Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Memorandum From the Under Secretary of State for


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet57/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   ...   95

175. Memorandum From the Under Secretary of State for

Economic Affairs (Cooper) to the President’s Assistant for

Domestic Affairs and Policy (Eizenstat)

1

Washington, December 15, 1978.



SUBJECT

Recommendation for the President on U.S. Oil Pricing Policy



I. Issue

How to fulfill the President’s commitment to reduce U.S. imports

of oil by raising U.S. crude oil prices to world level by the end of 1980,

while at the same time limiting the inflationary impact of this action.

The policy adopted should also eliminate the complicated oil price con-

trol and entitlements programs and prevent oil producers from cap-

turing windfall profits.

II. Essential Factors

An interagency memorandum to the President on December ,

1978, described options on oil pricing policy.

2

The policy the State De-



partment recommends is a phased decontrol of U.S. crude oil prices

combined with an excise or “severance” tax on old oil (excluding

stripper and enhanced recovery production). The decontrol of oil prices

should not be contingent upon Congressional passage of the excise tax

but should proceed independently. This policy will minimize the infla-

tionary impact of decontrolling oil prices while permitting the Presi-

dent to fulfill his Bonn summit commitment to raise prices paid for oil

in the United States to the world level by the end of 1980.

3

The proposal is illustrated in a schematic diagram on page 5 and



would work as follows (on the assumption of annual 10% OPEC price

increases):

—Early in 1979, the President would announce that controlled

prices for all U.S. oil would be raised by the statutory limit through De-

cember 31, 1979, and that on January 1, 1980, wellhead prices for

upper-tier oil would be completely decontrolled, as would retail

product prices. As stripper and enhanced recovery oil prices are al-

ready decontrolled, this would leave only the price of lower-tier oil

controlled. These price controls would be gradually raised until the

control authority expires in September 1981.

1

Source: Carter Library, White House Central Files, Subject File, Box TA–26, Trade.



Confidential.

2

The date was left blank on the original. The memorandum was not found.



3

See footnotes 2 and 3, Document 157.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 565

—At the same time, the President would propose legislation for an

excise or “severance” tax to be initiated on January 1, 1980. This tax will

increase during the year to raise the price of old oil to refiners to the

world level by the end of the year. After December 31, 1980, this tax

would prevent oil producers from obtaining windfall profits from old

oil.


—If OPEC increases oil prices on January 1, 1981, the excise tax

would be used to adjust the composite price to U.S. refiners to the new

world price level by September 1981, when the control authority ex-

pires. U.S. prices thereafter would remain at the world level.

—After October 1, 1981, the excise tax would be adjusted to permit

wellhead prices of old oil to reach world levels gradually, minimizing

any incentive to withhold production, while preventing windfall

profits in the interim.



III. Pros and Cons

Advantages of this approach are:

—It utilizes your existing authority to implement a phased decon-

trol of oil prices without requiring Congressional action.

—Decontrol is not contingent upon Congressional enactment of a

windfall profits tax. In fact, the reverse is true. The burden falls to

Congress to act quickly and responsibly on the Administration’s excise

tax proposal if it wishes to restrict excess profits by producers.

—Internationally, the United States would fulfill what is viewed

by our allies to be an important Bonn Summit commitment. Failure by

the United States to honor this commitment, together with Japan’s

failure to implement fully their summit commitments, may be used by

others, especially West Germany, as an excuse to back away from some

of their own already-implemented commitments. Our failure would

also have an adverse effect on U.S. credibility regarding future

commitments.

—It would eliminate the need for the complex entitlement and

price control programs after September 31, 1981, because the refiner ac-

quisition price for all categories of oil would be equalized.

—Because the date at which the excise or “severance” tax drops to

zero is unspecified, companies will have no incentive to withhold pro-

duction of old oil.

—The major economic impact would not be felt until 1980 or 1981,

thereby minimizing adverse effects on your anti-inflation program in

1979.

Some disadvantages are:



—The proposal includes Congressional passage of an excise tax. It

may be difficult to get Congressional approval at the time, in the form



365-608/428-S/80010

566 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

and with the tax revenues allocated as envisioned by the

Administration.

—Failure to enact the tax would mean that producers of old oil

would receive windfall profits when control authority ends on October

1, 1981. These producers would also be likely to reduce production of

old oil until that date.

—Small windfall profits will accrue to producers by decontrolling

upper tier oil.

—An excise tax which varies with world prices and with the old oil

wellhead price may be criticized as too complex. However, it will be

less complex than the present entitlements program.

IV. Recommendation

That you adopt the approach described above.

4

[Omitted here is the schematic diagram described in Section II.]



4

There is no indication of approval or disapproval of the recommendation.



176. Telegram From the White House to the Embassies in Saudi

Arabia, Iran, and Venezuela

1

Washington, December 15, 1978, 0013Z.



WH81609. Subject: Presidential Message: OPEC Meeting.

1. Embassy is instructed to arrange the earliest feasible delivery of

the following message from President Carter to, respectively, King

Khalid, or the Shah, or President Perez, with a view to inducing instruc-

tions compatible with this message to their delegates to the OPEC

meeting:


2. Text: (appropriate salutation)

“I have heard a number of reports that the OPEC nations may de-

cide, at their forthcoming meeting in Abu Dhabi this Saturday, on an oil

price increase that would average around 10 percent for 1979. I am

deeply disturbed by these reports, because I believe that an increase of

this magnitude would be highly disruptive and damaging to the world

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, President’s



Correspondence with Foreign Leaders File, Box 21, Venezuela: President Carlos Andres

Pe´rez, 6/78–3/79. Confidential; Exdis; Flash.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 567

economy, affecting not only my own efforts to stabilize the U.S. econo-

my and strengthen the dollar but your country’s economic interests as

well. I would stress in particular that the international monetary sys-

tem is at an extremely delicate stage, in which the United States, in co-

operation with other major industrial nations, has committed itself not

only to utilize massive foreign exchange resources but to undertake dif-

ficult domestic stabilization measures in an effort to restore and main-

tain world monetary order. The shock of a large oil price increase

would seriously jeopardize this effort, in whose success you have a

large stake.

“It is for these reasons that I am expressing to you, personally and

directly, my strong hope that any oil price increase in 1979 will be ex-

tremely moderate, and that delegates to the OPEC meeting will exert

their best efforts to this end.”

2

(complimentary close) Jimmy Carter



(End text)

3

3. Report transmittal and response.



4

2

On December 17, OPEC members announced their agreement to increase oil



prices by quarterly increments in 1979, such that the weighted average for the year would

total nearly 10 percent. The Embassy in Abu Dhabi, where the meeting was held, report-

ed: “Decision reflects compromise between moderates who started out at zero and others

who pressed for increases of up to 20 percent. Supply shortage caused by Iranian situa-

tion as well as impact of inflation and past weakening of dollar were stated to be princi-

pal factors which prevented moderates from holding price increase to more modest level.

Adoption of quarterly incremental increases poses problems for future since it could set

pattern for OPEC pricing which will be very difficult to stop.” (Telegram 3293 from Abu

Dhabi, December 17; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D780535–

0534)


3

Poats sent a memorandum to Brzezinski on December 18, in which he wrote: “The

White House used my revised press release expressing hope that OPEC will reconsider

before the next steps take effect. We need to follow up officially and confidentially on

this. Lonely US protests are not likely to avail much. For the first time, Japan and Ger-

many may be willing now to consider joint approaches to Saudi Arabia because they may

no longer enjoy oil price insulation due to dollar depreciation. Our best hope is to get

high Saudi production along with resumed full production by Iran, creating a glut that

leads to price-shaving by the OPEC hawks before the June OPEC meeting.” (Carter Li-

brary, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Subject File, Box 48, Oil: 8/78–2/79)

The December 17 White House press release is printed in Public Papers of the Presidents of

the United States: Jimmy Carter, 1978

, p. 2271.

4

King Khalid replied: “When the Kingdom sensed that the OPEC states, under



pressure of economic conditions, sought a large increase in petroleum prices, the King-

dom did its best in order to have that increase made in steps and within very reasonable

limits so that its total would not exceed (10 percent) from the beginning of 1979 and so

that it would not harm the world economy. Your Excellency is well aware of the efforts in

this direction exerted by the Kingdom.” He added: “In order to avoid continuing rises we

hope that you will continue your efforts towards raising the value of the dollar and re-

ducing or stabilizing the price of manufactured materials. These steps will restore eco-

nomic balance so that there will be no justification for raising petroleum prices in the fu-

ture.” (Telegram 8857 from Jidda, December 18; National Archives, RG 59, Central

Foreign Policy Files, D780522–1020)



365-608/428-S/80010

568 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



177. Memorandum From Secretary of State Vance to President

Carter

1

Washington, December 26, 1978.



SUBJECT

Mexican Natural Gas

As requested, I have reviewed Jim Schlesinger’s memorandum on

Mexican gas negotiations.

2

It is a thorough analysis of the technical as-



pects of the gas question. From the perspective of our overall relation-

ship with Mexico, however, I am concerned that the analysis does not

fully take into account the critical importance of increased

U.S.-Mexican cooperation in areas such as migration, trade, and en-

ergy. In particular, I believe that Jim’s proposed strategy of going back

to the Mexicans with an offer essentially the same as the one rejected

by Lopez Portillo a year ago could adversely affect your trip

3

and the



longer-term prospects for U.S.-Mexican cooperation.

The Mexicans view these gas negotiations as an indicator of our in-

terest in over-all cooperation. They have displayed anger and bewilder-

ment over the events which led up to the suspension of discussions last

year. While their reaction may be part of the bargaining process to

some extent, the outcome apparently has left Lopez Portillo personally

troubled and has provided a major focus for domestic criticism of his

efforts to strengthen ties with the U.S. The Mexicans see us as paying

very high prices for Algerian or Indonesian liquified gas, but vetoing a

deal negotiated between PEMEX and U.S. companies which would cost

American consumers much less than this other imported gas—or than

the gas we are planning to bring down from Alaska. While they can un-

derstand our concern with the effect of a Mexican deal on the Canadian

price, they are also aware that this concern has not deterred us from ar-

ranging for gas from these other sources at even higher prices than the

Mexican proposal.

Against this background, I fear that Jim’s going-in offer will not

provide a basis to continue the discussions. It is essentially the same

offer we made a year ago—$2.60 price when the gas starts flowing in

1980, with an escalator related to the inflation rate and/or world oil

price increases. It would come after another round of OPEC price in-

creases and after press reports of high level attention to Mexican policy

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P860136–2560. Se-



cret. Printed from an uninitialed copy.

2

Document 174.



3

A State visit to Mexico was scheduled for February 14–16, 1979.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 569

in the U.S. Government. Lopez Portillo could cut the dialogue short

and your visit would take place under adverse conditions.

This is not to say that we should simply accept the Mexican price.

At the very least, I think Jim should consider how to make sure that our

positions are presented in such a way as to keep the negotiations going

forward. He might emphasize that he is talking about general pricing

concepts (not hard and fast numbers) and that the actual purchase

would be negotiated in detail between private companies and PEMEX.

When you visit Mexico, you could discuss the gas issue briefly and in

general terms (since in any event the Mexicans would not want a com-

mercial transaction to become the focus of your state visit) and set the

stage for serious commercial negotiations commencing after your visit,

in an atmosphere that will increase—rather than diminish—the

chances for growing cooperation between our two countries in the dec-

ades ahead.

In preparation for these negotiations, I question whether our ulti-

mate fallback should be, as Jim proposes, a link to residual fuel oil that

closes less than half of the price gap between us and the Mexicans. In

light of the larger stakes we have in U.S.-Mexican cooperation, I am not

sure we can afford to adopt as a final bottom line a proposal that

refuses to meet the Mexicans half way.

Mexico’s population may exceed ours in a few decades. With a

2,000-mile border and 160 million legal crossings (and about a million

illegal crossings) a year, with narcotics a major concern, with a level of

bilateral trade exceeded by only four countries, with Hispanics soon to

be our largest minority, with the real possibility of social turbulence in

Mexico in the coming decades as migration, income-disparity, urbani-

zation and unemployment all increase, it is in our interest to work

closely with Mexico—not antagonistically.

A policy of waiting three or four years to pressure a weaker

Mexico into submitting to our terms would, I believe, be detrimental to

our national interest. A more dramatic concrete example of

North-South confrontation could not be imagined—right on our own

borders. We are likely to pay for it in many ways—in reduced coopera-

tion on narcotics, migration, trade, border issues, and also politically

within the Hispanic community. Although Jim may be correct that

Mexican gas will flow into the U.S. market in the next few years, the

Mexicans have demonstrated over the years that they are capable of

making decisions to their economic detriment where national pride is

involved.



365-608/428-S/80010

570 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



178. Telegram From the Department of State to Selected

Diplomatic Posts

1

Washington, December 29, 1978, 0327Z.



326855. Subject: U.S. Position on OPEC Price Increase.

2

1) At their discretion Ambassador and senior Economic Officer



should take the occasion, when it is appropriate, to inform senior levels

of the host government of the U.S. Government’s reaction to the OPEC

oil price increase. We do not wish you to make a formal de´marche at

this time, but we also do not wish to leave an incorrect impression

about this government’s position. Talking points follow:

2) The U.S. very much regrets the recent OPEC price increase,

which we do not believe warranted by underlying market conditions or

by other considerations.

3) Prior to the OPEC meeting, we had made clear our desire that, if

an oil price increase could not be avoided, it should be an extremely

moderate one in order to minimize damage to international economic

recovery. The four-stage price increase just announced, culminating in

OPEC oil prices 14.5 percent higher nine months from now, cannot be

considered moderate in its impact on the world economy.

4) This large price hike clearly has prejudiced the U.S. and world

economic outlook, and will impede programs to maintain world eco-

nomic recovery and to reduce inflation.

5) The oil price increase will also unfavorably affect global trade. It

will not only impose the burden of additional import costs on all

oil-importing countries but will also reduce overall export opportu-

nities as economic growth becomes more difficult to achieve in all in-

dustrialized and oil-importing developing countries.

6) The strong reaction by other oil-consuming nations to the price

increase gives ample evidence of the serious and widespread concern

over the harm it will likely do to the achievement of the universal eco-

nomic goal of sustainable non-inflationary growth.

7) The OPEC members themselves have an important stake in the

world economy. They must share the responsibility for the success of

programs designed to improve payment balances, maintain economic

growth, and reduce inflation. We are disappointed, therefore, that

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D780539–0146.



Confidential. Drafted by James C. Todd (EB/ORF/FSE); cleared by Rosen, Bosworth,

Katz, Twinam, Solomon, and in NEA/RA; and approved by Cooper. Sent to Riyadh, Abu

Dhabi, Algiers, Baghdad, Caracas, Doha, Jakarta, Jidda, Kuwait, Lagos, Libreville, Quito,

Tehran, Tripoli, and Dhahran.

2

See footnote 2, Document 176.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 571

OPEC’s decision to date has not given adequate consideration to the

world economic situation, and the basic oil market conditions.

8) For Jidda: FYI—We are considering further approaches to the

Saudis concerning their production ceilings and the Iranian production

situation. But you should proceed now to make appropriate use of the

points in this message.

9) For Tehran: Department leaves to your judgment the advis-

ability of making an approach at this time.



Newsom

179. Telegram From the Embassy in Saudi Arabia to the

Department of State

1

Jidda, December 31, 1978, 0511Z.



9044. Subject: Aftermath of OPEC Price Increase. Ref: Jidda 8735.

2

1. We have attempted to reconstruct both the political and eco-



nomic happenings which led to the higher than expected OPEC price

increase at Abu Dhabi.

3

In this connection we have talked informally



with numerous Saudi officials as well as private sector Saudi business

persons who are generally knowledgeable about SAG policy matters.

2. We conclude that the following factors were primarily determi-

native of the final action taken at Abu Dhabi:

A) A conclusion reached early on that Saudi Arabia could not

withstand another split in OPEC ranks, and would at all costs avoid the

two-tier system which resulted from the Saudi action at Doha in 1976.

4

The Saudis were determined because of the 1976–77 experience to pre-



vent a recurrence.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D790001–0049.



Confidential. Repeated to Riyadh and Dhahran.

2

In telegram 8735 from Jidda, December 13, West reported that Yamani told him



that “the Saudi ultimate compromise position at the December 16 OPEC meeting would

be for a 5 percent increase on January 1 with subsequent periodic increases so that the to-

tal cost of oil for 1979 would be no more than 10 percent above that of 1978.” Yamani also

noted that “the feeling of most OPEC countries was strong and beginning to be bitter

toward Saudi Arabia for its stance for a freeze or modest increase” and pointed out “con-

ditions in Iran as substantially weakening the Saudi argument for a minimal increase.”

(Ibid., D780518–0104)

3

See footnote 2, Document 176.



4

See Document 113.



365-608/428-S/80010

572 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

B) The Saudis, therefore, were unwilling to face their OPEC col-

leagues alone; at the 1977 December meeting

5

they had the support,



which was essential to the ultimate action taken, of Iran. This year they

recognized that they would have no support from Iran and, in fact, the

Iranian situation undercut their influence and leverage at the OPEC

meeting.


C) Accordingly, in looking for other substantial support, they

turned to Kuwait. The general outline of the agreement was reached

during the visit of Kuwait’s Crown Prince approximately ten days

prior to the OPEC meeting. The Saudis gained what they considered to

be a major concession from Kuwait in having them agree to a phased-in

series of small increases rather than a single large increase at the begin-

ning of the year.

3. The agreement reached with Kuwait was essentially that there

be a phased-in price rise which would average 10 percent over the year.

This agreement was discussed and probably approved by the Oil Min-

ister of the UAE during a visit to Saudi Arabia immediately after the

Kuwaiti delegation departed.

4. The Saudis feel that the price increase as finally adopted was a

creditable achievement for them and the interests of the U.S., and point

out the following arguments which were being advanced by the other

OPEC countries as a reason for a much larger increase:

A) The report of the Economic Commission Board of OPEC report-

edly showed that the purchasing power of oil had declined 38 percent

since the last price increase (I have requested a copy of this report and

have been told that one would be made available).

B) All of the OPEC countries with the exception of Kuwait and

Libya, but specifically including Saudi Arabia, had negative cash flow

positions for 1978, and even with the projected increase there will prob-

ably be a similar situation existing in 1979.

5. There is some resentment being expressed by Saudi officials on

two points in connection with the increase:

A) The price characterization by the press of the increase as a 14.5

percent increase. At least two high Saudi officials have expressed re-

sentment at such characterization, pointing out that the increase for

1979 is only 10 percent (overlooking of course that the ultimate price in-

crease is the higher figure).

B) A feeling that the U.S. does not appreciate the efforts made by

the Saudis in holding the increase to what the Saudis consider to be an

acceptable level.

5

See footnote 2, Document 142.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 573

6. Comment:

A) The visits of Secretary Blumenthal and Senator Byrd

6

were, in


my judgement, most helpful in strengthening the Saudis’ resolve to

hold for a moderate increase. The principal reason assigned by the

Saudis for not keeping the increase at or below the 10 percent level is

the situation in Iran which continued to deteriorate rapidly in the days

just before the OPEC meeting.

B) Whether or not this was in fact the controlling reason for the

Saudis’ ultimate decision to compromise at a higher figure, we can use

this happening as an argument to the Saudis that they should make a

commitment now to increase substantially their productive capacity.

As long as they do not have productive capacity to compensate for a

sudden reduction in the world supply, then their influence on OPEC

measures is diminished as well as their leadership position in the Arab

world.

C) In my judgement the chances of any favorable change in the de-



cision reached at Abu Dhabi is small. If the Iranian situation stabilizes

and production returns to pre-crisis levels, and if the dollar

strengthens, we would then have some basis to ask Saudi Arabia to

take a lead position in postponing some of the proposed quarterly in-

creases. Even with these two favorable developments, however, it

would be difficult for Saudi Arabia to take this action in view of their

stated position, including the post-OPEC statement by Oil Minister

Yamani at Geneva.

7

The loss of face and the appearance of responding



to U.S. pressure are difficult to overcome.

8


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling