Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Memorandum From Henry Owen of the National Security


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet66/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   ...   95

206. Memorandum From Henry Owen of the National Security

Council Staff to President Carter

1

Washington, May 18, 1979.



SUBJECT

Energy and the Summit

A dinner discussion last night with other heads of governments’

personal Summit representatives leads me to suggest that we should

submit to them both of the energy proposals now being submitted to

you:


—The Solomon proposal for an international public corporation to

finance the development of alternative energy sources that Mike Blu-

menthal, Cy Vance, Jim Schlesinger, and I have put to you.

2

—The proposal for an international agency without funds but with



the mission of mobilizing support for alternative energy prospects that

OMB is submitting to you.

3

The other personal representatives say that each of their heads of



government believes that agreement and action on energy should be

the centerpiece of the Tokyo Summit (Giscard has written Ohira in this

sense). The other representatives are, as usual, looking to the US for

ideas as to how to translate this interest into action. Whatever ideas we

submit will be discussed by the group and then probably refined into

options among which the heads of government can choose. Hence this

seems to me the time to canvas the field of possibilities, not to narrow it

by submitting only the idea that State, Treasury, and DOE favor, or only

the OMB proposal. We will get the best result if the preparatory group

looks at the entire range of possibilities, and then tries to define the op-

tions for review by you and the other heads of government.

Recommendation

That you authorize me to submit both the State–Treasury–DOE

and the OMB proposals to the Summit Preparatory Group.

4

1



Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Special Projects

File, Box 11, Henry Owen, Chron: 5/18–28/79. Confidential. Sent for action.

2

See Document 205.



3

See footnote 5, Document 205.

4

Neither the Approve nor Disapprove option is checked. Brzezinski wrote at the



top of the page: “HO, just do it on an informal basis, to take soundings. ZB”

365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 651



207. Memorandum From the President’s Assistant for Domestic

Affairs and Policy (Eizenstat) to the President’s Assistant for

National Security Affairs (Brzezinski)

1

Washington, May 19, 1979.



SUBJECT

Policy Toward OPEC

As you know, the economic stability and strength of this country is

now dependent in good measure on OPEC oil pricing decisions. Ad-

verse OPEC pricing decisions can break the back of our anti-inflation

program and jeopardize prospects for continued economic growth and

high employment.

I believe that the perception of our own citizens, and a source of

their frustration with whatever Administration is in office, is that the

U.S. passively acquiesces in, and acts thankful for, whatever decisions

the cartel happens to reach. I think we should study (on a confidential,

high-priority basis) the feasibility of a more effective policy toward the

pricing actions of the cartel itself and its individual members, particu-

larly those (e.g., Venezuela) which have been heavily dependent on the

United States. I know that such studies have been undertaken by prior

Administrations to little end, but I think we should try again and

harder. There must be some stance the U.S. can take between acquies-

cence and military intervention and some diplomatic/economic levers

we can utilize to achieve better results.

Would you please convene a meeting of Secretaries Vance, Brown,

Blumenthal, and Schlesinger to consider this matter? If you think this

would be worthwhile (and I hope you do), then I would like to be

included.

2

1



Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Subject File,

Box 48, Oil, 3–6/79. Administratively Confidential.

2

On May 22, Brzezinski responded: “Your proposal is indeed worthwhile. We have



had the issues of OPEC pricing and supply under review for some time. Let me review

those plans with your suggestion in mind and on that basis convene a meeting in which

you would of course take part.” (Ibid.) See Document 209.


365-608/428-S/80010

652 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



208. Editorial Note

The Energy Ministers of the member states of the International En-

ergy Agency convened in Paris May 21–22, 1979. The group observed

that the oil market was extremely tight and concluded that it would

likely remain so through the 1980s. While the Ministers noted that the

member countries had substantially strengthened their energy pro-

grams, they also believed that they should make additional efforts to

strengthen these programs. An earlier decision to enact measures to re-

duce IEA demand for oil on the world market by 2 million barrels per

day was confirmed, and the Energy Ministers decided that it would be

necessary to continue such efforts in the following year. In addition,

they agreed on a set of principles and policies for enhancing coal utili-

zation, production, and trade, and stressed the importance of natural

gas, nuclear power, and conservation for reducing oil import depend-

ence. (Telegram 135815 to all diplomatic posts, May 26; National Ar-

chives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D790240–0976) The meet-

ing’s final communique´ was transmitted in telegram 16460 from Paris,

May 22. (Ibid., D790232–0857) The communique´ is printed in Scott, The



History of the International Energy Agency,

volume III, pages 358–363.



209. Memorandum From Secretary of the Treasury Blumenthal

and Henry Owen of the National Security Council Staff to

President Carter

1

Washington, May 25, 1979.



SUBJECT

Oil Prices

You asked us for preliminary thoughts about possible approaches

to the oil-pricing problem.

We met Thursday

2

with Zbig and a group of your senior advisers



to discuss prospects and remedies. This memorandum summarizes

that discussion, and outlines how we intend to proceed.

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Special Projects



File, Box 11, Henry Owen, Chron, 5/18–28/79. Secret. Sent for information.

2

May 24.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 653

Oil prices are rising rapidly and the rate of their rise could increase

still further. The exporters have learned how to earn more by pro-

ducing less, and the oil importers haven’t yet acted to reduce their reli-

ance on oil imports. US inflation, unemployment, and external ac-

counts could be worse than our present “worst case” projections

suggest. Effects on the world economy would also be highly adverse.

Possible responses to this problem include:

I. Measures by Oil Importers to Affect the Market

1. Measures to restrain demand. Such measures are, as you know,

being considered as part of preparations for the Summit, notably an ex-

tension of the IEA 5% cut into 1980 and a specification of the measures

that each country will take to achieve this cut.

2. Measures to increase production. This involves national actions,

e.g., moving ahead with nuclear power and tempering environmental

regulations to permit increased use of coal; some of these actions could

have early effects. It also involves international cooperation to mobilize

resources for development of alternative energy sources; most of these

actions would have only long-term effects. (As part of Summit prepara-

tions, we have given you a Treasury–DOE–State proposal

3

to this end.)



3. Control over purchasing. This could include unilateral efforts to

improve the US position, e.g., centralized purchasing of oil imports. It

could also include agreement by the oil-importing countries to boycott

the spot market; this would involve a deeper cut in oil imports for some

countries than envisaged under the presently pledged 5% reduction. It

would, therefore, have to be accompanied by a decision to set in motion

the agreed international contingency plan for allocating scarce oil sup-

plies among industrialized countries, which none of the other

oil-importing countries want. Each of these actions would run into very

serious legal, administrative, and probably political obstacles.



II. Agreements with Oil Exporters

4. Separate bilateral deals with individual oil-exporting countries to

guarantee supplies for the United States. This would violate IEA rules

and risk triggering self-defeating competition among oil-importing

countries.

5. Separate agreement with Saudi Arabia, to assure higher levels of

present production and of investment to increase capacity for future

production. This agreement could be sought by the United States alone,

or by several industrial countries together. It is at least uncertain

whether such an agreement could be secured without giving Saudi

Arabia assurances regarding the West Bank and Jerusalem.

3

See Document 205.



365-608/428-S/80010

654 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

6. A long-term collective agreement between oil-importing and ex-

porting countries, which would guarantee adequate oil exports in re-

turn for gradually rising real prices and possibly other specified eco-

nomic favors from the industrial countries. It will be difficult to

persuade the main oil exporters to join such an agreement unless they

become worried about the possibility of a future softening in the oil

market. This will only happen if the industrial countries reduce their oil

imports. Domestically, it would be difficult to sell an agreement that

would guarantee OPEC the kind of steep price increase that would

probably be involved.



III. Joint Counter-Action By Industrial Countries

7. The industrial countries might collectively tax or embargo cer-

tain categories of exports to the OPEC countries, relating such actions

to OPEC price increases. (Export taxes raise constitutional problems in

the United States.) It is possible to think of other actions along these

lines. Any such measures would only be effective if virtually all indus-

trial countries joined in. So far, other industrial countries have been un-

willing even to contemplate “confrontation”.

As you can see, the obstacles to these measures, other than those to

reduce demand and increase output—which we are already consid-

ering, are very great. Most of them have been examined, or discussed

with other countries, in the past. Nonetheless, we believe that the situa-

tion is sufficiently serious to warrant close examination of every

possibility.

We will submit to you within ten days a paper outlining prospects

and possible courses of action. Ed Fried, whom you may remember

from the campaign (he was then at Brookings) and who is now US Ex-

ecutive Director of the World Bank, will work full time on its prepara-

tion. He will work closely with Jack O’Leary, Tony Solomon, Dick

Cooper, Henry Owen, and others under the supervision of Mike Blu-

menthal. We will consult outside experts, as well.

Proposals for vigorous action will be hard to sell other industrial

countries. If we come up with such proposals, we should plan to talk to

Schmidt when he is here; and to the French Energy Minister who will

visit Washington at the same time. We may also want to visit Thatcher

and Giscard thereafter, in an effort to secure their agreement to any

proposals that look promising.


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 655



210. Memorandum From the Military Assistant to the President’s

Assistant for National Security Affairs (Odom) to the

President’s Assistant for National Security Affairs

(Brzezinski)

1

Washington, May 31, 1979.



SUBJECT

Oil Policy: Sense and Nonsense

The staff meeting discussion on oil today

2

provokes me to make



some points which have been lost in a lot of nonsense talk.

Supply and demand.

These remain the key variables. We cannot af-

fect supply greatly in the short turn, but decontrol will not reduce

supply, and it might increase it. Demand, therefore, is the key variable

for our policy in the coming months and year. We can affect demand in

the following ways: (a) pricing; (b) administrative allocation system.



—Administrative ways to allocate:

First, gas rationing can be used,

but that will affect only auto transport, not other types of demand.

Second, we could use the French approach, set a maximum import

level and disallow imports above that quantity. This would limit use by

all kinds of consumers. There are other possibilities, but these are the

familiar administrative tricks for regulating demand administratively.

Administrative approaches are unlikely to induce a rational domestic

economic adaptation to decreased supply.

—Pricing:

If the price goes high enough, demand will drop. There

are two ways to push up the price rapidly. First, let the present OPEC

dynamic drive up the price. Second, use present statutory authority un-

der which the President can impose an import tax on oil. We cannot

easily avoid the first effect of OPEC’s actions and the probable drop in

world oil production (Iran, etc.) We have a choice, however, about use of

the second way.

If the President were to impose an import tax on all oil, and a large

one,

two-to-five dollars per barrel, it would have the following highly

desirable effects:

(a) It would cause a large price rise which at some point would re-



duce domestic consumption,

driving out the least profitable consumption.

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Subject File,



Box 48, Oil, 3–6/79. Confidential. Sent for information. Brzezinski wrote “good” at the

top of the first page.

2

No record of this meeting has been found.



365-608/428-S/80010

656 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

(b) It would reduce the flow of dollars abroad. It would put them

into the U.S. Treasury rather than into foreign bank accounts. This ad-

vantage is of enormous importance. The tax receipts might well make it

possible for the President to balance the budget, and in any event, it

would put large fiscal power into his hands (for Defense, HEW). At the

same time, it would reduce the trade deficit.

(c) The impact on our allies would be strong and positive: we

would signal our seriousness about the problem, our seriousness about



international monetary affairs,

and about our concern with vulnerability to



foreign supply.

(d) It could, after a time, cause some OPEC producers to reduce



prices.

It might even break up OPEC.

(e) It should expedite the search for alternate sources of energy—

gas from coal, shale, etc.

There are a number of counter-arguments but none very compel-

ling. For example:

(a) An import tax would fuel domestic inflation. Not so. To tax is to

take money out of circulation. That is deflationary. Inflation could only

come from the “transfer” of this money through government spending.

(b) It would penalize the “wrong” people. This argument begs the

larger issue: everyone is being punished by inflation and the growing

trade deficit. How do we best attack that structural problem? By a

market-wide price adjustment for oil, forcing an economic rational-

izing response throughout the economy. Protecting the “right” people

through gas rationing, etc., retains the dysfunctional structural rigidity.

(c) It will induce a recession. This is a valid argument, but it has be-

come a moot one. We are heading into a recession this summer or fall.

The unhappy reality of the energy crisis is that economic recession is in-

evitable until new sources of energy are found.

Of course, de-regulation must accompany a policy of taxing oil im-

ports. Finally, the most politically compelling feature of this oil import

tax approach is that it combines its simplicity and boldness with a com-

prehensive solution. It hits everyone and allows no one, not the Arabs,

not the oil companies, not the consumer, to escape the reality of an en-

ergy shortage. At the same time, it increases the premium on new en-

ergy sources and gives the Government more fiscal control.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 657



211. Memorandum From Henry Owen of the National Security

Council Staff to President Carter

1

Washington, May 31, 1979.



SUBJECT

Summit Energy Initiative

1. Problem. Recently you reviewed alternative State–DOE–

Treasury and OMB proposals for international support of development

of alternative energy sources, indicated your preference, and said that

any consultation with other Summit countries should be tentative.

2

We

have consulted on that basis. It is clear from this consultation that no in-



itiative will be seriously considered by other Summit countries unless

they know what the US Government’s position is. We need to commu-

nicate that position this week to the other Summit countries’ planners,

so as to get decisions in time for the final Summit declaration-drafting

session on June 15.

2. Background. We need at the Tokyo Summit to act on two fronts:

restraint of oil consumption to meet the short-term problem, and ac-

celerated development of alternative energy sources to deal with the

longer-term problem. First priority should go to immediate oil demand

restraint, about which I am writing you separately.

3

But if that’s all we



do at Tokyo, the Summit’s only message will be one of belt-tightening;

there will be no light at the end of the tunnel. To generate longer-term

hope of reducing our dependence on the OPEC cartel, we need to take

some visible and promising action on the production front. (See at-

tached article by Art Okun at Tab A.)

4

We have tentatively sounded out other Economic Summit gov-



ernments on two proposals to this end: an International Energy Finance

Corporation, which would lend capital to the first commercial-scale

projects using promising technologies; and an unfunded international

consultative body to promote such projects, as proposed by OMB. Your

cool reaction to the corporation proposal sets that idea aside. Finance

ministries of at least two other governments were also opposed to

creating such a corporation now. The Japanese doubt that we can get

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Special Projects



File, Box 32, Henry Owen, Summit: Tokyo. Confidential. Sent for action. Initialed by

Carter and Brzezinski.

2

See Document 205.



3

Not found.

4

Not found. In this paragraph Carter underlined “belt-tightening” and wrote in the



margin “should be main message.”

365-608/428-S/80010

658 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

agreement in Tokyo to start with anything more ambitious than the

OMB proposal.

This proposal offers an opportunity for modest constructive action

without committing us or any of the other countries now to increased

expenditures. It would create an International Energy Technology

Group, whose small staff would search out opportunities for joint or

parallel action to accelerate energy demonstration and commercializa-

tion projects involving use of new technologies. It would seek to ar-

range project financing by governments and private capital markets,

much as an investment banker does. Each member government would

be free to decide whether it did or did not wish to join in providing fi-

nancial support for a proposed project. The Group would be guided by

a Board consisting of the member countries’ energy ministers.

The only expenditures required from the US (or from other

members) would be for very limited planning and administrative sup-

port. If we decided to contribute to a project, we would draw on the

regular DOE budget or the Energy Security Trust Fund.

Other nations with the desire and capability to aid new technology

projects would be invited to join this Group. If some OPEC countries

joined, the Group would promote producer-consumer co-operation in

pursuing the one energy objective that the industrial and OPEC coun-

tries appear to share: slowing depletion of oil reserves. The Group

could, for example, engage such key oil producers as Saudi Arabia and

Venezuela together with industrial countries in developing such new

sources of energy as Venezuelan heavy crude.

3. Conclusion. We should indicate to our Summit partners our will-

ingness to join them at the Tokyo Summit in appointing a steering com-

mittee to establish an International Energy Technology Group, with the

understanding that the steering committee’s plan would have to be re-

viewed by governments before the Group comes into being. We should

suggest this action to increase supply as a complement to, not a com-

petitor with, proposals to reduce demand. Hence we should not use

bargaining chips to secure Summit acceptance of this proposal which

may be needed to secure agreement on proposals for demand restraint.

4. Recommendation

That I be authorized to transmit the proposal for an International

Energy Technology Group in the manner described above to the Eco-

nomic Summit Preparatory Group for consideration at its final meeting

June 15. State, Treasury, DOE, and OMB concur.

5

5



The President checked the Approve option and initialed. The proposal was trans-

mitted in telegram 143818 to Tokyo, June 5. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign

Policy Files, D790255–0185)


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 659



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling