Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Vance 4 Not further identified. 166. Paper Prepared in the Department of State


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet54/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   ...   95

Vance

4

Not further identified.



166. Paper Prepared in the Department of State

1

Washington, undated.



Iranian Oil Production

Summary

The situation in Iran’s oilfields and loading facilities is subject to

rapid change, but as of November 3 reports indicated a curtailment of

Iran’s exports on the order of 4 million b/d (over 10 percent of OPEC

exports). The interruption comes at a time when demand for OPEC oil

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Country



File, Box 29, Iran, 11/78. Secret. The paper was forwarded to Brzezinski on November 3

under cover of an undated memorandum from Tarnoff indicating that it was done in re-

sponse to a request from Brzezinski on November 1.


365-608/428-S/80010

526 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

has been rising sharply, substantially reducing the amount of excess ca-

pacity available earlier in the year.

2

The upward trend in spot market prices has already been acceler-



ated by this situation, but spot sales represent a small portion of oil

moving in international trade and are notoriously subject to specula-

tive pressures. If the strikers go back to work within the next week or

so, the situation would give only limited encouragement to OPEC price

hawks. It is likely that by some increase in liftings elsewhere, a

draw-down of stocks, and the adjustment of shipping schedules, the oil

companies could accommodate the loss of exports while Iran’s produc-

tion is being built back to normal levels.

If the strike is prolonged by several weeks, and holds production

down to the current level, it is unlikely that sufficient capacity will be

available to make up fully the loss of Iranian oil. Much of OPEC’s ex-

cess capacity is already committed to production for the fourth quarter;

it would require a politically difficult reversal of conservation poli-

cies—particularly in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the UAE—and a period

of months to reach maximum sustainable capacity. Even with the addi-

tion of surge capacity in producers outside OPEC (including Canada

and the U.S.), there would probably not be enough oil available to

avoid a tight market situation and substantial OPEC price increases in

December, or possibly earlier, which reflect it.

Among the most dependent on Iran as a source of oil are the Neth-

erlands (36% of imports); Spain (23%); and Japan, Canada and the U.K.

(about 16% each). Italy’s dependence is 13% and West Germany’s 11%.

The U.S. obtains 9% of its imports from Iran, which represents about

4% of consumption. Normal oil company practice to prorate supplies

among their customers, however, would help to even out the impact of

diminished Iranian exports.

Israel and South Africa, which are heavily dependent on Iranian

oil and have few alternatives, have large stockpiles. Nevertheless, Is-

rael is entitled to call upon the U.S. to fulfill its commitment to make oil

available if Israel is unable to locate sufficient supplies.

If the shortfall in oil supplies is perceived as likely to be deep and

prolonged, any of the members of the IEA whose traditional depend-

2

Strikes began in Iran on September 9 when workers left a Tehran oil refinery to de-



mand higher wages and protest martial law. With strikes in southern Iran continuing into

October, National Iranian Oil Company Chairman Hushang Ansary reported to Sullivan

on October 30 that production had fallen “about a million barrels a day for each of the

past three days and was now down to slightly over one million barrels.” (Telegram

10560 from Tehran, October 30; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files,

D780446–1068) The CIA produced a study entitled “Iranian Strikes: Impact on World Oil

Market” on November 1; a copy is in Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Ma-

terial, Middle East File, Box 28, Country Files, Iran, 11/1–21/78.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 527

ence on Iran’s oil exceeds 7 percent of normal consumption would be

entitled to request the activation of the IEA’s emergency sharing sys-

tem.

3

While the actual size and distribution of the shortfall would de-



pend on the supply and marketing response, the historic figures sug-

gest that if the IEA sharing system were activated, the U.S. would have

an obligation to make oil available to other IEA members by foregoing

some imports. Operation of the scheme, however, would be likely to re-

duce the potential for strained relations among the Western allies, and

help dampen speculative bidding on spot markets.

The Department of Energy’s “Interim Response Plan for Petro-

leum Contingencies”

4

provides for a number of domestic measures to



allocate supplies and restrain demand. Our primary emergency man-

agement measures would be the standby crude oil and product alloca-

tion programs and price controls, as only relatively small savings can

be expected from voluntary measures.

Consideration might be given to additional actions to enhance

supplies if the Iranian strike continues, including (a) suspension of oil

purchases for our strategic reserves and use of the 50 million barrels al-

ready purchased; (b) an approach to Canada to liberalize oil and gas ex-

ports; and (c) approaches as necessary to Saudi Arabia, the UAE and

Kuwait to persuade them to move to full capacity production. Such ap-

proaches would have to be considered in light of their likely effect on

perceptions in Iran and the Middle East of our continuing confidence in

and support for the Shah.

A. Consequences for Supply and Price of Oil

The world oil market was tightening even before the strikes led to

the interruption in Iranian supply. World demand for OPEC oil was

fairly slack early in the year, averaging only about 29 mmb/d during

the first six months, but it stepped up to 30.5 mmb/d in the third quar-

ter and is estimated to reach 31–33 mmb/d during the fourth quarter.

Normal seasonal swings produce a year-end jump in oil demand, but

this fall’s increase also reflects purchases for the U.S. and Japanese gov-

3

Lantzke convened the energy officers of the OECD’s permanent delegations on



November 8 to present the IEA’s views on the “drastic” decrease in Iranian oil exports.

According to the Embassy in Paris, “Lantzke believed ‘crisis,’ should it come, was

months away, even though other producers would not be able to fully compensate for

4–4.5 million b/d drop in Iranian liftings.” He concluded that “there might be a shortfall,

but certainly less than the seven percent reduction in supplies to the IEA area needed to

trigger emergency sharing program,” adding that “no major supply problem” would oc-

cur until “well into the first quarter of 1979, after discounting from present demand

hoarding in expectation of an OPEC price increase.” (Telegram 37123 from Paris, Novem-

ber 9; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D780463–0684)

4

Not found.



365-608/428-S/80010

528 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

ernment stockpile programs and speculative stockpiling in anticipation

of an OPEC price increase in January.

Iran supplied an average of 5.0 mmb/d to the world oil market

during the first nine months of 1978, or about 10 percent of free world

production and one-sixth of OPEC’s exports. Since the inception of the

severe strikes in the oil fields, Iran’s production has fallen sharply, re-

portedly providing enough for domestic consumption (0.6 mmb/d)

and up to 2.0 mmb/d of exports. Actual exports have not exceeded 1.5

mmb/d in recent days. (Iranian exports of refined petroleum products

amount to less than 400,000 b/d, mainly residual fuel oil surplus to do-

mestic needs. Domestic refineries will receive priority access to Iranian

crude and in any case a drop in Iranian exports of refined products

would not have a significant effect on world markets.)

Impact on Price

The reduction of Iranian exports and uncertainty about future pro-

duction have intensified upward price pressures in spot markets for

crude oil and products. This market is heavily influenced by marginal

and speculative trading, and prices could soar if the strike continues for

many weeks. At the moment, however, spot crude cargoes are not

available at the prices offered. Prices in spot markets influence the cli-

mate for OPEC price increases, but are not an accurate reflection of the

prevailing price for oil, which overwhelmingly moves under long-term

contracts. If the strike continues, within a month or so pressures in spot

markets would spread to the premiums charged among oil companies

for the crude they sell to one another. At the same time, some OPEC

members, including Algeria, Libya, Nigeria, and Venezuela would be

tempted to break ranks by raising unilaterally the price differentials ap-

plied to their oil in order to capture the benefits of a rising market. Such

market pressures in advance of the December 16 OPEC meeting would

powerfully strengthen the hands of members pressing for larger and

more frequent increases in the general level of oil prices.

It is impossible to predict what general level oil prices could reach

in the event of a shortfall prolonged for several months. This would de-

pend not only on the amount of the supply shortfall remaining after

offsetting supply increases elsewhere, but also on perceptions about

the duration of the crisis. In addition, national and international meas-

ures to restrain consumption and utilize existing stocks could help curb

demand.

For the sake of illustration, assuming a shortfall of 2 mmb/d after



the above measures were taken and a short-term price elasticity of 0.1,

it would require a 37 percent oil price increase to balance supply and

demand. However, the inflationary impact on domestic prices and the

recessionary effect of additional income transfer to OPEC would create



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 529

new economic conditions in oil-importing countries; each 5 percent in-

crease in the oil price raises the global cost of oil imports by over $6.0

billion, and the U.S. cost of oil imports by about $2.0 billion. Depending

on the fiscal and monetary policy responses to these conditions, de-

mand for oil might be further reduced through income effects.

Supply Vulnerability

International Energy Agency (IEA) members most dependent

upon Iran for their petroleum imports are the Netherlands (36%), Spain

(23%), and Japan, Canada, and the U.K. (each about 16%). The depend-

ence of other industrialized consumers is Italy (13%), West Germany

(11%), and the U.S. (9%). The Netherlands and Italy are refining cen-

ters, and some of the Iranian crude they import actually is reexported to

other European consumers. France—not an IEA member—depends

upon Iran for about 8 percent of its oil imports. A prolonged reduction

in Iranian exports is not likely to affect all consuming nations in pro-

portion to their dependence on Iranian oil, however, because oil com-

panies can be expected to manage stocks and adjust sourcing and desti-

nation of crude flows to spread out the effect of the reduced supply

among their own affiliates and long-term customers.

The two countries with the greatest dependence upon Iran as an

oil supplier—South Africa and Israel—have limited alternatives. In an-

ticipation, both have large oil stocks. South Africa’s oil stockpile may be

sufficient to provide up to three years’ consumption. Israel, with about

seven months’ supply, might nevertheless call upon the U.S. to make

good on our commitment to make oil available to cover its normal do-

mestic requirements if it is unable to find replacement supplies on the

world market, since that commitment is independent of the extent of Is-

rael’s stocks.

Impact on Gas Supply

Pipeline natural gas exports to the USSR have also been suspended

as a consequence of the Iranian strikes. The USSR normally receives ap-

proximately one billion cubic feet of natural gas per day from Iran,

which represents about 3 percent of total Soviet consumption of 32 bil-

lion cubic feet per day. However, the Iranian gas is consumed primarily

in the North Caucasus area where it is a more important component of

regional consumption of about 2 bcf/d. While the USSR is a substantial

gas exporter (1.7 bcf/d to Eastern Europe, 1.9 bcf/d to Western Eu-

rope), it is unlikely that Iranian-related shortages in the North Cau-

casus could be relieved in the short run by diverting supplies destined

for other markets, export or domestic, to that area. There would be

technical problems in reversing the direction of flow in the gas pipe-

lines which are currently set up for south-to-north deliveries, and the



365-608/428-S/80010

530 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Soviets would probably be reluctant to jeopardize their reputation as a

dependable supplier.



B. Supply Response

Oil companies are assessing the contribution which stocks could

make to current supply. Free world oil stockpiles at the end of the third

quarter—some 3.8 billion barrels—represented 74 days of normal con-

sumption but they are unequally distributed among countries. About

half of these could be drawn down, but the rest are working stocks

needed to keep the distribution system running smoothly. Oil being

transported at sea amounts to more than a 30 day supply. Stocks and oil

enroute are likely to provide only limited flexibility, however, as com-

panies will be reluctant to liquidate stocks if future supplies are

uncertain.

OPEC Availabilities

Oil companies are also seeking additional supplies from OPEC

producers. Producer government output ceilings and other policies

hold total OPEC available capacity below the maximum sustainable

production capacity. Some output ceilings are applied on an annual av-

erage basis, however, and reduced liftings earlier this year mean that in

some countries output theoretically could rise to maximum sustainable

levels for the fourth quarter without exceeding the ceilings. Much of

this nominal slack capacity, however, was already committed to meet

higher demand expected in the fourth quarter before Iranian output

fell. While additional amounts of oil might be available over time, this

would depend upon producer governments relaxing a number of im-

portant constraints outlined below. Many of these constraints are based

upon resource management considerations and have broad political

support in the host countries. Therefore, we cannot assume willingness

of producer governments to suspend these policies even temporarily;

oil companies have already been turned down by Kuwait, Iraq and

Abu Dhabi when they sought permission to lift greater than scheduled

amounts of oil to help offset the Iranian shortfall.

Before the strikes affecting Iran’s petroleum sector, maximum sus-

tainable crude productive capacity in OPEC was estimated to be ap-

proximately 36.9 million b/d, including 6.5 million b/d in Iran. With

OPEC production, excluding Iran, close to 25.6 million b/d in Septem-

ber 1978, under-utilized productive capacity outside Iran then stood at

about 4.8 million b/d.

Much of this capacity already was committed to production in the

fourth quarter. For a variety of reasons—political, technical and eco-

nomic—most of the remainder located in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and

Abu Dhabi will not be immediately available as a substitute for Iranian

oil. If these countries were willing to lift existing restraints on oil pro-



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 531

duction to balance market demand as a result of shortfalls from Iran,

two months or so might be required to bring a large share of this addi-

tional capacity on line.

Saudi Arabia

—Aramco estimates its sustainable capacity in Saudi

Arabia at 10.4 million b/d, and an additional 0.3 mmb/d is the Saudi

share of the Neutral Zone production. The company is operating under

a set of production rules, some of which will limit fourth quarter 1978

production to a level substantially below capacity. These rules include:

—A prohibition against producing more than 65 percent Arab

Light crude on an average annual basis. This limitation would restrict

fourth quarter output to approximately 8.7–9.0 million b/d. Production

above the 65 percent ratio in the first nine months of 1978 means that

Arab Light output will have to be held to 62 percent of the total in the

fourth quarter. Current sustainable capacity in other crudes is only

about 3.3 million b/d.

—Individual ceilings imposed on several major oil fields. These

ceilings would cumulatively restrict output below 8.7 million b/d.

—An 8.5 million b/d annual production ceiling. Since Aramco

production in the first nine months of 1978 averaged only 7.5 million

b/d, it will be able to produce to the level of sustainable capacity for the

rest of the year.

As of late September, one Aramco shareholder company projected

fourth quarter production in the range of 8.8–9.0 million b/d. The deci-

sion by the oil companies to lift larger volumes of crude in the fourth

quarter was made before the strikes in Iran. If this decision is approved

by the Saudi Petroleum Minister and higher Saudi authorities, much of

the additional crude would go toward meeting both normal winter

market requirements and liftings in advance of an OPEC price increase.



Kuwait

—Sustainable crude productive capacity in Kuwait is esti-

mated at 3 million b/d, excluding the Neutral Zone, but the gov-

ernment maintains an annual ceiling of 2.0 million b/d on production.

Several oil companies have already asked Kuwait to provide an in-

crease in their fourth quarter 1978 liftings because of the supply dislo-

cation in Iran. But Kuwait has thus far refused.

The Kuwaitis, arguing that the international oil companies have

taken advantage of liftings in advance of OPEC price increases to gar-

ner windfall profits, have advocated control over this practice. Thus,

the Kuwaiti oil minister indicated in October that additional volumes

of crude could only be obtained if the companies were willing to sign

contracts of 3 years or more. Moreover, Kuwait probably would prefer

a tighter oil market, at least temporarily, to strengthen its demands for

a higher price increase when OPEC convenes in Abu Dhabi in

December.



365-608/428-S/80010

532 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



United Arab Emirates

—Abu Dhabi has maintained stringent pro-

duction ceilings on the producing oil companies because of concern for

reserve depletion and proper oil reservoir maintenance. Although the

Emirate has estimated sustainable capacity of almost 2.0 million b/d, it

is limiting average 1978 production to less than 1.5 million b/d. The

government has cut back fourth quarter entitlements for companies

that exceeded their limits earlier. A political decision would now be re-

quired to reverse existing policy temporarily. The other Emirates to-

gether have only about 400,000 b/d of productive capacity, almost all

of which would be produced in the fourth quarter under normal

market conditions.



Iraq

—Iraq has an estimated 3.0 million b/d sustainable crude pro-

ductive capacity and produced close to this level in September 1978.

Damage to the Iraq–Turkey 500,000 b/d pipeline resulted in some cur-

tailment of production in October, but the pipeline returned to service

in early November. Normal market demand (excluding the Iranian

supply problem) will lead Iraq to produce between 2.7–3.0 million b/d

in the fourth quarter. Hence, Iraq probably will not be in a position to

measurably add supplies this year to compensate for shortfalls in Iran.

Venezuela

—Estimated sustainable productive capacity in Vene-

zuela totals 2.6 million b/d and the government normally maintains a

production ceiling of 2.3 million b/d. With Venezuelan output ex-

pected to reach 2.4 million b/d or more in the last two months of 1978,

primarily to meet U.S. winter demand for heavy fuel oil, only an addi-

tional 100,000 b/d could be made readily available to meet extraordi-

nary demand requirements.



Other OPEC

—The seven remaining OPEC countries—Libya, In-

donesia, Nigeria, Algeria, Qatar, Gabon and Ecuador—have a com-

bined crude productive capacity of about 8.4 million b/d. In September

1978, their cumulative output totaled more than 7.7 million b/d, leav-

ing less than 700,000 b/d in under-utilized productive capacity. Much

of this spare capacity would have been brought into production in any

case during the fourth quarter; the volume available to compensate for

Iranian supply shortages will be small.

Non-OPEC Producers

Non-OPEC oil exporters, such as the U.K., Norway, the USSR,

Mexico and Trinidad, tend to produce as much as they can, and are un-

likely to be able to export significant additional quantities of oil on

short notice. Canada has about 400,000 b/d of capacity shut in to slow

its long-term production decline, which would be available if the Cana-

dian Government should decide to authorize further exports or ex-

changes with the U.S. Lesser amounts of capacity might be found in the

U.S., with up to 200,000 b/d available from stripper or marginal wells


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 533

and other shut in capacity. Alaska’s North Slope is now producing at

the 1.2 mmb/d capacity of the pipeline, and the Naval Petroleum Re-

serves are producing at their maximum efficient rate of 132,000 b/d,

given current facilities.



C. Contingency Plans

IEA Sharing System

The IEA provides a system for member countries (most developed

countries but not France) to allocate oil equitably in an emergency to

prevent a scramble which could be costly both economically and politi-

cally. The IEA emergency sharing system may be triggered whenever

the group, or any member, sustains or can reasonably be expected to

sustain a reduction in daily oil supplies (production plus net imports)

of 7% or more when compared to Base Period Final Consumption (the

current base period is July 1977–June 1978). Because of economic

growth since the base period, seasonal factors, and anticipatory lifting,

a stoppage of Iranian production would not reduce available oil to the

IEA group trigger level.

However, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Japan, and the UK de-

pended on Iran for over 14% of their oil supplies in 1977. One of them

could seek to activate the selective trigger if normal rearrangements of

supply and trading among oil companies did not go far enough in

evening out the shortfall among countries.

Procedurally, such a country would have to supply to the IEA Sec-

retariat detailed national oil supply data indicating a prospective short-

fall of at least 7% below its base period consumption. The Secretariat

would verify the data and submit a report to the Governing Board,

which would have to decide whether the conditions for emergency ac-

tion are fulfilled. To decide not to implement emergency measures

when the conditions for such action are found to exist requires a “spe-

cial majority” consisting of 3/4 of member countries and 60% of

weighted votes. (The U.S. has about 1/3 of the weighted votes.)

If the IEA’s sharing system is activated, the Governing Board is to

decide whether the situation warrants a partial or full application of the

allocation procedures. Full implementation of the system on the basis

of a selective trigger would require those countries receiving oil to

make up the first 7% reduction in their supplies through demand re-

straint measures or draw down of stockpiles.

Since the U.S. depends on Iran for a comparatively small part of its

consumption, a triggering of the IEA system based on the Iranian crisis

would likely obligate the U.S. to make oil available to other IEA mem-

bers, an obligation which would be fulfilled by foregoing some of our

imports.


365-608/428-S/80010

534 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



U.S. Domestic Contingency Plan

The Department of Energy’s “Interim Response Plan for Petro-

leum Contingencies” provides overall guidance for managing supply

interruptions. As in 1973–74, our primary emergency management

measures would be the standby crude oil and product allocation pro-

grams and price controls, as only relatively small savings can be ex-

pected from voluntary measures. The crude oil allocation program is

designed to mesh with the IEA allocation system internationally and to

allocate available crude oil supply equitably to all refiners. Product al-

location programs would result in distribution of available products to

domestic consumers.

Revisions of the emergency standby crude oil allocation, refinery

yield control, product allocation, and price control regulations are un-

derway; DOE is accelerating this process in view of the Iranian situa-

tion. DOE is also readying emergency data acquisition systems neces-

sary to support the IEA allocation system and domestic allocation

programs. Agencies involved have accelerated preparation of antitrust

clearances which would enable U.S. oil companies to participate in the

IEA emergency allocation system if it is triggered.

As authorized by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975,

DOE has developed mandatory energy conservation contingency plans

and a standby gasoline rationing plan. The mandatory demand re-

straint proposals now ready for transmittal to Congress would, if fully

effective, curtail demand by about 600,000 barrels per day. The plans

cover: restrictions on energy use for commercial, industrial, and public

buildings; commuter parking management and carpooling incentives;

weekend restrictions on sale of gasoline and diesel fuel; emergency

boiler combustion efficiency standards; and restrictions on illuminated

advertising. The proposed standby gasoline rationing plan would re-

quire a number of steps, including Congressional action, before it could

be made ready for implementation.

D. Additional Measures

For the next several days, the situation bears watching as the GOI

strives to restore control and production in its oil facilities and while oil

companies push their production systems worldwide and probe pro-

ducer governments for access to offsetting supplies. We will then have

a better idea of the technical and political flexibility of supply and a

sharper picture of industry patterns of sharing supplies among con-

suming countries. The stock position in consuming countries and the

supply of crude on the high seas give us at least some time to assess

next steps. If, however, production in Iran is not restored soon and

price pressures continue to build, we may have to consider additional


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 535

measures to affect supply and demand. The possibilities discussed be-

low are not exhaustive and will require further analysis.



U.S. Supply Actions

—We could suspend crude oil purchases for the

Strategic Petroleum Reserve, expected to average 330,000 b/d in No-

vember and December, in order to remove that much non-commercial

demand from the world market, provided that the contracts made by

DOD allow such flexibility. There might, however, be an additional

budgetary cost in reordering these amounts of crude at a later date. In

addition, although SPR holdings are not large (currently 50 million bar-

rels) we might at some point wish to consider using these to help main-

tain oil supplies to the U.S. economy. Presumably we would first wish

to explore the imposition of stringent conservation measures to restrain

total oil demand.



Approaches to producers

—If market forces and company approaches

to producer governments fail to bring forth all the technically feasible

alternative oil supplies to offset the Iranian shortfall, we should con-

sider making official approaches to Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Kuwait

to relax constraints on producing at full physical capacity, recognizing

that the time required to reach full capacity is different for each

country. We could also explore the possibility of short-term availability

of increased exports of crude oil and natural gas from Canada.

Before we make approaches to OPEC governments it would be

prudent to examine carefully a number of significant political consider-

ations. The Saudis and their small Gulf neighbors are acutely sensitive

to any sign of lack of constancy in our support for the Shah. They might

draw undesired conclusions with respect to their own future relations

with us if we appear to be premature in showing a lack of confidence in

him. It would also be desirable to consult with the Shah before taking

such action.

5

5



On November 10, Schlesinger sent a memorandum to the President updating him

on the “Iranian oil situation,” including its background, the available alternative sup-

plies, and the impact on the international oil market. (Carter Library, National Security

Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Country Files, Box 29, Iran, 11/78)



365-608/428-S/80010

536 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling