Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Letter From President Carter to Indonesian President


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet48/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   ...   95

141. Letter From President Carter to Indonesian President

Suharto

1

Washington, December 14, 1977.



Dear Mr. President,

I am writing to express my hope that you will support a freeze on

oil prices at the forthcoming meeting of the Organization of Petroleum

Exporting Countries, and to explain why I believe this is necessary in

order to sustain world economic security.

I have become increasingly concerned in recent months over the

outlook for the global economy. Many nations, in both the developed

and developing worlds, suffer from persistent unemployment, massive

trade deficits, large external debt, and low rates of growth. Pressures

for protectionism are rising. International lending institutions are be-

coming more cautious.

If these conditions continue, the world economy could suffer

lasting damage. Over the last thirty years, the nations of the world have

cooperated to reduce trade barriers and to expand resources for devel-

opment. They have created an environment which offers developing

countries improving prospects for long-term growth. These gains

could be eroded by economic stagnation and protectionism.

All our countries must work closely together in the critical months

ahead to avert these setbacks. Our energy policies will be the key to the

outcome. In my energy program, I have recognized the responsibility

of the United States to reduce the growth of its demand for fossil fuels,

and thus help prevent future shortages. At the Caracas meeting, the

most effective contribution which your government and the other

member governments could make to world economic recovery would

be to freeze the price of oil, at least through 1978. I believe that a freeze

would serve the long-run economic interest of all countries, producers

as well as consumers. At this critical juncture, any increase in the price

of oil in 1978 would strain the system of trade and finance on which we

all depend.

Because this question of an oil price freeze is crucial to world

economy recovery, it is at the center of my concerns in respect to both

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, President’s



Correspondence with Foreign Leaders File, Box 9, Indonesia: President Suharto,

12/77–1/80. No classification marking. A similar letter to Pe´rez was personally delivered

by Vance on November 23; see footnote 7, Document 138. On December 13, the President

also sent similar letters to Sheikhs Sabah, Khalifa, and Zayed, which are in telegram

296833 to Kuwait, telegram 296835 to Doha, and telegram 296836 to Abu Dhabi, respec-

tively. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D770474–0828, D770463–

1041, D770463–1037)


365-608/428-S/80010

466 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

domestic and foreign policy, and I am grateful for the opportunity to

share my views with you about it.

I am pleased that under your leadership Indonesia and the United

States have intensified their collaboration on political and social, as

well as economic, issues. I look forward to continued close cooperation

for the well-being and security of both our peoples.

Sincerely,

Jimmy Carter

Best personal wishes to you—



J.C.

2

2



President Carter added the initialed postscript by hand.

142. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassies in

the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, and Qatar

1

Washington, December 23, 1977, 2252Z.



306595. Subject: Expression of Appreciation re OPEC Decision.

1. Action addressee Ambassadors should, at earliest opportunity,

express at appropriately high level satisfaction of USG that oil prices

were not raised at Caracas OPEC meeting

2

and USG appreciation for



the efforts of those OPEC governments which worked to prevent the

price increase. You may wish to draw on Dept’s December 22 statement

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D770480–0553.



Confidential; Immediate. Drafted by Twinam, cleared by Bosworth, and approved by So-

ber. Repeated Priority to Tehran and Jidda.

2

The second OPEC summit conference was held December 20–21. On the second



day, the Embassy in Caracas reported: “The Caracas OPEC conference concluded with a

freeze on oil prices for at least six months, but little else. The price issue was discussed,

and while the members could not agree on an increase, there was no open split as had oc-

curred a year ago. Pres Perez’s proposal to increase assistance to the third world appar-

ently fell on deaf ears, in part possibly due to his over enthusiastic efforts to promote it

among the assembled OPEC Ministers.” (Telegram 12394 from Caracas, December 22;

ibid., D770479–0764) Previous reports on the conference are in telegrams 12330, 12331,

and 12367 from Caracas, December 21. (All ibid., D770475–1016, D770475–1252,

D770476–0675)


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 467

on this subject (State 305543)

3

noting our mutual conviction that any



price increase would have been damaging to international financial

markets and the world economy and would have aggravated the al-

ready difficult economic situation of many developing countries. You

may wish to note that position of those Gulf countries opposing an in-

crease appears to us to underscore the strong common interest between

the Gulf countries and the industrial world, including the US, as well as

that cooperation among Gulf states which US policy has long wel-

comed. You should stress that the OPEC decision will help our efforts

to sustain economic expansion and reduce inflation and that we partic-

ularly welcome indications that leaders of a number of oil producing

countries oppose any price increase through at least the full year 1978.

Over coming months we will want to continue our dialogue with the

Gulf governments about the international economic situation and the

effect of oil prices on it. You should also note that for our part the US

recognizes the need to press ahead with the enactment of a strong do-

mestic energy program.

2. FYI: Separate messages are being conveyed to Jidda and Teh-

ran.


4

End FYI.


Vance

3

Telegram 305543 to all diplomatic posts, December 22. (Ibid., D770478–0800)



4

Carter sent a personal message to Khalid on December 23 expressing his “sincere

appreciation” for Saudi Arabia’s “successful efforts to prevent an increase in oil prices.”

He added that he was “heartened by press reports” of a statement by Yamani that “there

would not be any increase in oil prices throughout the year 1978” and concluded that he

intended to “push ahead with the enactment and implementation of a meaningful do-

mestic program of energy development and conservation.” (Telegram 306484 to Jidda;

ibid., D770480–0341) He also sent a message to the Shah on December 23. (Telegram

306483 to Tehran; ibid., D770480–0340)


365-608/428-S/80010

468 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



143. Memorandum From the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Brzezinski) to President Carter

1

Washington, January 24, 1978.



SUBJECT

Secretary Schlesinger’s Talk with Fahd and Yamani

Jim Schlesinger talked at length with Crown Prince Fahd and Zaki

Yamani last week.

2

Much of the conversation simply rehearsed well



known Saudi and U.S. positions. The following points are of interest:

—Fahd expressed concern that major increases in Saudi produc-

tion would damage the oil fields. Schlesinger stated this was a technical

problem that required more study.

—Yamani said that predictions of Saudi production levels of 18

mbd or even 16 mbd were not realistic. He felt there could be an in-

crease to 12 mbd by 1983. Schlesinger told Fahd he believed 14 mbd

was the outer limit for production by Saudi Arabia, and “feasible re-

ality” was between 12–14 mbd.

—Both Fahd and Yamani wondered if the Caracas price freeze

3

may not have been a mistake. They felt that a series of small increases



might be easier for the West to absorb than a single, huge price increase

when demand catches up with supply. At that point no one will be able

to prevent a major price increase. Yamani believed that there could be

an increase of as much as 40 percent in the price of oil by 1980.

4

—Yamani thought the current oil price freeze will last through



1978. He also felt the soft market for oil would last at least through the

coming year.

—Yamani noted the critical role Iraq will play in the future in de-

termining oil prices. He thinks they have the capability to increase their

production from 1.7 mbd at present to 2.2 mbd.

—Yamani complained that tax problems, particularly the taxation

of individual Americans, make it difficult for Saudi Arabia to structure

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Agency



File, Box 8, Energy Department, 5/77–5/78. Secret. Outside System. Sent for information.

A stamped notation on the first page reads: “The President has seen.”

2

A Department of State record of the January 14 and 15 discussions is in telegrams



453 and 454 from Jidda, January 19. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy

Files, P850033–0080, P850071–2617) Memoranda of conversation prepared in the Depart-

ment of Energy are in the Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Schlesinger Papers,

Box 1, Saudi Arabia.

3

See footnote 2, Document 142.



4

The words “40 percent” and “oil by 1980” are underscored and an exclamation

point was written in the margin, presumably by Carter.


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 469

joint ventures with U.S. firms. He felt that some restructuring of the

Joint Commission could improve cooperation in technology transfer.

5

—Fahd stressed the necessity of including Palestinians outside the



West Bank and Gaza in any future plebiscite, citing the Palestinians in

Kuwait as an example of the “terrible events” which could occur if they

feel they are being ignored.

6

5



The Joint Economic Commission was one of the joint commissions established by

the United States and Saudi Arabia in 1974 to develop and broaden economic and mili-

tary cooperation. Documentation on the creation of the U.S.-Saudi joint commissions is

scheduled for publication in Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, volume E–9, Documents on

Middle East Region; Arabian Peninsula; North Africa, 1973-1976.

6

On January 25, Stansfield Turner sent Schlesinger a memorandum informing him



that the Saudi officials with whom Schlesinger had met on January 14 and 15 “were im-

pressed by the reasonableness of the Secretary’s position and his understanding of the

constraints with which the Saudi Government is faced in its oil policies.” They were also

“pleased with the Secretary’s position on moderate increases in the price of crude oil.”

(Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Schlesinger Papers, Box 1, Saudi Arabia)

144. Paper Prepared by the National Security Council Staff

1

Washington, undated.



Agenda Paper for SCC Meeting on the

Petroleum Supply Vulnerability Assessment

Friday, March 24, 1978

10:30–12:00, Situation Room

The purpose of this SCC meeting is to discuss the principal issues

and conclusions arising from those portions of the interagency assess-

ment of petroleum supply vulnerabilities which do not depend on esti-

mates of future supply and demand. Supply and demand-related is-

sues will be addressed at a second SCC meeting

2

once analysis of



recently acquired information on technical problems in many OPEC oil

fields is completed.

More specifically, the aims of this meeting are:

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Office File, Box 8,



Meeting File, SCC Meeting: #67, Held 3/24/78. Secret. The paper is attached to a March

21 covering memorandum from Staff Secretary Christine Dodson to Vance, Blumenthal,

Harold Brown, Schlesinger, Turner, McIntyre, Schultze, and General George S. Brown.

2

See Document 152.



365-608/428-S/80010

470 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

1. to discuss the progress and general direction of US programs to

reduce and to cope with petroleum supply vulnerabilities; and

2. to consider possible new policies further to reduce those

vulnerabilities.

The following are the four principal topics for discussion:

A. Supply interruption contingencies for which the U.S. should be pre-



pared.

The seriousness of supply interruptions depends upon their

probability of occurrence and the degree of damage they are likely to

cause. The paper at Tab A

3

provides a cross section of scenarios which,



although not exhaustive, could plausibly cause interruptions, ranging

from loss of a small percentage of the normal Persian Gulf oil flow to a

total cutoff. Issues for discussion are: With what types of interruptions

should the U.S. be prepared to cope? What types of contingencies

should the U.S. plan to deter? What priorities should be assigned to

particular contingencies?

B. Military options for preventing oil supply disruptions. At Tab B is a

paper


4

describing the DOD analysis of military options for dealing with

various oil supply interruption scenarios. Some preliminary analysis is

embodied in the Persian Gulf section of DOD’s Consolidated Guidance

document, and a comprehensive study is underway. Issues for discus-

sion are: What are the primary defense-related national security impli-

cations of an oil supply interruption? What progress has been made in

the DOD analysis, and what will be done in the future? Are the goals of

the DOD study effort consistent with and supportive of the overall oil

vulnerability assessment objectives? Should the scope of the study be

expanded (or contracted)?

C. Measures for coping with oil supply interruptions. The Strategic Pe-

troleum Reserve, the International Energy Agency, and oil conserva-

tion and rationing contingency plans are the three primary vehicles

being developed to ease the effects of any oil supply interruption.

Progress with respect to them is described in the paper at Tab C.

5

Issues


for discussion are: How adequate are existing measures to deal with

supply interruptions? What types of contingencies can these measures

deal with? What additional measures might be pursued?

D. Measures to strengthen the security of Saudi Arabian and Iranian oil



facilities against terrorism.

At Tab D


6

is a synopsis of two proposals de-

veloped by the Department of State, in cooperation with DOD, CIA,

and DOE, which details a set of specific initiatives for augmenting the

3

Attached but not printed.



4

Not attached, but a copy is in Carter Library, National Security Council, Institu-

tional Files, Box 93, SCC 67: Oil Supply—Vulnerability Assessment, 3/24/78.

5

Not found.



6

Attached but not printed.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 471

current anti-terrorist programs in Saudi Arabia and Iran. Issues for dis-

cussion are: What are the feasibility and desirability of offering such

improvements to Saudi Arabia? To Iran? Should the programs offered

be equivalent, or are each country’s needs basically different? What is

the most logical way to approach each of the governments? Should

others (Kuwait, UAE) be included?



145. Summary of Conclusions of Special Coordination Committee

Meeting

1

Washington, March 24, 1978, 10:30–11:45 a.m.



SUBJECT

Petroleum Supply Vulnerability Assessment

PARTICIPANTS

State

OMB

Richard Cooper

Bowman Cutter

Under Secretary for

Executive Associate Director

Economic Affairs

for Budget

Randy Jayne



Defense

Associate Director for

David McGiffert

National Security

Assistant Secretary for

and International Affairs

International Security Affairs

CEA

JCS

Lyle Gramley

Lt. Gen. William Y. Smith

Acting Chairman

Assistant to the Chairman

Robert Litan



CIA

Senior Staff Economist

Hans Heymann

White House

National Intelligence Officer

Zbigniew Brzezinski

for Political Economy

David Aaron

Treasury

NSC

Helen Junz

Samuel P. Huntington

Deputy Assistant Secretary for

Sam Westbrook, III

Commodities and Natural Resources



Energy

Dale Meyers

Under Secretary for Energy

Cecil Thompson

Special Assistant to Assistant

Secretary for International Affairs

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Office File, Box 8,



Meeting File, SCC Meeting: #67, Held 3/24/78. Secret. The meeting was held in the White

House Situation Room.



365-608/428-S/80010

472 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

SUMMARY OF CONCLUSIONS

The United States must be prepared to deter or to cope with a

number of plausible oil supply interruption contingencies, including

those resulting from actions by producing governments and from

physical destruction or seizure of oil facilities. The most probable inter-

ruptions will result from accidents or terrorist or guerrilla action, but

these will usually cause only a minor disruption in the oil flow over a

short period of time. While the political situation in the Middle East

might at some point produce a voluntary production cutback and em-

bargo by OAPEC, the second most probable cause of interruption

would be Saudi decisions to cut back their production or not to increase

their productive capacity because of technical problems, the $4 billion

investment needed for expansion, and/or the feeling the oil was worth

more in the ground. Any Saudi Arabian decision to limit production

would be especially critical. Some felt, however, that Saudi interest in

maintaining their leadership position in OPEC would induce them to

make the capital investment necessary to increase production capacity

to about 13 mmbd. A detailed CIA report on technical problems in

OPEC oil fields, with a special section on Saudi Arabia, should be com-

pleted in about three weeks.

2

For the near term, the U.S. faces major vulnerability to petroleum



supply interruptions, even with the International Energy Plan,

3

and



would have to absorb this shortfall and distribute the imports pri-

marily through crude and product allocation regulations. By the end of

1980, the U.S. will have greater protection and flexibility—primarily

due to a 500 mmb Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The management

of the SPR has been strengthened and short term goals brought more in

line with expected results (the December 1978 estimate has been low-

ered from 150 to 100 mmb). All agreed it was probably desirable to ac-

celerate SPR purchases so as to more quickly reduce vulnerability and

take advantage of current low prices. DOE was directed to analyze

ways to accomplish this, including acquisition of temporary storage fa-

cilities in the U.S., overseas, or afloat (in oil tankers), and to be prepared

to address the subject at an SCC meeting in late April 1978.

DOD has underway an analysis of the requirements for US mili-

tary forces to protect Persian Gulf oil facilities and SLOCs against hos-

tile military action.

4

The point was made that this analysis should con-



sider the impact of a permanent US airbase and naval base in the

region. In addition, DOD was tasked to produce contingency plans for

2

Not found.



3

See footnote 6, Document 9.

4

See Document 144 and footnote 4 thereto.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 473

the use of currently available forces to deal with the most probable So-

viet and Cuban military threats (particularly by forces based in South

Yemen) as well as by hostile local governments. A report on these con-

tingency plans should also be ready for the April SCC meeting.

It was generally agreed that Saudi oil facilities were highly vulner-

able to terrorist attacks and a State-Department-developed six-point

program of action

5

was approved subject to further study of the



problems it might raise concerning technology transfer and of the ways

in which it could be presented to the Saudis. The fragmentation of secu-

rity planning responsibilities among a number of Saudi ministers and

ARAMCO creates complex bureaucratic rivalries which will make

gaining Saudi acceptance of an effective oil field security program par-

ticularly difficult. Ambassador West will be asked to recommend the

best way of approaching the Saudis on this sensitive subject, and State

will talk with ARAMCO officials in Washington to seek advice and

support. The desirability of proposing a similar program for Iranian fa-

cilities will also be studied. The proposals on how to approach the Sau-

dis and recommendations on an Iranian program will also be discussed

at the SCC meeting at the end of April.

5

See Document 144 and footnote 6 thereto.



365-608/428-S/80010

474 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling