Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet84/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   ...   95

Leslie J. Goldman

7

6

No decision for action is indicated.



7

Printed from a copy with this typed signature and an indication that Goldman

signed the original.

268. Telegram From the Department of State to All OECD

Capitals

1

Washington, April 28, 1980, 0415Z.



112008. Subject: De´marche In Response to Iranian Oil Cutoff.

1. Entire text Confidential.

2. Posts should promptly approach host government to inform

them of measures taken or being contemplated by the U.S. Government

in response to the cutoff of Iranian oil to Japanese and British oil com-

panies and to seek their cooperation in coordinated efforts aimed at

avoiding the repetition of last year’s price explosion in the world oil

market.


3. You may draw upon the following talking points:

(A) The National Iranian Oil Company (NIOC) is seeking a $2.50

per barrel increase in the price of Iranian oil. British and Japanese oil

companies which were purchasing Iranian oil have refused to buy at

the higher price and on April 21 Iran stopped all crude oil deliveries to

those companies.

(B) Because of this, Iranian exports have reportedly fallen substan-

tially. It is possible that Iran will find other customers for a portion of its

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D800212–0983.



Confidential; Immediate; Exdis. Drafted by Todd and approved by Rosen. Repeated to

Algiers, Abu Dhabi, Baghdad, Caracas, Doha, Jakarta, Jidda, Kuwait, Lagos, Libreville,

Mexico, and Quito.


365-608/428-S/80010

846 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

exports, although it will probably have to lower its asking price in

order to do so.

(C) In the meantime, we are seeking ways to cope with the cutoff in

order to prevent an explosion of spot prices which could lead to in-

creased OPEC official prices such as occurred in 1979.

(D) At this time, loss of Iranian oil to UK and Japan ought not to

pose unmanageable difficulties if the oil consuming countries coop-

erate in several ways.

(E) We urge IEA member governments and France to counsel their

oil companies to refrain from spot purchases beyond normal levels and

at unwarranted prices.

(F) Consuming countries should also urge producers with whom

they have influence to increase production to offset the impact on the

market of the loss of Iranian supplies.

(G) The United States is taking the following measures:

—We are discussing with the major U.S. oil companies ways of al-

locating oil within their systems on a consumption basis, to ensure that

countries which suffer an interruption in oil supplies from Iran do not

bear an unfair burden;

—We are actively seeking antitrust mechanisms (i.e., Business Re-

view Letters) to improve the capability of U.S. oil companies to operate

more effectively in dealing with shortfalls which may emerge;

—We are approaching certain producing countries in OPEC and

elsewhere to encourage them to maintain or increase production levels;

—With respect to the spot market, we are ready to implement im-

mediately a quick response reporting system; this will give us lifting

prices for crude imports by our 35 largest refiners, with a maximum lag

of two weeks from the date of loading;

—We are already discussing with our largest companies the need

to avoid spot market pressure, and have alerted them to the prospect of

coordinated IEA action;

—We are willing to consider with other IEA members additional

measures to dampen spot market pressures.

4. For Tokyo: Please assure GOJ that we have their requests very

much in mind. We continue to work with U.S. oil majors and with oil

producing countries, and we are actively considering what else we can

do. In the meantime, however, it will be important that the GOJ do

what it can to keep companies from paying high spot prices, to draw

down stocks as required in the interim, and to share supplies as neces-

sary among refiners.

5. For London and Oslo: We urge that the UK and Norway maxi-

mize production during this period in order to alleviate the impact of

the Iranian cutoff.


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 847

6. For London and Paris: Host governments should be encouraged

to approach Iraq, Kuwait, and the UAE to seek expanded production.



Christopher

269. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassies in

Venezuela, Nigeria, and Saudi Arabia

1

Washington, April 28, 1980, 0037Z.



112009. Subject: Approach Re Increased Oil Production.

1. Entire text Confidential.

2. Unless you believe it would be counterproductive, Embassy Ca-

racas should promptly approach host government to urge that current

oil production levels be increased to meet market demand stemming

from cutoff of Iranian oil to Japanese oil companies, British Petroleum

and Shell. Embassy Lagos should make a similar approach, expressing

USG appreciation that oil production was not reduced April 1, and urg-

ing that present output be maintained and if possible increased. Posts

may draw upon the following points:

—Since Iranian oil exports resumed in March 1979, Iran has de-

manded prices not justified by traditional standards of quality and lo-

cation, and it is not surprising that the market will not support Iran’s

latest price hikes.

—The absence of substantial quantities of Iranian oil in the market-

place risks renewal of unsettling pressures on the spot market, which,

owing to joint efforts by producers and consumers, has recently been in

somewhat better balance.

—Any disturbances in the world oil market at this time will further

exacerbate the current delicate state of the world economy.

—The United States is pursuing a strong conservation policy and

producing at maximum levels; we believe orderly oil market condi-

tions are in the best interests of producers and consumers alike.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D800212–0980.



Confidential; Immediate; Exdis. Drafted by Todd; cleared by Hinton, Twinam, Michael

A. Armacost (EA), and Edward L. Morse (E) and in ARA/AND, AF/W, and DOE/IA;

and approved by Rosen. Repeated Priority to all OECD capitals, Algiers, Abu Dhabi, Ja-

karta, Kuwait, Baghdad, Doha, Quito, Libreville, and Mexico, and to Helsinki and

Reykjavik.


365-608/428-S/80010

848 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

—Thus we urge producer governments, especially those which re-

cently reduced oil production levels, to increase output to meet market

demand resulting from the loss of Iranian oil exports.

3. For Jidda: Unless Ambassador West sees overriding reasons not

to do so because of the other pressures on our relationship at this time,

it would be helpful if he could make our concerns known to Petroleum

Minister Yamani, and pursue with him in the context of the SAG effort

to reunify OPEC oil prices Yamani’s thoughts on what might be done to

encourage other producers with the capacity of doing so to increase

production at this time, and whether the Saudis might be helpful in this

regard.

4. Info addressees in oil producing nations may draw upon this



message if they believe it might be useful, or if they discern any evi-

dence that host governments might be contemplating a reduction in

present oil production levels. FYI We are suggesting to the British and

French Governments that they consider making similar approaches in

Iraq, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates.

Christopher


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 849



270. Memorandum of Conversation

1

Washington, May 1, 1980, noon–2 p.m.



SUBJECT

Summary of the President’s Meeting with Prime Minister Ohira of Japan

PARTICIPANTS

President Jimmy Carter

Vice President Walter Mondale

Acting Secretary, Warren Christopher

Secretary of Defense, Harold Brown

Secretary of Treasury, William Miller

Secretary of Energy, Charles Duncan

Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, Zbigniew Brzezinski

Special Trade Representative, Reubin Askew

Ambassador Mike Mansfield, Ambassador to Japan

Ambassador Henry Owen, Ambassador at Large

Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, Richard Holbrooke

NSC Staff Member, Donald Gregg (Notetaker)

Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, Michael

Armacost

Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Nicholas Platt

Japan Desk Officer, Alan Romberg

United States Interpreter, Cornelius Iida

Prime Minister Masayoshi Ohira of Japan

Foreign Minister, Saburo Okita

Ambassador Yoshio Okawara, Ambassador to The United States

Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary, Koichi Kato

Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs, Yasue Katori

Minister Kiyoshi Sumiya

Director-General, North American Affairs Bureau, Shinichiro Asao

Director-General, Economic Affairs Bureau, Reishi Teshima

Director of the First North American Division, Hiroshi Fukuda

Executive Assistant to the Prime Minister, Yoshiyasu Sato

Counselor, Embassy of Japan, Koichiro Matsuura

First Secretary, Yutaka Kawashima

Chief of Second North American Bureau, Kazuo Ogura

Japanese Interpreter, Sadaaki Numata

The President opened the meeting by extending greetings to Prime

Minister Ohira as a great leader and a great friend. Prime Minister

Ohira responded by saying that he was pleased to be meeting with the

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Subject File,



Box 38, President’s Memoranda of Conversation. Secret. The meeting was held in the

Cabinet Room of the White House. Prime Minister Ohira visited Washington April

30–May 1. Documentation on his visit, including the full text of this memorandum of con-

versation, is scheduled for publication in Foreign Relations, 1977–1980, volume XIV,

Korea; Japan.


365-608/428-S/80010

850 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

President in very trying times. Ohira said that he was gratified by the

strong leadership exerted by President Carter, not only for Japan’s sake

but for the entire world. He said he hoped to revitalize the underlying

trust which exists between our two countries.

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

In a more serious vein, the President said that he recognized the

special significance of actions taken by Japan in not buying high-priced

Iranian oil.

2

The President said that he knew that this action had been a



difficult one for Japan, but that it had been highly important to have

held the line on oil prices. The President added that if Iran continues to

sell its oil to other countries, the total world supply ought to be suffi-

cient for Japan to make up its short-fall. This is particularly true, the

President noted, since both our countries have good oil reserves at the

moment. The President said that countries like Mexico and Saudi

Arabia have been asked to increase their production, to help ease the

situation. The President went on to say, however, that he wanted Prime

Minister Ohira to know that the US will help Japan acquire oil, if such a

need arises. The President said that in an emergency situation, Amer-

ican oil could go to Japan. He added that he did not feel that this would

be necessary, since Japan purchases oil so wisely. The President said

that he felt that he could get US oil companies to help Japan voluntarily,

and had the authority to order it on a mandatory basis, should the need

arise. The President said that this assurance was being offered in the

privacy of the meeting, but that it could be made public at a later time,

should Japan wish. The President concluded by saying that should

Japan decide to trigger the IEA plan, the US would support its position.

Ohira expressed his gratitude for the President’s offer. He said that

Japan has to be careful in its oil purchases so as not to “disturb the

world market.” It was for this reason that Japan refused to buy from

Iran at such a high price. Ohira said that if there were to be a sustained

world oil shortage, Japan would be in a difficult position. Ohira said

that if Japan got into “dire straits” it might ask for US help. Ohira again

thanked the President for his offer of oil, and for his stand on triggering

the IEA plan. As of now, Ohira said, Japan would try to meet its oil

needs through its own efforts.

The President said that since the Tokyo Summit, the US has made

progress in reducing oil consumption. As of now, the US is using and

importing 5% less oil than one year ago. He expressed the hope that

more countries can follow suit in reducing oil use. The President urged

Ohira to join forces with him in Venice to urge others to cut back on oil

use, and to thereby stabilize the international oil market. The President

2

See footnote 3, Document 267.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 851

said that America’s reduction of oil use was a source of pride, but that

we can do more. He praised the fine example that Japan has set in terms

of limiting its oil use.

Ohira said that at least year’s Summit in Tokyo, the President had

taken the lead in setting oil ceilings. This had helped save the interna-

tional economy. Ohira noted that statistics show the progress America

has made in reducing oil use, but that all major countries need to do

more. Ohira said that along with setting numerical ceilings, we need to

develop policies that will sustain those numerical quotas. Such policies

will need to be developed on conservation, development of alternative

sources of energy, etc. Ohira joined the President in calling for more

progress to be made at Venice.

The President asked what the Japanese experience has been with

conservation over the past year. Ohira replied that Japan had been suc-

cessful in reaching its goal of 5% reduced oil consumption. In JFY (Japa-

nese Fiscal Year) 1979, oil use was 99.6% of the previous year, while the

economy grew by 6%. The President noted that the Japanese economy

is more efficient than ours. He noted that we use about 50% of our oil

for transportation. This means, the President noted, that we have the

potential to reduce oil use more. The President said that in the near fu-

ture, Congress will finish passing legislation involving tens of billions

of dollars that will be devoted to the development of alternative

sources of energy, and improved public transportation. He noted that

the recently passed windfall profits tax

3

will help pay for this program,



that will involve development of new technology, new plants and new

equipment to convert shale and coal into usable energy.

Foreign Minister Okita noted that Japan’s oil consumption has

held steady for the past six years, while its GNP has increased by 35%.

The President expressed admiration for this record, and said that

America had done well in terms of industrial energy use, but not in

terms of use of energy in transportation.

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

3

President Carter signed the Crude Oil Windfall Profit Tax Act (P.L. 96-223) on



April 2. For the text of his remarks on signing the bill, which he called “an historic step to

the Nation’s energy security,” see Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Jimmy



Carter, 1980,

pp. 584–590.



365-608/428-S/80010

852 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



271. Memorandum From the Under Secretary of Defense for

Policy (Komer) to the President’s Special Representative for

Economic Summits (Owen)

1

Washington, May 8, 1980.



Henry

Harold, Dick Cooper, David Aaron and I agree that the energy

crunch has critical security implications which ought somehow to be

aired at the Venice Summit. Here are some propositions to prove the

point.

Oil price increases are slowing economic growth and promoting



inflation in both developed countries and LDCs to an extent that is seri-

ously undermining needed real defense budget increases. In the US,

FRG, France, Japan and other countries added fuel costs appear to be

major reasons why defense strengthening cannot proceed faster and

why real budget increases instead get partially eaten up by inflation.

Indeed added fuel costs themselves are directly eating up an ever

greater proportion of defense outlays. The FY 80 DoD fuel bill alone

will be around $7 billion, compared to $3.3B in FY 79.

The oil cost impact is even greater on key LDCs like Korea, Thai-

land, Pakistan, and Turkey whose net outflow on oil account probably

exceeds the net inflow from foreign aid. We are providing massive mil-

itary and economic aid credits to these countries which will never be re-

paid because the money will go to OPEC instead.

The energy crunch has far greater adverse impact on Free World

deterrence/defense than it does on the USSR’s. It is an added major

Free World burden not imposed on the USSR, whose military spending

already is much larger than that of the US. In sum, we keep running

faster just to stay in place, and can’t catch up with the Soviet effort.

Ironically, this impact of the energy crunch is undermining our

ability to defend the oil-producing states, who depend on our security

umbrella to protect them from the Soviets. The Persian Gulf producers

are good cases in point. They are now undermining their own security

as well.

For all these reasons we must not treat energy issues as primarily

politico-economic, but take fully into account the dire security

implications.

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Subject File,



Box 65, Summits, 9/79–5/23/80. Confidential. The salutation is handwritten.

365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 853

The West badly needs an energy strategy which will reduce the se-

curity impact of the energy bind.



R.W. Komer

2

2



Komer signed “Bob” above this typed signature.

272. Telegram From the Department of State to Selected

Diplomatic Posts

1

Washington, May 12, 1980, 2226Z.



125558. Subject: OPEC Meeting in Taif and Algiers.

1. Secret entire text.

2. Action addressees are requested to seek early meetings with Oil

Ministers or other appropriate officials to seek impressions of OPEC

long-term strategy meeting held May 7 in Taif.

2

You should cast your



inquiry in context of importance USG attaches to sustaining an ex-

change of views with producers on how consumers and producers can

best work together over long haul to fulfill common responsibility to

achieve orderly transition to new energy economy in a manner that

safeguards the health of the international economic system.

3. During course of discussion of long-term market prospects you

should take occasion to reinforce recent approach in certain capitals on

maintaining or increasing production levels (State 112009)

3

and that


USG view is that price restraint by producers continues to be essential.

You may draw on the following:

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D800236–0401. Se-



cret; Exdis. Drafted by David Patterson (NEA/ECON) and Todd; cleared by Rosen,

Schotta, John A. Bushnell (ARA), and Morse (E) and in EA/IMBS, NEA/ARP, EUR/RPE,

ARA, AF/W, and the Energy and Treasury Departments; and approved by Twinam. Sent

Immediate to Jidda and Priority to Abu Dhabi, Kuwait, Jakarta, and Caracas. Repeated to

Algiers, Quito, Libreville, Baghdad, Dhahran, Lagos, Manama, Muscat, Riyadh, Cairo,

London, Paris for the Embassy and USOECD, Bonn, Rome, Tokyo, Ottawa, and Brussels

for the Embassy and USEC.

2

The meeting in Taif considered the report of the Long-Term Strategy Committee.



3

Document 269.



365-608/428-S/80010

854 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

—World economic conditions and the basic oil market situation

over next few months do not in our view justify a new round of oil price

increases. Such increases at this time would deal a severe blow to the

world economy, struggling to cope with the extraordinary price in-

creases of the last eighteen months.

—We are urging buyers to exercise restraint and to follow rational

stocking policies. Producers in turn should feel responsibility to avoid

raising prices or imposing new premiums and to refrain from testing

the market to bid up prices. It would be inconsistent with our long-term

common interests and common responsibilities for producers to take

advantage of the current short-term uncertainty.

—The U.S. is making strong and painful efforts to cope with infla-

tion, about which producers have indicated great concern, by re-

straining credit and balancing the budget. Equally painful and inten-

sive efforts to reduce dependence on imported oil are in train and have

been welcomed by producers. These are taking effect: U.S. oil imports

have dropped and per capita energy use, as well as oil use, is declining.

Interest rates have fallen and we believe we have turned the corner on

inflation.

—We face the prospect of very low or negative growth rates in sev-

eral major countries, a trend that would be accelerated by new oil price

increases.

—If recession deepens sharply in major industrial countries, with

attendant declines in general imports, the developing countries, a

number of which are now in serious difficulty, will be caught in a hope-

less squeeze between declining export revenues and rising oil import

costs.

—It is imperative that producers carefully consider the full impact



of their decisions in order to avoid lasting damage to the structure of in-

ternational trade, finance and security in which they have a large and

growing stake.

3. For Jidda, Abu Dhabi, Doha, and Kuwait: We are aware that

Gulf countries oppose Iranian sanctions and might argue that uncer-

tainty in market is a result of USG actions and is thus USG responsibil-

ity. If they do so, you should respond by drawing on standing guidance

on U.S. policy. In doing so, you should stress that Gulf countries have

urged that we seek to resolve Iranian situation by peaceful means and

that sanctions are important component of our efforts to do so.

4. For Jidda: You should point out to Yamani that in line with his

urgings we have engaged in strong and sensitive efforts to resist Ira-

nian attempts to pressure consumers to accept higher prices (State


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 855

122313 and State 122311).

4

You should add that we appreciate his ef-



forts at price unification; in view of market situation, which we would

characterize as tightening somewhat in an atmosphere of uncertainty,

we hope SAG will be cautious about trying to achieve reunification

unless it has firm assurances that others will cooperate by holding the

line on prices.

5

5. For Lagos: This cable is FYI at this time, since Nigeria reportedly



did not attend the Taif meeting, but you should draw upon it if appro-

priate occasions arise.

6. For Quito, Libreville, Algiers, Baghdad: You may draw upon

this cable if you believe it might be useful and if appropriate occasions

arise.


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling