Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet77/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   ...   95

Brewster

5

The final Iran Oil Sitrep from London, No. 69, February 2, 1980, was telegram



2481. (Ibid., D800058–0469) The Department assigned Grossman to the Embassy in Paris

as a commercial officer, where he continued, with the Department’s approval, “his tele-

phone contact work and reporting out of Paris.” Because the Department “and other in-

terested agencies” found the Iran Sitreps “valuable in helping Washington understand

current developments in Iranian oil sector and general economy,” it instructed the Em-

bassy in Paris to tailor Grossman’s duties “to allow him to include reporting on condi-

tions in Iran until hostage crisis is resolved.” (Telegram 29929 to London and Paris, Feb-

ruary 3; ibid., D800059–0691) The first Iran Oil Sitrep from Paris was telegram 4055,

February 5, but beginning with telegram 5684 from London, March 14, the reports came

exclusively from London. (Ibid., D800063–0233, D800131–0146) The last Iran Oil Sitrep—

at least under that subject heading—was telegram 19807 from London, September 17,

1980. (Ibid., D800447–0495)



248. Memorandum From the Deputy Secretary of Energy

(Sawhill) and the Under Secretary of State for Economic

Affairs (Cooper) to President Carter

1

Washington, undated.



SUBJECT

IEA Update

The International Energy Agency (IEA) has decided to move for-

ward its previously-scheduled January Ministerial-level meeting to De-

cember 10. This was done largely on the initiative of the U.S., for two

reasons:


1. The Tokyo targets for the Summit countries, and other tentative

1980 oil import targets for the remainder of the EC and for non-

Summit, non-EC countries, do not give the prospect of a balanced oil

market in 1980; even against a projected optimistic OPEC production

level of 30 mmb/d, after allowance for net demand for the rest of the

world, the aggregate IEA oil import targets may overshoot OPEC out-

put by 600 to 900 mb/d.

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, International Eco-



nomics File, Box 45, Rutherford Poats File, Chron, 12/79. Confidential. At the top of the

page, Carter wrote: “cc: To Duncan, Vance. Sounds good. C”



365-608/428-S/80010

778 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

2. With the exception of France, which controls carefully its

volume of oil imports, no other industrialized country has considered

putting in place effective import control mechanisms such as an import

quota.


2

We therefore face the prospect of a worsening scramble for oil next

year; this would aggravate price pressures in the market, would subject

importing countries to political blackmail, and would create political

tensions among importing countries.

To deal with this problem, we are proposing that the IEA adopt a

system of national oil import targets, which would be adjusted quar-

terly to a level which gives a reasonable prospect of market balance. As

a part of this system other countries will be required to put in place ef-

fective and credible enforcement mechanisms as well as demand re-

straint measures directed at achieving the targets. The proposed system

would include penalties against countries exceeding the targets. Such

an allocation mechanism should reduce incentives for buying at high

spot market prices.

As part of the pro-rata reduction in import target levels to match

available world oil supplies, the U.S. would have to be prepared to ac-

cept a 1980 oil import target below the level of 8.5 mmb/d agreed upon

at the Tokyo Summit. Preliminary analysis indicates that the U.S. could

comfortably accept an import ceiling in 1980 of approximately 8.1

mmb/d without adopting additional demand restraint measures. An

interagency task force has completed a preliminary review and

adopted an “unconstrained demand” estimate of 7.90–8.05 mmb/d

(not including any SPR fill) as a safe projection for 1980.

In the judgment of some of your advisors, there is an additional

safety margin built in to the high end of that range for the following

reasons:


• An inventory build-up during 1980 of 100 m/b is included even

though 1979 end-of-year inventories will be close to an all-time high;

• A voluntary nuclear moratorium is assumed which increases oil

consumption by up to 250 mb/d. This moratorium could be offset in-

stead by other policy actions such as coal-fired electricity and use of re-

sidual fuel oil from inventories. Additionally, if world oil supplies are

as limited as currently expected, action to bring some of these 9 affected

plants on line during 1980 will have to be considered.

We will press other countries to adopt stringent import control

systems comparable to a quota mechanism as backstops for the re-

duced import targets. In the event that other countries resort instead to

softer measures, such as “political” commitments rather than legisla-

2

Next to this sentence, Carter wrote: “Tell me briefly how France does it.”



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 779

tive actions, it would be appropriate for us to follow suit, and back up

our lower target with a political commitment rather than an actual

downward adjustment in the 8.5 mmb/d import quota trigger point.

If the industrialized world is unprepared to adopt stringent de-

mand restraint measures of its own choice, demand will be effectively

limited by short supply leading to still higher prices and further eco-

nomic slowdown. We can take the fixed volume of oil that will be avail-

able on the world market in one of two ways: at the very high price that

will result from IEA nations bidding against each other, which is politi-

cally as well as economically damaging, or at a somewhat lower price

under a cooperative system of demand restraint where shortfalls are

shared equitably.

In the upcoming working group meetings in Paris, we will stress

the criticality of adopting meaningful enforcement systems (e.g., im-

port quotas) to the success of any effort made at the Ministerial, while

conditioning our willingness to lower our quota commitment on other

nations’ willingness to commit to a rigorous enforcement mechanism.

We will report back to you on our progress following the Gov-

erning Board preparatory meeting in Paris next Monday.

3

3



December 3.

249. Memorandum From Secretary of the Treasury Miller to

President Carter

1

Washington, December 5, 1979.



SUBJECT

Middle East Trip Report

Visit to Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait

November 23–29, 1979

The three countries together produce almost one-half of OPEC oil

and earn well over one-half of OPEC financial surpluses. In each coun-

try, our party was received with warmth and cooperation, despite ten-

sion in the area.

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Agency



File, Box 22, Treasury Department, 3/79–3/80. Secret. Copies were sent to Vance,

Duncan, and Eizenstat. At the top of the page, the President wrote: “Good trip. J”



365-608/428-S/80010

780 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



Summary

It is probable that the three countries will maintain oil production

into the early part of next year at current levels, in excess of their pre-

ferred rates. This will be favorably influenced by evidence that the U.S.

and other oil importing countries are making progress in containing

and reducing demand. However, some scale-back in production can be

anticipated as 1980 progresses, if the expectation of the three countries

that supply will be comfortable is realized.

The countries seek return to a single benchmark price system,

2

al-



though they do not believe it is likely to be achieved at the OPEC meet-

ing in December. However, they feel that continued higher production

levels will put downward pressure on spot prices as stockpiling ends

and it becomes apparent (in their view) that production now exceeds

final oil consumption. Their price objectives for December appear

moderate, but uncertain because of the breakdown in OPEC price

compliance.

All this is on the assumption that there is no serious reduction in

Iranian oil exports.

The three countries’ production and pricing plans seem motivated

by (1) desire to return to stable oil pricing system with all producers re-

ceiving equal treatment, (2) concern over impact of oil shortages or sub-

stantial price increases on U.S. and world economies and hence on their

own investments, and (3) internal pressures which question desir-

ability of more rapid production than needed to finance orderly devel-

opment plans.

Kuwait is most likely to cut back production somewhat next year,

probably starting in the second quarter.

The three countries all expressed concern over the freezing of Ira-

nian official assets.

3

After explanation of the unique circumstances,



there was a better appreciation and some public expression of under-

standing and acceptance of the action. Nonetheless, there remains an

underlying nervousness, perhaps best illustrated in the comment:

“capital is a coward.” If the hostages are released and the assets un-

blocked promptly thereafter, the concern will probably fade away.

Underneath is the nagging question: “If we embargo oil or oppose

the U.S. on major policy issues, will our assets be blocked?” We did our

best to reassure them on this score.

2

See footnote 3, Document 220.



3

Carter issued Executive Order 12170 freezing Iranian Government assets in the

United States on November 14. It reads, in part: “I, Jimmy Carter, President of the United

States, find that the situation in Iran constitutes an unusual and extraordinary threat to

the national security, foreign policy and economy of the United States and hereby declare


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 781

The incident at Mecca

4

somewhat preoccupied the Saudis. My ap-



pointment with Crown Prince Fahd in Riyadh was cancelled since he

remained in Jeddah (or possibly Mecca itself) to deal with the Mecca

situation.

Oil Production

In the aftermath of the Iranian revolution and the cut back in Ira-

nian crude exports, each of the three Arab countries increased or main-

tained production. (Saudi Arabia from 8.5 to 9.5 mb/d; UAE stayed at

1.8 mb/d; Kuwait from 2.1 to 2.6 mb/d, including the neutral zone.)

Even so, the world oil supply has been tight and there has been a break-

down in the pricing system. Officials of the three countries believe that

current production is slightly above actual final oil usage, but that

excess demand is resulting from stock building either as a hedge

against shortages or to reduce dependence on supply from major oil

companies. They, therefore, expect the supply-demand relationship to

be more comfortable in the near future as stockpiling subsides.

The three also take the position that oil supplies will be adequate in

1980—with perhaps one million barrels per day surplus—provided

there is no substantial reduction in Iranian output. Underlying this

viewpoint is an implied willingness on their part to maintain produc-

tion levels at or near present rates.

There is some reluctance to make public commitments as to pro-

duction levels. Each country is now generating substantial financial

surpluses, and there are internal pressures to reduce output to levels

more in line with financial needs. There are those who question the

wisdom of converting domestic oil resources into financial assets held

outside their domains. Recent events in Iran and Mecca add weight to

these voices. But the Governments recognize their interdependence

with the world economy and appear prepared to maintain somewhat

higher levels of production as their “sacrifice”, provided the U.S. and

other oil importing countries make their “sacrifice” by conservation

and constrained demand.

Saudi Oil Minister Yamani has stated publicly that his Govern-

ment will consider extending the current production level of 9.5 million

barrels/day into the first quarter of 1980 if the consuming nations will

a national emergency to deal with that threat.” The full text of E.O. 12170 is printed in



Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Jimmy Carter, 1979

, pp. 2118–2119.

4

On November 20, 26-year-old Saudi religious extremist Muhammad Abdallah



and approximately 300 well-armed followers seized the Grand Mosque in Mecca and

took hostages. An assault on the Mosque by Saudi forces on November 24 ended the inci-

dent. The Embassy in Jidda reported on the incident in telegrams 8041, November 21, and

8119, November 25. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D790536–

0257, D790543–0581)


365-608/428-S/80010

782 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

do their part to constrain demand. Any public commitment to this ef-

fect is not likely to be made until after the upcoming OPEC meeting.

Privately, the assurances are somewhat more positive, again depend-

ing on evidence of U.S. and others taking measures to curtail demand.

The value placed on our conservation is reflected in Minister Yamani’s

statement that Saudi production was increased in the third quarter

as a direct result of the Tokyo Summit commitments on energy

consumption.

In the UAE, there seemed to be an unqualified and public commit-

ment to maintaining the current production level of 1.8 mb/d. How-

ever, in more specific discussions, we were informed that 1980 produc-

tion would be down by about 70,000 b/d because of the need to treat a

field that has been mishandled by the oil operating company. The pro-

duction would be restored after treatment, we were told.

The Kuwaitis were more outspoken about cutting back produc-

tion. This may be because of the greater internal pressure, a reflection of

the population mix which includes large numbers of Palestinians and

substantial numbers of Iranians. In private conversations with Oil

Minister Ali Khalifa, I was told that the Council of Ministers was likely

to approve a production scale-back (perhaps several hundred thou-

sand b/d) in 1980, to be effective sometime between April and July. Ac-

tual cutback may be influenced by supply conditions, and the Minister

told me he would advocate higher production rates if there was a sig-

nificant reduction in Iranian exports.



Oil Production Capacity

Privately and in confidence, the Saudis indicate plans to expand

production capacity to 10.5 to 11.0 mb/d by the end of 1980, and then

going on to the 12 million level by 1982. The UAE, after some setback to

treat a field, expects to double capacity to about 4 mb/d. Kuwait indi-

cates a return to its previous maximum capacity of 3 to 3.5 mb/d.

Such expansion in capacity is, of course, important for longer run

stability in the oil markets and I came away increasingly impressed

with our own energy vulnerability. I believe that these three countries

will respond positively on production as our energy program increas-

ingly takes hold and accelerates. In view of existing plans, I see no need

at this point for us to propose inducements to expand capacity levels.



Oil Pricing

All three countries share our desire to return to a single benchmark

price for oil and limit the spot market—though none are confident that

this can be accomplished soon. No one seems able to predict the out-

come at Caracas and no one has decided or was willing to reveal his

own position. The Kuwaiti Oil Minister—an avowed price hawk—told

me privately that he is thinking of an increase of $2 from the current av-


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 783

erage price of about $23. The Saudis and UAE will almost certainly be

moving to bring their prices up to the level of the other producers. The

effect of this on oil consumers will depend on overall pricing and the

change in the average of actual selling prices.



Financial Matters

Our freeze of Iranian assets was uppermost on the minds of all

those we met, both governmental officials and private business execu-

tives. Most of the officials expressed concern about the precedential im-

plication on their own sizable holdings.

At the same time, putting aside the question of blocked assets, they

noted that the dollar had become increasingly superior to other cur-

rencies as an outlet for their investments—given the instability of ster-

ling and the yen, and increased German restrictions on foreign in-

vestors. These attitudes are central to our own efforts to maintain a

stable dollar over the longer term.

The three countries will probably run a combined surplus of over

$50 billion next year ($30–35 billion for Saudi Arabia alone).

In this context, I stressed your commitment to reduce inflation and

strengthen the dollar. All my counterparts indicated satisfaction with

our efforts, though they also adopt a wait-and-see attitude regarding

actual results.

Other Issues

The Saudis seem to have become somewhat unhappy with the

American companies who have traditionally been their close friends.

They said that these companies had taken advantage of Saudi price

moderation by increasing their profits rather than passing on the lower

prices to consumers. Although unrelated, the Saudis noted that a U.S.

windfall profits tax would capture some of the excess profits; other-

wise, they would consider larger price increases. Saudi officials, partic-

ularly Yamani, are also incensed that two of the companies complied

with a Church Committee subpoena to reveal what they consider to be

proprietary data.

5

Crude allocations of those companies have been re-



duced as a form of punishment.

At present, the Saudis are extremely agitated with us over two

company-related issues: the risk that Saudi taxes on oil companies will

be declared non-creditable against U.S. tax liabilities of the companies

(this affects Aramco, of which they own 60%); and the Justice Depart-

ment’s Civil Investigative Demand (in connection with its anti-trust in-

5

The Subcommittee on Multinational Organizations of the Senate Foreign Rela-



tions Committee, chaired by Senator Frank Church (D–ID), was investigating bribery

payments by U.S. companies to foreign governments.



365-608/428-S/80010

784 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

vestigation of the oil companies) for data which the Saudis consider to

be their own sovereign property. These matters deserve early attention.



Conclusion

Deep reservoirs of good will for the United States continue to exist

in all three countries, despite the current unrest in the area and some

unhappiness with our Middle East efforts. We must expect occasional

bursts of unhelpful rhetoric, but I believe their underlying interests will

keep them largely in harmony with our own, if we do our part in the

relationship.

In the economic area, this means above all showing steady

progress in (1) reducing our requirements for imported oil and (2)

maintaining a stable dollar. As we do so, I believe we can count on

these three Arab countries to maintain adequate oil output, seek or-

derly pricing with greater stability, and continue to invest the bulk of

their earnings in dollar assets.

There is, understandably, an underlying concern about the current

Iranian incident (and the Mecca incident) and the fear that violence or

force could spill out into the region and cause great harm. While less

explicit, there is also concern about regional security and the Mid East

peace process.

It is clear that personal relationships are of critical importance to

the Arab countries. The trip has strengthened ties with my counterparts

there, and I plan to maintain contacts on a regular basis.

250. Memorandum From Henry Owen of the National Security

Council Staff to President Carter

1

Washington, December 7, 1979.



SUBJECT

Status Report on IEA Ministerial Meeting, December 10

Charles Duncan phoned Count Lambsdorff, pursuant to his talk

with you yesterday.

2

He indicated to Lambsdorff that he might not at-



1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, International

Economics File, Box 45, Rutherford Poats File, Chron, 12/79. Confidential. Sent for

information.

2

According to the President’s Daily Diary, Duncan met with Carter in the Oval Of-



fice from 10:32 to 10:37 a.m. on December 6. (Ibid., Staff Office Files)

365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 785

tend the Ministerial Meeting on December 10 unless we could have

some assurance that it would demonstrate effective IEA action to re-

store order to the oil market by either cutting targets one mmbd or by

the proposal outlined in paragraph 3(b), below. Lambsdorff was pre-

pared to accept the latter proposal. UK Energy Minister Howell indi-

cated that he wanted the meeting to succeed, and reserved his position

until then. So here is the present state of play:

1. All major IEA countries agree that the December 10 meeting

should fix 1980 import ceilings for each IEA country. Each country’s per-

formance will be regularly monitored to see that ceilings are not ex-

ceeded. If they are, a country will be committed to take specific

remedial action. There will be nothing fuzzy about the ceiling or the

commitment; consequently, this part of the agreement will represent an

important step forward in building an effective mechanism for collec-

tive action.

Comment:

These country ceilings are too high in terms of both

likely market demand and likely OPEC supply:

—This year’s oil price increases, lower economic growth, and a

probable reduction in the rate of stock-building may reduce IEA import

demand by perhaps one mmbd below the agreed ceilings.

—On the other hand, OPEC is not likely to supply more than 30

mmbd of the 31 mmbd required by the IEA import ceilings, and it may

well supply less.

2. There is also agreement among major IEA countries on the principle



that the countries, as a group, should adjust demand to available supply.

The


question that will have to be settled at the December 10 meeting is how

this should be done.

3. To meet this need, the US has made two alternative proposals:

a. Reduce 1980 ceilings now by at least one mmbd, allocating the reduc-

tions among countries, and making the reduced targets binding. If

greater stringency is required in the future, in light of the changing

market situation, the process would be repeated. Germany, the UK,

Canada, and probably others are firmly opposed, arguing they will not

go below the 1980 ceilings in the absence of demonstrated need.

b. Agree on how future reductions in 1980 ceilings are to be made. This

means:

—Staying with the 1980 ceiling as the starting point.



—Agreeing now to meet at a specific date during the first quarter

(say March 1 or earlier, if the supply situation worsens), to determine

by how much these ceilings have to be reduced to adjust demand to

available supply.

—Agreeing now that any reductions in ceilings will be binding.

—Agreeing now, to the maximum degree possible, on the prin-

ciples for allocating any further reductions, e.g., pro rata in proportion


365-608/428-S/80010

786 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

to oil consumption, adjusted for such factors as growth rates, weather,

or other individual circumstances.

This (3(b)) is the compromise that we discussed with Lambsdorff

and Howell. The chances of securing this agreement appear sufficiently

promising to warrant Charles Duncan’s going to Paris. But it will be

tough going. Other countries will try hard to water down the proposal

seeking to avoid any commitment to unpleasant action until the need is

demonstrated.

4. If we obtain the agreement described under 3(b), above, the meeting

will be a success:

It will clearly reflect IEA determination to take what-

ever measures are necessary to restore equilibrium to the world oil

market. We will lose the possible benefit of announcing now a one

mmbd cut in the IEA import ceiling, but we will achieve a strong IEA

commitment to make whatever cuts prove necessary in March—even if

they are more than one mmbd. Obtaining agreement in principle on

how cuts would be allocated among countries will also be a step for-

ward, although a wide area for disagreement will remain regarding

critical details.

5. Under this proposal, there would be no need at this meeting to

commit the US

to any import ceiling other than the 8.5 mmbd repre-

senting the initial target for 1980. When an adjustment is required,

however, we would have to reduce our ceiling, as would the other IEA

countries and France. This reduction would depend on available sup-

ply and on the adjustment formula to be negotiated in the next month

or two.


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 787



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling