Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet83/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   ...   95

265. Memorandum of Conversation

1

Washington, March 20, 1980.



SUBJECT

Meeting between Secretary Vance and Foreign Minister Okita

PARTICIPANTS

US

Japan

Secretary Vance

Foreign Minister Saburo Okita

Undersecretary Newsom

Ambassador to US Fumihiko

Undersecretary Cooper

Togo

Richard Holbrooke, Assistant



Deputy Foreign Minister Yasue

Secretary (EA)

Katori

Reginald Bartholomew, Director



Shinichiro Asao, Director General,

Pol-Mil Bureau

N. American Bureau

Donald Gregg, NSC Staff

Kiyoshi Sumiya, Minister,

Michael Armacost, Deputy Assist-

Japanese Embassy

ant Secretary (EA)

Mitsuhiko Hazumi, Deputy Direc-

Nicholas Platt, Deputy Assistant

tor Gen. Economic Bureau

Secretary (DOD/ISA)

Yoshio Hatano, Economic

Minister, Japanese Embassy

1. Following a one hour briefing earlier in the morning by INR and

Assistant Secretary Holbrooke on Soviet naval and air deployments in

Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean area, on developments within In-

dochina, and on Secretary Vance’s meeting with PRC Vice Minister

Zhang, Foreign Minister Okita met with Secretary Vance during a

working luncheon and follow-on talk for three and a half hours on

March 20.

2. The Secretary welcomed Okita warmly, noting that “productive

partnership” is of vital importance to the US. Okita responded that he

had been trying to come to the US ever since assuming his post in No-

vember 1979, but that Diet business had prevented that.

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Executive Secretariat Files: Lot 84D241, Nodis



1980 Memoranda of Conversation for Secretary Vance. Secret; Nodis. Drafted by Alan

Romberg, Country Director for Japan, and approved by Raymond Seitz of S/S on April 7.

A note indicates the list of participants was continued on the last page, which is not print-

ed here. The full text of this memorandum of conversation and additional documentation

on Okita’s visit are scheduled for publication in Foreign Relations, 1977–1980, volume XIV,

Korea; Japan.



365-608/428-S/80010

836 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



Energy

14. Okita then turned the conversation to broader energy matters.

He said the discussion in IEA

2

centered on three aspects: a) scientific co-



operation; b) energy economy and savings; and c) shifting to alterna-

tive sources of energy. He said that the GOJ has introduced a plan this

year to save 7 percent on energy usage. He noted that for the last six

years, real GNP has grown at over 6 percent annually, but oil consump-

tion has not grown at all. Thus there has already been great economiz-

ing. There might be some increase this year, but this would be dis-

cussed in the IEA.

15. On alternative sources, the GOJ plans to reduce its dependence

on oil from 74 percent at present to under 50 percent by 1990. This will

require large imports of coal, a subject he had discussed with the Aus-

tralians during his visit there in January. In addition to coking coal,

they can provide some burning coal for power generation. Also, they

can supply some uranium and natural gas. The Chinese also said that

while the oil prospects are not so bright as before, the PRC could sup-

ply 100 million tons of coal if Japan requires that. Okita also mentioned

US coal. Beyond that, Japan is working on alternative sources such as

solar and fusion. They appreciate US cooperation in all these areas.

16. Under Secretary Cooper then described our view of the energy

situation and its relation to the Venice Summit. He said we have been

working with Japan and others for three years on these issues. In pre-

paring for the Venice Summit, we would be relying on progress at the

IEA Ministerial in Paris in May. We hope there to establish a common

assessment of the near- and mid-term future, including oil consump-

tion targets for 1981 and goals for 1985. Cooper said there is some con-

troversy on this, largely with Germany and the UK who think the exer-

cise may be unnecessary and unwise. Most others, however, feel that

some international framework regarding conservation and substitution

is necessary. The Secretary added that the President certainly feels that

way.

17. The Secretary and Under Secretary Cooper stressed the impor-



tance of progress at the IEA Ministerial for success at Venice. Cooper

said there was also the question of measures to be taken individually

by countries. These would vary, of course, from country to country, but

each needs to take steps.

18. Beyond the IEA meeting and individual country measures,

Cooper noted a third concern was the spot market. We have, of course,

2

The IEA Governing Board met March 13–14. During the meeting, the members



“went to work in earnest” on preparing for the IEA Ministerial meeting in May. (Tele-

gram 71281 to Ankara, March 18; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files,

D800137–0534)


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 837

discussed this issue with Japan, the UK and others. There is no magic

solution so long as demand exceeds supply. However, in 1979, some

countries got substantial supplies on the spot market, scrambling for oil

and building stocks, only to find in the end that supplies were not

short. We need new, multilateral technical discussions, Cooper said.

19. The Secretary observed that a collateral issue was how the en-

ergy discussion in the UN special session

3

was related to the IEA/



Venice discussions. Although it has not worked in the past, to what ex-

tent should we seek a producer/consumer dialogue?

20. Cooper said that the whole question of a late August special

session was obscured by the agreement to global negotiations. Until we

have various preparatory meetings in the Committee of the Whole we

will not be able to sort out the respective responsibilities of the special

session (e.g. international development strategy for the 80’s with which

the LDCs do not seem to want to grapple) and the global negotiations

(where people now think energy is the key issue). The G–77 thinks the

global negotiations should go from January to September 1981, thus

filling up the entire gap between UNGAs. In fact, the Indians, who are

in the chair of the G–77, have said they would welcome suggestions

how to use all that time.

21. To speak of a “dialogue” on energy is much too vague, Cooper

continued. Some in the US and elsewhere literally think of a global bar-

gain between suppliers and producers. But though they don’t rule it

out, most who have looked hard at this question, including OPEC

countries, are skeptical. Much is possible short of that, however. Per-

haps the greatest promise, Cooper said, is in helping non-OPEC LDCs

in developing conventional and non-conventional sources of energy. It

is certainly in our interest to do so, and OPEC countries sees it in their

interest as well. Thus there is a clear convergence of interests if we can

work out the modalities. So far as OPEC is concerned, some of the

members are cool on multilateral efforts, others would like to see them

linked to aid flows.

22. Okita responded that, so far as the special session is concerned,

there are too many countries participating for meaningful results.

Though there is need for a dialogue, the size of that session is not con-

ducive to a good outcome. The dialogues should mainly be conducted

bilaterally. For its own part, Japan needs to work on shifting from pur-

chases of oil from majors to direct deals since supply to Japanese refin-

eries by US majors had been cut back. There has been a serious effort in

3

The Preparatory Committee of the UN Conference on New and Renewable



Sources of Energy held a special session in New York February 4–8 to lay the ground-

work for the Conference in Nairobi in August 1981. For further information on the Com-

mittee’s session, see Yearbook of the United Nations, 1980, pp. 705–708.


365-608/428-S/80010

838 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

this respect over the past several months. In the past, the majors sup-

plied 1.4 million barrels/day (b/d), but now that is down to 400,000

b/d, and this will disappear completely after the spring. This has pre-

sented very serious problems. Some government officials say that the

GOJ should ask the USG to influence majors to keep supplies going to

Japan. But, Okita said, this may not be “quite easy”. So, Japan has en-

deavored to increase contacts with producer governments to increase

supply. This is one aspect of Japan’s relations with the Middle East. (In

response to a question from Cooper, Okita noted that, though the gov-

ernment was trying to facilitate them, these direct deals were private,

not governmental.)

23. Regarding assistance to LDCs in developing their own energy,

Okita agreed this was very important and said it is an issue that we

need to face at Venice including in the areas of solar, biomass, coal, nat-

ural gas, etc.

24. At the Secretary’s request, Cooper explained the consequences

of the Saudi takeover of ARAMCO.

4

Cooper said that if it is carried out



in “benign” circumstances, it will be a sheer formality with no substan-

tive change. The Saudis already consider ARAMCO theirs and have

only delayed the takeover for interministerial reasons. ARAMCO is

viewed by the Saudis as a service company now, and it will continue as

that after the takeover, though it will get some payment in oil.

25. In response to the Secretary’s question whether the shares of

the majors would be affected, Cooper said that in the short run they

should not be affected, again assuming a “benign” takeover. Over the

long run, the Saudis are still considering how to handle it. Congress

and the FTC are fishing for sensitive data. If the pressure is too great,

Saudi Arabia could say it is too difficult to deal with the US. This is not

likely, but it is possible.

26. Under Secretary Newsom observed that the total amount of oil

in the world now under control of the majors has been reduced. Cooper

said that the share of crude handled by the majors has dropped from 65

percent to 45 percent. But shares in distribution of product are not so

different from the past.

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

4

Saudi Arabia completed the full acquisition of Aramco in early September al-



though the final payment was reportedly made on March 9. (The New York Times, Sep-

tember 5, 1980, p. D3)



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 839



266. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassies in

France, the United Kingdom, Italy, West Germany, Japan,

and Canada

1

Washington, April 1, 1980, 1855Z.



85839. Subject: Venice Summit: Energy Preparatory Meeting.

1. Summary. The Energy Preparatory Meeting chaired in Germany

by Engelmann (FRG) on March 26–27, agreed that the oil market out-

look was serious (although the UK remains skeptical) and that the

Venice Summit should focus on longer term (1990), but delegations dif-

fered significantly on specific actions to be taken. The United States was

represented by Fried (NSC), Treat (DOE), and Pickering (State). The

FRG and the UK opposed quantified objectives, preferring general al-

though strengthened commitments to additional policy measures and

monitoring of results. After a year or so experience, they argued, the

base might exist to establish 1990 goals. However, neither excluded

some quantification as a possible compromise. Canada, Japan, and

Italy all expressed some support for quantified objectives if limited to

two or three aggregate targets, e.g., oil consumption, non-oil supply,

energy/GNP ratio. Only France indicated strong support for the U.S.

position, which called for sectoral oil consumption goals and targets for

coal, synthetics, and nuclear power. In spite of FRG and UK opposition,

strong U.S. advocacy of quantified objectives resulted in clear majority

for at least some quantification. Energy group will meet again May

25–26 in Rome to complete preparations for the Summit. End

summary.

2. Summit Objectives. All delegations agreed that short and me-

dium term (1981, 1985) should be the subject of the IEA Ministerial,

with the Venice Summit focussing on the longer term. All delegations

agreed that the oil market outlook was pessimistic, although UK

(Jones), citing a recent OECD study (“Shriner Report”) insisted that a

soft market was still a possibility in 1990. Chairman Engelmann out-

lined his intention to redraft his discussion paper for eventual presenta-

tion at the April preparatory meeting in Sardinia, but agreed at U.S. in-

sistence to attach U.S. draft communique´ containing quantitative

projections. Delegations were invited to submit latest 1990 forecasts by

April 2 so that Engelmann could disseminate second draft by April 4.

Energy group will convene again May 25–26 in Rome, following IEA

Ministerial, to complete draft communique´. At that meeting, IEA Exec-

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D800165–0421.



Confidential. Drafted by Treat; cleared by Treat, Fried, and Pickering; and approved by

Pickering.



365-608/428-S/80010

840 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

utive Director Lantzke will provide a report on the progress made in

implementing the decisions taken at the Bonn and Tokyo Summits, ful-

filling commitment to monitor results.

3. Oil Consumption Objectives. U.S. pushed hard for reduced con-

sumption targets for major sectors (utility, residential/commercial, in-

dustry, and transport). Only the French indicated support for this ap-

proach. FRG and UK strongly opposed quantified sectoral targets,

citing lack of credibility of previous targets and inadequate time for

analysis of appropriate consumption levels. Canada, Japan, and Italy

took middle ground, supporting concept of some quantified objectives

for oil consumption, but not accepting need for targets in each sector.

FRG and UK left door open for possible compromise, with Engelmann

agreeing to present options in his redrafted backup paper.

4. Coal. All delegations supported strong statement on doubling

the use and production of coal, although Canada insists on an equally

strong statement on protecting the environment. UK urged consulta-

tion with non-Summit countries, particularly Australia, at IEA Ministe-

rial to avoid any misunderstanding.

5. Synthetics. All delegations agreed Summit should endorse IETG

report, but U.S. proposal to set 2 MMB/D goal for synthetics produc-

tion in 1990 met widespread opposition. Delegations also concluded

the work should go forward in OECD/IEA on developing new energy

technologies and constructing demonstration plants. FRG and UK were

particularly vehement in opposing establishment of 1990 targets on

grounds (ostensibly) that such a decision went beyond the hard-fought

IETG compromise on a two-phase approach and would be “revising”

the report only days after its adoption. U.S. argued that while IETG re-

port did not have quantitative goals, it was within the province of Min-

isters or Heads of Government to react to the report by setting goals.

6. Nuclear Energy. With the exception of objections by the FRG

and the UK to the idea of quantified objectives for 1990, there was a

general agreement that, in the nuclear energy area, increased efforts

should be made to develop nuclear power. In doing so, account should

be taken of the requirement to improve health and safety protection

and to undertake programs to demonstrate the safe storage and dis-

posal of nuclear waste. Germany proposed, as did the U.S. draft com-

munique´, that special account be taken of the work of INFCE and that

the IAEA be the center for future cooperative works. Japan proposed

more support for reprocessing and the creation of a nuclear energy

pressure group, but did not receive support. France, and to a lesser ex-

tent Canada and Japan, supported the U.S. proposal for quantitative

targets.


7. LDC Energy Production. U.S. proposal for considering estab-

lishment of a new energy development facility affiliated with the



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 841

World Bank received sympathetic hearing from all delegations. While

other delegations stressed need to consult in capitals with Finance Min-

istries, all indicated strong support for additional action to encourage

primary energy production in LDCs and indicated interest in specific

U.S. proposal on conditions that OPEC surplus countries would partic-

ipate. In addition to briefing by World Bank (Chardenet) on status of its

energy program, group focussed extensively on tactics of presentation.

Strong desire to win OPEC financial support translated into differing

views on appropriate form of Summit action. FRG and others initially

counselled slow approach, suggesting no new initiative should be pre-

sented at Summit, but should wait for progress in the UN global negoti-

ations. However most other delegations joined U.S. in favoring Summit

action in June. Engelmann agreed that issue would be discussed again

at May meeting.

8. Relations With Producers. No delegations expressed expectation

of imminent breakthrough in prospects for producer/consumer dia-

logue. Group generally accepted U.S. draft language for communique´,

but preferred to omit specific reference to price and supply as poten-

tially dangerous. All considered this area as troubling and most ex-

pressed perplexity as to what should be done.



Vance

267. Action Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of Energy

for International Affairs (Goldman) to Secretary of Energy

Duncan and the Deputy Secretary of Energy (Sawhill)

1

Washington, April 23, 1980.



SUBJECT

Impact of Iranian Oil Embargo/Boycott



Issue

What action should be taken in response to an Iranian oil embargo

or in support of a coordinated boycott of Iranian oil by our allies.

1

Source: Department of Energy, Executive Secretariat Files, Job #8824, International



Affairs, 4/80–5/80. Confidential. Drafted by Treat. A handwritten note indicates that the

memorandum was handcarried to Duncan.



365-608/428-S/80010

842 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



Background

In the first quarter of 1980, Iranian oil production averaged 2.5 mil-

lion b/d, with exports of about 1.8–1.9 million b/d. Of these exports,

approximately 1.5 million b/d went to the OECD countries. Since early

April, however, there has been a substantial drop in Iranian exports. In

response to the pricing dispute between NIOC and various Japanese

and British companies, exports are reported to have recently fallen to a

level of .3–.4 million b/d. Thus, the balance of Iranian exports, roughly

1.5 million b/d, are at stake.

The distribution of Iranian exports among the industrialized coun-

tries is very uneven (as shown on Table 1),

2

ranging from the relatively



high dependence of Japan, Germany, and some smaller European

countries, to very low levels in France, the UK, Italy, and Canada.

The current debate over sanctions

3

could result in various actions



which might interrupt Iranian oil exports to major industrialized coun-

tries, or political groupings such as the European Communities or the

IEA. The EC plus Japan might eventually discontinue their purchases

of Iranian oil; the IEA might take action to activate its sharing system;

or the Iranians themselves might declare an embargo in retaliation for

other political/economic measures. Whatever the precise nature of

events, the loss of Iranian oil to all or some of our allies does not appear

at this juncture to pose insurmountable difficulties to the world oil mar-

ket because:

• Analysis by both DOE and CIA suggests that the oil market

could absorb a complete loss of Iranian exports with only modest pres-

sures on oil prices, if spot market speculation or inventory hoarding

can be avoided. Demand has been falling rapidly due to the past price

increases and to the reductions in economic activity.

• Iran may elect to sell a substantial portion of its exports to alter-

native markets in Eastern Europe and the Third World. Such sales

could displace other sources of supply which might then become avail-

able to our allies to offset the loss of Iranian oil.

• Some additional supplies may be available from other OPEC

producers. Iraq might be willing to sell an additional 300,000 b/d. Ven-

2

Attached but not printed.



3

On April 7, President Carter announced a break in diplomatic relations with Iran

and issued Executive Order 12205, which imposed several economic sanctions on Iran,

including the prohibition of U.S. exports. Executive Order 12211, April 17, extended the

sanctions to include the prohibition of all direct or indirect imports from Iran. See Public

Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Jimmy Carter, 1980

, pp. 612–614 and 714–716.

Meeting in Luxembourg on April 22, the European Community also voted to impose full

economic sanctions on Iran on May 17. The text of the EC resolution was published in The



New York Times

, April 23, 1980, p. A12. On April 24, Japan allied itself with the EC

decision.


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 843

ezuela may have some volumes of heavy oil for sale and might also be

persuaded to raise its production ceiling by 200,000–300,000 b/d. Ku-

wait has some oil available for contract sales and could temporarily re-

lax its recently announced production cut, although the Kuwait stance

on prices and contract terms has become harsh, as of late. There may be

offsetting potential elsewhere, such as Nigeria, the North Sea, and

small Gulf producers such as Qatar.

• Current world stocks are 500 million barrels above last year’s

level and at least 200–250 million barrels above normal. If properly

used, these “excess” stocks could offset the loss of 1.5 million b/d from

Iran for up to 6 months.

Discussion

The principal danger in the current situation is panic buying and a

competitive scramble for incremental supplies, particularly by the

Japanese and British companies which were most dependent on Iran.

To deal with this threat, there is a continuum of actions which the

United States might consider:

• Company Approach—The Deputy Secretary has initiated calls to

major U.S. oil companies (Talking Points are attached),

4

urging them to



facilitate a reallocation of world oil supplies. Following the results of

the ongoing IEA discussions, a second round of discussions with com-

panies should be undertaken to cover spot market and inventory man-

agement policies.

• Good Offices—We could also approach key producing gov-

ernments to urge that production be increased to offset the loss of Ira-

nian oil.

• IEA Action—The IEA Governing Board (GB) is currently consid-

ering two possible courses of action:

Soft Option—The GB may soon endorse this approach, which

calls for consultations with oil companies, approaching other produc-

ing countries, careful monitoring of oil market developments, re-

straints on spot market activities and consultations on stock

management.

Hard Option—In addition to the above actions, the GB could trig-

ger the IEA sharing system. If the loss of Iranian supplies stems from a

self-imposed boycott rather than an embargo, there might be some op-

position from the IEA neutrals, but this should be manageable. Prelimi-

nary calculations indicate that activation of the IEA system would only

require a minor reduction in U.S. imports (of perhaps 100,000 b/d) and

4

Attached but not printed.



365-608/428-S/80010

844 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

would require the triggering countries to first absorb a 7 percent short-

fall; further work in this area is underway.

• Increase U.S. Production—If the State of Alaska would tempo-

rarily relax its MER requirements, we could increase Alaskan produc-

tion by about 100,000 b/d for a period of perhaps 3 months. This would

be a modest but dramatic gesture, emphasizing our willingness to be

supportive. The incremental Alaskan oil should be kept in the United

States. A more ambitious option—seeking legislative authority to ex-

change or export Alaskan oil, seems unnecessary and politically

unwise.


• Reduce U.S. Import Quota—The President could also reduce the

1980 U.S. import quota to emphasize willingness to free up supplies for

our allies. This action would not necessarily require additional U.S.

policy actions since the impact of higher prices, existing prices, and

lower economic growth seem very likely to keep U.S. imports well

below 7.5 million b/d this year.

5

Recommendation

Our most important objective should be to prevent a competitive

scramble for marginal oil supplies which drives up spot prices, in turn

touching off further increases in official prices. We need to reassure the

Japanese, other allied governments, and the public that the loss of Ira-

nian oil can be absorbed with only minor adjustments. Some overt U.S.

action is essential in this regard, as is close cooperation with our allies.

As a first response, we should:

• Maintain close consultations with our major companies, ad-

vising them of Governing Board actions on inventories and spot

market activity, and enlisting their support;

• Initiate approaches to other producing countries, in coordination

with our IEA partners;

• Implement other elements of the IEA soft option, as they may

emerge from today’s Governing Board;

• Assess rapidly the feasibility of quickly increasing Alaskan

production.

As a later round of actions to be taken, if deemed necessary, we

could:

5

On April 22, Johnston sent an action memorandum to Vance on “whether to en-



courage or support a boycott of Iranian oil by our allies by a) obtaining White House con-

currence that the United States would be prepared to forego a portion of our oil supplies

to share in a likely supply shortfall, and b) exploring with Congress the possibilities of

using existing authority or seeking new legislation to facilitate the diversion of some oil

from the United States for this purpose.” Johnston added: “Whether or not a boycott is

agreed on, these steps would encourage our allies to impose economic sanctions in the

face of Iranian threats to embargo oil exports to nations joining in sanctions.” (National

Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P870128–2590)



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 845

• Support activation of the IEA allocation system;

• Increase Alaskan production;

• Reduce our oil import ceiling either individually or in conjunc-

tion with our allies.

We should maintain close consultations with the Congressional

leadership throughout these efforts, but we need not seek new legisla-

tive authority at this time.

6


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling