Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Telegram From the Department of State to All Diplomatic


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet74/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   ...   95

234. Telegram From the Department of State to All Diplomatic

and Consular Posts

1

Washington, September 15, 1979, 1354Z.



243027. Inform Consuls. Subject: Update on Energy Issues.

1. This cable updates where we stand on a number of energy

issues:

—The state of the international oil market for the next year;



—The U.S. energy situation;

—Oil import pledges made by the US; and

—The status of U.S. domestic energy initiatives.

2. International Oil Market Situation. Even with a partial restora-

tion of Iranian oil production to an average level of about 3.5 million

barrels per day (MBD) and with production running near capacity in

most other OPEC countries, the world oil supply continues to be tight

but adequate to meet current demand and rebuild depleted stocks.

Given probable trends in supply and demand, this delicate balance is

likely to continue through the next six to twelve months, barring a large

drop in oil demand precipitated by deep recession, or a sharp reduction

in supply for political or other reasons.

A. Demand. An average rise of 59 percent in official crude oil

prices in 1979, dampening world economic growth, has been an impor-

tant contributing factor in an anticipated increase of only 0.8 percent in

non-Communist world oil demand from 50.4 MBD in 1978 to 50.8 MBD

in 1979, according to Department of Energy (DOE) estimates. World oil

demand next year will depend on the severity of projected global eco-

nomic turndown and efficiency of demand restraints. Assuming 2 per-

cent OECD growth, total demand estimates show a 0.8 percent in-

crease, rising to 51.2 MBD in 1980. Most growth in demand will occur

in developing countries, especially in OPEC countries, Mexico and

more developed LDC’s. On the other hand, a world economic down-

turn in 1980 could result in a drop in world demand to below 50.0

MBD.

B. Supply. The most problematic element in a near term market as-



sessment is production levels of key OPEC countries. Current (third

quarter 1979) Free World production (52.3 MBD) is at a level permitting

significant stock re-building, principally due to Saudi Arabia’s 1 MBD

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D790421–1109.



Limited Official Use. Drafted by Alan P. Larson (EB/ORF/FSE) and D. Dolan (EB/ORF/

FSE); cleared by Katz, Rosen, and Calingaert and in DOE/IA, NEA, ARA, EA, AF/EPS,

and EUR/RPE; and approved by Cooper.


365-608/428-S/80010

746 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

temporary increase in crude oil production from 8.5 to 9.5 MBD. The

Saudi Government will review this temporary increase later this

month.

2

If Saudi Arabian production returns to 8.5 MBD, and other OPEC



producers produce at more or less current levels, DOE estimates that

Free World oil production will be about the same in 1979 and 1980

(about 51.4 MBD). This scenario assumes a slight increase in non-OPEC

production and an off-setting decrease in net exports from Communist

countries as Soviet production peaks and begins to decline.

3. Oil Demand and Supply Balance. While the market has eased

somewhat during third quarter 1979 owing to the Saudi temporary in-

crease and near maximum output levels elsewhere, excess capacity that

existed before the Iranian crisis has disappeared and the market re-

mains very vulnerable to supply disruptions. In addition to those of

Saudi Arabia and Iran, production levels from Nigeria, Iraq and Ku-

wait are also subject to political and/or technical uncertainties. While

an unusually cold U.S. or European winter would further increase de-

mand, DOE estimates foresee a slightly improved Free World stock sit-

uation at year-end 1979 (a rise of about 220 million barrels, or about 5

percent above December 1978 levels).

4. U.S. Energy Situation. DOE data indicate that U.S. oil consump-

tion for the year to date (through August 24) is running at about 18.7

million barrels per day (MBD), down slightly from 18.8 MBD for the

comparable period last year. Significantly, consumption of motor gaso-

line is 7.1 MBD, 3 percent below last year’s level.

5. Net U.S. petroleum imports for the year to date are 7.7 MBD, a

slight increase over the level of 7.1 MBD for the first eight months of

1978. Both figures exclude imports for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve,

which averaged 160,000 B/D in 1978 but which declined sharply this

spring after purchases were suspended in response to the tight oil

market.

6. Stocks of crude oil and products are still somewhat below the



optimal levels, but are being rebuilt in a generally satisfactory manner.

There is particular concern that we achieve an adequate level of distil-

late (i.e., diesel fuel and home heating oil). Distillate stocks now total

about 190 million barrels, roughly 50 million barrels short of the admin-

istration’s goal for this fall. It is expected that continued stockbuilding

will result in an adequate level of distillate stocks by the end of October.

2

The White House issued a statement on September 26 confirming reports that the



Saudi Government would continue production of 9.5 million barrels of oil per day for 3

more months. The statement is printed in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States:



Jimmy Carter, 1979

, p. 1766.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 747

7. U.S. Energy Initiatives. There are a number of U.S. energy initia-

tives which have been adopted since April:

—The phased decontrol of domestic crude oil prices has begun.

The price of newly discovered oil was decontrolled on June 1. Other do-

mestic crude oil prices will be gradually raised and by September 30,

1981, all domestic crude oil prices will be decontrolled.

—Mandatory building temperature standards went into effect in

July. It is estimated that they will result in oil import savings of 0.2

MBD.

—In August, the administration decontrolled the price of heavy



oil, an almost tar-like substance that must be heated to be produced.

The President has also proposed that heavy oil be exempted from the

windfall profits tax. It is estimated that with these incentives 0.5 MBD

of heavy oil can be produced by 1990.

8. In response to a request by the President, the Federal Energy

Regulatory Commission is moving to create a special incentive price for

natural gas from tight sands (low permeability gas basins primarily in

the Rocky Mountain region).

9. There are several administration proposals currently before the

Congress:

—An amended version of the windfall profits tax has passed the

House and is now being studied by the Senate Finance Committee;

—The Energy Security Corporation (a catalyst for development of

synthetic fuels plants) is the subject of hearings in several House and

Senate committees;

—The Energy Mobilization Board (which would establish binding

schedules for Federal, State and local decision-making on critical,

non-nuclear facilities) is being addressed by committees in both

Houses;

—A wide variety of proposals to promote residential conservation



have been made both by the administration and by various Con-

gressmen, including mandatory programs under which utilities would

conduct “energy audits” for residential customers, make recommenda-

tions for energy saving investments, and provide long term financing

to their customers for conservation improvements;

—Legislation to require utilities to reduce oil use by 50 percent by

1990 is being prepared but has not yet been sent to the Hill;

—Programs to help low income households pay their fuel bills are

being examined;

—Proposals for greater Federal spending on mass transit are being

examined;

—House and Senate conferees are attempting to work out differ-

ences in bills that would give the President authority to develop a

standby gasoline rationing plan;



365-608/428-S/80010

748 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

—Request for Presidential authority to set State-by-State targets

for energy conservation is included in the gasoline rationing bill which

is in conference (If State conservation plans did not result in achieve-

ment of their targets, the Federal government would be permitted to

impose a plan for that State.);

—Hearings have been held on a bill to grant authority to establish

a solar bank;

—Initial hearings have been held on tax credits for investments in

solar energy and biomass technologies, e.g. a permanent exemption of

gasohol from the 4 cents per gallon Federal excise tax; and

—A tax credit for producers of natural gas from tight sands has

been proposed.

10. Oil Import Commitments. At the Tokyo Summit, the U.S.

pledged that U.S. oil imports in 1979, 1980 and 1985 will not exceed

1977 levels, i.e., 8.5 MBD. In July the President announced that an oil

import quota would be established, and that 1979 oil imports would be

held at or below 8.2 MBD.

3

The quota level for 1980 has not yet been set.



11. The administration is reviewing alternative oil import quota

mechanisms, e.g. quota-auction or the allocation of import rights based

on historical patterns or refinery capacity. A notice on oil quota mecha-

nisms will be published in the Federal Register in September and public

comments will be solicited. A decision on a quota mechanism might be

made within a few months by early 1980. (Implementation should not

be required before 1980 since 1979 oil imports are projected to fall short

of the 8.2 MBD ceiling without imposition of a quota.)

12. The U.S. will more than meet its IEA goal of reducing demand

for oil on world markets to roughly one million barrels per day under

what it otherwise would have been. (U.S. oil imports had previously

been projected to be as much as 9.5 MBD in 1979. In making compari-

sions with oil import figures of other countries it is important to note

that U.S. import figures include bunkers (about 0.5 MBD), but exclude

imports by U.S. territories (about 0.3 MBD)).

13. Tokyo Summit Follow-up. At Tokyo the Summit countries

adopted oil import targets and pledged:

—To review programs toward meeting the targets;

—To set up a register of international oil transactions to “bring into

the open” the working of oil markets and thereby to moderate the spot

market;

—Not to buy oil for government stockpiles when this would place



undue pressure on prices and to consult on such decisions;

3

He announced the goal at Kansas City on July 16. See footnote 2, Document 226.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 749

—To increase as much as possible coal use, production and trade;

—To cooperate on assuring safety in the expanded use of nuclear

power;

—To establish an International Energy Technology Group (IETG)



linked to the OECD, IEA and other international organizations to re-

view the actions being taken or planned domestically by each Summit

country to develop new energy technologies and to report on the need

and potential for international collaboration including financing; and

—To place special emphasis on helping developing countries ex-

ploit their energy potential.

14. There will be a meeting of Summit Energy Ministers (plus rep-

resentatives from the EC and possibly the OECD/IEA) on Sept 26 in

Paris to discuss implementation of Summit decisions.

Vance

235. Memorandum From Secretary of Energy Duncan and Henry

Owen of the National Security Council Staff to President

Carter

1

Washington, September 27, 1979.



SUBJECT

Trip Report

This memorandum reports on the results of the meeting of Summit

Energy Ministers held in Paris on September 26, 1979 at President Gis-

card’s initiative to assure fulfillment of the Tokyo agreements. The U.S.

delegation was led by Charles Duncan and included Henry Owen and

Dick Cooper.

2

At this meeting, the Tokyo Summit agreements and your July



energy initiatives provided the basis for making progress toward

securing country specific oil import commitments from the EC coun-

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Agency



File, Box 8, Energy Department, 8–10/79. Confidential.

2

Telegram 256287 to Paris, September 29, summarized the Energy Ministers’



meeting. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D790445–0563) Tele-

gram 256740 to Paris, September 29, transmitted memoranda of conversation of bilateral

meetings held during the meeting. (Ibid., D790446–0231)


365-608/428-S/80010

750 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

tries, as well as on several other Summit energy measures, and a bet-

ter understanding by our partners of the importance of your July

initiatives.

1. 1985 European National Oil Import Targets. The European Summit

countries carried out their Tokyo commitment to specify 1985 national

import targets. The five non-Summit EC countries also fixed their 1985

national targets. The intra-EC negotiation that led to agreement on

these nine national targets was only completed halfway through our

meeting; we were told that it might not have been completed at all

without the pressure created by holding this Ministers’ meeting. The

European import ceilings are set at or slightly above 1978 import levels,

except for Italy (which, you will remember, was granted exceptional

treatment at Tokyo) and the Netherlands—both of which secured large

increases. The 1985 European total is 472 million tons (approximately

9.5 MMB/D), which was the EC net import total in 1978. Within this to-

tal, the UK will move from its current position of being a net importer

to becoming a marginal net exporter of 5 million tons (100 MB/D) in

1985. The four European Summit governments each made a political

commitment at the Paris meeting to achieve the national ceilings that

they specified. Although the targets of Italy and the Netherlands are

not sufficiently rigorous, they resulted from complicated intra-EC

negotiations; taken as a whole the EC total is acceptable. We have

gained considerable ground by the EC’s adoption of the national

target approach and by the stringency of the French and German

targets.

2. North Sea Oil. The U.S. indicated, as did the Japanese and Cana-

dians, that North Sea 1985 oil exports over the indicated 5 million tons

could not be used to increase individual European country import

targets for 1985.

3

The UK took the same position and made clear, more-



over, that if its 1985 exports went over 5 million tons it could give no

assurance that these exports would go to the EC; British Energy Secre-

tary Howell said this not only in the meeting but publicly at the press

conference that followed. In private bilateral talks, the French and Ger-

mans disputed this US–UK view, saying that North Sea oil should be

viewed as community property. The EC representative took the same

position until Howell publicly outlined the UK view; after that, he told

us the U.S. had won its point. This question will be discussed further

when a small internal high-level group of the seven Summit nations

and the EC meets early next month. This group will meet periodically

thereafter, in accordance with the Tokyo Declaration, to monitor fulfill-

ment of Tokyo import pledges.

3

Regarding this North Sea oil issue, see Document 228.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 751

3. 1980 European National Targets. We pressed for fulfillment of the

Tokyo commitment to develop 1980 European national import ceilings.

After some discussion, we were assured that this would be done, prob-

ably next month.

4. Japan. Energy Minister Esaki repeated to the meeting what he

earlier had said in Washington to the Vice President: that Japan was

planning to achieve the lower end of the 6.3–6.9 MMBD 1985 range that

Japan had accepted at Tokyo. He repeated this statement of intent at the

press conference, while protecting himself by pointing out that Japan’s

formal commitment remained within the 6.3–6.9 range.

5. U.S. Import Ceilings. The others seemed impressed by Secretary

Duncan’s description of measures being taken by the U.S. to restrict im-

ports—particularly the 8.2 MMBD ceiling for 1979 and the fact that im-

port quotas would be used, if necessary, to achieve the 8.5 ceiling for

1980. The Paris press gave front-page treatment to this latter point,

stressing Secretary Duncan’s statement that these quotas would not re-

quire Congressional approval. This may have been an important step

in increasing European awareness of U.S. energy policy. In fact,

throughout the Ministerial and related bilateral meetings, it was the

U.S. which appeared to be on the offensive in terms of meaningful com-

mitments to action, and the Europeans who appeared to be on the de-

fensive. This difference was less than at Tokyo, however, since all were

committed to fulfill the Tokyo decisions.

6. Registration of Crude Oil Transactions. It was agreed, in accord-

ance with the Tokyo Declaration, to activate immediately a system for

monthly registration and publication of crude oil import transactions.

Through this reporting of prices and terms on a cargo basis, we will in-

crease market transparency, and thus inhibit the kind of speculative

purchases that destabilized the market last spring. The International

Energy Agency and the EC will study extending this system to all prod-

ucts and making it a fortnightly, instead of monthly, system.

7. Spot Market. The French made further proposals for surveillance

of the spot market,

4

including a Tokyo–Brussels–Washington hotline to



discuss actual or impending violations of the Tokyo commitment to

moderate use of the spot market. These proposals were referred to the

IEA and EC for urgent study. The hotline idea may be useful.

8. Alternative Energy Sources. It was decided to activate the Interna-

tional Energy Technology Group agreed on in Tokyo, on the basis of a

U.S. paper outlining the Group’s charter. The Group will assess what

each country is doing to develop alternative energy sources, and will

4

French officials initially discussed their spot market proposals in Washington



June 14–15. See footnote 2, Document 218.

365-608/428-S/80010

752 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

explore possibilities for international collaboration, including financ-

ing. Its first meeting will be in late October or early November, and it

will present its report to the Venice Summit.

9. Distillate Entitlement. In accordance with your decision, Secre-

tary Duncan indicated that there would be no further extension of the

$5 distillate entitlement beyond October 31.

5

This brought a very favor-



able reaction at the meeting and in the French press.

10. Conclusion. The French press treated the meeting as a large

success in translating the Tokyo decisions into concrete actions earlier

and more effectively than had been anticipated. Our view is more tem-

pered. We made progress on specific European national import ceilings

and other decisions to fulfill Tokyo commitments. But some of these

targets (Italy’s in particular) are too high. How rigorously the other Eu-

ropean import targets bite will depend on whether the UK maintains its

projected lower level of exports (designed to extend the life of its oil re-

serves), and whether the UK continues to insist (along with the U.S.,

Canada, and Japan) that any increase in exports over this level will not

alter existing national European import ceilings. We will discuss how

best to nail down this latter point and related matters with UK Secre-

tary Howell when he visits Washington next week.

All in all, the Paris meeting was a promising start toward fulfilling

the Tokyo energy commitments; we made all of the progress that could

reasonably be expected; other participating governments were pleased.

But a good deal of hard work still remains if effective implementation

of the Tokyo decisions is to be assured.

5

Regarding the Carter administration’s original decision on middle distillates and



the European reaction, see footnote 2, Document 214.

365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 753



236. Memorandum of Conversation

1

Washington, September 28, 1979, 11:20 a.m.–12:30 p.m.



SUBJECT

Bilateral Issues and President Lopez Portillo’s Energy Proposals

PARTICIPANTS

U.S.

Mexico

The President

President Lopez Portillo

The Vice President

Jorge Castaneda, Secretary of

Secretary Vance

Foreign Relations

Secretary Duncan

Jorge de la Vega Dominguez,

Dr. Brzezinski

Secretary of Commerce

Assistant Secretary Jules Katz

Jose Andres Oteyza, Secretary of

Assistant Secretary Viron Vaky

Patrimony and Industrial

Robert Krueger, Amb. at

Development

Large-Des.

Alfonso de Rosenzweig Diaz,

Ambassador Patrick Lucey

Under Secretary for Foreign

Ambassador Henry Owen

Relations

Jerry Schecter, NSC Staff

Jorge Diaz Serrano, Director of

Guy F. Erb, NSC Staff

PEMEX

Everett Briggs, State



General Miguel A. Godinez

Bravo, Chief of Staff, Pres.

Gen. Staff

Rafael Izquierdo, Advisor to the

President

Jose Antonio Ugarte, Advisor to

the President

Dr. Robert Casillas Hernandez,

Private Secretary to the

President

Rosa Luz Alegria, Under

Secretary for National

Planning and Budget

Andres Rozental Gutman,

Director General of North

American Affairs, Secretariat

of Foreign Relations

Hugo Margain, Mexican Ambas-

sador to the United States

Jose Ramon Lopez Portillo, Direc-

tor of Analysis, Secretariat

of Programming and Budget

Abel Garrido, Director of Bilateral

Trade Relations, Ministry of

Commerce

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Subject File,



Box 37, Memoranda of Conversation: President, 7/79–9/79. Confidential. Drafted by Erb

on October 3. The meeting was held in the Cabinet Room of the White House. The full

text of this memorandum of conversation is scheduled for publication in Foreign Rela-

tions

, 1977–1980, volume XXIII, Mexico, Cuba, and the Caribbean. President Lo´pez Por-

tillo was in Washington for an official visit September 28–29.


365-608/428-S/80010

754 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

President Carter opened the meeting by saying he was delighted,

pleased, and honored to meet again with President Lopez Portillo in

the White House.

2

Lopez Portillo thanked him. President Carter sug-



gested that they take up bilateral issues at this meeting and interna-

tional issues on the next day. Lopez Portillo agreed.

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

Lopez Portillo said the two countries had made substantial

progress with regard to gas. There had been some misunderstandings.

What was important to him was the principle on which our dealings

would be based. We now had a permanent basis and it was worth the

long discussion.

3

Now we had established a principle and had a pattern



to follow in our negotiations. He was happy with the outcome. It gave

us a structure that can be taken to any other field.

4

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]



On energy, Castaneda said that there had been an agreement on

gas. It was well received and he was well satisfied. Mexico sold 500,000

b/d of crude petroleum to the United States, 80% of their crude oil ex-

ports. Sales of electric energy were promising across the California and

Texas borders, particularly in the San Diego area. There was a possi-

2

Lo´pez Portillo was last in Washington in February 1977.



3

The first of six rounds of U.S.-Mexican natural gas negotiations, which mainly in-

volved discussions over the price that the United States would pay for Mexican gas, took

place in Mexico City April 3–4. (Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material,

International Economics File, Box 1, Subject File, Mexico: Gas Negotiations, 3–4/79) The

second was held in Washington May 3–4 (ibid., Country File, Box 49, Mexico, 5–6/79);

the third in Mexico City July 11–13 (ibid., 7/79); the fourth in Washington on July 27

(ibid., 8–9/79); the fifth in Mexico City on August 10 (telegram 13518 from Mexico City,

August 10; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P840175–2453); and

the sixth in Mexico City August 29–30 (telegram 14866 from Mexico City, August 31;

ibid., P840175–2441). At the last meeting, Mexican Foreign Minister Castan˜eda proposed

that the United States pay $3.625 per million cubic feet for Mexican natural gas, while

Christopher countered that “the initial price be set at $3.50, to be escalated at three-month

intervals from time gas starts flowing, but that price would be at least $3.625 on April 1,

1980.” Castan˜eda wanted the guaranteed floor price of $3.625 to start on January 1, 1980,

and said that “both price and date had acquired ‘political importance.’” (Ibid.)

4

According to a September 12 memorandum from Erb to Brzezinski, “a consensus



emerged” that day in favor of accepting “the last Mexican offer on gas prices, subject to

negotiation by the U.S. private companies of satisfactory clauses on the escalation of gas

prices and the termination of the contract.” (Carter Library, National Security Affairs,

Staff Material, International Economics File, Box 3, Subject File, Mexico: Gas Negotia-

tions, 9–10/79) According to the text of the ad referendum agreement that the Ambas-

sador reached with Castan˜eda, the Governments of Mexico and the United States had

reached an understanding on a framework for the sale of 300 million cubic feet per day of

natural gas by Petro´leos Mexicanos (PEMEX) to U.S. purchasers, with an initial price of

$3.625 per million BTU as of January 1, 1980. (Telegram 16281 from Mexico City, Sep-

tember 20; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P840175–2419) On Sep-

tember 21, the U.S. and Mexican Governments issued a joint announcement on the agree-

ment. For text of the announcement, see Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States:



Jimmy Carter, 1979

, pp. 1703–1704.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 755

bility of selling electrical energy generated through geothermal facil-

ities. This could take place by 1983.

President Carter said this was all very encouraging. There was no

need, he said, to repeat our frequent statements that how Mexico de-

velops and sells its energy was your decision. We wanted to be reliable

customers and good trade partners, that was our goal. Mutual analysis

of energy programs had good prospects. He and his government had

expressed their willingness to explore new ways to sell energy across

the border.

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

President Carter said that he was very interested in Lopez Por-

tillo’s energy plan and he suggested that he discuss it.

5

President Lopez Portillo said he would like to underline two



things. The problem was that we were in transition between two eras. If

this were so we must face other problems. Give or take a decade, in

forty years, he said, petroleum would no longer be the principal energy

source for the human race. Humanity was moving at an accelerated

pace. The stone age had lasted thousands of years, the iron age much

less, the petroleum age might last no more than 100 years. We were

living at the end of an era. His first appeal was that we understand this

situation. Our generation would witness the end of the petroleum era.

The objectives of our energy plans should be clear: to prepare the tran-

sition from one era to another and to introduce the use of other re-

sources. In this transition we must explore, conserve, produce and ra-

tionalize use of petroleum. We must use it in a more satisfactory

manner. By doing this we would be able to make the change to the next

era.


A universal body should prepare the substance of the solution of

the energy issue. This in itself required a strategy. That was the thrust

of his proposal to the United Nations General Assembly: to plan the

transition between two eras, to lay out a program, to establish a

5

On September 27, Brzezinski sent a copy of Lo´pez Portillo’s speech, delivered that



day to the UN General Assembly, to the President with a covering memorandum high-

lighting the central recommendations of Lo´pez Portillo’s “World Energy Plan.” Brze-

zinski wrote that it would: “guarantee full and permanent sovereignty over national

resources; rationalize exploration, production, distribution, consumption, and conser-

vation of energy sources; increase the exploitation of energy resources; facilitate national

energy plans that would be consistent with a world energy policy; promote auxiliary en-

ergy industries in developing countries; address the short term problems of oil importing

developing countries; set up financing and development funds based on contributions

from industrialized and oil exporting countries to meet the needs of oil importing devel-

oping countries; improve technology transfers in the field of energy; create an interna-

tional energy institute, as proposed by U.N. Secretary General Waldheim.” (Carter Li-

brary, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, International Economics File, Box 3,

Subject File, Mexico: Gas Negotiations, 9–10/79)


365-608/428-S/80010

756 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Working Group which would encompass the industrialized countries

of both East and West, oil exporters, and the oil consuming developing

countries. Mexico had consulted with all these groups and was ready,

in general, to sit around the table and discuss this. If we were to estab-

lish this group we could take up both broad and narrow issues. The

Working Group could make proposals that could be studied and con-

sidered by others.

The energy problem affected the entire world. Lopez Portillo was

especially concerned with the situation of developing countries. Rich

countries could find substitutes for petroleum. They had the ways and

means to do so. Developing countries had no such possibilities. He

always gave two specific examples that moved him, he said: Costa Rica

and Jamaica. Both had democratic governments, very respectable

democratic governments. Their problem was that more and more of

their GNPs was devoted to the purchase of oil. He had met President

Carrazo of Costa Rica before the oil price rise. At that time 27% of Costa

Rica’s GNP was used to buy oil. Perhaps it was 30% now. This caused

him great anxiety. Costa Rican democracy was running a great risk be-

cause of this problem. A similar reflection, not so dramatic perhaps,

was made by Manley at the Non-Aligned Movement meeting in Cuba.

That was why, while proposing long term measures of transition, he

also sought immediate solutions. Developing countries said that they

were not interested in the long term. What were we going to do in the

short term?

One of his great concerns, he said, and Mexico was a potential oil

producer, was to look for ways out for these countries, not for to-

morrow but for today. And this must include supply, prices and condi-

tions of purchase, avoidance of speculation, and a mechanism to

transfer real resources to the developing countries. That was why he

had proposed a fund, or several funds, which would finance the

long-term and the anxiety-creating problems of developing countries

that import oil. The oil exporters should recognize that we had a special

commitment to them.

This had been set out in general terms. He would give an example

of what he meant by rationalization of the management of oil while we

enjoyed that product. Between Mexico and Guatemala flowed the Usu-

macinta River. It was the largest river in Central America and could

generate a great deal of electric power. To do this we needed funding,

equipment and a political agreement because the lands threatened by

the dam would be Guatemalan. We had not yet reached an agreement

with Guatemala that would provide power to all Central America.

Under his proposal the global community would make it necessary to

come to an agreement, said Lopez Portillo. It was not right not to use

potentially available electricity. It was a case of what he meant by ra-



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 757

tionalization, that is, the use of a parallel source of energy. This project

could solve the energy problems of Mexico and Central America and

would make it possible to save oil.

Lopez Portillo said that if we explored in each country in the

world, we would discover sources that had not been tapped because of

a lack of funds, technology, or equipment. It should be possible to orga-

nize mankind in such a way that energy was wisely used. The only sub-

stitute today for oil is the oil we discover tomorrow. It was our respon-

sibility to discuss this problem.

The developed countries only wanted to discuss the price of oil in

their conversations with oil exporters, as if this were the only issue be-

tween them, said Lopez Portillo. The exporters would not discuss this

point in isolation from others. They wanted to discuss the entire eco-

nomic order. That was where things stood. In the meantime other

things were happening. If we reflect on this impasse, it was not a matter

of principle but of methodology. We should agree on methods. Presi-

dent Carter nodded his agreement. President Lopez Portillo said that

he believed that his method was appropriate. We had determined that

energy, not only oil but alternative sources, was the principal problem

of mankind. We should determine long-term and short-term solutions.

He believed that with political will we would be able to make the best

use of the world’s last oil opportunity.

Disorder could not continue, said Lopez Portillo. Either we put

order into the situation or else it would be imposed on us by the party

that won the struggle, which itself would consume energy. Order

would come in one way or another. He believed that the rational way

was best.

President Carter said that Secretary Duncan, the State Department,

and the National Security Council Staff were studying the proposal and

its bilateral and multilateral aspects. He asked Secretary Duncan and

Henry Owen to report to him tomorrow. He said he had thought it

would be useful to hear the remarks of President Lopez Portillo so that

we could prepare our response overnight.

President Carter said that he looked forward to seeing President

Lopez Portillo that evening. Tomorrow they could discuss interna-

tional issues and meet alone as well. President Carter said that the

American people had been excited about the visit and were hopeful of

beneficial results. He knew he shared a desire not to disappoint them.

Lopez Portillo thanked him and said he looked forward to the

meeting tomorrow with great pleasure.



365-608/428-S/80010

758 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling