Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


R.W. Komer 2 2 Komer initialed “RWK” above this typed signature. 254. Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of Energy for


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet79/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   ...   95

R.W. Komer

2

2



Komer initialed “RWK” above this typed signature.

254. Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of Energy for

International Affairs (Goldman) to the Special Assistant to

the Secretary of Energy (Siemer)

1

Washington, January 8, 1980.



SUBJECT

DOE Intelligence Requirements

Review of DOE’s requirements for intelligence on foreign energy

developments, and the Intelligence Community’s current ability to sat-

isfy these requirements, suggests three kinds of information we do not

now get which would be useful objectives of Department of Defense

interest. First, we need better information on tanker loadings and

movements. Second, detailed intelligence on foreign energy technology

programs generally is lacking. Third, more comprehensive nuclear pro-

1

Source: Department of Energy, Executive Secretariat Files, Job #8824, International



Affairs, 1/80. Secret.

365-608/428-S/80010

796 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

liferation intelligence is essential. Additional thoughts on these three

needs are outlined below.

The Department of Energy requires additional, more detailed in-

formation on the movement of crude oil in world markets. As gov-

ernments and national oil companies have assumed more responsi-

bility for marketing and shipping, the quality and quantity of overt

information available to the US Government has declined. Many

oil-producing countries, including Iran, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Libya and

the Soviet Union, now consider production and export statistics to be

“state secrets”, thus forcing DOE market analysts to rely on dated and

often incorrect “official numbers” to develop short-term forecasts of

supply and price. Moreover, in recent months the amount of crude oil

passing through the major international oil companies also has de-

clined, causing additional uncertainty. The DOD, and especially the US

Navy, might be in a position to provide independent and timely infor-

mation on oil tanker loadings, destinations, offloadings, shipping prob-

lems, and in-transit transactions.

It is important that the U.S. not be surprised by foreign techno-

logical developments in energy or energy-related fields. Community

reporting on the political and economic aspects of oil supply and

pricing generally is adequate. [8 lines not declassified] DOD assistance in

filling this disturbing gap in our energy intelligence capabilities would

enable the DOE International Energy Technology Assessment Program

to provide more complete and balanced studies in support of DOE pol-

icy development and program planning.

The wider use of nuclear technologies to meet national/interna-

tional energy demands, and the associated spread of various strategic

nuclear materials in both spent fuel and separated form will enable an

increasing number of countries to make nuclear and thermonuclear

weapons. The diffusion of this potential for nuclear weapons will im-

pact significantly on the criteria, procedures, and assessments involved

in nuclear-related export cases, the implementation and verification of

US bilateral technical agreements for nuclear cooperation, and the de-

velopment of US non-proliferation initiatives. The past limited role of

intelligence in providing a periodic watch of impending nuclear

weapon capabilities in certain countries is no longer adequate, but this

role must be expanded to provide a major input to national security

policy development, implementation and verification. DOD’s informa-

tion on the security concerns motivating nations to develop the capabil-

ity to produce nuclear weapons, and these countries’ technological

progress toward such capability, would be of particular use to DOE in

meeting our various non-proliferation responsibilities.

The DOE intelligence staff continues to work closely with the Intel-

ligence Community in defining and prioritizing collection, analysis



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 797

and production of energy related intelligence. However, energy intelli-

gence must compete for limited National Foreign Intelligence Program

resources with traditional military and political topics and, conse-

quently, does not have sufficiently high priorities to ensure adequate

attention. In addition to urging our friends in Defense to re-orient their

resources toward the three topics discussed above, I suggest that we so-

licit their support for DOE representation by Secretary Duncan on the

Policy Review Committee (Intelligence). Such representation, previ-

ously denied to Secretary Schlesinger by Admiral Turner, would pro-

vide a national-level forum for energy intelligence issues, thereby en-

abling DOE to influence the National Security Council guidance to the

Intelligence Community.



Leslie J. Goldman

2

2



Goldman initialed “LJG” above this typed signature.

255. Editorial Note

From January 14 to 19, 1980, Edward Fried, a White House consul-

tant on international energy issues, conducted “exploratory talks” in

Paris, London, Bonn, Brussels, and Rome, with French, International

Energy Agency, British, European Community, German, and Italian of-

ficials on energy questions “with a view toward preparations” for the

Venice Summit in June and the IEA Ministerial meeting in March. Ger-

ald Rosen, Director of the Office of Fuels and Energy at the Department

of State, and John Treat, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy, accom-

panied him. (Telegram 7261 to Bonn, January 10; National Archives,

RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D800018–0616) Discussion topics

included the outlook for the international oil market, the spot market,

import targets, stock policies, less developed countries, produc-

er-consumer dialogues, and other issues.

A summary of the delegation’s discussion with French officials on

January 14 is in telegram 1565 from Paris, January 15; with OECD Sec-

retary General Emile Van Lennep on January 14 in telegram 1107 from

Brussels, January 18; with IEA Executive Director Ulf Lantzke on Janu-

ary 15 in telegram 1107 from Brussels, January 18; with British officials

on January 16 in telegram 1189 from London, January 17; with EC offi-

cials on January 18 in telegram 1187 from Brussels, January 21; with

German officials on January 18 in telegrams 1288 and 1363 from Bonn,



365-608/428-S/80010

798 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

January 22 and 23; and with Italian officials on January 19 in telegram

2119 from Rome, January 23. (All ibid., D800026–0247, D800031–0150,

D800029–0707, D800036–0487, D800038–0257, D800040–0056, D800039–

1059)


256. Telegram From the Department of State to All Diplomatic

Posts

1

Washington, January 24, 1980, 0936Z.



20298. Subject: Recent U.S. Energy Developments. Reftel: State

309970.


2

1. (Unclassified entire text)

2. This cable is the second in a series of reports on U.S. energy de-

velopments. (Reftel) It is a report of activities as of January 18.

3. Report on IEA Ministerial.

3

At the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ministerial meeting on



December 10, the major oil consuming nations took a significant step

toward stabilizing the world oil market by agreeing to control the level

of their oil imports. They set national oil import ceilings for 1980 and

agreed to establish a mechanism whereby the performance of each

country would be regularly monitored and the ceilings would be ad-

justed quarterly if necessary to take account of changes in the world oil

supply situation. This was an extension and reinforcement of target set-

ting process at the Tokyo Summit Meeting in June, 1979. (At Tokyo,

only the U.S., Japan, and Canada set national targets for 1980; the EC

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D800041–0694.



Unclassified; Priority. Drafted by A. Hegburg (DOE/IA) and Alan P. Larson (EB/ORF/

FSE), cleared in EUR/RPE, DOE/IA, AF/EPS, NEA/ECON, ARA/ECP, EA/RA, and

OES, and approved by Rosen.

2

In telegram 309970 to all diplomatic and consular posts, December 1, 1979, the De-



partment sent its “first of continuing, periodic reports on US energy developments.” The

reports were “intended to keep US Missions apprised of the latest developments, accom-

plishments, strategies and plans in the energy area.” The Department hoped that they

would “serve as a valuable information source to Ambassadors and senior Mission offi-

cials in informing host country officials of US progress in coping with energy problems.”

Telegram 309970 focused on “recent Congressional action on several of the President’s

energy initiatives,” including: 1) a windfall profits tax, 2) an energy mobilization board,

3) an energy security corporation, 4) solar energy, 5) energy conservation legislation, 6)

gasoline rationing, 7) assistance to low-income families, and 8) oil import quotas. (Ibid.,

D790555–0193)

3

See Document 251.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 799

nations simply reaffirmed the EC group target established earlier at

Strasbourg.

4

The seven countries did set targets for 1985, but with vary-



ing degrees of commitment and specificity.)

—The 1980 ceilings of IEA nations total 24.5 million barrels per day

(MMB/D), including 1.4 MMB/D for bunkers. France, though not an

IEA member, was closely involved in this process through the EC. Due

to expected reductions in economic growth, and the demand restraint

and fuel switching effects of higher oil prices, there is a good chance

that the IEA nations will collectively import less than the sum of the

ceilings. The U.S. ceiling for 1980 is 8.5 MMB/D plus .4 MMB/D for the

territories.

—The IEA Ministerial also set national oil import goals for 1985.

The sum of these goals is 26.2 MMB/D. When bunkers are excluded the

collective goal becomes 24.6 MMB/D. This replaces the collective target

of 26 MMB/D (excluding bunkers) set in 1977. The U.S. goal for 1985 is

8.5 MMB/D for the 50 states, plus 0.4 MMB/D for territories.

—The Ministers also directed the IEA to develop an improved in-

formation system on stock movements and a system of consultation on

stock policies, and to consider additional measures leading to a more

coordinated approach to spot market activities.

4. US Energy Performance

—During the last several years the United States has instituted a

number of programs and policies aimed at reducing our dependence

on imported oil and our overall consumption of energy. The full effect

of these measures will take years to develop; however, results are al-

ready beginning to manifest themselves, in some cases dramatically, in

reducing our oil import and energy use. In the past we promised to

meet the energy challenge—we are meeting it as the preliminary data,

primarily for 1979, indicate.

—For example, on a 50-state basis in 1977, net imports averaged

8.6 million barrels per day (MMB/D) of oil. By 1978 we reduced that

level by nearly 600,000 B/D to about 8.0 MMB/D while 1979 levels are

expected to be 7.8 MMB/D.

—U.S. petroleum product consumption in 1979 was well over 2

percent below 1978. Preliminary data indicates that total energy con-

sumption was also less than in 1978. This occurred while U.S. GNP

grew at 2.3 percent in real terms in 1979. This represents a significant

change from the pre-1979 relationship between energy use and growth

rates.

—Our very positive contributions to reducing demand pressures



on the world oil market have not been limited simply to decreasing our

4

See footnote 4, Document 221.



365-608/428-S/80010

800 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

oil imports, but include the overall performance in improving energy

efficiency in the major sectors of our economy.

—In the transportation sector gasoline demand during 1979 was

about 5 percent below that of 1978. Savings were due to a number of

factors including higher prices, fuel efficiency standards and voluntary

conservation. Our mandatory automobile fuel efficiency standards will

ensure continued progress in this area. The savings were greatest in the

second half of the year when shortages were not a constraint on

consumption.

—We are also particularly pleased with the conservation perform-

ance of the U.S. industrial sector. Industry used about the same amount

of energy in 1978 as in 1973, in spite of economic growth and industrial

output increases during this period.

—In the residential/commercial sector our oil consumption be-

tween 1973 and 1979 has dropped by more than 200,000 B/D as a result

of higher fuel prices and government incentives for retrofitting existing

structures.

—Coal production in 1978 despite the prolonged strike was nearly

62 million tons above the 1973 level. In 1979 our coal consumption in-

creased by more than 10 percent over last year as a result of gov-

ernment policy requiring greater coal utilization for generating elec-

tricity and in direct industrial use.

—In 1978, our domestic production of crude oil was 8.7 MMB/D

largely due to our Alaskan North Slope fields reversing a long-term

decline in our oil production (when natural gas liquids (NGL) and

processing gains are included, total U.S. production was over 10.5

MMB/D). Overall there has been an increase in exploratory and pro-

duction work in the United States. As a measure of exploratory effort,

the number of seismic crews operating in the United States has in-

creased by 57 percent between 1973 and 1979. For production, the num-

ber of rotary rigs in operation in 1979 was almost double that of 1973.

—Domestic gas production appears more promising as a result of

pricing policies instituted by the U.S. Government; also the rate of de-

cline in reserves has been slowed down.

—Nuclear power continues to play an important role in our en-

ergy production providing an average of 12 percent of total domestic

electricity generation in 1979 compared with only 4.5 percent in 1973. In

pursuing nuclear power development we will continue to emphasize

safety in the operation of our nuclear plants.

—The commercialization and use of renewable energy and syn-

thetic fuels has been greatly enhanced by the initiatives proposed by

the President which are nearing final Congressional consideration. We

believe that these sources of energy will play an increasingly important

role in our energy future.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 801

—At Tokyo the Summit countries agreed “on the importance of

keeping domestic oil prices at world market prices or raising them to

this level as soon as possible.” This is exactly what the US is doing.

Over one third of US oil production is now free of price controls and

this proportion will increase monthly until September 30, 1981, when

all domestically produced oil will be free of price controls.

—Even with price controls on part of US oil production, the differ-

ence between the price of imported oil and the composite or average re-

finer acquisition cost of crude oil has been much smaller than com-

monly realized. In 1978 this difference amounted to an average of $2.11

per barrel. The gap widened somewhat in 1979 as world prices rose

faster than domestic crude oil prices. In September 1979 (the last month

for which reliable figures are available) the composite price was 80 per-

cent of the price of imported oil. The percentage gap between import

prices and the average acquisition cost of crude oil to refineries will

narrow because each month a large percentage of domestic production

will be freed of price controls. By September 30, 1981 the gap will be

eliminated.

—With the exception of gasoline and propane, the retail prices of

major petroleum products have been decontrolled. In the case of gaso-

line, retailers are permitted to pass through fully all increases in

product costs. Refiners are permitted to pass through to gasoline re-

tailers 110 percent of the increased cost of crude oil used to produce

gasoline. Therefore, the ex tax prices of gasoline and other petroleum

products are almost the same in the US and Europe.

—Changes in prices can have as much or more influence on con-

sumer behavior than absolute levels. The percentage rise in the real

price of gasoline and home heating oil in the US since 1973 has been

greater than in major European countries.

5. Energy Legislation

The following developments have taken place in the energy legis-

lation reported in reftel:

A. Windfall profits tax

On December 17, the Senate completed action on its version of the

windfall profits tax legislation. On December 19, a House/Senate con-

ference committee began deliberations over resolving the differing pro-

visions in the separate versions passed by each body. In a major deci-

sion, the conferees agreed on a tax level of 228 billion dollars over ten

years and are now considering alternative tax regimes consistent with

this revenue target. The administration hopes that action on this bill

will be completed by the end of January.

B. Energy mobilization board

This measure is now before a joint House/Senate conference com-

mittee to resolve the differing versions.



365-608/428-S/80010

802 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

C. Energy security corporation

This measure is also subject to conference committee

consideration.

D. Conservation

The Senate has already passed legislation providing $14 billion

over five years for solar and energy conservation. In the House there

are two bills under consideration, both of which provide for creation of

an energy bank to provide subsidized loans for residential and com-

mercial conservation. The bills differ, however, in two major respects:

—The Banking Committee bill provides for two separate banks,

one for solar and one for conservation, whereas the Interstate and For-

eign Commerce bill provides only for one bank;

—Only the Banking Committee version expands existing require-

ments that utilities provide energy audits for their customers.

To accelerate consideration of this legislation the House leadership

has agreed to let the House conferees consider solar and energy

conservation measures even though House action is not completed.

The conference is expected to begin discussion of these provisions

about February 1.

E. Gasoline rationing

The administration is preparing a standby gasoline rationing plan

under authority provided in the Emergency Energy Conservation Act

of November 5, 1979.

5

The plan would give the President authority to



impose an approved rationing plan at his discretion, if this is required

by a severe energy supply interruption or to comply with the obliga-

tion of the U.S. under the International Energy Program (i.e., the IEA oil

sharing program). The administration’s final plan will be submitted to

Congress; unless the plan is disapproved by joint resolution within 30

days, the plan is approved.

6. Mexican gas

The USG has also been working to enhance energy trade and coop-

eration with Mexico. The first contract negotiated under the framework

of the September 1979 U.S./Mexican agreement to facilitate the import

of Mexican natural gas

6

received final regulatory approval on Decem-



ber 28, 1979. This cleared the way for imports of 300 million cubic feet

per day of Mexican gas. This amount, about one half of one percent of

total U.S. consumption and 8 percent of U.S. natural gas imports, is the

5

The President signed the Emergency Energy Conservation Act, P.L. 96–102, also



known as the gas rationing bill, on November 5.

6

See footnote 4, Document 236.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 803

equivalent of 50,000 barrels per day of crude oil imports. The price is

$3.625 per MMBTU with quarterly escalator based on a mix of world

crude prices.

7. International energy R and D cooperation

The U.S. continues to pursue an active program of international co-

operation in the development and commercialization of new or im-

proved energy technologies. The primary focus for our efforts is in the

International Energy Agency (IEA). We also conduct some bilateral,

and occasionally multilateral activities, though in most cases these are

complementary to or associated with our IEA efforts. The first meeting

of the International Energy Technology Group (IETG) was held in Paris

November 5 and DOE Under Secretary John Deutch was elected chair-

man. The IETG, growing out of a U.S. initiative at the Tokyo Summit,

will examine the need for international cooperation in the commercial-

ization of new technologies likely to be available in the mid-1980’s. The

Group’s report, to be issued in late March, will be considered at the

Venice Summit.

Significant steps in bilateral cooperation, primarily with Japan,

were taken during November and December. The most important of

these was Japanese agreement to participate in phase one of the SRC II

(Solvent Refined Coal II) liquefaction project as a quarter partner (the

same as Germany). The cost of the SRC II demonstration facility, to be

built near Morgantown, West Virginia, is now estimated at $1.3 billion.

The first meeting of the U.S.–Japan Fusion Coordinating Committee

was held November 8–9 in La Jolla, California, to review the progress

of joint research at the Doublet III Tokamak. The Japanese are contrib-

uting $50 million to upgrade the Doublet III facility.

A U.S.-Japanese high energy physics implementing agreement

was signed November 11 followed by a meeting which laid out an ex-

perimental program at various U.S. accelerator facilities. Japanese fi-

nancial participation will be some $5–7 million. High energy physics

cooperation is also being undertaken between the U.S. and the PRC.

Over 40 PRC scientists are now working in this field at U.S. accelerator

centers and universities. This is part of DOE’s agreement to collaborate

with the PRC in its effort to build the world’s fourth largest atomic par-

ticle accelerator outside Beijing and to begin contributing to research

into the fundamental properties of matter by 1985. The PRC also ex-

plored the possibility of collaboration with DOE in the field of mag-

netic fusion.

Other significant recent bilateral activities include the visits of a

DOE alcohol team to Brazil to discuss possible areas of cooperation,

and a DOE coal team to Poland to review on-going cooperative activi-

ties in coal liquefaction.


365-608/428-S/80010

804 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

8. Nuclear affairs

The 23rd IAEA General Conference met in New Delhi December

3–10 and provided an opportunity for numerous consultations on nu-

clear matters, particularly as the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Eval-

uation (INFCE) is scheduled to be completed this February. The confer-

ence, in an unprecedented 46–29 vote (with 9 abstentions), rejected the

credentials of South Africa. The U.S. strongly opposed this action as in-

troducing political issues into the IAEA. This action does not affect

South Africa’s membership in the IAEA or the agreements under which

the IAEA applied non-proliferation safeguards with respect to certain

nuclear activities in South Africa.

The President has approved an amendment to the U.S.–IAEA

Agreement for Cooperation Concerning Peaceful Uses of Nuclear En-

ergy. The agreement incorporates new non-proliferation controls re-

quired by the Non-Proliferation Act of 1978. This agreement is the pri-

mary vehicle for U.S. peaceful nuclear cooperation with countries that

do not have bilateral agreements for cooperation with the U.S. The

amendment will soon be submitted to Congress, where it must lie for

60 days of continuous session before it may enter into force.

A U.S.–IAEA–Indonesia supply agreement was signed on Decem-

ber 7 in New Delhi. Under this agreement, the U.S. will supply 18.3 kgs.

of low enriched uranium for Indonesia’s Triga Mark II research reactor.



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling