Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Memorandum From the President’s Assistant for National


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet51/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   ...   95

155. Memorandum From the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Brzezinski) to President Carter

1

Washington, July 6, 1978.



SUBJECT

Energy Issues Raised by Venezuelan President Perez

DOE and State have prepared reports on the energy issues raised

by Venezuelan President Perez on your visit to Caracas.

2

Below is a



brief summary of their findings:

Long-Term Supply Agreement

DOE notes that Venezuela has frequently expressed interest in a

long-term supply agreement with us. The Venezuelans see a preferen-

tial arrangement with the US as a way of obtaining a more secure mar-

ket and, if possible, higher prices than would otherwise be available. In

March, Jim Schlesinger told Venezuelan Energy Minister Hernandez

that the US was unable to separate security of supply and price, that

American oil importers would shift sources of supply in response to

price differences, and that the USG itself was sensitive on the price is-

sue.


3

In DOE’s view, a long-term supply agreement would only be in

our interest if it resulted in lower prices.

State underscores the US interest in assuring access to foreign oil

but stresses that we must weigh the costs as well as the benefits from

special bilateral arrangements. On balance, State concludes that, since

Venezuelan oil will flow to the US market as long as it is competitively

priced, there are probably more disadvantages than advantages in a

preferential access scheme.

Despite these negative assessments, both DOE and State believe

we should continue bilateral discussions with Venezuela on both sup-

ply and price issues. We believe this is a wise approach because of the

overall importance of our relations with Venezuela.

Orinoco Tarbelt

With respect to development of the Orinoco Tarbelt, DOE is gener-

ally skeptical about energy cooperation with Venezuela beyond a

government-to-government technical exchange program. DOE ques-

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Country



File, Box 85, Venezuela, 1/77–12/78. Confidential. Sent for information.

2

See Document 146. An NSC summary condensing the two reports is attached but



not printed.

3

See footnote 2, Document 146.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 493

tions the desirability of supporting the development of expensive,

high-risk sources outside the US or of subsidizing private sector invest-

ment in such projects if no interest exists on commercial grounds. Our

private sector would not be interested in developing the Tarbelt into a

commercial resource unless Venezuela offered substantial new incen-

tives. However, there is still considerable hostility within Venezuela to

permitting foreign firms to develop the country’s energy resources,

and so the Venezuelans have asked the USG to play an intermediary

role.

DOE is prepared to explore cooperative arrangements with Vene-



zuela which might range from a USG–GOV umbrella agreement to fa-

cilitate or encourage private sector participation in the development of

the Tarbelt, to a trilateral arrangement with Canada under which US af-

filiates could participate in such a scheme through PetroCan, an official

Canadian entity.

Other Issues

The DOE report also addresses a number of specific issues raised

by Perez. It provides an update on pending energy legislation, com-

ments on the alleged violation of our bilateral commercial agreement,

and assesses the possibility of storing residual fuel oil as part of our

strategic petroleum reserve.



Next Steps

We plan to respond to Perez through our Embassy in Caracas. In

the meantime, DOE will proceed with early consultations on specific

areas for government-to-government technical cooperation in the Ori-

noco project.

I recognize and understand DOE and State’s reservations about

development of the Orinoco and a long-term supply agreement for

crude oil. At the same time, we cannot afford to antagonize Perez, who

has been a useful supporter of American policy in non-energy areas. It

would be a serious mistake to break off our dialogue on energy cooper-

ation prematurely. In this instance, the tone of our response may be

more important than its substance. We will, therefore, urge DOE and

State to continue their discussions with the Venezuelans in the hope

that we will eventually find some areas for fruitful and mutually bene-

ficial cooperation.

4

4



Carter wrote “I agree” and initialed below this paragraph and drew an arrow

pointing to the last sentence. On July 12, Brzezinski sent a memorandum to Vance and

Schlesinger informing them that the President wanted them to continue their discussion

with the Venezuelan Government in a “positive manner with the purpose of trying to

find areas for fruitful and mutually beneficial cooperation.” (Carter Library, National Se-

curity Affairs, Staff Material, North/South File, Box 47, Pastor Country Files, Venezuela,

7–12/78)


365-608/428-S/80010

494 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



156. Memorandum to President Carter

1

Washington, July 7, 1978.



FROM

Cyrus R. Vance

W. Michael Blumenthal

Charlie Schultze

Zbigniew Brzezinski

Henry Owen

SUBJECT

Energy and the Summit



1. All the heads of government at Bonn will want to know whether

US oil imports will go down. They don’t care whether this happens by

legislative actions, or administrative action, or by using your existing

authority to allow domestic prices to increase gradually to world price

levels (which is probably their preferred course of action). You will re-

member that when Callaghan came in March and Fukuda in May,

2

both stressed their concerns on this issue; you said to Callaghan that



you would respond to these concerns at the Summit.

All believe that large US oil imports increase the US external def-

icit, weaken the dollar, and thus damage their economies. Schmidt has

said that any German expansion would only make sense if he could be

sure that it would not be offset by the currency disorders that he be-

lieves would attend US failure to limit oil imports more drastically. He

and the others also fear that continuing large US oil imports will drive

up the world price. They, their peoples, and the foreign exchange

markets have not digested the progress that has already been made by

the US; they exaggerate, moreover, the significance of COET or equiva-

lent administrative action, relative to the rest of the energy bill, in re-

ducing oil imports.

2. Our tactical situation at the Summit is made easier by the fact

that other heads of government are being asked to take action in other

areas: All want Germany and Japan to grow faster, and all want Britain

and France to be as forthcoming in MTN as the rest of us. Some of the

countries being asked to take these actions have linked them to US ac-

tion on energy. But this linkage works both ways. Other heads of gov-

ernment face the same kinds of political constraints—the Germans and

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Trip File,



Box 14, President: Germany, 7/13–17/78. Confidential. Sent for information. Solomon in-

itialed for Blumenthal. The memorandum is typed on White House stationery.

2

Callaghan was in Washington March 23, Fukuda May 1–3.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 495

Japanese on growth, and the British and French on trade—that you do

on energy. There is no reason why you should be more forthcoming or

specific in talking about energy than they are prepared to be on growth

and trade.

3. At your Friday meeting with Schmidt,

3

you will be able to sound



out his intentions about growth—which is the key to triggering other

Summit countries’ actions. As of this date, we only know what Schmidt

said to Callaghan and in a recent Business Week interview: that he

would be willing to take expansion measures as part of a package deal.

He evidently implied the same thing at the recent Bremen EC meeting.

4

In Bonn last week, German officials were talking of a 12 billion DM



package (1% of GNP), which seemed to include some water, i.e., meas-

ures that would have been taken in any event.

A July 6 telegram just in from Embassy Bonn

5

indicates that “the



poor May economic data as well as the internal debate on tax reduc-

tions have increased the chances of a German 1979 program of fiscal

stimulus going beyond the one percent of GNP or DM 12 billion re-

cently mentioned by German officials. A larger rather than a smaller

package of tax reductions and expenditure increases may in some ways

actually be more easy to put together politically. But it is as yet far from

a sure thing, as aversion to higher public deficits remains a significant

counterbalance throughout the political spectrum.” The matter will be

decided at a German cabinet meeting twelve days after the Summit;

any resulting proposals would be put to Parliament in September.

4. One can envisage three alternative positions that Schmidt might

take in your meeting with him:

a. He may be willing to make a statement that, however general,

would clearly envisage a substantial growth package in the 1979

budget—on the order of 1% GNP. In this case, we would recommend, if

this proves necessary, a US statement on energy (Tab A)

6

that, while



less specific than the one you discussed recently with members of the

Congress and therefore less welcome to allies and more troubling to

foreign exchange markets, might still be sufficiently forthcoming to

meet Schmidt’s concerns and thus elicit his firm growth pledge, with-

out being unnecessarily offensive to the Congress. This statement

would also describe the progress that we have achieved to date in

strong terms.

3

According to the President’s Daily Diary, he met with Schmidt on Friday, July 14,



in Bonn. (Carter Library, Staff Office Files)

4

The EC Council met in Bremen July 6–7.



5

Telegram 12298 from Bonn, July 6. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign

Policy Files, D780277–0155)

6

Tabs A–C are attached but not printed.



365-608/428-S/80010

496 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

b. Alternatively, he may be willing to make a statement that would

pledge action in the 1979 budget but would not make clear the amount

of new growth action we could expect. In this case, we would recom-

mend that you fall back to the weaker statement at Tab B. This state-

ment, by referring explicitly to “working with Congress” and to the

possibility of “legislative action”, is weaker in its commitment to ad-

ministrative action than your April statement to the American Society

of Newspaper Editors

7

(Tab C). This evident difference would probably



trigger adverse comment and renewed pressure on the dollar.

c. He may be willing to make only a general policy statement on

growth, which pledges nothing. In this unlikely case we will have to

decide what to say on energy in light of other factors.

7. In choosing among options, the situation at home is relevant:

a. Political: The stronger your statement the greater the likelihood

that the Dole amendment

8

will be passed by a large majority. Stu Eiz-



enstat attaches a memo on these dangers. (Annex I)

9

(We wonder



whether the outcome would be affected by whether you brought back

an evident success, including important growth and trade pledges,

from the Summit?)

b. Economic: A question has been raised as to whether it would be

in the US interest in 1979 to take administrative action to restrain oil im-

ports, in view of current economic prospects. Charlie Schultze attaches

a memo indicating the pluses and minuses, and concluding that it

would still be in our interest to do so, if we can get something substan-

tial in return. (Annex II)

10

8. Tactics: In your conversation with Schmidt, you may want to:



a. find out what he has in mind saying and doing about growth, in

as specific terms as possible;

b. repeat your determination to act vigorously to restrain oil im-

ports; underline the difficulties you face in trying to define that deter-

mination in specific terms, if contraproductive Congressional reactions

7

Carter spoke on April 11 to the American Society of Newspaper Editors on his



anti-inflation policies. He stated explicitly: “If Congress does not act, then oil imports will

have to be limited by administrative action under present law.” For the full text of his

remarks, see Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Jimmy Carter, 1978,

pp. 721–726.

8

In response to threats by Carter to impose “massive” oil import fees if the Senate



did not agree to his proposed tax on domestic crude oil, Senator Robert Dole (R–KS) pro-

posed an amendment to the energy bill in conference committee that would revoke ad-

ministrative authority to impose fees on oil imports. (The New York Times, June 28, 1978,

p. D15)


9

Entitled “Energy and the Summit,” dated July 7; attached but not printed.

10

Entitled “Economic Effects of Alternative Outcomes at the Summit;” attached but



not printed.

365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 497

are to be avoided; and explore how weak a statement on energy would

be sufficient to elicit his expansion decision.

After hearing Schmidt out, you may want to say that you will de-

cide what to say on energy in light of this conversation, and that your

advisers will communicate the specific language to his staff later in the

day. (He will want to know what you intend to say before the Summit

opens, since it will affect what he says on growth.)

This procedure would provide an opportunity for us to give you a

careful assessment of what he had said about his growth intentions (as-

suming he was willing to make some sort of pledge), before you made

your decision, choosing between the stronger and weaker statements at

Tabs A and B. We believe that a weaker statement, such as Stu Eizenstat

is proposing, which would do no more than defend our energy record

to date and promise to continue trying, would likely be insufficient,

and would be perceived, at home and abroad, as such a sharp back-

down from your April statement and such evidence of weakness as al-

most surely to be followed by a sharp fall-off in the dollar.

It would be understood that use of both your statement on energy

and Schmidt’s statement on growth would depend on what you found

out in the Summit about Japanese, British, and French intentions.



157. Minutes of the Bonn Economic Summit Meeting

1

Bonn, July 16, 1978.



[Omitted here are a list of participants and the minutes of Session

1, which began at 10:10 a.m. on July 16.]

BONN SUMMIT

Session 2

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Executive Secretariat Files: Lot 84D241, Vance



Nodis Memcons 1978, Box 9. Secret. Drafted by Hormats. According to the President’s

Daily Diary, Session 2 of the Summit began at 3 p.m. and ended at 6 p.m. (Carter Library,

Staff Office Files) The minutes of all four sessions of the Summit are scheduled for publi-

cation in Foreign Relations, 1977–1980, volume III, Foreign Economic Policy.



365-608/428-S/80010

498 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Schmidt: Let’s go now to energy. The brackets there are taken care

of by what Carter has hinted at in his initial statement.

2

The US will



give us a text on energy before 6:00 p.m.

3

We should now move to the



substance of the energy issue.

Trudeau: We should be more specific on paragraphs 13 and 14 of

the energy chapter.

4

Our assistance to LDCs benefits them and the



world economy. We should make sure that part of our aid is directed at

renewable energy resources in LDCs and encourage the World Bank to

advance money for development and exploration of hydrocarbons. We

should help to find new hydrocarbons and more renewable energy re-

sources. Quite frankly, my earlier wording on this was rejected by the

Preparatory Group.

5

Schmidt: But this is a new look at the problem.



Trudeau: I’ll provide the wording.

2

The participants are discussing a draft of the final joint declaration of the Summit.



In his statement during Session 1, Carter said: “Energy imports are up only 1% in 1977.

During the first five months of this year, oil imports are down by about 1 million barrels a

day. I have introduced a five-part program on energy. Three are in little dispute. A con-

ference committee has agreed on the fourth part, on natural gas. A few oil pricing ele-

ments are also agreed. As far as oil is concerned, the sum total of these agreed efforts will

reduce oil consumption by 2.3 million barrels per day by 1985. I will attempt to raise the

price of US oil to world market prices by 1980. I will check back home on these things so I

am not doing what is politically unfeasible.” Later he added: “I have a political problem

concerning oil. Previous Congresses were heavily influenced by oil producers. Now

there is an equal interest and influence by oil consumers. The big problem is to change

thinking domestically.”

3

The U.S. contribution to the energy section of the joint declaration (paragraph 7)



reads: “Recognizing its particular responsibility in the energy field, the United States will

reduce its dependence on imported oil. The U.S. will have in place by the end of the year a

comprehensive policy framework within which this effort can be urgently carried for-

ward. By year end, measures will be in effect that will result in oil import savings of ap-

proximately 2.5 million barrels per day by 1985. In order to achieve these goals, the U.S.

will establish a strategic oil reserve of 1 billion barrels; it will increase coal production by

two-thirds; it will maintain the ratio between growth in gross national product and

growth in energy demand at or below 0.8; and its oil consumption will grow more slowly

than energy consumption.” The United States also agreed to raise the domestic price of

oil to the world level by 1980 to reduce consumption. The full text of the final joint decla-

ration issued on July 17 is printed in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States:

Jimmy Carter, 1978

, pp. 1310–1315. The section on energy comprises paragraphs 4–16.

4

The section on energy and LDCs became paragraphs 15 and 16. Paragraph 15



reads: “To help developing countries, we will intensify our national development assist-

ance programs in the energy field and we will develop a co-ordinated effort to bring into

use renewable energy technologies and to elaborate the details within one year. We sug-

gest that the OECD will provide the medium for co-operation with other countries.”

Paragraph 16 reads: “We stress the need for improvement and co-ordination of assistance

for developing countries in the energy field. We suggest that the World Bank explore

ways in which its activities in this field can be made increasingly responsive to the needs

of the developing countries, and to examine whether new approaches, particularly to fi-

nancing hydrocarbon exploration, would be useful.”

5

The Preparatory Group met in Bonn the first week of April.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 499

Andreotti: We should add a point to indicate that we are only rec-

ommending conservation for non-productive uses. It is not wise to con-

serve if it reduces productivity. And paragraph 12

6

is too weak. We



should say something to the effect that we will “safeguard with the

greatest care . . .” not just say we will take into account.

Callaghan: According to our analysis, OPEC supplies are going

down steadily. We are coming soon to the point, perhaps 1985, when

the market takes over from OPEC. We feel that it is undesirable to have

prices increased over the next 12 months. But in the longer run it looks

as if the Saudis will be short of money in the 1980’s and Iran before

them. They will press for substantial increases. Should we hold prices

down and then face a big increase at that time or seek a gradual in-

crease in the price of oil in the next 3–4 years? In the future OPEC will

have a case for price increases because absorptive capacity will exceed

revenues.

Schmidt: I recently discussed this with Fahd. He was concerned

with possible economic consequences of increased oil prices, which he

foresees next year. The Saudis are rather sophisticated in their under-

standing of the mechanisms of the world economy. They are aware that

the world economy will be adversely affected, depending on when and

to what degree oil prices will be increased next time. They also feel the

responsibility for managing their surpluses.

The Saudis are aware that their absorptive capacity will not in the

very near future enable them to buy as much as their export revenues.

They will have a surplus for a long time to come because of the large

gap between revenues and absorption. But they are worried that other

colleagues in the OPEC will force them to raise the price of crude earlier

and higher than they desire because of the dollar’s decline.

Fahd also strongly pointed out that the Saudis interpret Soviet

Union activity in the Horn and South Yemen as a strategic operation

with a double target. First, the Soviet Union wants to expand influence

in Africa and from there regain a foothold in the Middle East imports

[region?]. For that reason, they want great political influence in the

region.

With respect to German interests, if war were to break out in the



Middle East, and given present attitudes in Jerusalem there is reason

for concern, countries around this table would be in a chaotic situation.

Oil would be used to press Israel through Western allies. Next time oil

will be used more massively. This concern causes a certain measure of

irritation by those countries without energy, e.g. France and Italy. This

6

Paragraph 12 became paragraph 14, which reads: “In energy development, the en-



vironment and human safety of the population must be safeguarded with greatest care.”

365-608/428-S/80010

500 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

concern is more acute because other sources of energy, e.g. nuclear,

have been increasingly constrained by emotional reactions and public

opinion. The communique´ should emphasize the strong need to protect

the environment and population, but we need nuclear if we are not to

be at the mercy of foreign pressures. We were eager to hear what Carter

and Trudeau had to say on the nuclear issue at London.

7

There we put



in place the INFCE study. Yet I must say there was irritation aroused by

the US non-proliferation measures and particular comments by various

people. Is what was said at London still valid, or should we consider

that there will be difficulties in the future? If the latter, this will pose

considerable economic and strategic problems. As far as enrichment is

concerned, I do not want to be dependent on the Soviets. I can imagine

that for others the situation is very much the same. Germany places

strong emphasis on its rights under Article IV of the NPT

8

and will in-



sist on the defense of those rights.

Fukuda: I wholly support Chancellor Schmidt’s views on nuclear

energy. As petroleum supplies diminish, we must make provisions for

a new situation. The only way to do this is development of nuclear en-

ergy. The non-proliferation issue and peaceful pursuit of nuclear en-

ergy are separate. They should be dealt with separately.

We are in an age of uncertainty. There is no clear outlook about our

energy future. We do not know what will happen to the energy situa-

tion. We would not like the Soviet Union to have a monopoly on the

peaceful uses of nuclear energy. We need a clear outlook for the

post-petroleum era. For instance, countries reluctant to produce oil

today may produce more if they have a clearer picture of the

post-petroleum era. We should study these matters. Let us do research

in unison—not individually—and pool our wisdom and resources

together.

I believe Carter supports my view of the importance of R&D for fu-

ture energy. This can help make the future into an age of certainty.

Coming up with alternative energy resources will help in dealing with

the rest of the world, especially OPEC.

Giscard: The prospects of nuclear fuel production are less than in

1974. In 1985 we will only have one-half of the capacity envisioned for

OECD countries in 1974. France decided last month to build new pow-

er stations for 10,000 megawatts. In 1985 our nuclear production will be

second only to the U.S. Public opinion has accepted our nuclear pro-

7

The G–7 Economic Summit held in London May 7–8, 1977. See Document 122.



8

Article IV of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty safeguards the rights of all

parties to the treaty to develop research, production, and use of nuclear energy for

peaceful purposes without discrimination and pledges all parties to facilitate the ex-

change of material and information.


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 501

gram. We still have a reserve on unused sites. We have succeeded be-

cause public opinion agrees that there should be a national source of

energy. Cooperation among us might help to bring about a better un-

derstanding of this need among all of our peoples. We might get good

results if we better explain the need for nuclear. We must all proceed in

common. I am pleased that agreement has been reached between the

U.S. and Europe on Euratom supplies. Could you confirm that supplies

will continue?

Also, we should include OPEC in energy talks, particularly those

on nuclear energy.

Carter: The U.S. economy is strong and growing rapidly. We are

the world’s largest energy consumer, but we have made progress in

conservation. We have dropped from 1.46 barrels of oil per $1,000 GNP

to 1.38 barrels. We are trying to achieve a .8 ratio of energy consump-

tion to GNP growth by 1982. From 1976–77 we had an increase in oil

imports because of GNP growth and sharp drop in domestic oil pro-

duction. Since 1972 we have had a 34% increase in consumption and a

one-third increase in GNP. We have a specific problem with gasoline,

because autos are so widely used. To cut gasoline consumption we

have instituted mandatory fuel emission standards for autos, increased

the price of gas substantially and instituted a 55 mile per hour manda-

tory speed limit.

By 1985 we expect to save 2.5 million barrels per day of oil imports.

A substantial portion of this will be realized by the non-controversial

elements in the energy bill I have submitted. We want to control de-

mand at 2% per year and are working toward a two-thirds increase in

coal production. We also want to hold the ratio of growth in energy use

to less than .8%. We expect imports in 1978 and ’79 to be below 1977 in

volume terms.

Let me also add a point on the Saudis. We will use our influence

with them constructively and hope you will join. We do not believe

there will be a price increase until 1979 and only one in that year. We

hope that it will not be more than inflation. The Saudis and Iranians

have much investment in the U.S. The Saudis recognize that their in-

terests are intimately tied in with all of us, and particularly the U.S. I am

sending Mike Blumenthal to Saudi Arabia in the fall. We are working

closely with Venezuela and Mexico, and the PRC, to encourage addi-

tional energy production. My guess is that Helmut is correct regarding

the Soviet Union. According to our information, Soviet oil supplies

have been overestimated in the past. Soviet oil supply is less than antic-

ipated. Lately they have encouraged their friends to buy oil not from

the Soviet Union but from other sources.

On nuclear power, our position is the same as at London. All of us

will face problems unless we take action to eliminate nuclear prolifera-



365-608/428-S/80010

502 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

tion. Nuclear power ought to be expanded for peaceful purposes, but

all of us ought to comply with rigid international safeguards. The U.S.

initiated the move to nuclear power. Thus, we feel we need to be con-

scientious about proliferation. We and Canada helped India to develop

nuclear power. If France and the FRG say they will not cooperate be-

cause it infringes on their sovereignty, it will be difficult for us. I strug-

gled to see that the Act did not hurt the countries involved. But there

are major domestic pressures on non-proliferation. A number of na-

tions want to reprocess spent nuclear fuel and convert it into explo-

sives. I can understand that other countries want to shift to nuclear

power, but we want to ensure that international safeguards are rigidly

applied. Our new legislation can give us a predictable policy. One pur-

pose of our legislation was to let our policy be better understood.

We have no objections if nations seek to reduce their energy de-

pendence including the use of the breeder reactor. But non-

proliferation must be respected. We have two years to continue sup-

plies under our legislation as long as negotiations are going on on non-

proliferation. There will be no cutoff during INFCE. We have supplies

and technology to provide and want to provide them where possible. It

is in the national interest to do so because we see the need for conserva-

tion and prudent use of fuels. We agree with the need for stability of

supplies of nuclear power and we realize that that did not exist a few

years ago. We will be glad to provide information if you have ques-

tions. Jerry Smith is now devoting full time to the issue of nuclear fuel

supplies and proliferation,

9

and he can be helpful.



Schmidt: In paragraph 9 of the communique´

10

could we get a state-



ment that the U.S. will prevent any interruption of fuel supplies during

INFCE and a point that existing agreements are to be respected. Could

we also have something about reprocessing?

Carter: We could put this language in. It is possible to export under

our legislation. For instance, I ruled recently that we could sell fuel to

India. We could indicate that the U.S. will avoid supply interruption

during the period of the INFCE study and will respect existing

agreements.

9

Gerard C. Smith was the President’s special representative for non-proliferation



issues.

10

Paragraph 9 became paragraph 11. The part under discussion here reads: “The



President of the United States and the Prime Minister of Canada have expressed their

firm intention to continue as reliable suppliers of nuclear fuel within the framework of

effective safeguards. The President intends to use the full powers of his office to prevent

any interruption of enriched uranium supply and to ensure that existing agreements will

be respected. The Prime Minister intends that there shall be no interruption of Canadian

uranium supply on the basis of effective safeguards.”



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 503

Trudeau: I can give you the same assurances Carter gave you. I

said at London we would ship while safeguards were respected. With

Japan, we are prepared to accept the safeguards provided. We will

guarantee their shipments of technology and nuclear fuel provided

safeguards are respected. Even if the study proved breeder technology

would be necessary and useful we will also have to agree on safeguards

for the by-products of plants. If we all agree that proliferation is a

danger, we could reach agreement on safeguards. Countries can get it

from other countries, of course, and we can’t prevent that; but we can

prevent our material from being used for war. There are a lot of

non-nuclear countries. We should not be fatalistic and assume that they

will cross the threshold. We share Carter’s worry. In fact, our safeguard

system anticipated the U.S.

Giscard: With respect to the communique´, President Carter’s text

seems to be very satisfactory. However, I wonder if we can say that for

1979 and ’80 something more than we “hope”. Can it be stronger?

Carter: Expected?

Schmidt: EC should include a paragraph of our own taken from

the Bremen communique´: “The EC stated the following objectives for

1985 . . .”

11

Regarding the question of Andreotti as to whether we should indi-



cate the importance of conservation of oil for non-productive purposes,

I believe there are ways of reducing energy use in industrial production

as well. We should not narrow the declaration down to eliminate this

possibility.

Callaghan: I agree. We give grants to factories to help in conserva-

tion through better insulation.

Schmidt: Regarding paragraph 9, Carter, Trudeau, Giscard and

others spoke at length to this issue. We should amend the declaration in

two directions; adherence to existing commitments and the need for

rigid international safeguards.

I also want to point out that we subsidize our coal industry by

about fifty marks, or $25 a ton. These are huge subsidies, but necessary

given the oil situation and the fact that our coal is 1,000 meters below

the surface. This is a very heavy burden on our budget, and I hope no

one here will criticize me for such subsidies.

Regarding Andreotti’s point that the language in paragraph 12 is

too weak. Can we agree to use the language “safeguards with the

greatest care”.

11

The communique´ issued at the end of the EC Council meeting on July 7 listed as



objectives the reduction of EC dependence on imported energy, the limitation of oil im-

ports into the EC, and the reduction to 0.8 of the ratio between the rate of increase in en-

ergy consumption and the rate of increase in Gross Domestic Product.


365-608/428-S/80010

504 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Regarding paragraph 13, I am in favor of strong bilateral assistance

programs to help LDCs produce energy. And I think we should de-

velop a coordinated effort to bring into use new energy technology. We

should coordinate over the next 6 months and get a report after 6

months.

Giscard: With respect to paragraph 14 the World Bank is not the



only body which can carry out a coordinated function. I suggest that

we indicate that “we stress the need for the competent international or-

ganizations and financial institutions to provide aid to LDCs in the en-

ergy field. We further support the World Bank’s efforts . . . ” and then

use language already in the draft. We should say that we also want to

assist development and exploration of hydrocarbons. We should ask

the experts to see if they can include exploration as well.

Carter: They should report back progress to the next Summit.

Jenkins: You will report to whom?

Trudeau: Officials in our aid agencies would meet to see if we can

devote a greater part of our aid to renewable energy development and

also include training in LDCs.

Carter: I agree that there is a shortage of technology in the LDCs.

Trudeau: I agree.

Schmidt: Couldn’t we ask DAC to do a report?

Carter: My experts say that OECD is better since it can call on the

DAC and OECD energy experts. We should ask OECD to study this

and provide a report.

[Omitted here are discussion unrelated to energy and the minutes

of Sessions 3 and 4, which were held on July 17.]



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling