Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Summary of Conclusions of Ad Hoc National Security


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet53/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   ...   95

161. Summary of Conclusions of Ad Hoc National Security

Council Meeting

1

Washington, September 21, 1978, 10:30–11:45 a.m.



SUBJECT

OPEC Oil Prices

PARTICIPANTS

State:

Richard Cooper, Under Secretary for Economic Affairs

Julius Katz, Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Economic-Business Affairs

Treasury:

Secretary Michael Blumenthal

Anthony Solomon, Under Secretary for Monetary Affairs

Energy:

Secretary James Schlesinger

Walter MacDonald, Deputy Assistant Secretary for International Affairs

Council of Economic Advisers:

Chairman Charles Schultze



Domestic Policy Staff:

Director Stu Eizenstat

Kitty Schirmer, Associate Director

White House:

Zbigniew Brzezinski

David Aaron

NSC:

Henry Owen

John Renner

Gary Sick

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, International Eco-



nomics File, Box 44, Rutherford Poats File, Chron, 9–11/78. Secret. The meeting was held

in the White House Situation Room.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 517

Summary of Conclusions

1. OPEC Oil Price Increase

It was agreed that US spokesmen would make a strong case

against an oil price increase for 1979, that this case would be made as

persuasive as possible taking into account political and economic real-

ities, and that Presidential involvement was not appropriate. If an in-

crease cannot be halted, we will work toward the lowest possible price

hike—hopefully taken in two stages. The Department of State will pre-

pare a telegram to the field setting forth the points to be used in our ini-

tial discussions.

There has been no price increase since July 1977. Inflation and the

depreciation of the dollar have reduced the real income of OPEC coun-

tries. The OPEC countries with high revenue needs are pushing hard

for a price increase; Iran has signalled that an increase is desired; Saudi

Arabia is not working for a continuation of the price freeze.

There was a consensus that if we were to go flat out against any

price increase, we would lack credibility and our ability to influence the

extent of the price increase would be greatly reduced. We would also

not be in a good position to argue for additional investment to increase

production capacity, which is essential if we are to avoid supply strin-

gencies in the mid to late 1980s. Furthermore, the more ammunition we

use against a price increase the less we would have to oppose OPEC

pricing on the basis of a basket of currencies.



2. OPEC Oil Price Based on Basket of Currencies

It was agreed that the US should make a maximum effort to per-

suade OPEC not to price its oil on the basis of the value of a basket of

currencies, that this objective had a higher priority than avoiding a

price increase, and that the President’s prestige should be engaged if

necessary. It was also agreed that when the monetary situation stabi-

lizes we should consider whether a properly defined basket would be

to our advantage.

Treasury believes exchange markets would react badly to OPEC

pricing oil based on a basket of currencies. The exchange markets are

nervous and the adoption of the basket would cause a run from the dol-

lar. Furthermore, regardless of the theoretical symmetry of the basket,

the OPEC countries would not lower prices when the dollar

strengthened.

However, because OPEC oil prices are denominated in dollars, the

cost of oil to Germany and Japan falls as the dollar depreciates in rela-

tion to the DM and the Yen. This reduces German and Japanese pro-

duction costs and improves their competitive position. Thus, at some



365-608/428-S/80010

518 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

future date when the pressure is off the dollar, a basket might serve our

interest and help improve our competitive position.

2

2

Brzezinski sent an undated memorandum to Carter the following week informing



him of the conclusions reached at the meeting. (Ibid.)

162. Memorandum From John Renner of the National Security

Council Staff to the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Brzezinski)

1

Washington, September 26, 1978.



SUBJECT

Long-term National Security Strategy on Oil Prices

On May 12 you established a task force to prepare a study on

long-term policy on imported oil prices for PRC consideration. Your

tasking memo is at Tab B.

2

The report you requested has arrived. It is at Tab A.



3

There is an ex-

ecutive summary. The main policy conclusions are that the US Govern-

ment should:

—Establish the longer-term strategic goal of seeking to expand

world productive capacity as a major foreign policy objective.

4

—Reaffirm the policy of seeking to keep OPEC price increases as



small and infrequent as possible within the limits of US influence and

advisable trade-offs with other objectives.

—Review periodically US posture and tactics with respect to

OPEC in the light of market developments and past success in moder-

ating price and expanding capacity.

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, International Eco-



nomics File, Box 44, Rutherford Poats File, Chron, 9–11/78. Secret. Sent for action.

2

Printed as Document 150.



3

Not found, but see footnote 2, Document 160.

4

In his September 29 memorandum to Brzezinski analyzing the study, Odom



wrote that “this kind of generalized policy,—to increase global production,—is more

likely to entangle us in contradictions than to help in pursuit of our interests.” He noted

that Schlesinger had “serious reservations” about the study and that it would be “inter-

esting to smoke him out.” (Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Inter-

national Economics File, Box 44, Rutherford Poats File, Chron, 9–11/78)


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 519

The next step should be a PRC meeting, which I will set up if you

agree in principle. At such a meeting, we should examine the policy

conclusions of the task force and attempt to reach agreement on our

main policy objectives with regard to oil prices and supply.

We should also agree on a follow-up mechanism. I recommend

that, near the end of the PRC meeting, you propose that an interagency

working group, chaired jointly by State and Energy, review annually

US posture and tactics with respect to OPEC in the light of market de-

velopments and past success in moderating price and expanding ca-

pacity. The composition of the working group should be the same as

the task force that produced the present report.

5

Recommendation

That a PRC meeting be held to review the report and determine

policy objectives and follow-up.

6

5

Under this paragraph, Renner wrote: “ZB, I’ve asked that the effects of the dollar



vs. a basket on our competitive position also be added so we can look at that very impor-

tant strategic issue—these other conclusions are obvious.”

6

Brzezinski did not indicate his decision on the recommendation. On September



27, the President issued Executive Order 12083 establishing an Energy Coordinating

Committee “to provide for the coordination of federal energy policies” and “ensure that

there is communication and coordination among Executive agencies concerning energy

policy and the management of energy resources.” The committee had 23 members and

included every major Cabinet officer. (Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States:

Jimmy Carter, 1978

, pp. 1637–1638) Carter initially doubted “the need” for such a com-

mittee, as he wrote on the June 28 memorandum that McIntyre sent to him proposing it,

preferring instead to “let Schlesinger and Watson try this without a formal E.O.” (Carter

Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, International Economics File, Box 44,

Rutherford Poats File, Chron, 9–11/78) The committee’s first meeting was held on De-

cember 19. (Draft minutes; ibid., Chron, 12/14–31/78)


365-608/428-S/80010

520 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



163. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

Venezuela

1

Washington, September 28, 1978, 2010Z.



247461. Subject: Message to President Perez re Oil Prices.

1. Charge´ is instructed to seek appointment with President Carlos

Andres Perez to make following points on behalf of President Carter.

2. Talking points are as follows: Begin text: It has come to our atten-

tion that Venezuela is seeking to persuade other OPEC countries to

agree to an immediate increase in oil prices and a further increase at the

beginning of next year.

3. This would be a most inopportune time for such a step. It would

damage the global economy, still struggling to emerge from a period of

recession. The effect would be magnified by the uncertainties that

would flow from a price increase which appears unwarranted by cur-

rent market conditions.

4. Perhaps most important of all a rise in oil prices at this time

would place further pressure on the dollar. This would not be in

anyone’s interest, and would be particularly unfortunate when US

Government is taking vigorous measures both to strengthen the dollar

and to strengthen the international monetary system. Our Congress

will, in the next few days, pass legislation that will bring into effect the

bulk of energy program that you, President Carter and other world

leaders have felt was needed. The Senate acted on September 27 and

the bill now goes to the House. And we expect that it will next year

enact additional energy legislation. The Congress is also about to give

final approval to the Witteveen facility which will augment the re-

sources of the IMF.

5. An oil price increase now could have other unfortunate implica-

tions, globally and in the United States. It would place the Arab oil pro-

ducers in the unhelpful position of raising the price of oil at a point

when the results at Camp David have at last provided essential for-

ward motion toward peace in the Middle East.

2

6. For these and other reasons, our government requests that you



reconsider Venezuela’s position on oil prices and that Minister Her-

nandez not continue his efforts to obtain a price increase at this time,

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D780396–1071.



Confidential; Immediate; Exdis. Drafted by Rosen; cleared by Vaky, Blumenthal, Schle-

singer, and Owen; and approved by Cooper.

2

The Camp David Accords were signed by Egyptian President Sadat and Israeli



Prime Minister Begin on September 17.

365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 521

and that this issue should be deferred until the regularly scheduled re-

view. Venezuela can in this way make a significant contribution to the

maintenance of forward momentum for the solution of important

world economic and political problems. President Carter intends to

continue to pursue with vigor policies toward the same end. End text.

3

Christopher

3

Charge´ d’Affaires John J. Crowley made the de´marche to Minister of Presidency



Lauria on September 29. The Minister said that he would convey the U.S. position to

Pe´rez, who had “an extremely full schedule” that day and believed that the President

“would be willing to reconsider the current” Venezuelan position, although he “doubted

this would result in any change.” Crowley characterized Lauria as “literally President

Pe´rez’s right-hand man, and his views may be taken as accurately reflecting those of the

President.” (Telegram 9294 from Caracas, September 29; National Archives, RG 59, Cen-

tral Foreign Policy Files, D780398–1151)

164. Editorial Note

On October 15, 1978, the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives

passed the five bills that together constitute the National Energy Act of

1978: 1) the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, which funded

conservation and solar energy initiatives (P.L. 95–619); 2) the Power

Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act, which encouraged the use of coal

and other alternative fuels instead of oil and natural gas in both new

and existing utilities (P.L. 95–620); 3) the Natural Gas Policy Act, which

provided for the creation of a single national market for new natural

gas sales (P.L. 95–621); 4) the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act,

which facilitated conservation through the efficient use of utility gener-

ating equipment (P.L. 95–617); and 5) the Energy Tax Act, which estab-

lished incentive tax credits to induce energy conservation and the use

of alternative energy sources (P.L. 95–618).

In a telegram to posts in both oil-producing and oil-consuming na-

tions, the Department of State noted that the new programs were esti-

mated to save 2.4–3.0 million barrels of oil per day by 1985, compared

to what the United States would otherwise have required. Such

savings, the Department explained, met a commitment that the United

States made at the Bonn Economic Summit in July and also adhered to

“the decision on group objectives and principles for energy policy

adopted by the International Energy Agency at its October 1977 Gov-

erning Board meeting.” (Telegram 273815 to Brussels and other posts,

October 27; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files,



365-608/428-S/80010

522 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

D780443–0651) Regarding the October 1977 IEA meeting, see Docu-

ment 129.

President Carter signed the bills into law on November 9. For the

text of his remarks on signing the bills, see Public Papers of the Presidents



of the United States: Jimmy Carter, 1978

, pages 1978–1985.



165. Telegram From the Department of State to Selected

Diplomatic Posts

1

Washington, October 20, 1978, 2259Z.



266410. Subject: OPEC Price Deliberations.

1) At an early opportunity, Embassies except Abu Dhabi, Jidda,

Kuwait, and Tehran should make informal approaches to key officials

to convey U.S. concern about upcoming OPEC oil price decision. You

should not describe your approach as a formal de´marche made under

instructions, but you may draw from points below in your dialogue.

(For Abu Dhabi, Jidda, Kuwait, and Tehran: Secretary Blumenthal will

visit all four posts in mid-November while Under Secretary Cooper

will visit all but Jidda next week. Suggest you defer your approach at

the highest level until after conclusion of these visits, since combined

impact is likely to be greater in this sequence. We would appreciate

your assessment of this proposed procedure.)

2) The U.S. is concerned that the pressures within OPEC may re-

sult in a decision for a price increase which would have adverse effects

on the global economic and financial systems.

3) Current oil market supply and demand conditions do not war-

rant a price increase. Demand for OPEC oil has been in the 29.5–31 mil-

lion barrels per day range for over 18 months—below projections, and

for most OPEC members below desired production levels. Recent tight-

ening of the market has been caused by inventory build-ups in antici-

pation of future price hikes and by Saudi restraints on production of

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D780431–0447.



Confidential; Immediate. Drafted by Moore and Hart; cleared by Bosworth, Rosen, Katz,

Solomon, Bergold, and in NEA/RA and EUR/RPE; and approved by Cooper. Sent to

Jidda, Kuwait, Tripoli, Abu Dhabi, Algiers, Doha, Tehran, Caracas, Lagos, Jakarta, Libre-

ville, Quito, Ankara, Athens, Bern, Bonn, Brussels for the Embassy and USEEC, Copen-

hagen, Dublin, London, Luxembourg, Madrid, Oslo, Ottawa, Paris for the Embassy and

USOECD, Rome, Stockholm, the Hague, Tokyo, Vienna, Wellington, Baghdad, and

Dhahran.


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 523

Arabian light. Neither of these reasons reflect a shortage of oil which

could justify a price increase.

4) While exchange market developments have been the subject of

concern in OPEC countries, there is no reason to anticipate a long run

decline of the dollar relative to other currencies. On the contrary, we

believe that the dollar will be strengthened as a result of measures be-

ing implemented by the U.S. and several other countries: (A) At the

Bonn Summit in July President Carter reaffirmed the U.S. commitment

to reduce its dependence on imported oil.

2

The recent passage of U.S.



energy legislation should produce an oil import savings of over 2.5 mil-

lion barrels per day by 1985. (B) Reduced deficit spending and tighter

monetary policy measures by the U.S. will help reduce the U.S. infla-

tion rate, as will a strong anti-inflation program to be announced later

this month.

3

(C) There is a convergence of growth rates among OECD



countries which will help the trade balance. U.S. growth is slowing

somewhat, while Japan and Europe will achieve real growth in excess

of the U.S. for the first time since 1975. (D) The dollar depreciation

which has already occurred, coupled with an intensive export promo-

tion program, should stimulate U.S. exports next year. (E) Japan and

West Germany have both taken fiscal measures to stimulate their econ-

omies. The Japanese Government has proposed a supplemental budget

increase of about 13 billion dollars to achieve its growth target of 7 per-

cent for 1978. Germany has also increased its fiscal expenditures by 5.6

billion dollars in 1979 and 1.6 billion dollars in 1980.

5) The U.S. trade and current account deficits are now expected to

improve substantially next year. As these movements become more ob-

vious to exchange markets, we expect exchange market conditions will

improve. An oil price increase at this time would tend to offset part of

these favorable developments and could put downward pressure on

the dollar.

6) FYI: As Embassies are aware, projections of changes in economic

growth, international trade, and inflation owing to oil price changes

vary considerably, depending upon model used and assumptions

made about fiscal and monetary policy responses. Thus, figures cited in

following paragraphs may vary in differing analyses, but substance of

basic argument remains unchanged. End FYI. Our analysis shows that

for every 5 percent increase in oil prices, real GNP growth for the seven

largest OECD economies as a group would decline by about 0.25 per-

cent or some 10 billion dollars. Consumer prices in these seven coun-

2

See footnote 3, Document 157.



3

Carter introduced his anti-inflation program in an address to the nation on Oc-

tober 24. For the text of his speech and a fact sheet issued by the White House, see Public

Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Jimmy Carter, 1978

, pp. 1839–1848.



365-608/428-S/80010

524 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

tries would increase also by about 0.25 percent for each 5 percent price

increase. The level of GNP losses and overall price increases would

vary from country to country, but according to our estimates, none of

the big seven would be immune. In addition, the climate for capital in-

vestment decisions would be more uncertain, and governments with

increased oil bills would face protectionist pressures to reduce non-oil

imports and would have to slow economic growth to reduce energy

consumption. OPEC countries should be aware that these responses

could under present conditions come about from a relatively small

price hike in percentage terms.

7) A 5 percent price hike would increase the import bills of the big

seven OECD countries by 5 billion dollars. Even though the impact of

this would be softened by increased exports to OPEC of about 1.2 bil-

lion dollars and decreased non-oil imports of about the same amount,

exports to non-OPEC countries would decrease by nearly 1 billion dol-

lars resulting in an overall increased trade deficit of around 3.5 billion

dollars. Forty percent of this deficit would accrue to the U.S. Our esti-

mate is that the smaller industrial countries would experience a 1.2 bil-

lion dollar deterioration in their overall trade balances from a 5 percent

oil price increase because of a 1 billion dollar increase in their oil import

bills and reduced exports to other developed countries.

8) For non-OPEC developing countries, an oil price increase would

worsen their external debt positions and current account deficits by in-

creasing import costs and reducing exports. A 5 percent price increase

would add about 700 million dollars in 1979 to their oil import bill.

Price increases in developed countries induced by a 5 percent oil price

increase would add 500 million dollars to the cost to developing coun-

tries of non-fuel imports. The demand for non-OPEC LDC exports in

the developed countries would be reduced as well, with the revenue

loss offset only in part by higher export prices. A number of developing

countries would be hit particularly hard.

9) FYI: Some projections indicate that the Japanese surplus on cur-

rent account in 1978 will exceed that of OPEC as a group. Should OPEC

officials raise the matter of surpluses within the OECD, you should in-

dicate that we have consistently expressed our concern to the Japanese

about their current account surplus and have received their assurance

that actions will be taken to reduce the surplus. The Japanese commit-

ment at the Bonn Summit to increase growth rates was in part a re-

sponse to such pressure from the U.S. and other Summit countries. End

FYI.


10) For OECD Embassies: You should add that U.S. believes that in

any approaches to OPEC or public comments on OPEC oil prices, our

governments should point out the adverse consequences of any price


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 525

increase at all at this time, as the best means to encourage restraint in

OPEC’s ultimate decision.

11) If asked about reports of estimate by Secretary Schlesinger of

U.S. oil import level of 9–10 million B/D in 1985,

4

Embassies may point



out (A) that the energy measures on which Congress has completed ac-

tion will effectively fulfill President Carter’s commitment at the Bonn

Summit to have measures in effect by the end of this year that will re-

sult in oil import savings of approximately 2.5 million B/D by 1985;

and (B) that the U.S. will continue to strengthen its energy efforts in the

fields of both conservation and accelerated production of alternative

energy sources, including through the adoption of new measures when

needed. If asked about Secretary Schlesinger’s statement that demand

for OPEC oil would approach the upper limit of current OPEC avail-

ability in the last quarter of this year, Embassies may point out that this

would be a reflection of high seasonal and anticipatory buying in ad-

vance of any OPEC price increase, and not a permanent market condi-

tion. While demand for OPEC oil will undoubtedly rise in the early

1980’s, we would in fact anticipate a drop in demand in the first quarter

of 1979 as compared to the fourth quarter of 1978.


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling