Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Vance 257. Telegram From the Department of State to Selected


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet80/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   ...   95

Vance

257. Telegram From the Department of State to Selected

Diplomatic Posts

1

Washington, January 31, 1980, 1813Z.



27703. Subject: Gulf Oil Price Increases.

1. In the light of Yamani’s explanation to Ambassador West prior

to last OPEC meeting and Shaikh Ali Khalifa’s comments to Embassy

Kuwait, we are frankly confused as to how Saudi price increase to $26

followed by increases by Gulf states to what appears to be a $28

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D800055–0244.



Confidential; Immediate; Exdis. Drafted by Twinam, cleared by Calingaert and in E and

the Energy and Treasury Departments, and approved by Cooper. Sent to Jidda, Kuwait,

Abu Dhabi, and Doha. Repeated Priority to Dhahran, Riyadh, Baghdad, Muscat, Ma-

nama, London, Paris, Oslo, Lagos, Caracas, Jakarta, Algiers, Quito, and Libreville.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 805

marker

2

squares with what Saudis, Kuwaitis and others have been tell-



ing us. Saudi announcement of $24 marker prior to OPEC meeting was

allegedly part of a coordinated strategy designed to reach an OPEC

compromise on a marker not above $26 and a narrowing of differen-

tials above that marker. Price decisions by UAE and Qatar prior to

OPEC meeting and Kuwait’s after meeting seemed consistent with this

alleged strategy. In this context, Saudi increase to $26, once the abil-

ity of higher price OPEC members to hold their prices had been thor-

oughly tested is at least comprehensible (although retroactivity to Janu-

ary 1 is not). Decision by Kuwait, Iraq, Qatar, and UAE to increase

prices an additional $2 is totally incomprehensible within this concept

of a coordinated Gulf strategy. We therefore think a strong case can be

made for holding Gulf prices to present $26 Saudi level (with appropri-

ate differentials) and would of course welcome production policies and

Saudi efforts with Gulf states to achieve a reunified Gulf price

structure.

2. Action addressees are requested to approach host governments

at Ministerial level to seek clarification of recent increases. You should

seek clarification of following points:

—Are Gulf increases to $28 range part of a coordinated strategy

with Saudi Arabia or do they represent a change in pricing policy?

—What is SAG attitude on increases by Gulf states?

—How does decision of Gulf producers to raise prices shortly

after OPEC meeting and do so retroactively square with assertions by

Yamani and Ali Khalifa and others that a substantial surplus in the

market is developing? Have Gulf producers modified their market out-

look and if they foresee a tighter market does this suggest Saudis and

Kuwaitis will be prepared to maintain present level of production fur-

ther into 1980?

—What do SAG and Gulf producers see as impact of their price in-

creases on price decisions by other OPEC members?

—If latest price increases by Gulf states were part of strategy coor-

dinated with Saudi Arabia, how does this square with professed desire

of Saudi and Gulf producers to unify prices? Is unification now being

sought nearer the price levels of the upper tier of OPEC states? Are we

to anticipate an additional Saudi increase up to the Gulf level?

—What do host governments foresee as the course of OPEC pric-

ing in the remainder of this year?

2

On January 28, it was reported that Saudi Arabia had decided to raise the price of



a barrel of oil by $2 to $26, and that the price rise would be retroactive to January 1. The

next day, Iraq, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, and Qatar raised prices to $28 per

barrel. (The New York Times, January 28, 1980, p. 1, and January 30, 1980, p. D1)


365-608/428-S/80010

806 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

3. In this probing you should feel free to draw on State of the Union

message


3

and other available guidance, including Secretary Miller’s

late November discussions in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and the UAE,

4

to



emphasize efforts US is making to reduce consumption, combat infla-

tion, and maintain stable dollar while undertaking significant new obli-

gation of resources to maintain the sort of global strategic balance

which permits Saudi Arabia and Gulf neighbors to continue to feel able

to assert that they need no outside help in defending Gulf region from

aggression. While in course of these conversations you should give

credit where due to those OPEC members who are making an extra

contribution on the supply side and seem less eager than some to

charge all the market will bear for their oil. You should in no way sug-

gest USG condones latest increases; on the contrary, we are baffled and

disturbed by them. You might seek assessment of host governments as

to impact of their latest price increases on international economy, with

particular reference to developing countries. You should also probe as

to the possibilities for rolling back these price increases to Saudi price

so as to re-establish a consistent pricing structure in the Gulf, either de-

finitively or by substantially postponing the effective dates of the

increase.

4. For Baghdad: You should exercise your own discretion as to

whether and to what extent you wish to join action addressees in

seeking above clarification.



Vance

3

President Carter’s January 21 State of the Union message, which is printed in



Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Jimmy Carter, 1980

, pp. 114–180, contains

a section on “Creating Energy Security.” Delivered soon after the Soviet invasion of Af-

ghanistan, the speech also emphasized the strategic importance of the Persian Gulf area

and U.S. willingness to defend it: “In recent years as our own fuel imports have soared,

the Persian Gulf has become vital to the United States as it has been to many of our

friends and allies. Over the longer term, the world’s dependence on Persian Gulf oil is

likely to increase. The denial of these oil supplies—to us or to others—would threaten our

security and provoke an economic crisis greater than that of the Great Depression 50

years ago, with a fundamental change in the way we live. Twin threats to the flow of oil—

from regional instability and now potentially from the Soviet Union—require that we

firmly defend our vital interests when threatened.” On January 23, the President deliv-

ered his State of the Union of message to a joint session of Congress and declared what

became known as the “Carter Doctrine”: “Let our position be absolutely clear: An at-

tempt by any outside force to gain control of the Persian Gulf region will be regarded as

an assault on the vital interests of the United States of America, and such an assault will

be repelled by any means necessary, including military force.” The address, which was

broadcast nationwide, is ibid., pp. 194–200.

4

See Document 249.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 807



258. Memorandum From Secretary of Energy Duncan to President

Carter

1

Washington, February 7, 1980.



SUBJECT

Resumption of Oil Acquisition for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve



Background

The Department of Energy (DOE) suspended acquisitions for the

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) last March due to tight oil market

conditions caused by the reduction in Iranian production. The Tokyo

Summit partners agreed in June not to resume SPR purchases as long as

they would add undue pressures on the world market price and agreed

to consult about decisions they will make in that regard.

Events in the Middle East are a clear reminder of our need for a

substantial SPR. The present relatively comfortable world oil supply of-

fers a good opportunity for resuming purchases. Consequently we are

consulting with our Summit and selected IEA partners, and I will also

consult with Saudi Arabia regarding the resumption of SPR purchases.

2

I will inform you of the results of the Saudi consultation. Imports for



the SPR will be included in the 8.2 million barrels per day (MMB/D) oil

import ceiling for the United States that you directed in the State of the

Union message.

3

DOE is committed to filling the reserve in line with existing Ad-



ministration policy. Total volume of the reserve currently is 91.7 mil-

lion barrels; existing storage capacity is 248 million barrels. The reserve

can be filled at a maximum fill rate of 500,000 B/D over the next 6

months and has a withdrawal rate of 1 MMB/D that will be increased

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Special Projects



File, Box 14, Henry Owen, Chron, 2/1–8/80. Confidential.

2

According to the Embassy in Jidda: “Oil Minister Zaki Yamani protested in stron-



gest terms possible USG purchase of any oil for Strategic Petroleum Reserve. He likewise

objected to diverting Elk Hills oil to reserve on grounds that both such intended actions

would frustrate Saudi efforts to regain one-tier price system. He also predicted that such

purchases or diversion would cause other OPEC producers to reduce production and at-

tempt to raise prices even higher. In addition it would place substantial pressures on SAG

not to continue 9.5 MBD rate after current quarter. He requested most fervently that noth-

ing be done on purchase of oil for SPR, at least through the end of the third quarter.” (Tel-

egram 1093 from Jidda, February 17; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy

Files, D800085–0544) Elk Hills, located in central California, is the seventh largest oil field

in the Continental United States, and was part of the Federally-owned Naval Petroleum

Reserve before the U.S. Government sold it to the Occidental Petroleum Corporation on

February 5, 1998.

3

See footnote 4, Document 257.



365-608/428-S/80010

808 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

in accordance with additional fill. Over the longer term, the reserve can

be filled at a sustained rate of 200,000 to 300,000 B/D, with a drawdown

rate of 2 to 3.5 MMB/D.

Opportunity to Resume Oil Acquisition

Oil inventories in the OECD countries are at record high levels and

the outlook for 1980 oil demand is for the lowest growth since 1975.

U.S. net oil imports in 1980 (50-State basis) are projected in the range of

7.4 to 8.0 MMB/D including 200,000 B/D for SPR, allowing enough lee-

way within the 8.2 MMB/D ceiling for resuming SPR imports. Most

projections indicate some softness in the international crude oil market

in the middle quarters of 1980. Spot and term prices of internationally

traded crude oil already appear to be converging. However, uncertain-

ties exist on the supply side which could make for a tight market, par-

ticularly if there are significant OPEC production cutbacks or supply

interruptions.

It is the collective judgment of the interagency open market com-

mittee, which has monitored the international oil market over the last

several months, that now is an opportune time to resume purchases for

the SPR. This committee consists of representatives from the Depart-

ments of State and Treasury, Office of Management and Budget, Do-

mestic Policy Staff, and the National Security Council Staff, and is

chaired by the DOE Under Secretary. The committee has agreed in

principle to resume purchases for SPR at a rate of up to 200,000 B/D

based upon consultations with the Saudis and major energy consuming

nations. Continuation of purchases after their resumption would de-

pend upon continuing assessments of world oil market conditions.

We currently estimate that an average fill rate of 200,000 B/D

might slow the expected spot market decline in 1980 by about $1 per

barrel. If the spot market for crude oil accounts for 10 percent of U.S. oil

imports in 1980, resumption of SPR procurement may increase our total

non-SPR oil bill by some $250 million in 1980. Resumption of purchases

by other industrialized nations for their smaller government stocks

would increase slightly this price effect. Apparent German and Japa-

nese purchase goals are for an additional 16 and 32 million barrels re-

spectively for completion of their reserve programs, far less than ours.

However, we do not believe the Germans have the capacity to add to

their stockpile and we do not know whether Japan intends to enlarge

its reserve. In any case, we do not expect that reasonable fill rates on

their part would lead to official OPEC price increases.

The reaction of Saudi Arabia to resumed government oil stock-

piling and Saudi willingness to maintain current production levels will

be determined during my consultations with Saudi officials. Assuming

that my consultations with the Saudis indicate that our SPR acquisi-



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 809

tions will not trigger a cutback in their production, I now intend to re-

sume acquisitions at an average annual rate of up to 200,000 B/D as

soon as possible after consultations with the Saudis and our Summit

partners have been completed. Actual fill rates may vary above and be-

low this average from time to time, depending on buying opportunities

and delivery schedules.



Potential Sources of Acquisition

We have examined a number of domestic and international

sources of oil for SPR. Possible domestic options include the Naval Pe-

troleum Reserve (NPR) at Elk Hills, California; Alaskan State royalty

oil; mandatory industry allocations; competitive solicitations among

domestic producers; or Federal royalty oil from the outer continental

shelf in the Gulf of Mexico. The committee has agreed in principle to an

acquisition strategy involving both domestic and international pur-

chases. The domestic oil probably would come from the NPR. The prin-

cipal advantage of using domestic oil for SPR is one of perception.

OPEC producers are less likely to object to resumption of SPR fill if it

involves significant domestic sources even though the overall effect on

world oil supplies would be the same as if all the oil were purchased on

world oil markets. From a budget perspective, it may be less costly to

acquire all oil for SPR on the international market, since NPR oil in the

recent sale received bids of $35 to $41 a barrel. However, as you know,

other oil consuming nations have expressed their concern to us that our

NPR sales policies are giving signals to producing countries that their

prices could be adjusted still higher.

The details of our planned acquisition strategy are summarized

below:

1. We intend to acquire approximately 100,000 B/D from domestic



sources, assuming that this is necessary to overcome Saudi objections

to resuming SPR fill or for domestic policy purposes. At this time the

preferred domestic source is NPR oil. This volume represents approxi-

mately 75 percent of the government’s share of NPR oil and could be

exchanged in whole or in part for deliveries to the SPR. The remaining

25 percent, about 30,000 B/D, could be set aside for small refiners in

California. Section 201(K) of the NPR Production Act of 1976

4

requires a



Presidential order to make NPR oil available for SPR acquisition. We

will be submitting such an order for your approval shortly after the

consultations.

2. Potential international sources for the remaining 100,000 B/D

(or more depending on Saudi reactions) include producer governments

and private suppliers. Purchase prices will be in the range of the av-

4

See footnote 4, Document 95.



365-608/428-S/80010

810 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

erage term contract prices being paid for similar generic imported

crudes. DOE will attempt to obtain long-term contracts for volumes

sufficient to raise the annual fill-rate to 200,000 B/D. Other types of

purchases will also be considered in accordance with the price guide-

lines. The fill rate would be adjusted, including halting acquisition of

foreign oil if necessary, if market conditions dictate.



Budget and Organization

Over $4 billion of budget authority is currently available for oil ac-

quisition. Your 1981 budget includes $255 million for oil acquisition

outlays in fiscal year 1980 and $1,111 million in 1981 which is sufficient

for a fill-rate of 100,000 B/D, assuming resumption in 1980. If we are

successful in resuming purchases at the rate of 200,000 B/D, there will

be sufficient budget authority on hand, irrespective of acquisition

strategy. However, a 200,000 B/D purchase rate could increase the 1981

budget deficit by up to $1.2 billion either by increased outlays for oil, or

from revenues foregone by the use of NPR oil.



259. Paper Prepared in the Department of State

1

Washington, February 8, 1980.



SUBJECT

International Energy Strategy

In deciding on an international strategy we should bear in mind

the medium-term outlook (1985–1990) as much as, or even more than,

the 1980–81 outlook. The two perspectives raise different problems.

In the short run, emphasis necessarily is on measures to mitigate

the costs of a tight or tightening market through restraining the

scramble for supplies and equitably sharing the burden of cutting con-

sumption quickly through painful internal measures—price or other-

wise. Establishing import ceilings, consultations on pricing, and coor-

dinating stock policies are means of accomplishing these objectives. If

the ceilings are tight, they amount to an international allocation of

scarce supplies.

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, International Eco-



nomics File, Box 45, Rutherford Poats File, Chron, 2/80. Confidential. There is no drafting

information on the paper.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 811

Over the medium-term, with more time for adjustment, we can

seek to improve the underlying market situation through measures to

restrain demand and increase supply of primary fuels on a gradual

basis. For 1985, primary reliance for adjustment must still rest on de-

mand restraint measures. For 1990, supply side actions take on much

greater importance. The economic justification for new measures in ad-

vance of a crisis is that they are less costly than relying wholly on price

jumps imposed by OPEC and on reduced economic growth to adjust

OECD demand to reduced oil supplies. In addition, reduced depend-

ence on oil imports may well be essential to achieve political and strate-

gic objectives. Since lead times are long, decisions on these measures

have to be taken early if the results are to be worthwhile.

What are the likely oil market constraints over the next ten years

with which energy and economic policy will have to contend?



I. The World Market Outlook:

A lot of work has been done on the 1980–81 outlook; a reasonable

amount on 1985, and very little on 1990. This is what we have so far:

1980:

—OPEC production is likely to be down by 2 mmbd from 1979 lev-

els. This assumes a return to baseline production in Saudi Arabia and

Kuwait after the first quarter 1980, and moderate reductions in a few

other countries.

—This reduction in supply could be offset by:

1) a reduction of 6 mmbd in consumption (resulting from higher

prices and the assumption of zero OECD growth);

2) an increase in non-OPEC supply of .3 mmbd (assuming a further

decline in net communist exports);

3) the absence of additional stock building, which amounted to 1.1

million barrels per day in 1979. Stocks are now at record levels.

—While these calculations suggest greater precision than is war-

ranted, it is likely, new political disruptions aside, that much of the

steam will be taken out of the spot market during most of 1980. On the

other hand, downward pressure on contract prices can virtually be

ruled out because of the ease with which OPEC production can be fur-

ther reduced. At the least, contract prices should increase during 1980

by enough to offset inflation; if OECD economic growth is somewhat

higher than zero, prices could significantly increase in real terms.

—IEA import demand should also be down by 1.5–2 mmbd from

the import targets set for 1980 (which were based on OPEC supplies in

1979). The “surplus” will be unevenly spread among the IEA countries,

but only Japan may have difficulty in undershooting its ceiling.



365-608/428-S/80010

812 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

—The December communique´

2

said that the ministers would meet



in the first quarter of 1980 to review the need to adjust 1980 targets in

light of the market situation. If both OPEC supplies and net import de-

mand go down by roughly equivalent amounts and if spot prices con-

tinue to soften, those opposing adjustment of 1980 targets will hold

strongly to their position—even though the underlying market balance

is narrow.



1981:

Assuming significant economic recovery (3% OECD economic

growth), oil consumption may still increase only moderately, princi-

pally because of additional use of coal, nuclear capacity, and gas. Even

so, significant pressure on prices could reemerge, because OPEC sup-

plies are not expected to increase and in any event are subject to major

uncertainties—as are the projections for expanded use of alternative

energy fuels (coal, nuclear and gas). The IEA Secretariat believes that

the market could tighten in mid-1981, but clearly the margin for error is

so small and the uncertainties so substantial that price pressures could

develop earlier.

1985:

Present projections suggest that oil supplies available for OECD

net imports could range from 19 mmbd to 22 mmbd. Saudi production

is the major variable. Present estimates suggest that for both economic

and internal political reasons, Saudi production is not likely to exceed

8.5 mmbd and it may be less.

This is a much more pessimistic outlook than OECD has assumed

up to now. It rests on a growing belief that OPEC production will be

more heavily influenced by conservationist policies (made feasible by

high and rising real oil prices), that declining Soviet production will in-

crease demand on the world market by 1.5 mmbd between now and

1985, and that OPEC oil consumption will grow by more than 1 mmbd,

thus further reducing the amount of OPEC production available for

export.


The main point is that even the optimistic estimate of OPEC sup-

ply would require that net OECD imports be 4 mmbd below the

present, and recently reduced, IEA targets for 1985. OECD oil produc-

tion is likely to decline by 1 mmbd because the continued fall in US

production will not be fully offset by increased North Sea oil (in part

because UK and Norwegian politics could also turn more conservation-

ist). Thus, OECD oil consumption in 1985 may have to be on the order

of 12% less than it was in 1979. If this reduced availability of oil is not

2

See footnote 2, Document 251.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 813

offset by supplies of non-oil primary fuels above the amounts now

foreseen, and by non-price conservation measures, the prospect for the

next five years is for further large increases in real oil prices and low

economic growth.



1990:

We are only at the beginning of this forecasting exercise. If CIA’s

first rough oil availability numbers are to be taken seriously, the world

will come to the end. We will soon have new figures, representing the

results of further analysis. I doubt that the 1990 outlook will be more

promising than 1985 (assuming present policy trends), and it is very

likely to be worse.

II. Policy Implications:

1. The 1980 supply situation may provide some breathing room to

get away from the present preoccupation with short-term emergency

measures to deal with immediate shortages. The danger is that it will be

used as an excuse for doing nothing. This would be a serious mistake. If

we do not begin now to accelerate measures to restrain demand and in-

crease supply, the macro-economic adjustments to a steadily tightening

oil market in the future will be that much more severe and costly.

2. Going directly to setting 1981 targets as a way station to a pro-

gram of sustained demand restraint through 1985 might now be the

best way to proceed. There seems to be considerable support among

the major countries for concentrating on 1981, although by no means a

willingness to face the need for sustained demand restraint to cope at

less cost with the certainty of long pull problems. To be realistic, we

would have to face the probability that in a 1981 target setting exercise,

most other IEA countries would insist on starting from actual con-

sumption (e.g., 1979–1980 average) adjusted for growth, rather than

from 1980 targets. This would greatly reduce, if not eliminate, the

present margin in the US target, but it would require taking into full ac-

count the oil consumption requirements for US economic recovery in

1981, which would be of advantage to the US.

3. On the other hand, if we insist on achieving reductions in the

1980 targets in the present market situation, we are likely to get no-

where. At most, by shedding a great deal of blood, we might get a re-

duction of 1 mmbd for the IEA as a whole, of which considerably more

than half probably would be from the US target. At worst, we could

end up in disagreement and disarray. In any event, because the collec-

tive IEA target is 1.5–2 mmbd above actual demand for consumption,

any reductions that might be negotiated would not result in tight tar-

gets and would not be likely to stimulate new demand restraint

measures.


365-608/428-S/80010

814 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

4. This suggests that at the March Ministerial meeting, we should

try to concentrate minds on the bleak 1985 outlook, on setting 1981

targets consistent with this worsening supply outlook and, most im-

portantly, on putting into place new measures that could improve the

economic fundaments of future markets. The Germans and the British

have been saying we should concentrate on measures; we could take

their statements at face value. The objective would be to have each

country adopt new measures in 1980 that would restrain oil consump-

tion in 1981 and beyond, bearing in mind the need to accelerate energy

conservation and production to deal with the medium-term outlook.

We would have to agree on price and non-price measures that were

meaningful and could be quantified, so that rough equality of effort

would exist, be perceived, and could be monitored. Setting tight import

targets for 1981 would be the first step in this program.

5. If we pursue this approach, the March IEA Meeting, illustratively,

could shape up as follows:

—The ministers would announce that as a result of reduced eco-

nomic growth and energy conservation measures, net IEA imports in

1980 were likely to be 1–2 mmbd below the collective IEA target and

that each country would at least meet its ceiling.

—They would express their concern about the medium term oil

market outlook and announce a reduction of 4 mmbd in the collective

IEA target for 1985, as required by that outlook. Individual country tar-

gets for 1985 would be approved and country programs for achieving

these targets would be reviewed, at a November meeting. These pro-

grams would subsequently be monitored on a regular basis.

—The ministers would announce that net import targets for 1981

would be reduced by 1.5–2 mmbd from the 1980 target level. This

would require that oil consumption be 3%–4% lower than in 1979. Min-

isters would meet in November to agree on how the reduction in

targets would apply to each country and to approve the measures pro-

posed by each country to achieve its target.

—If supplies proved to be higher than the collective 1981 target,

the ministers would agree that their countries would absorb the addi-

tional amount into stocks so as to maintain stability in the market. If

supplies proved to be lower than anticipated, the targets for 1981

would be reduced on a pro-rata and semi-automatic basis to share the

burdens equitably.

—We might also seek to build up an informal system of close con-

sultations among major consumers (a hot line) to stiffen resistance to

leapfrogging prices when the market is comparatively slack and stocks

are high, as at present. This probably would require informal under-

standings providing partially compensating import rights to countries

that might suffer reduced supplies as a result of resistance to price in-



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 815

creases. It also would require understandings with the moderate OPEC

exporters as being part of a joint program to avoid disorder and disrup-

tion in the market. Arrangements of this type, however, should not be

part of the formal IEA system.

6. The Venice Summit could follow up on this approach. If agree-

ment is reached on interim measures at the IEA, the heads of gov-

ernment could agree on:

An accelerated program to increase supplies of alternative sources of



energy by 1990.

One way to do this would be establish expanded goals

for the use of coal, nuclear energy and synthetic fuels by 1990. In this

respect it might be useful to tie in the efforts of the US and Japan to a

European Community-wide program, now being formulated by the

Commission, which in part might be financed by a new community oil

import fee or oil consumption tax. The report of the IETG could help to

formulate goals for synthetic fuels. These goals for the expanded pro-

duction of alternative fuels in 1990 could be presented as a contribution

by the industrial countries to the achievement of an orderly transition

to a world economy that will have to be less dependent on oil.

A program to accelerate production of primary energy fuels in the de-

veloping countries, both to lessen the damage done to developing

country economies by rising oil prices and as a positive means of ad-

justing to the increasingly difficult world oil balance. In proposing a

new program (or an expansion of existing programs), the Summit

leaders could invite both OPEC countries and other industrial coun-

tries to join in this effort. With the groundwork properly prepared in

Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, and Mexico, this initiative could be presented

as a Summit response to an OPEC call for joint action to deal with the

energy problems of the developing countries.

—Also, if positive responses were received beforehand from mod-

erate producing countries, (see section below on tactics, approach to

the Saudis, Venezuela, and Mexico), the Summit leaders might make some



forthcoming noises about the need for new understandings between oil pro-

ducing and oil consuming countries

to ensure an orderly world market,

for their mutual benefit.

III. Tactics:

1. Lambsdorff. We are now dug in on adjusting targets for 1980 as a

means of obtaining demand restraint. We should discuss with Lambs-

dorff the possibility of passing over target adjustment for 1980 and con-

centrating directly on 1981 and 1985 targets, and on the necessary de-

mand restraint measures. Without going into specific numbers, we

should seek his support for the concept of tight 1981 targets and strong

proposals for measures as well as agreement on the general lines of an

approach to energy issues at the Summit. We might also broach to


365-608/428-S/80010

816 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Lambsdorff, or leave for the subsequent visit of Schmidt to Wash-

ington, the question of a possible US/Japan, European Community ap-

proach on alternative energy fuels.

2. Yamani. Secretary Duncan’s talks with Yamani should have am-

bitious objectives.

—We need to get Saudi understanding and agreement on stock

policies—not only for the SPR but also for coordinated IEA stock man-

agement policies. Yamani must come to understand that by carrying

and cooperately managing large stocks, the industrial countries can

make an important contribution to orderly markets and avoid costly

disruptions of the world economy. In international commodity agree-

ments, stocks are either financed by producers or jointly financed by

producers and consumers. In the case of oil, the importers could be

asked to take sole responsibility for financing stocks even though the

purpose of carrying stocks would benefit the world economy, includ-

ing Saudi Arabia and other moderate producers. If we could get Saudi

understanding and support for this position, it would immediately be

feasible to work out a stronger and coordinated stock policy in the IEA,

as well as a rapid building of strategic stocks.

—We should use this visit to explore the feasibility of developing

an understanding between producers and consumers on the oil market,

including understandings about the future course of prices and, most

importantly provisions for standby capacity to underwrite such under-

standings. The place to begin is Saudi Arabia. Are the Saudis interested

in such understandings, and if so, do they believe they should be based

on informal discussions, bilateral or multilateral, with a few of the

moderate producers, or on a broad agreement between producers and

consumers along the lines of full fledged international commodity

agreements. (Separate paper on these issues will be prepared.)

—We should obtain Saudi views on their willingness and that of

other oil producers to participate in an expanded assistance program to

increase LDC energy production.

3. Calderon-Berti. Depending on the talks with Yamani, C-B’s visit

to Washington in March provides an opportunity to explore producer-

consumer understandings and OPEC participation in an LDC energy

assistance program. A clarification of Venezuela’s interest in the in-

volvement of US and other industrial countries in heavy oil invest-

ments in Orinoco would also be helpful to action in this area and would

be useful in shaping the IETG report for the Summit.

4. Mexico. Secretary Duncan’s visit to Mexico provides another op-

portunity to explore with a key country (1) producer-consumer under-

standings; (2) support for an expanded LDC energy program; and (3)

stock policies.


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 817



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling