Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Action Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of State


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet59/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   ...   95

182. Action Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of State

for Economic and Business Affairs (Katz) to the Under

Secretary of State for Economic Affairs (Cooper)

1

Washington, January 15, 1979.



U.S. Oil Strategy Toward Saudi Arabia

Issue

The uncertain conditions in the world oil market, as a result of the

cessation of Iranian oil exports, emphasize the need to update our

strategy to encourage Saudi Arabia to continue to meet the world’s es-

sential energy needs.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P790016–0363. Se-



cret. Drafted by Todd on January 12 and concurred in by Crawford (NEA).

365-608/428-S/80010

584 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Our immediate objective is:

—to convince Saudi Arabia to continue to produce all the oil it can

to help offset the shortfall owing to the Iranian situation.

Over the longer term, we seek:

—to obtain a Saudi decision to expand production capacity more

rapidly; and

—to produce conditions propitious for a freeze of OPEC oil prices

in 1980.


Background and Analysis

The strikes in Iran’s oil sector, which began to interrupt oil exports

in late October, led other OPEC nations—particularly Saudi Arabia—to

produce higher than normal levels of oil in November and December.

Tight oil market conditions and uncertainty over the likely course of

events in Iran were important factors behind the Saudis’ failure to press

OPEC members to decide upon a lesser price increase at the December

16 meeting.

2

In normal circumstances, the world oil industry adjusts to seasonal



demand by building stocks during the second and third quarters of the

calendar year, and drawing down stocks during the first quarter and

part of the fourth. Since late December, the cessation of Iranian oil ex-

ports has withdrawn about 5.5 million barrels per day (mmb/d) from

normal oil supplies. Saudi Arabian production has increased to about

10.5 mmb/d, or 2 mmb/d more than would have been anticipated at

this time. Other OPEC members—primarily Kuwait and Iraq—have

also increased oil output, and there is ample economic incentive for

other oil producers to maximize output. We estimate that an additional

1 mmb/d is being supplied to the world oil market by producers other

than Saudi Arabia. The remaining “shortfall” of somewhat over 2

mmb/d is being met by drawing down stocks. World oil stocks were

very high late last year, partly as a result of seasonal stockbuilding and

partly owing to anticipatory purchases in advance of the expected

OPEC price increase.

With restoration of at least half of Iran’s normal exports within the

next few months and continued additional output by other producers,

oil market conditions will be manageable, though tight for the rest of

the year. Unless conditions improve more rapidly than now seems

likely, however, it would be futile to attempt to roll back any portion of

OPEC’s announced quarterly price hikes. A more feasible objective

would be to ensure that sufficient oil will be available to meet normal

2

See Documents 176 and 179.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 585

demand, avoid hoarding, reduce the chance for market-induced price

increases in the remainder of this year, and set the stage for a price

freeze in 1980.

In the immediate future, there is a danger that Saudi output

ceilings or other restrictions could reduce incremental oil output

needed to help offset the shortfall in Iranian exports. Since mid-1977,

Saudi Arabia has maintained a ceiling of 8.5 million barrels per day,

calculated as an annual average. Until the Iranian crisis, oil market de-

mand never tested this ceiling. The Saudis have publicly acknowl-

edged an obligation to meet the world’s essential oil needs and since

the cutback in Iranian exports have permitted Aramco to produce at

maximum sustainable levels.

A Saudi official recently warned Aramco, however, that Saudi

Arabia is considering application of the ceiling on a quarterly basis.

Aramco responded that this would impede its normal adjustments of

output to meet seasonal demand, as well as interfere with the current

all-out level in response to the Iranian cessation of exports. A series of

exchanges was inconclusive, though it ended with an acknowledge-

ment by a senior Saudi official that Aramco for the present could con-

tinue as before. Moreover, Deputy Petroleum Minister Khayyal, in a

conversation with our personnel in Dhahran, clearly implied that Saudi

Arabia would, at least in the near future, continue to produce over 8.5

mmb/d in order to help meet the Iranian shortfall without referring to

the ceiling.

3

Even when Iran’s production is restored in large measure, it will



be necessary for higher than normal liftings from Saudi Arabia to con-

tinue. Strict application of the Saudi ceiling could interfere with the sat-

isfaction of deferred demand and normal second and third quarter re-

building of stocks by the oil industry.

Because the Saudi output ceiling has in the past served as evidence

of their willingness to restrain production in order to maintain OPEC

prices, we should not expect them to abandon the ceiling publicly or

permanently. To do so might provoke cutbacks in production by other

OPEC members now helping to offset the Iranian shortfall, especially if

they suspected the Saudi action was a prelude to an attempt to freeze

oil prices next year. Thus our approaches should be made privately,

and we should not make any reference to the price issue while we urge

3

According to telegram 21697 to Riyadh, January 26, Aramco sources informed the



Department that Saudi Arabia formally notified the company that the 8.5 million barrels

per day production ceiling would be raised to 9.5 million for the first quarter and would

be applied on a monthly basis. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files,

P850027–2555)



365-608/428-S/80010

586 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

continued maximum production in response to the shortfall in Iranian

oil.


The current Iranian situation has driven home the dangers of a

world oil market with only 5 percent spare capacity. While Saudi pro-

duction capacity is adequate for foreseeable world demand over the

next few years, present Saudi conservation and investment policies

prevent the expansion of that capacity which will be necessary to meet

unexpected contingencies as well as essential world needs in the mid

and late 1980s. We must plan to discuss with some intensity with the

Saudis the need for increased investment in production capacity,

keeping in mind the danger that a premature approach might detract

from our efforts to encourage the continuation of maximum Saudi pro-

duction for a sustained period.

Tactics

Our immediate goal is to obtain continued maximum Saudi output

to offset the Iranian shortfall, stressing that this need does not end

when Iranian exports resume, but will continue for a further time in

order to enable the oil industry to replace abnormal stock drawdowns

and resume normal stock rebuilding. The attached cable

4

instructs Am-



bassador West to encourage such a Saudi response. The President was

advised to suggest that the Guadeloupe summit

5

countries also ap-



proach the Saudis in this regard. It would be useful if you could inform

their Finance Ministers that we will be making our approach shortly.

The next step is to impress upon the Saudis, particularly in light of

the fragility of the market balance revealed by the events in Iran, the

need to approve additional plans to expand production capacity, both

to maintain their own influence within OPEC and to be able to meet in-

creased world oil demand expected in the next few years. This step

should be taken by West in a low-key way. It may be desirable thereaf-

ter to reiterate it in a more direct way and at a high level, either by the

President if Crown Prince Fahd visits the U.S. soon, or by Secretary

Schlesinger if he undertakes a trip to Saudi Arabia later this spring.

If we are successful in obtaining Saudi agreement to high produc-

tion levels throughout the current year in response to the Iranian situa-

tion, and if they agree to commence investment in expanded produc-

tion capacity, this may set the stage for pressing for an OPEC price

freeze throughout 1980. Specific presentations on the price issue should

be withheld until later in the year unless conditions change markedly.

4

Attached but not printed.



5

See footnote 2, Document 183.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 587



Recommendation

That you approve the attached instructions for Ambassador West

as a first step in the implementation of our strategy.

6

6



A handwritten note dated January 15 reads: “Mr. Cooper requested several

changes in the cable and initialed off. Cable returned directly to EB for retyping and

transmission.” The cable is telegram 11004 to Jidda, January 15. (National Archives, RG

59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D790020–1041)



183. Memorandum From Rutherford Poats of the National

Security Council Staff to the President’s Assistant for

National Security Affairs (Brzezinski)

1

Washington, January 16, 1979.



SUBJECT

Follow-up to Guadeloupe Discussions on Oil

2

All concerned (in State, CIA, DOE and NSC) with forecasting Iran-



ian oil production agree that we should expect a prolonged and sub-

stantial shortfall, with a serious possibility of further use of the oil

weapon by contending Iranian political factions if not by a new gov-

ernment(s).

3

Management of Iranian production by foreign oil compa-



nies through expatriate technicians seems to be finished. The necessary

programs of investment in oil well rehabilitation and enhanced recov-

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Middle East File,



Box 121, Stoddard File, Oil, 11/77–11/79. Secret. Sent for information. Copies were sent

to Aaron, Owen, and Quandt. A notation on the first page reads: “ZB has seen.”

2

Carter met with Giscard, Schmidt, and Callaghan on the island of Guadeloupe



January 4–5 to address common issues, including the Iran crisis and the energy issues as-

sociated with it. On January 10, Brzezinski sent a memorandum to Aaron and Owen in-

forming them: “The four agreed informally that we would explore the possibility of ob-

taining an OPEC price increase stretch-out. The basic notion would be that the first price

increase would be delayed by three months; the second by some six months; etc. Our

allies are supposed to send messages along these lines to Saudi Arabia prior to the Fahd

visit to Washington.” (Ibid.)

3

On January 16, the Shah left Iran for Cairo, beginning what became a permanent



exile. Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomenei returned to Iran on February 1, after having been ex-

iled himself by the Shah for 15 years, and on February 11, the Bakhtiar government,

which Khomeni declared illegal, resigned. Documentation on the revolution in Iran is

scheduled for publication in Foreign Relations, 1977–1980, volume X, Iran: Revolution,

January 1977–November 1979.


365-608/428-S/80010

588 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

ery have been suspended for three months and are unlikely to resume

for at least another three months. Meanwhile, world oil stocks will be

drawn down, despite partially offsetting increases in other OPEC coun-

try exports.

Consequently, the world oil market will be tight through at least

the first half of 1979. In this situation, we cannot reasonably expect po-

litical appeals to the Saudis or market conditions to cause an under-

mining of the scheduled OPEC price increases. Our best hope is to

avoid real shortages by using the Iranian situation to persuade the Sau-

dis to set aside arbitrary production ceilings and to encourage their

Arabian Gulf neighbors to do the same.

State is sending an instruction to West to tell the Saudi government

that (1) we appreciate their authorization of Aramco’s continued pro-

duction at maximum levels (10.3 mmbd) to help offset the Iranian

shortfall, (2) even after Iran has resumed substantial oil exports there

will be a need for continued Saudi and other Arabian Gulf production

above normal limits to restock inventories, and (3) the Iranian case fur-

ther emphasizes the importance of expanding Saudi capacity.

4

I understand that Dick Cooper plans to suggest to his British,



French and German counterparts attending the OECD XCSS meeting

tomorrow that they use the first two points summarized above.

Saudi responses to these approaches will help define two issues for

the PRC meeting in preparation for the Fahd visit: whether and how to

press Fahd during the visit to commit to lifting the 8.5 mmbd limit for

all of 1979; and whether and how to influence a Saudi decision to pro-

ceed with the stalled investment program to raise capacity to 13 mmbd.

4

See Document 182. The instructions were sent to West in telegram 11004 to Jidda,



January 15; see footnote 6 thereto. On January 22, West reported that he had a 2-hour

meeting with Prince Fahd the previous day. Analyzing his meeting with the Crown

Prince, and one with Yamani the day before, he wrote: “Both [Fahd] and Yamani have

been extremely sensitive to USG’s criticism of the OPEC price increase and it was my

sense that he welcomed this opportunity to demonstrate once again SAG’s friendship

and concern. However, both Fahd and Yamani recognize the leverage they now have in

terms of supply because of Iran.” (Telegram 567 from Jidda; National Archives, RG 59,

Central Foreign Policy Files, D790031–1032)



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 589



184. Memorandum From Secretary of Defense Brown to Secretary

of State Vance

1

Washington, January 27, 1979.



Dear Cy,

In conjunction with preparations for the President’s trip to Mexico

and as a part of the ongoing review of our policies toward Mexico, I be-

lieve we should address, as a major issue of U.S. security interest, the

question of a broad petroleum agreement with Mexico.

I believe Mexican petroleum is, or should be, one of the basic

factors in our quest for an improved bilateral relationship. Our PRC de-

liberations in this area, however, have centered only on the narrow

subject of the importation of natural gas.

2

The deteriorating situation in Iran has magnified the serious ques-



tion of continuing availability of oil from the Persian Gulf in the future,

causing us to reexamine our military requirements and look for alterna-

tive sources of supply. Accordingly, our bilateral relations with Mexico

and ready access to Mexican oil have rapidly emerged as extremely im-

portant U.S. security interests.

The attached assessment

3

prepared by my Assistant Secretary for



Program Analysis and Evaluation provides a starting point for consid-

eration of our future requirements and how we should be attempting to

satisfy them. If we add to these concerns the potentially precarious po-

litical scenarios that could develop in the Persian Gulf area there is even

more reason for concern. Given these facts, prudence dictates ad-

dressing these issues prior to the President’s trip to Mexico. As Secre-

tary Schlesinger has recognized, the pace at which Mexico expands its

petroleum production is an important factor in the equation—one

which we should be working on at top levels in our bilateral

deliberations.

I believe that it is essential that we address this subject in the forth-

coming PRC meeting on Mexico, now scheduled for January 31.

Sincerely,

Harold

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Special Projects



File, Box 9, Henry Owen, Chron, 1/27–31/1979. Secret. A copy was sent to Brzezinski.

2

See footnote 2, Document 170. Another PRC meeting on Mexico was held on Janu-



ary 19. The Summary of Conclusions is attached to a February 2 memorandum from

Brzezinski to members of the Cabinet, informing them that the President had approved

the conclusions. None of the conclusions concerned energy, which would be the subject

of a future PRC meeting. (Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material,

North/South File, Box 32, Pastor Country Files, Mexico: PRM 41 (Policy, 12/78–1/79))

3

Attached but not printed.



365-608/428-S/80010

590 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



185. Memorandum From Rutherford Poats of the National

Security Council Staff to the President’s Assistant for

National Security Affairs (Brzezinski)

1

Washington, January 30, 1979.



SUBJECT

Urgent Presidential Message to Prince Fahd

Tony Solomon, Dick Cooper, Bill Quandt and I recommend that

the attached Presidential message, prepared in State/NEA and

amended here, be sent this morning to Prince Fahd. Its purpose is to nail

down our understanding of Fahd’s commitment to Secretary Kreps

2

on

oil production and pricing before Yamani or others cause him to re-



verse it or compromise it.

Briefly, the sequence of events was:

1. Yamani instructed ARAMCO to limit production to 9.5 mmbd

and to pay for the increment above the normal 8.5 mmbd limit at fourth

quarter 1979 prices, i.e., an increase of 9.5%.

3

2. Kreps asked Fahd about “rumors” of such a decision.



4

Fahd de-


nied the report and assured her and West that Saudi policy remained as

before: maximum sustainable production during the Iranian crisis and

at posted current OPEC prices.

3. West told Yamani of Fahd’s statement, and Yamani expressed

amazement because he said he had acted on written instructions from

Fahd. He said he would seek urgent clarification.

5

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Country



File, Box 67, Saudi Arabia, 1–3/79. Secret. Sent for action.

2

Secretary of Commerce Kreps visited Saudi Arabia at the end of January for dis-



cussions on trade.

3

See footnote 3, Document 182.



4

As reported in telegram 785 from Jidda, January 28. (National Archives, RG 59,

Central Foreign Policy Files, D790042–1228) Kreps also read aloud a message from Carter

to Fahd welcoming “the fact that Saudi Arabia has maintained its petroleum production

levels, thus helping to compensate for the Iranian shortfall.” The message continued:

“Given the tightness of the current market, our understanding is that Saudi Arabia will

continue production at full capacity levels. It is our further understanding that you will

continue to sell at the price schedules agreed upon at the OPEC meeting in Abu Dhabi. A

pricing change by Saudi Arabia would encourage other producers to increase their

prices, and could therefore lead to a general price increase above the OPEC level.” The

message concluded: “We therefore urge you, as a sincere friend, to reject any thoughts of

reducing production from recent high levels or accelerating the schedule of price in-

creases.” (Telegram 822 from Jidda, January 29; ibid., P850017–2222)

5

As reported in telegram 857 from Jidda, January 30. (Ibid., D790046–0109)



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 591

We know that others in the Saudi cabinet favor restricting produc-

tion and pressing other OPEC countries to increase production.

6

Libya


already is pushing prices up to fourth quarter levels. Saudi profiteering

on the Iranian situation would spread like wildfire through OPEC.

7

We need to bolster Fahd’s commitment before it is undermined by



his colleagues.

If you can’t clear this as a Presidential message during this

morning, Secretary Vance is prepared to send it.

Attachment

SUBJECT


Presidential Message on Saudi Oil Policy

Ambassador should deliver urgently following message from the

President to Crown Prince Fahd, provided, understanding expressed in

second paragraph is consistent with latest statement by Fahd of SAG’s

position.

Begin Quote:

Your Royal Highness:

I want you to know how delighted I am that we will be getting to-

gether in Washington in March. I very much look forward to that op-

portunity in view of the importance I attach to having a quite thorough

exchange of views on matters affecting the strong community of in-

terests between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United States.

In the meantime, I wish to express my appreciation of your deci-

sion to maintain Saudi Arabia’s oil production at maximum sustainable

capacity of over 10 million barrels daily and at OPEC first-quarter price

schedules. This will make a major contribution to world economic sta-

bility during the difficulties created by the Iranian situation.

Saudi Arabia’s wise decision is particularly important at this time

in view of our strong mutual interest in the strength of the dollar in

world markets. The dollar has weathered the pressures created by the

recent OPEC price decision and the Iranian problem and we now ex-

pect that it will maintain stability with some possibility for further re-

6

On February 1, West wrote: “Our apparently successful efforts to persuade Prince



Fahd to reverse the recent Saudi oil pricing decision may well be a pyrrhic victory. What-

ever the economic benefits may be to USG, and in the Saudi view they are infinitesimally

small, we will have exacerbated existing divisions within SAG and damaged further

Fahd’s credibility here.” (Telegram 1010 from Jidda; ibid., P850027–2583)

7

The Department instructed the Ambassador in Kuwait to seek similar assurances



on oil pricing from the Government of Kuwait. (Telegram 37743 to Kuwait, February 13;

ibid., P850011–1016)



365-608/428-S/80010

592 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

covery. Any unexpected increase in oil prices could have serious im-

pact on the dollar with consequences that we cannot fully foresee.

The constructive approach of Saudi Arabia to this problem will, I

am certain, have a significant and favorable impact on American and

world public opinion, and will lay an even stronger basis for the broad

cooperative relationship which I am dedicated to building between our

two countries.

Sincerely, Jimmy Carter



End Quote.

8

8



The message was not sent. A handwritten note at the top of the first page of the

covering memorandum by Poats reads: “ZB: Last minute telephone conversation with

West conveyed West’s belief that Fahd’s commitment will stick so no Presidential mes-

sage is necessary now. State/NEA is asking Vance whether he wants to proceed with this

message. He may call you. I still prefer Presidential message and Quandt will settle for

Vance message. RP” Above Poats’s note, another note in an unknown hand reads: “ZB

agrees message should not be sent at this time.”


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 593



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling