Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet6/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   95

2.

Memorandum of Conversation

1

Washington, August 17, 1974.



PARTICIPANTS

President Ford

Dr. Henry A. Kissinger, Secretary of State and Assistant to the President for

National Security Affairs

Lt. General Brent Scowcroft, Deputy Assistant to the President for National

Security Affairs

Kissinger: On the energy situation, we have to find a way to break

the cartel.

2

We can’t do it without cooperation with the other con-



sumers. It is intolerable that countries of 40 million can blackmail 800

million people in the industrial world.

We have to get into position carefully so we don’t get out ahead

and our allies don’t move in to pick up the pieces and get an economic

advantage. That was the purpose of the Washington Energy Confer-

ence.


3

We are getting the IEP by the end of September. It is effective

only against a selective embargo and it creates a framework for com-

munication. The Europeans probably think we should use it only

passively.

Simon wants a confrontation with the Shah. He thinks the Saudis

would reduce prices if the Shah would go along. I doubt the Saudis

want to get out in front. Also the Saudis belong to the most feckless and

gutless of the Arabs. They have maneuvered skillfully. I think they are

trying to tell us—they said they would have an auction—it will never

come off. They won’t tell us they can live with lower prices but they

won’t fight for them. They would be jumped on by the radicals if they

got in front.

The Shah is a tough, mean guy. But he is our real friend. He is the

only one who would stand up to the Soviet Union. We need him for

balance against India. We can’t tackle him without breaking him. We

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Memoranda of Conversations,



Box 5. Secret; Nodis. The meeting was held in the Oval Office and lasted from 9:45 to

10:15 a.m. (Ibid., White House Office Files, President’s Daily Diary)

2

The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).



3

The Washington Energy Conference of the major industrialized nations, including

the United States, the United Kingdom, West Germany, Japan, and France—a reluctant

participant—was convened at the Department of State in February to develop common

energy policies in response to the Arab oil embargo precipitated by the Arab-Israeli war

of October 1973. At the conference, which revealed the extent of Franco-American dis-

cord over whether the European Community should even coordinate energy policy with

Washington, the United States proposed that a permanent organization of energy-

consuming states be created. See Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, volume XXXVI, Energy

Crisis, 1969–1974, Document 318.



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 13

can get to him by cutting military supplies, and the French would be

delighted to replace them.

President: He didn’t join the embargo.

Kissinger: Right. Simon agrees now, though. The strategy of tack-

ling the Shah won’t work. We are now thinking of other ways. First, we

have to get the IEP going. Second, we have to use the Library Group,

4

an informal finance group which is meeting on 7 September to raise the



problem of oil prices and work for a coherent structure to deal with it.

Third, there is a meeting of the IMF board at the end of September, and

the UN Foreign Ministers will be here. We thought of assembling the

Finance and Foreign Ministers then and put a more daring action pro-

gram to them. It will be refused—like the February Energy Conference.

France won’t go along. That is okay, because in six months they will be

eager to join. If there is a crisis, we will be out in front and can organize

it. We will get some cooperation, though.

But as a precondition, we need to get our own energy program in

hand. Conservation has gone by the board. If we don’t show a

shrinkage; our allies won’t. There is a forty percent chance of a Middle

East blowup.

President: There is no problem getting conservation started again,

but the coal moratorium is a problem. Maybe that gives us a lever to get

conservation going again.

Kissinger: If the public focuses on the fact this is not just a coal

strike but an energy crisis.

President: We don’t have to attack the workers but show it as an

illustration of the energy problems.

Kissinger: Everyone now agrees on the necessity of what we pro-

posed at the Washington Energy Conference.

President: The conservationists are launching an offensive and this

would give us a chance to fight against it on grounds the crisis

continues.

When the consumers get organized and we start dealing with the

producers—if it worked as you wish—what would you do?

Kissinger: We are organizing the consumers. Then we are orga-

nizing bilateral commissions to tie their economies as closely to us as

possible. So we have leverage and the Europeans can’t just move in in a

crisis. We want to tie up their capital.

When the Shah sees us organizing the consumers—he will see, if

we don’t do it in a way appearing threatening to him.

4

See footnote 4, Document 1.



365-608/428-S/80010

14 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

I perhaps should visit him in October, in connection with the So-

viet trip, and talk about bilateral arrangements.

President: Does he want higher prices?

Kissinger: Yes. He has limited supplies. He knows the profit is

higher on petrochemicals and that the Saudis get more from the com-

panies in everything.

We won’t be in a position to confront the producers before the

middle of 1975. We have got to get rolling.

President: We have the Alaskan pipeline, and ERDA. I’m glad

Scoop


5

moved.


Kissinger: We called him yesterday and he was conciliatory. You

might consider talking to him again next week. I told Dinitz he had to

help us here and that Rabin had to come in early September.

President: We have to give Scoop his amendment.

6

Kissinger: If you get waiver authority, that Congress would have



to veto, it’s okay.

President: What he wants is his amendment. The supporters don’t

understand the waiver authority.

Kissinger: The Soviet Union won’t buy going in every year for leg-

islation. They will complain about this, but will go along with it.

A Member of Congress last night said they want a compromise.

President: If we can pull it off and get the bill, it is the best thing we

can do.


Kissinger: Next week you will be hit with a recommendation for

export controls. I would like a chance to comment.

President: I notice the Japanese are buying heavily.

Kissinger: That is the problem. It leads to scare buying—like sur-

pluses. Commodities are one of our big foreign policy tools.

President: Who is for it?

Kissinger: Not Butz. I think OMB and Treasury.

I will have a paper for you on Monday.

7

I want to ensure it won’t



be decided on domestic grounds alone.

President: It won’t be.

5

Senator Henry “Scoop” Jackson (D–WA), Chairman of the Senate Committee on



Interior and Insular Affairs, which later became the Committee on Energy and Natural

Resources.

6

Jackson wanted to attach an amendment on emigration from the Soviet Union to



the trade bill stalled in the Senate.

7

August 19. The paper was not found. An undated August memorandum from



Kissinger to Ford on “Oil Strategy” is in the Ford Library, National Security Adviser,

Presidential Subject File, Box 4, Energy (2).



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 15



3.

Telegram From the Embassy in Saudi Arabia to the

Department of State

1

Jidda, September 3, 1974, 1000Z.



5074. Subject: Yamani’s Displeasure at Lack of U.S. Action on Oil

Auction. Ref: (A) Jidda 4431; (B) State 182093.

2

Summary: Minister of Petroleum Yamani believes it would be



worthwhile for Ambassador to visit Fahd in London or Cannes and

make a final appeal that oil auction be held. Yamani feels USG has not

tried hard to support Saudi Arabia’s efforts for a reduction in oil prices.

He wonders if we are in fact trying to provoke a consumer/producer

confrontation to better organize consumers against OPEC. Ambassa-

dor believes he should make approach to Fahd as recommended by

Yamani. Approach will probably not succeed and even if an auction

should be held its long-term effects might not be very significant. A

strong de´marche to Fahd, however, would at least harden Saudi re-

solve to keep oil prices constant, which would be of considerable help

in face of present inflation. End summary.

1. Ahmad Zaki Yamani, Saudi Minister of Petroleum, asked me

why I had not gone to London to try to convince Prince Fahd (Saudi

Minister of the Interior and Chairman of the Supreme Oil Council) to

hold the oil auction. He said he thought there was still a chance that the

decision to cancel the auction could be reversed and indicated I was the

only one Fahd would listen to (Ref A).

2. I told him Fahd was expected back from London vacation soon

and I would talk with him then. He replied that the decision on the auc-

tion must be made before the OPEC meeting September 8 and Fahd

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D740243–0333. Se-



cret; Niact; Immediate; Exdis. Repeated to London and Dhahran.

2

In telegram 4431 from Jidda, July 30, the Embassy reported that Yamani “was



having great difficulties” in getting an oil auction organized. He had hoped that the com-

petitive bidding process of an auction would lower the price of oil without reducing the

rents paid to producers but instead cutting into the profit margins of the major oil com-

panies. Yamani was opposed by the Abu Dhabi Minister of Petroleum, the Shah, and

Fahd, who wanted to sell oil directly to individual companies so that they could, as

Yamani phrased it, “get their hands on vast quantities of oil and cream off substantial

commissions for themselves.” (Ibid.) Telegram 182093 to Geneva and London, August 20,

noted that Yamani would probably soon unveil a proposal for a “‘mini-conference’ of oil

producers and consumers” and instructed the Mission in Geneva not to “solicit or en-

courage discussion of such a conference, but rather remain entirely in a reactive posture.”

(Ibid.)


365-608/428-S/80010

16 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

will not be back in the Kingdom before the middle of the month. He

asked that we reconsider and that I make a special trip to London or

Cannes to see Fahd.

3. He then asked about our approaches to the King. I said I in-

tended to see His Majesty. I had briefed Congressman Wyatt

3

on the



subject; Wyatt had raised it with the King, but the King did not re-

spond. I will raise it with the King when I see him—I hope during the

coming week. Yamani was pleased and asked if we had coordinated

this with Britain, France and Germany; would their Ambassadors be

making similar de´marches? I said the Europeans could, of course, do

what they wanted, but we had decided that it was probably premature

to make a strong joint approach (Ref B).

4. Yamani blew up. He said Saudi Arabia and he in particular had

done everything they could to reduce oil prices. He had asked me re-

peatedly for assistance and he had gotten very little. He had asked that

the USG make approaches to the other OPEC countries; he now had

full reports of these meetings. All the Americans did, he said, was to

say mildly to the governments how nice it would be if prices were to be

decreased; there were no threats, no intimations of affecting relations;

nothing, in short, that could convince any OPEC government, except

Saudi Arabia, that we were serious about prices. He referred to my

elaborate presentations and detailed analyses of what the oil costs

would do to the U.S. and other countries, and asked why we had not

made such presentations in “Iran or anyplace else”.

5. He said that in Quito the consensus was to raise oil prices by

$3.00/barrel, and only Saudi Arabia’s efforts frustrated this.

4

There



had been, indeed, several official U.S. expressions of gratitude to

Saudi Arabia for its work, but there had been no recognition in the U.S.

press.

6. Now, he said, he was forced to conclude that we did not want



any decrease; we probably really wanted a further increase in prices in

order to provoke a confrontation between consumers and producers. If

prices jumped sharply again, he said, it would make it much easier for

us to organize the consumers in a bloc against OPEC.

3

Representative Wendell Wyatt (R–OR).



4

At the 40th OPEC conference, held in Quito June 15–17, the participants agreed to

raise the royalty rate on oil sales from 12.5 to 14.5 percent but not the price of petroleum

itself for the next 3 months. Those who advocated an increase in the royalty rate wanted

to prevent inflation from eroding the purchasing power of their revenues. (Skeet, OPEC:

Twenty-Five Years of Prices and Politics

, p. 112) The communique´ issued at the conclusion

of the conference was transmitted in telegram 4044 from Quito, June 17. (National Ar-

chives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D740157–0952)



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 17

7. I told him he had flipped. We might not have handled the price

question as smoothly as he would have liked. And we certainly hadn’t

been as successful in other OPEC capitals as either of us would have

liked. But we did try and we would continue trying. And what possible

purpose could we have in provoking confrontation? The high oil prices

were ruining much of the world; this could scarcely benefit us. He said

he was sorry, but in light of the information I had just given him, he

doubted if we had tried or would try very hard to reduce prices. As for

our motives, he said, they had been suggested before; he hadn’t be-

lieved them then, but was forced to wonder. (He did not specify but

was referring to reports last winter that we were preparing US-

European invasion force to occupy the oil fields of Arabia.)

8. Comment: Yamani is obviously disappointed that his plan to re-

duce oil prices has been frustrated by Prince Fahd and probably others

in the Saudi Government. And he is angry that we appear not to be

giving him the support he thinks he deserves. But I do not believe that

the auction would really establish a new world market price for oil. It

would indeed have an important psychological effect; it would enable

us to tell other oil producers that a “correct” price for oil had been es-

tablished, but it wouldn’t have been effective very long.

9. I am inclined to believe Saudi Arabia is bluffing regarding the

auction. If it had its auction and if the new price is $8.00/barrel, I am

sure all other OPEC countries will say fine, we will continue selling

ours for $11.00/barrel. There is no doubt what would then happen; the

world would continue paying $11.00; Saudi Arabia could not increase

its production fast enough to take away markets (even if it wanted to)

and Yamani’s enemies in the country would point out that Saudi Ara-

bia had lost billions; the consumers had not profited and the buyers of

Saudi oil had seen their profits multiplied. There would not be a second

auction.


10. Nonetheless, bluffs frequently work; OPEC is quite clearly still

frightened of the Saudi potential. The rulers of Iran, Algeria and Ku-

wait and others would not have appealed to King Faisal not to hold the

auction, if they had been sure it would fail. Accordingly, I think we

must give Yamani as much support as we can.

11. Action Requested: (A) That I be instructed to see Fahd immedi-

ately; review the world’s financial problems, and ask him to do what he

can to hold the oil auction. A special trip to him would demonstrate the

depth of our concern.

(B) That we reconsider our position on asking the British, French,

and Germans to make supportive de´marches to the King.


365-608/428-S/80010

18 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

(C) That we make a very strong approach to the Shah—not a lesser

official—and that I be authorized to give the details of this de´marche to

the Saudis.

5

12. Conclusion: Assuming that all these efforts fail (and I would es-



timate their chances of success as small) we would have demonstrated

more fully our determination to reduce prices, and we could at least

hope that the compromise proposed by the Saudis of freezing oil prices

for a “long time” would be more generally acceptable to OPEC. In a pe-

riod when the cost of OPEC’s imports are increasing by 10–20 percent

per year, constant oil prices would be a considerable achievement.



Akins

5

The Department ruled against meeting Fahd in London, noting: “it could well be



embarrassing to SAG to be seen to have American Ambassador make such an unusual

visit against the background of current controversy over prices and the forthcoming

OPEC meeting.” Akins was also reminded that Ford had “recently written to King Faisal

and in course of that letter made certain remarks on the ramifications of the high level of

petroleum prices,” as Yamani had asked. (Telegram 193332 to Jidda, September 4; ibid.)

The August 29 letter from Ford to Faisal is in telegram 192483 to Jidda, September 1; Ford

Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Correspondence with Foreign Leaders,

Box 4, Saudi Arabia—King Faisal.



4.

Memorandum From Secretary of State Kissinger to

President Ford

1

Washington, September 6, 1974.



SUBJECT

Ambassador Helms Assessment of Situation in Near East and South Asia

When Richard Helms took up his post as our Ambassador to Iran,

we asked him to keep watch over developments in the entire region

stretching from Iraq, Iran, the Arabian Peninsula, Persian Gulf, and Af-

ghanistan, to India and Pakistan. Ambassador Helms has just sent me

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, “Outside the System” Chrono-



logical Files, Box 1. Secret; Sensitive. Sent for information. Ford initialed the

memorandum.



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 19

his annual assessment of developments and prospects in this region. (A

reference map of the region is at Tab A.)

2

1. The Price of Oil: With oil selling at four times its October 1973



price, stabilizing the price of oil must be ranked as one of the critical

problems in the area. As Helms notes, the future of oil prices depends

on the success of our endeavors for a peaceful Arab-Israeli settlement.

We must stabilize the price of oil, Helms is convinced. We cannot

accomplish this by using the Saudis, he believes, because they probably

cannot be so used; we cannot achieve it by threatening the Shah, be-

cause this only makes him less willing to compromise. Helms, who

knows the Shah well, believes that the Shah is “not an unreasonable

man” and can see himself the calamitous consequences of an economic

collapse in the West.

We should therefore try to make clear to the Shah the ruinous ef-

fects of the excessive oil prices. We should also try, Helms suggests, to

get the Chinese to make the same point to the Shah. This is not a

far-fetched suggestion. The Chinese (who are good friends of the Shah)

should hardly welcome an economic collapse of Western Europe which

would free Soviet forces for redeployment in China’s direction.

[Omitted here is discussion of “India–Pakistan–Iran Relations,”

“The Indian Nuclear Test,” “The New U.S. Rapprochement with Egypt

and Syria,” “Persian Gulf and Indian Ocean,” “Iraq,” and “China’s

Role.”]


2

Helms’s assessment is in backchannel message 966 from Tehran, August 25. (Ibid.,

National Security Adviser, Backchannel Messages, Box 4, Middle East/Africa) Tab A is

attached but not printed.



365-608/428-S/80010

20 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



5.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

Saudi Arabia

1

Washington, September 16, 1974, 1551Z.



203063. Subject: Appreciation for Saudi Position at OPEC. Ref:

Jidda 5305.

2

1. Ambassador should convey in manner he deems most appro-



priate to His Majesty King Faisal President Ford’s appreciation for the

courageous and statesmanlike position taken by Saudi Arabia at the

OPEC conference in Vienna.

3

2. The President quite understands the point made in His Maj-



esty’s letter of September 11 that other oil exporters are behaving in a

less responsible manner, and we have let our views be known both

publicly and privately. What is required is continuing understanding

that we live in an interdependent world and that the free world will

suffer if measures are taken to prevent market forces from determining

a fair price for oil. We fear that unless there is a statesmanlike approach

on oil prices, the alternative will be a confrontation between consumer

and producer countries, given the need for oil to help fuel the world’s

economy.

3. The President appreciates the burdens that are now being thrust

on Saudi Arabia because of the heavy responsibility it bears for the free

world’s economic health.

This is a responsibility, however, which Saudi Arabia derives from

the position of leadership which the Kingdom now occupies and from

the value it places in the prosperity, well being, and security of the free

world.


4. FYI: We are not coming out publicly to pat Saudis on the back

because we know they are sensitive to charges of being an American

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D740258–1032. Se-



cret; Immediate; Exdis. Drafted by Francois M. Dickman (NEA/ARP); cleared by Ather-

ton, Katz, and Scowcroft; and approved by Kissinger.

2

Telegram 5305 from Jidda, September 13, transmitted a September 11 letter from



Faisal thanking Ford for his August 29 message and commenting: “all of the OPEC states

are standing against us with regard to lowering the prices which we have suggested—be-

cause they wish them to increase steadily. But after long discussions with Algeria and

Iran it has been agreed to freeze the current price for a further period. We ask that you get

in touch with your friends from among the OPEC states and particularly Iran and Algeria

to support our position with regard to lowering the price.” (Ibid., D740256–0455) For

Ford’s August 29 message, see footnote 5, Document 3.

3

At the 38th OPEC conference, held in Vienna March 16–17, the participants agreed



not to raise the price of oil over the next 3-month period. Faisal informed Akins before

the meeting that he would instruct Yamani to try to lower prices and “to compromise

only to the extent of freezing prices.” According to the Ambassador, numerous reports

confirmed that Yamani “fought hard to carry out his instructions.” (Telegram 5411

from Jidda, September 17; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files,

D740260–0255)



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 21

tool on oil policy matters. However, we are quite prepared to do so if

Embassy believes Saudis would welcome this.

4

End FYI.


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling