Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Memorandum From Director of Central Intelligence Turner


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet52/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   ...   95

158. Memorandum From Director of Central Intelligence Turner

to Secretary of Energy Schlesinger

1

Washington, August 14, 1978.



Dear Jim,

Attached is a very short report on the role intelligence might best

play in supporting U.S. energy policy and planning. This was prepared

by my Science and Technology Advisory Panel. After you have an op-

1

Source: Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Schlesinger Papers, Box 1, CIA



Documents, File Four. Confidential.

365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 505

portunity to read it, I would like very much to get together with you to

discuss this report and any other ideas you may have on how we can be

supporting you better. May I invite you and two or three of your assist-

ants to come to the Agency for luncheon with me and our top people

involved in collecting and analyzing energy information.

Yours,


Stansfield Turner

2

Attachment

3

Proposed Intelligence Activities in Support of



US Energy Policy and Planning

Observations and Conclusions

1. A number of studies have indicated clearly that a driving force

in the strategic position of the major powers in the 1980s–1990s will be

the availability and price of major energy resources. In this time frame,

oil, natural gas, coal, and uranium are the only resources that need be

considered. At present, a number of agencies and departments—CIA,

DOE, Defense, Treasury, and State—have limited efforts to examine

the present situation and are making limited extrapolations of what

might happen over the next 10 years or more with the emphasis on the

shorter term projections.

2. There is a high probability of continued increases in the price of

oil and a possible severe shortage of oil relative to the demands of the

world economy by the end of the coming decade. The “crunch” will be

massive under the almost certain condition that the Soviets will no

longer be a net energy exporter. The situation will be even worse if CIA

forecasts of the Soviet need to become a substantial importer are valid.

Alternative sources of energy will simply not be available in practical

economic terms in the necessary volume by that time.

3. The implications of this situation in itself and for the actions of

governments as it becomes closer and more salient are numerous, crit-

ical, and complex. With the probable exception of the nations of arid

Africa, the consequences of the impending energy crunch will impact

heavily on most governments and thus on most major international

economic issues; on the stresses felt by existing alliance systems

(NATO and Warsaw Pact); on regional power balances and emerging

regional powers; and on perceptions of the need for and incentives to

use military forces. Without engaging in overstatement, the energy fac-

2

Turner signed “Stan” above this typed signature.



3

The report is dated June 1978.



365-608/428-S/80010

506 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

tor will have at least as much impact on the role of the United States in

the world in the coming decades as nuclear weapons have had in previ-

ous decades.

4. Relative to nuclear weapons, the energy factor will create far

more difficult requirements for information and thus tasks for the US

intelligence and policy analysis communities. The implications cannot

be adequately grasped simply through concentration on a very small

number of foreign countries, on military as distinct from economic

matters, and on meeting the problem through unilateral US procure-

ments or dispersal of technology.

5. The US energy policy community now has on its agenda a large

number of relevant issues and action programs. These developments

are relatively recent and fluid in terms of the division of executive

branch responsibility and focus on coordination. Nevertheless, the

policy community is well ahead of the current production capacity and

institutional priorities of the Intelligence Community on energy and

energy-related matters. Without substantial increases in the resources

allocated to intelligence production pertinent to the energy factor, the

gap will grow.

6. Scientific and technical development will greatly influence the

pace of energy resource recovery and production in countries

throughout the world. Much of this information is in the open literature

or available from easily accessible sources. At one time, the Intelligence

Community maintained almost routine coverage of these engineering

(non-nuclear) developments. Shifting emphasis to assumed higher pri-

ority items has vastly degraded the US capability in monitoring tech-

nical developments in many areas of fossil fuel recovery, conversion,

and use. For example, our knowledge of technological possibilities of

the use of the high BTU gas production developed in East Germany is

extremely limited. Our knowledge of the South African technology for

the development and use of Solvent Refined Coal is similarly limited. A

list of comparable examples is virtually limitless. The failure to main-

tain cognizance of technical developments in the non-nuclear energy

area will severely limit technical developments in the use of fossil fuels

in the United States.

7. Many of the policy alternatives now under active consideration

and increasingly detailed formulation call for syntheses of two kinds.

First, they require the integration of political, economic, and scientific

and technical intelligence. Second, they require the integration of esti-

mative intelligence on the policy intentions, capacities, and responses

of numerous governments in OECD, in CEMA, and in the developing

world.


8. Unfortunately, these two sorts of syntheses are precisely what

the US Intelligence Community is poorly organized to provide. Given



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 507

other production burdens and historically established interagency and

interoffice divisions of labor, it is unrealistic to expect these syntheses

to be generated in the absence of high-level guidance and demand.

There clearly exists competence among individual analysts as demon-

strated by a superb ORPA report on the political economics of energy

in the Warsaw Pact.

9. Analyses which synthesize across types of information and per-

tinent nations obviously can be no better than the descriptive intelli-

gence information and “single discipline” and “single country”

analyses on which they can draw. The activities being undertaken and

the priority questions identified for production are by and large com-

mendable and necessary. They are in no way sufficient, however, to the

scope of the problems posed by the energy factor.

10. It would obviously be inappropriate to assume that the sole

provider of information pertinent to energy and energy-related policy

issues will or should be the Intelligence Community. However, there is

little evidence of a thorough assessment of which information needs

should be met by the Intelligence Community, which would be best

provided by analysts working under other public and private sector

auspices, and how these streams of production should be organized to

complement each other efficiently.

11. An examination of these efforts to understand (a) the energy

policy of the Soviet Union, (b) the implications of the energy shortages

to the LDCs, and (c) the significance of these developments to the fu-

ture of the United States convinces us that US efforts in this area fall far

short of what is needed. In our view, the availability of energy will de-



termine

the economic situation in the world in the 1985–2000 period.

There is at present no unified effort to understand the long-term view of

the Soviets regarding their energy policy or even their assessment of

the US policy. Limited efforts are under way to understand Soviet R&D

developments. We believe that these are relatively weak attempts

which reflect an evaluation of Soviet R&D in terms of our own

programs.

12. The rapid evolution of requirements for intelligence on energy

systems poses two kinds of important problems. First, our lack of expe-

rience will hinder the developments of the kind of analysis important

in the 1985–2000 time period. Second, the users of intelligence analysis

will also require experience as to the kind of analysis that will be of

greatest aid in the formulation of policy. The development of the ap-

propriate analytical capabilities and the acquisition of the means to use

analysis will require the close cooperation of the analytic and policy

making communities.

Recommendations

1. The DCI should charge his staff to develop a community-wide

plan for the production of energy and energy-related intelligence and


365-608/428-S/80010

508 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

the identification of the additional resources necessary to support the

framing and evaluation of US policy choices. The plan should also

identify the focus of leadership responsibility to ensure that the synthe-

sized analyses mentioned earlier will be forthcoming.

2. The DCI and his representatives should clarify with the Secre-

tary of Energy and his representatives the information needs of the lat-

ter and the contributions each will make to the provision of needed

analyses. Resolution of their relationship is important for getting on

with the substantive intelligence needs posed by the energy factor. Fail-

ure to do so is likely to result in unproductive hassles about control of

the turf and additional intelligence resources.

3. While all necessary work cannot be done at once, the Intelligence

Community should pursue major synthesized analyses of, and devote

ongoing intelligence attention to, a small number of particularly crucial

questions and problems facing US policymakers. These include:

• Preparations to maintain the safety of oil transport by sea to the

United States, Western Europe, and Japan.

• Feasible and acceptable US initiatives to enhance the

non-nuclear energy alternatives available to the developing countries

(and in particular to potential nuclear proliferators).

• Alternative adaptations by major OECD nations to the coming

energy crunch, including their responsiveness to collective action pro-

posals in cooperation with each other and the United States.

• Clarification of the extent and the economic and technical condi-

tions for feasible exploitation and use of energy mineral endowments

on a worldwide basis (in particular oil, natural gas, uranium, and coal).

• Alternative strategies to create sufficient interdependence be-

tween major energy exporters and importers to induce the latter to

sharply boost extraction rates in time of emergency and to acquire the

facilities on a standby basis which will make that possible in a timely

fashion.

• Development of institutional techniques that will facilitate the

rapid application of energy technologies developed outside the United

States but knowledge of which may have been obtained through intelli-

gence analysis.


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 509



159. Memorandum From Timothy Deal of the National Security

Council Staff to the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Brzezinski)

1

Washington, August 30, 1978.



SUBJECT

Proposed Meeting on Short-Term Oil Price Strategy

State recommends (Tab A)

2

that we convene a meeting in Sep-



tember to review our short-term oil price policy. The memo notes that

OPEC appears to be moving quickly toward a decision to increase oil

prices. State argues that if the US hopes to influence that decision, we

must reach agreement soon on our tactical position on oil price issues.

We cannot defer consideration of this question until completion of the

PRC study on our long-term oil price strategy, which should go for-

ward to meet other needs.

State proposes an ad hoc meeting among NSC, State, Treasury,

and Energy during the week of September 11. You chaired a similar

meeting in your office last September shortly before Mike Blumenthal

left on his Middle East trip.

3

It was successful producing important pol-



icy decisions and a diplomatic campaign for a price freeze throughout

1978.


The week of September 11 is inconvenient because of the Camp

David Summit and a heavy NSC schedule during the latter part of the

week. Under the circumstances, I have suggested to State that the meet-

ing take place on September 18 or 19. State concurs. State will coordi-

nate with DOE and Treasury in preparation of an agenda and briefing

papers. Henry Owen and I will monitor that preparation.



Recommendation

That you agree to convene an ad hoc meeting among State, DOE,

Treasury and NSC on September 18 or 19 to discuss our tactical posi-

tion on oil price increases.

4

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Middle East File,



Box 66, Subject File, Middle East Oil, 12/77–12/78. Confidential. Sent for action. Trans-

mitted through Owen.

2

An August 29 memorandum from Tarnoff to Brzezinski; attached but not printed.



3

The meeting was held in October. See Document 132.

4

Brzezinski checked the Approve option. Quandt initialed his concurrence with the



recommendation. Dodson also concurred and wrote: “fine with me; you could, of course,

if you thought the process and decision making necessary warrants it, elevate this

meeting to an SCC. Tim tells me State will go along with that too.”


365-608/428-S/80010

510 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



160. Paper Prepared in the Department of State

1

Washington, undated.



Strategy Toward December OPEC Price Decision

Issue

The OPEC Ministers will meet on December 16 in Abu Dhabi to

decide the price of the market crude from January 1979. We must de-

cide on our objective with regard to the price issue and our tactical ap-

proach over the next several weeks.

2

Background

Most producers last increased oil prices in January 1977 by ten per-

cent, based on a marker price of $12.70. Saudi Arabia and UAE raised

their prices by five percent then and by a further five percent in July

1977. At the Caracas meeting last December, Saudi Arabia and Iran ef-

fectively blocked any price increase for 1978, citing world economic

and oil market conditions, and have maintained that the freeze applies

for the full year.

The small and middle producers only reluctantly acquiesced in the

price freeze and have sought unsuccessfully to overturn it through the

year. Rising revenue needs, declining purchasing power of oil

earnings, and the approaching end of the agreed price freeze period

have contributed to strong pressures within OPEC for a price increase

at the next meeting. No member currently espouses a continuation of

the freeze. The Shah has gently signalled that an increase is desired;

and while Saudi Arabia has not indicated it would support an increase,

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Middle East File,



Box 66, Subject File, Middle East Oil, 12/77–12/78. Confidential. The paper is attached to

a September 19 memorandum from Bosworth to the National Security Council, Depart-

ment of Energy, Department of the Treasury, and the White House, explaining that the

NSC Staff had asked that he distribute the paper to principals for use at the September 21

NSC-chaired meeting on short-term OPEC price strategy.

2

While the report of the Interagency Task Force on Long Term Strategy toward



OPEC prices has not yet been reviewed by the PRC, its conclusion is that gradual in-

creases by OPEC in the real price of oil are not preferable to a later, sharp oil price in-

crease by the mid-1980’s. The report recommended that the U.S.:

—Reaffirm the policy of seeking to keep OPEC price increases as small and infre-

quent as possible within the limits of U.S. influence and advisable tradeoffs with other

objectives.

—Establish the longer-term strategic goal of seeking to expand world productive

capacity as a major foreign policy objective.

—Review periodically U.S. posture and tactics with respect to OPEC in the light of

market developments and past success in moderating price and expanding capacity.

[Footnote in the original. For the terms of reference for the task force, see Document 150.]


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 511

it has clearly not ruled one out and is not working for a continued price

freeze as it did prior to the meeting last December. Saudi Oil Minister

Yamani has continued to comment publicly on the desirability of small

but frequent price increases as an alternative to a sudden, large mar-

ket-induced increase at some point in the future.

The second issue likely to come up at Abu Dhabi is a proposal for

adoption of a mechanism to adjust oil prices for exchange rate changes.

Several OPEC countries have sought oil price adjustments to compen-

sate for loss of purchasing power caused by dollar depreciation. This

effort has been resisted by Saudi Arabia, and Iran and Venezuela are

not supporting it. For the moment it appears unlikely that such a mech-

anism will be adopted. However, continued rapid depreciation of the

dollar against the yen, mark, and Swiss franc could intensify pressures

for an exchange rate adjustment mechanism.



Relevant Factors

In making price decisions, OPEC members take a number of fac-

tors into account. OPEC’s perception of these factors also affects the in-

fluence we can have on the Abu Dhabi decision.

1. Current and expected demand for oil. The rate of growth of oil con-

sumption by the major oil-importing countries has declined since 1976,

and non-OPEC oil production increased by 7 percent during the first

half of 1978 over the same period of 1977. As a result, demand for

OPEC oil has remained roughly level during the period 1976–78 at

about 31 million b/d. The market will tighten through the remainder of

1978 as a result of seasonal inventory accumulation and anticipatory

buying in advance of an expected price increase. Based on assumed

constant real prices, demand for OPEC oil in 1979 will continue at

about this same level, as rising global consumption is largely met by in-

creased production from the North Sea and Mexico.

Saudi production policies introduce an element of some uncer-

tainty in the market outlook for the next 15 months. The Saudis have

imposed a limit on production of light Arabian crude, on an annual

basis, to 65 percent of total liftings, compared with the traditional por-

tion of about 75 percent. Misunderstandings involving how the limit

would be calculated caused Aramco to overproduce light crude earlier

this year, and reductions necessary to meet the limit will further tighten

the oil market during the remainder of 1978. It is possible that the Sau-

dis could tighten the heavy/light limitation further in 1979 by, for ex-

ample, reducing the allowable proportion of light crude production to

50 percent (roughly in line with the proportion of light oil in Saudi

reserves).

Over the longer term OPEC has no significant fear that demand for

their oil will decline as a result of short-term price increases, nor are the


365-608/428-S/80010

512 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

revenue surplus members persuaded that oil in the ground will be less

valuable than financial assets accumulated now. This expectation lends

force to the demands of Venezuela, Kuwait, and others that the price of

oil should be adjusted at least to maintain constant purchasing power.

U.S. demand for imported oil is an important element in OPEC’s

perception of future demand because of the sheer size of U.S. demand

and the U.S. potential for developing alternative conventional and

non-conventional energy sources. Saudi Arabia in particular asserts

that it cannot be expected to pursue the pricing and production policies

we desire if our demand for oil goes unchecked. Enactment of the four

pending parts of the U.S. energy plan

3

will be helpful in influencing the



upcoming price decision and should bolster our case for price modera-

tion over the longer term.

2. World economic conditions. Except for maverick Iraq and Libya, all

OPEC members and particularly the leading ones, have been respon-

sive to some degree to the impact of oil price increases on the world

economy. While economic growth in the oil-importing countries can

hardly look robust to OPEC, it is also unlikely that OPEC currently be-

lieves that any oil price increase at all would necessarily endanger cur-

rent levels of economic activity world-wide. Nevertheless, the impact

of oil price increases is significant and may act as a restraining factor in

OPEC’s decision as to the amount of an increase. Further analysis is un-

derway to obtain an agreed view on the impact of price increases which

can be used in our tactical approaches. However, preliminary analysis

indicates that a five percent price increase for oil for 1979 could raise

inflation in the Big Seven OECD countries by 0.4 percent and reduce

OECD growth by 0.25 percent, thus intensifying the problems of fiscal

and monetary management of those OECD economies. The trade bal-

ances of the OECD countries in 1979, even taking into account in-

creased exports to OPEC, would deteriorate by almost $4 billion, with

the U.S. bearing about 40 percent of that total.

The oil-importing developing countries would be hit even harder.

A 5 percent price increase would raise their oil bills by $700 million in

1979 and would add $450 million to the cost of their non-oil imports.

Their export revenues would also decline because of slowed economic

growth by developed countries. The net result is estimated to be a dete-

rioration of $1.2 billion in the trade accounts of oil-importing devel-

oping countries.

3. OPEC Purchasing Power and Revenue Needs. The strongest argu-

ment made within OPEC for a substantial price increase for 1979 is

based on the effect of dollar depreciation and inflation on the purchas-

3

See footnote 3, Document 153.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 513

ing power of OPEC revenues, particularly in the markets of Europe and

Japan. DOE has calculated that OPEC purchasing power for oil reve-

nues (on a trade-weighted basis) has declined to about 80–90 percent of

its value in 1974 depending on the country involved, with about 7 per-

cent of the decline in the last quarter alone. OPEC’s desire to recoup the

loss through an oil price increase is restrained to some degree by the

fear of leading producers, particularly Saudi Arabia, that a price rise

could precipitate a further dollar depreciation and by their hope that

the dollar will stabilize and strengthen.

This loss of purchasing power and the stagnant demand for OPEC

oil has had a direct adverse effect on the ability of OPEC members to fi-

nance growing public expenditures. For members such as Venezuela,

Indonesia, and Nigeria, immediate revenue needs will tend to out-

weigh concern over depressing effects of a price increase on global oil

demand. The Saudis are not immune to this concern and have cut back

production in the past year in part to assist the sales of other OPEC

members.

4. Political and security. The political and security stake of indi-

vidual OPEC members in cooperative relations with the West may not

dictate the outcome of OPEC’s decision, but at a minimum it will affect

the receptivity of approaches we make on price. Here the priority Saudi

concern will be the post Camp David-Summit implications for the Mid-

dle East, while Iran’s first concern will be internal stability. These fac-

tors can conceivably strengthen our influence on the price decision.

Conversely, the amount of influence we must concentrate on gaining

continued Saudi support for our Mid-East peace strategy will deter-

mine how much we can press the Saudis on the short-term price issue.

5. Attitude of other oil-importing countries. The convictions and ap-

proaches of other governments will reinforce or weaken the arguments

and approaches we make. Several industrialized countries are unlikely

to take a strong position against any price increase in 1979. German and

Japanese credibility is undercut by appreciation of their currencies

which has resulted in major declines in the mark and yen price of oil.

They will be more disposed to counsel unspecific price moderation,

stressing the threat to financial and economic stability of a large price

increase. The British now have a stake in high oil prices,

4

and they are



unlikely to oppose a 5–10 percent price increase. Most oil-importing de-

veloping countries would hope that a price increase could be avoided

but are unwilling to oppose it actively.

4

As a result of oil development in the North Sea.



365-608/428-S/80010

514 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



Options for U.S.

1. Seek a price freeze

Since no one in OPEC is espousing a freeze, it is extremely difficult

to expect this can be achieved. To carry it would require a Saudi lead,

probably the backing of Iran, and some neutralization of Venezuela

and others pressing for a price increase. If we decide to support this op-

tion, we would have to try to convince other major consuming coun-

tries to adopt a parallel and consistent posture. We would have to act

quickly with high-level de´marches to the Saudis, Iran, Venezuela and

others. Publicly we would make clear that the onus of a price hike

would rest squarely with OPEC, that market conditions do not justify

an increase, that we want to avoid not only an increased burden on our

own shoulders but a heavier burden for the non-OPEC LDC’s.

Pro

—Tactically, it is a clear U.S. position which cannot be misunder-

stood, which OPEC has come to expect and which might act as a re-

straining factor on the eventual amount of any increase; and

—It accords with public and Congressional perception that the

OPEC price is already unjustifiably high.

—Achievement of the objective would be the best outcome for the

world economy and for the dollar.



Con

—Governments of some important oil-importing nations might

not be willing to press for a freeze under present circumstances.

—To have a chance of acceptance probably requires extremely fa-

vorable linkage or costly actions on political and security matters of

concern to leading producers.

—Would damage our domestic and international credibility if the

objective were publicly announced and failed.

2. Try to hold increase below ten percent

5

Recognizing that some increase is highly probable, we would try



to minimize severely the amount of the increase. We would indicate

privately to the Saudis that while any price increase can compound

global economic problems, we could consider an increase of, say, five

5

In a September 20 memorandum to Brzezinski attached to this paper, John Renner



of the NSC Staff recommended that Brzezinski favor this option because: “a. It is in line

with the decision the OPEC countries are likely to make; b. It would appear to the Saudis

as the more reasonable position and would enable us to use our influence to try to per-

suade the Saudis to support the Camp David agreements; c. It would put us in a better

position to argue for increased investment in production capacity, which is essential to

avoid supply problems in the late 1980s.” Renner also noted that Henry Owen agreed

with his recommendation.


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 515

percent for the full year to be at the outer limits of that which the world

economy could absorb without serious damage and that which would

not jeopardize our efforts to strengthen the dollar.

We could at the same time raise the issue of capacity expansion,

pointing out the favorable impact that a firm Saudi decision to increase

investment in capacity would have on the U.S., thus mitigating some-

what the adverse reaction to a price increase. We would make parallel

approaches on the price question to Iran, Venezuela, and others. In any

public statements we would avoid giving any specific number as to the

price increase we would be prepared to accept but would stress that

any increase would have some impact on the world economy and that

OPEC governments have a direct responsibility for the health of the

world economy. We should make our own efforts on inflation, domes-

tic energy policy and the balance of payments a central feature of our

overall approach to the oil price increase.

Pro

—Other major oil-importing countries would probably adopt a

similar posture.

—If the dollar does not decline further, our objectives may be

achievable within the limits of U.S. influence and without concessions

on other questions.

—Achievement of an understanding would minimize the extent of

potential damage to the world economy and could settle foreign ex-

change and oil markets if a small increase is understood to be the prob-

able outcome of the OPEC meeting.



Con

—There is no strong justification for a price increase in oil market

conditions.

—Position could be misconstrued by OPEC as acquiescence in a

larger increase or future price increases.

—Is subject to criticism from segments of U.S. public and Congres-

sional opinion.

Tactics

Regardless of the option decided upon, many of the tactics which

can be employed will be the same. These include public pronounce-

ments, letters to key OPEC governments from the Secretaries of State

and/or Treasury and the President, de´marches by our Embassies to

OPEC governments, consultations with key oil-importing countries, in-

clusion into agendas during meetings with key OPEC officials, coordi-

nation of importing country positions via IEA and possibly other fo-

rums. In this regard, we should take advantage of the Bank/Fund


365-608/428-S/80010

516 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

meetings in Washington and the UNGA later this month and the op-

portunities for contact with key OPEC ministers.

Our approaches should cover the elements analyzed in this paper,

including the state of the oil market, the impact of oil price issues on the

world economy, and the relationship between OPEC’s decision on oil

prices and the success of our efforts to control inflation and improve

our trade deficit as fundamental to a strengthening of the dollar.


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling