process. “But we shall really be the people who will

have this (a price freeze) in mind in Caracas. The Saudis will probably

come along with exactly the same point of view.”



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 463

The President noted that if the world knew that a price freeze was

based on a long-term arrangement with you, then others might be more

interested in going along with such an arrangement and that would be

welcomed. It would remove the constant threat which the consumer

nations feel in not knowing what to expect next. If we could plan two,

four, or even six years ahead on our individual problems it would be

helpful. At the present time the business community is unwilling to

commit itself to new plant construction because of uncertainty over en-

ergy. Part of this is our own problem since we have lacked an energy

policy. We hope to take care of that problem in the near future. Of

course, we are oil producers as well and in fact produce more oil than

Iran. As a result, this gives us greater problems on energy policy than

leaders such as Giscard or Schmidt. The President wondered if the

Shah had gone beyond simply outlining the program on bonds. Did he

have any more specific proposals?

The Shah replied that if the United States is interested (the Presi-

dent indicated yes, we are interested), he will brief Minister of Finance

Ansari or Dr. Reza Fallah to come over to the United States and discuss

this proposal with the United States.

President Carter said he welcomed this and that we would partici-

pate as oil producers.

The Shah noted that if in fact there is going to be a freeze in prices

for 1978 there must be something concrete done or something con-

crete to show for this. At this point he referred to an AP item quoting

Qadhafi as criticizing the Shah, saying that the Shah was the tool of the

United States and that he only wanted his money to pay for U.S. advis-

ers. He also quoted another item indicating that an Iraqi envoy to Teh-

ran had indicated that they wanted a 23 percent increase in oil prices.

The President responded that he was sure that Iran could control

Libya and Iraq.

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to oil.]


365-608/428-S/80010

464 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



140. Memorandum From the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Brzezinski) to President Carter

1

Washington, November 29, 1977.



SUBJECT

Letter from Ambassador West

Attached is a letter from Ambassador West.

2

Unfortunately, due to



the long transmission time by pouch from Saudi Arabia, his report on

talks with the Saudis about Geneva and oil prices has largely been ov-

ertaken by events.

Both Saudi Arabia and Iran have continued to honor their commit-

ment to a price freeze at the OPEC meeting on December 20, and this

has had the effect of forcing Venezuela and others to lower their sights

somewhat. The price “hawks” are now talking only of a price increase

between five and ten percent, as compared to estimates which ranged

upward from ten percent. Nevertheless, some hard bargaining is now

going on among the OPEC states, and as Ambassador West observes,

there is little support for any continuation of the two-tier price system

which emerged at Doha a year ago. Both Saudi Arabia and Iran have

made it clear that they will insist on a consensus position at Caracas;

and if the Saudis are unwilling to use their production leverage, as Am-

bassador West indicates, then the chances are great that the final out-

come will be a compromise involving at least some price increase.

Our de´marches on oil prices to industrialized and LDC states

3

have generally been received with total agreement, but there is little ev-



idence that any of these states are willing to jeopardize their relations

with the oil producers by making strong representations in the OPEC

capitals. Instead, they seem to be content to let the United States do the

talking, while they applaud quietly from the sidelines. For our part, the

range of further initiatives available to us at this stage is very limited;

our views are well known, and if we overdo it in the remaining three

weeks before Caracas we could undercut the solid achievements we

have made thus far. One exception is Ambassador Vaky’s suggestion

that you call President Perez prior to the OPEC meeting. We will be

sending you a recommendation for the timing and substance of such a

call in the near future.

1

Source: Carter Library, White House Central Files, Subject File, Box TA–26, Trade.



Confidential. Sent for information. The President initialed the memorandum.

2

Attached but not printed.



3

See footnote 6, Document 136.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 465



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling