Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Memorandum From Secretary of Energy Duncan and Henry


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet78/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   ...   95

251. Memorandum From Secretary of Energy Duncan and Henry

Owen of the National Security Council Staff to President

Carter

1

Washington, December 12, 1979.



SUBJECT

IEA Ministerial

We reached agreement with our IEA partners at Paris on the main

elements that we mentioned to you last week:

2

—Agreement on firm 1980 import ceilings by all 20 IEA countries



(paralleling the import ceilings agreed to by seven of these countries at

Tokyo).


—Agreement to meet again in the first quarter of 1980 to decide

whether, and if so how much, to cut these ceilings in light of what we

then estimate to be likely oil availability.

—Agreement to meet quarterly thereafter to review and revise

these ceilings in light of changing oil availabilities.

—Agreement by all countries to take additional restraint meas-

ures, as needed, to avoid exceeding their ceilings.

—Agreement to review each country’s performance quarterly.

—Agreement to convene meetings of ministers, as necessary, to

confront countries that are exceeding their ceilings and shame them

publicly into taking additional measures.

—Agreement to undertake an urgent study of whether the IEA al-

location system, which goes into effect whenever there is a 7% drop in

oil availability, can be structured so as to penalize countries that violate

the commitments they make at this IEA meeting. This system is em-

bodied in agreements that have been ratified by some parliaments, but

we are hopeful necessary changes can be made.

What we have done, in effect, is to create a structure for continu-

ously adapting the Tokyo Summit national import ceilings to changing

circumstances—and for monitoring national observance of these

ceilings. If IEA Members carry out the commitments that they made at

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Subject File,



Box 48, Oil, 8–12/79. No classification marking. Carter initialed the memorandum.

2

See Document 250. The IEA Governing Board met at the Ministerial level in Paris



on December 10. The communique´ issued at the end of the meeting was transmitted in

telegram 38652 from Paris, December 10. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Pol-

icy Files, D790569–0839) Telegram 327981 to all OECD capitals, December 20, circulated

an account of the meeting. (Ibid., D790586–0729) The communique´ is printed in Scott, The



History of the International Energy Agency,

vol. III, pp. 364–367.



365-608/428-S/80010

788 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

this meeting, oil supply and demand will be brought into continuing

balance—which should substantially mitigate pressure on oil prices.

We obtained this agreement through difficult negotiations. Many

of our allies would rather have waited for bad news on oil availability

to materialize next year instead of anticipating it now. The British were

particularly concerned about any changes in the targets because of their

fear that this would reopen the debate over the relationship of in-

creased North Sea oil production to EC import ceilings. The Germans

were more helpful than expected and the British became more support-

ive through the course of the meeting as they observed the emerging

trend.

It will be imperative that we maintain the same level of U.S.



firmness and leadership as we proceed, through a newly established

working group, to the even more difficult meeting that will be held in

March.

3

We will have to press in the working group to turn the general



allocation principles agreed upon in Paris into an allocation of specific

cuts among countries.

We were pressured to include in the Communique´ a statement en-

dorsing the need for replacement cost energy pricing, and were able to

finally secure agreement to the exact oil pricing language used in the

Summit Communique´.

4

It was clear that our ability to secure further



demand restraint commitments is related to our willingness to deal

with U.S. oil pricing levels. In particular, the U.K. Energy Minister and

others said privately that it would be much easier for them to secure

firm domestic support for U.S. proposals for greater demand restraint

if U.S. gasoline were selling for more than a third of European prices.

5

Thus, any action in this area before next March could help in our forth-



coming negotiations.

6

3



Carter wrote “I agree” in the margin next to this sentence.

4

See footnote 18, Document 221. Both communique´s “agreed on the importance of



keeping domestic oil prices at world market levels or raising them to these levels as soon

as possible.”

5

Under this paragraph, Carter wrote: “It’s more than 1/3 now.”



6

On December 14, the Department of State sent an aide-me´moire to the Embassy in

Venezuela to be delivered to the Government of Venezuela as well as to the Embassies of

OPEC members in Caracas, which in turn were asked to transmit it and the IEA commu-

nique´ to their nations’ representatives to the OPEC Ministerial meeting scheduled for De-

cember 17–20. The aide-me´moire described the “firm action” taken by the member states

of the IEA at their December 10 meeting “to help restore stability to the international oil

market.” It concluded: “The IEA nations agreed that a solution to the world’s serious en-

ergy problems requires a common approach by producing and consuming countries,

both developed and developing. They expressed their confidence that oil producers will

recognize their important role in pursuing policies which contribute to the stabilization

of conditions in the world oil market and in the world economy.” (Telegram 321925 to

Caracas; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D790574–0785)


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 789



252. Telegram From the Embassy in Venezuela to the Department

of State and the Department of Energy

1

Caracas, December 22, 1979, 1130Z.



12285. Subject: OPEC Conference—Preliminary Analysis. Ref:

State 322193.

2

1. (C—entire text)



2. Summary. OPEC appears unlikely even to meet to discuss a uni-

form oil price system for at least three and possibly six or more months,

that is, until (1) Saudi Arabia and the other moderates believe the spot

market has weakened enough to moderate the demands of those mem-

bers seeking higher prices, or (2) they are convinced that this is not go-

ing to happen. There also appears to be no agreement on production

cutbacks. Among the individual participants, the biggest surprise was

Iraq’s new moderate look. End summary.

3. The following is our preliminary and somewhat impressionistic

assessment of the results of the 55th OPEC conference on prices and

production levels, as well as comments on the special roles played by

some OPEC members during this conference. We will attempt to pro-

vide more detailed comments on these and other aspects of the confer-

ence at a later date.

4. Prices—As best as we can piece together the development of the

closed discussions, Saudi Arabia initially held fast in its insistence that

the conference adopt a marker crude price of $24 per barrel, while the

African countries insisted on $30 per barrel, either for the marker crude

or for their own higher quality oil. Nigeria suggested as a compromise

a 10 percent increase over $24, that is to $26.40, which was widely but

erroneously reported as $26. Saudi Arabia agreed to this level provided

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, [no film number].



Confidential; Niact; Immediate. Repeated Priority to Abu Dhabi, Algiers, Baghdad,

Bonn, Brasilia, Brussels for the Embassy and USEEC, Dhahran, Doha, Geneva, Jakarta,

Jidda, Kuwait, Lagos, Libreville, London, Mexico, Oslo, Ottawa, Paris for the Embassy

and USOECD, Quito, Rome, Tokyo, and Vienna.

2

In telegram 322193 to Caracas, December 14, the Department instructed the



Embassy to transmit the full text of the final communique´ and any other official state-

ments from the OPEC Ministerial meeting held December 17–20. The Department also

requested “coverage of press conferences held by OPEC spokesmen or by Petroleum

Ministers from key countries,” as well as information on “any discussions of assistance

by OPEC to oil-importing developing nations, possible membership in the food aid con-

vention, the report of OPEC’s Long-Term Strategy Committee, and proposals for

North-South discussions of energy in various fora.” (Ibid., D790575–0933) The Embassy

sent the final communique´ in telegram 12246 from Caracas, December 20. (Ibid.,

D790586–0417) The communique´ was published in The New York Times, December 21,

1979, p. D3. The OPEC Long-Term Strategy Committee, chaired by Yamani, aimed to de-

vise a unified policy to support oil prices and stabilize international markets.


365-608/428-S/80010

790 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

a realistic set of differentials was established and maintained. The tech-

nical experts met to decide on such a system of differentials and agreed

on a maximum spread of $3 above the marker. Algeria, Libya, and ap-

parently then Nigeria, insisted, however, on a larger spread, thereby

creating the final deadlock.

5. It appears at this point that OPEC is unlikely to agree on a single

official price for at least the first quarter and probably well into the

year. Saudi Minister Yamani, in his press conference following the con-

ference, said the extraordinary conference to establish prices would

convene some time in the future (with emphasis on some time) and that

Saudi Arabia would hold its price at $24 as long as possible. He said the

world has managed with chaos in the oil market for the past year, and

that he saw no reason why this situation could not continue for at least

one or two quarters more. He expressed as his personal view that there

would be a glut of oil in the market in the next few months resulting in

lower spot market prices, and thus the decision not to set an OPEC

price should be considered good news by the consumers, since prices

could be much lower in the future. Kuwaiti Minister Al Sabah followed

Yamani, also predicting that demand would drop in 1980, causing a fall

in spot market prices, but adding that no member of OPEC wished to

see prices drop below the official OPEC price (apparently the $24–26

level).


4. Production. There was clearly no agreement on production cut-

backs, and it is not even clear that this issue was discussed at any

length. Venezuelan Minister Calderon Berti stated in his final press

conference that many countries believe production levels should not be

discussed in OPEC, since each country should be free to decide its pro-

duction based on its own criteria. Yamani confirmed that Saudi pro-

duction would remain at 9.5 million BPD through the first quarter of

1980, and Al Sabah, replying to a question re Kuwait’s reported inten-

tion to reduce production by 500,000 BPD, said that while he has al-

ways said that Kuwait will reduce its production, he has never indi-

cated the amount or timing of such a reduction.

5. Thus, it appears to us that the moderates, at least those in the

Gulf, intend to keep production close to current levels in an effort to

drive spot market prices down to what they see as the correct price for

oil, that is, a range of prices corresponding to a marker crude of

$24–26.40 per barrel. What is not clear is the extent to which other

member countries will try to counter these efforts by production cut-

backs of their own.

6. A number of member countries appeared to play particularly

important or unusual roles in the Caracas conference. The following

represent our impressions of this aspect.


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 791

A. Saudi Arabia—By all accounts, Saudi Arabia remained the most

moderate of the moderates.

3

Yamani scheduled and then cancelled a



number of individual and general press interviews over the course of

the conference, but in all other respects appeared to be a perfect gen-

tleman throughout.

B. Kuwait—The Kuwaitis appeared to take an unusually low pro-

file throughout the conference, until Al Sabah’s press conference, when

he went out of his way to praise Saudi Arabia for its efforts to reach a

compromise, and otherwise came out in support of the Saudi views.

C. Iraq—Probably the greatest surprise of the conference was

Iraq’s moderate position. In his December 18 press conference, Oil Min-

ister Karim said Iraq did not intend to reduce its current production of

3.7 million BPD because it was still attempting to balance supply with

demand, but would be one of the first to act on production levels, if

there was a glut. There were a number of clear indications that Iraq

supported the moderates and nothing to indicate that it wavered signif-

icantly from this support.

D. Iran—Reactions to Iran’s public and official statements were

universally negative. Oil Minister Moinfar also reportedly antagonized

the other OPEC members with his constant political revolutionary

comments, and when Yamani called for a meeting of the Ministers

about midway through the conference, Moinfar reportedly insisted

that his whole delegation be included. While he apparently eventually

backed down in this demand, it created just another delay. While Iran

was generally accepted to have been one of the major stumbling blocks

in the price discussions, and Yamani, asked if Iran was one of those

seeking a higher price, agreed that this was the case, it now looks like

Iran was not one of those causing the final deadlock.

E. Nigeria—By one report, it was Nigeria’s late intervention for a

high differential that caused the final deadlock, even though Nigeria

had apparently initiated the earlier compromise on the price level for

the marker crudes.

F. Venezuela—As the host, Venezuela apparently did everything

possible to avoid a breakdown on prices, possibly including a tele-

3

On January 10, 1980, the Department of State instructed the Embassy in Jidda:



“You are authorized to transmit a verbal message of appreciation from President Carter

to Crown Prince Fahd concerning the Saudi decision to maintain production at current

levels at least through the first quarter of 1980. You should indicate that: —President

Carter is extremely pleased by the announcement that Saudi Arabia will continue pro-

duction for the first quarter of 1980 at 9.5 MBPD; —this decision further reflects Saudi

Arabia’s statesmanlike concern for the health of the international economy; —this level of

Saudi production will be most helpful in our common effort to maintain balance in the

international oil market and stability in the world economy; —for our part we remain

dedicated to continuing effective efforts to restrain demand in the United States and

other major consuming countries.” (Telegram 6722 to Jidda; National Archives, RG 59,

Central Foreign Policy Files, D800051–0502)


365-608/428-S/80010

792 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

phone call by President Herrera to King Khalid, and Calderon Berti’s

final press conference clearly showed his disappointment at the final

outcome on this point. At the same time, Venezuela apparently did suc-

ceed in obtaining an increased OPEC commitment to assist the oil im-

porting LDCs.

7. Administrative Support—The facilities and services provided

the conference and the press by the GOV appeared adequate, and ac-

cording to some veteran OPEC watchers, were among the best they had

seen. The OPEC press office, however, drew heavy and largely well-

deserved criticism for its failure to provide information on what was

happening or even when something might happen, and the little infor-

mation which was provided often proved to be unreliable. At least in

part, this failure to provide the press with up-to-date information re-

flected the general uncertanties and confusions of the conference itself.

4

Luers

4

The Embassy in Caracas provided daily reports on the conference in telegrams



12148 and 12164, December 18, and 12169, 12217, and 12274, December 19, 20, and 21, re-

spectively. (All ibid., D79058–0581, D790583–0006, D790584–0108, D790585–0098, [no

film number]) The conference ended on December 20 with no agreement on a uniform

pricing structure for oil. On December 28, Venezuela, Libya, Indonesia, and Iraq an-

nounced price increases of 10–15 percent. (The New York Times, December 29, 1979, p. 1)

253. Memorandum From the Under Secretary of Defense for

Policy (Komer) to Secretary of Defense Brown and the

Deputy Secretary of Defense (Claytor)

1

Washington, December 24, 1979.



Developing a strategy and capability to cope with the growing en-

ergy crunch should rank as high on our list of security objectives as

coping with the Soviet threat. Indeed, at the moment the energy crunch

is undermining the security of the West far more rapidly than the So-

viet military buildup. CIA now estimates that already announced oil

price increases will slow real economic growth in the developed coun-

tries to about half of one percent next year, and push their average in-

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Subject



File, Box 65, Summits, 9/79–5/23/80. Secret; Sensitive. The President initialed the

memorandum.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 793

flation rate into double digits. Moreover, OPEC can: (1) keep raising

prices; (2) cut back production if prices soften; or (3) do both.



The economic impact of the above will play hob with defense resource

availability.

Higher direct fuel costs (already painful) will be minor com-

pared to indirect effects from inflation and recession. This will be even

more the case with our chief Allies, owing to their even greater depend-

ence on OPEC oil. And the bleeding of Western economies could con-

tinue indefinitely. Ergo, how can we finance the needed Western de-

fense buildup, when more and more real resources are siphoned off to

pay for oil, and when meeting recession and inflation competes with

defense spending? As only one example, FRG abandonment of 3% real

defense growth was primarily an anti-inflation move.

Thus the West desperately needs an energy strategy which will get

us out of this bind, or at the least reduce its impact. This much is pain-

fully obvious; the hard part is “what strategy”? I have few ideas be-

yond those already being widely discussed, but I will make it one of

our highest priority planning tasks to try and come up with more. In

the meantime how do you react to the following preliminary thoughts?

1. A crucial precursor task is to do a better job of sensitizing the

country—and the free world—to the sheer national security impact of

the energy crunch. It is in effect “the moral equivalent of war” (the only

trouble here was that the President declared war three years too early

and then wasn’t politically able to follow through). I see “national secu-

rity” as the only compelling argument around which to rally the

Congress (by appealing to the patriotism of oil state senators). Other-

wise we and others will continue fumbling around (like the US

Congress) without facing up to the need. DOD can play a major con-

tributory role: (a) in cabinet you should press hard for vigorous meas-

ures; (b) your Posture Statement should highlight this problem—not

just in terms of RDF (which frightens mostly our friends) but of impact

on our defense strength; (c) we should play up this theme in speeches

as well, the objective being to influence Congress and the Administra-

tion to adopt stronger conservation measures.

2. Next, we must explain to friendly OPEC countries that they are

undermining the very national security umbrella which they count on

the US holding over them. For example, have we gotten across ade-

quately to the Saudis and Kuwaitis that our ability to defend them is

being gradually hamstrung? They look at how our defense budget is

going up, plus all the stress on RDF and probably conclude the exact

opposite.

3. Our overall security objective must be to retain acceptable access to

minimum essential ME oil.

In practical terms this means ensuring that at

least the lower Gulf states (Saudi Arabia, the sheikdoms, Oman, maybe

Kuwait) remain in friendly hands, and firmly under our security um-



365-608/428-S/80010

794 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

brella (which means that we must have a visible will and ability to de-

fend them). This is not to say that we should “abandon” Iran and Iraq

as outside our “security perimeter,” but that in classified strategic

terms we treat them as a buffer area—which we want to hold too if at

all possible.

4. We should examine the pros and cons of an overt declaratory



policy

that ME oil is vital to our security and we will do whatever is nec-

essary to retain access to it. This is tricky but may be essential. If possi-

ble, we should try to get our Allies (including Japan) to join us in an ac-

ceptable formulation. I have in mind a formulation aimed at deterring

external

intervention, rather than one aimed at indigeneous states.

5. Since Saudi Arabia is the key to security of the lower Gulf, we

must seek a new security relationship with Riyadh

along lines which we are

already exploring (non-US presence but Saudi development of a base

structure we can use). In return for our security “guarantees,” the

Saudis should help pay for security assistance to other friendly coun-

tries, which is vitally needed to rent base and access rights to enable us

to come to Riyadh’s assistance. We also need Saudi aid in denying the

USSR access

to similar base and access rights (for example, maybe in-

stead of defending N. Yemen against PDRY, we should look at whether

N. Yemen could take over PDRY—this would require a lot of Saudi

rethinking).

6. Strategically speaking, Egypt looks like by far the best main base for

projecting any sizable ground/air response into the Gulf. Despite all

the problems, it is politically and militarily the best bet. Since this in

turn dictates a Saudi/Egyptian rapprochement, it should be a major

objective of our policy. It also dictates convincing the Israelis not to

upset the applecart.

7. Oman looks like the best bet for a peacetime forward base. Be-

sides the ships offshore, we need some visible US onshore presence in

the PG area itself. We must convince the Saudis that if they don’t want

US forces on their soil, they should agree to having them nearby.

8. In the Saudi, Omani, Egyptian and other cases we must actively



buttress internal stability

via economic and internal security aid and ad-

vice. While the price will be high in the Egyptian case, it is imperative

that Sadat be able to show early visible payoff from a pro-US policy. If

this requires buying off Israel, that too is cheap at the price—compared

to the stakes for which we are playing.

9. Our Iran policy must be geared to this overall strategic design.

My own sense is that preserving Iran as a unitary buffer state, however

radical, is more in our interest than a fragmentation that invites parti-

tion. The last should be a worst case fallback, in event Iran nevertheless

breaks apart or Tehran comes under Soviet influence.


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 795

10. We must also hedge our bets by cementing relations with non-PG

oil states.

It amazes me that (1) we are on the verge of cutting real aid

level to Indonesia; (2) we are not exploiting Nigeria’s interest in F–4s;

(3) we are not encouraging in every way Venezuela’s exploitation of

Orinoco heavy oil; and (4) we are not more actively seeking long term

modus vivendis with Canada and Mexico. All this will take billions in

aid and investment, but this price is modest indeed compared to what

oil is even now costing us—with more increases yet to come.

11. Last but not least, we must press harder for major user country

conservation measures, using our economic clout with Europe and

Japan to reinforce our security arguments.

The above is the merest outline of a strategy; it leaves out most of

the all-important obstacles, costs, and details. But I hope it can serve as

a strawman for active discussion and debate, first in this building and

then in interagency fora. I’d value your personal reactions.


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling