Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet87/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   ...   95

Muskie

4

On a July 2 memorandum from Owen to the President, with a draft of the letter to



Fahd attached, Carter wrote: “Either delete marked passage or don’t send letter.” The

passage he instructed to be deleted was: “Saudi Arabia’s policy of raising sustainable ca-

pacity to 12 million barrels per day is thus a major contribution to world order. As the fu-

ture unfolds, you may find that a further increase in capacity beyond 12 million barrels

per day would serve Saudi Arabia’s interest in a secure international environment.” On

the same memorandum, Owen wrote: “The letter was sent as a message with the indi-

cated passage deleted. No hard copy will follow.” (Carter Library, National Security Af-

fairs, Brzezinski Material, President’s Correspondence with Foreign Leaders File, Box 17,

Saudi Arabia: Crown Prince and First Deputy Prime Minister Fahd ibn Abd al-Aziz Al

Saud, 6–10/80)



365-608/428-S/80010

872 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



278. Memorandum of Conversation

1

Washington, July 1, 1980.



SUBJECT

Highlights of Secretary Duncan’s Meeting with Venezuelan Energy Minister,

Humberto Calderon Berti, Tuesday, July 1, 1980

LIST OF PARTICIPANTS



U.S.:

Secretary Duncan

Henry Owen, Ambassador at Large and Special Representative of the President

for International Economics

Richard Cooper, Under Secretary, DOS

Leslie J. Goldman, Assistant Secretary for International Affairs, DOE

Edward Fried, Consultant, NSC

Bob Swandby, International Affairs Officer, Office of Energy Producing Nations,

International Affairs, DOE

Venezuela:

Perez Chiriboga, Ambassador

Humberto Calderon Berti, Minister for Energy

Ivan Sigurani, Minister Counsellor for Petroleum



USG/GOV Energy R&D Cooperation

After being welcomed by the Secretary, Venezuelan Energy Min-

ister Calderon expressed his pleasure at the progress which has been

made in implementing the Energy R&D Agreement signed on March 6

during his visit to Washington. The Minister indicated that despite

some criticism by leftist opposition for cooperating with the U.S., the

presentation of the Agreement to the Congress has gone very well.

Further OPEC Price Increases

The Minister stated that the recent OPEC meeting in Algiers,

2

was


marked by feuding, particularly between Iran and Iraq. The Secretary

1

Source: Department of Energy, Executive Secretariat Files, Job #8824, Box 3135, IA



Memoranda of Conversation. Confidential. Drafted by Swandby on July 2 and approved

by Goldman who signed at the bottom of the last page.

2

At the June 9–11 meeting, OPEC members established a new price structure,



which sought to achieve “an equilibrium between supply and demand in order to avoid

further stockpiling” that they considered “harmful to producers and consumers alike.”

OPEC set the marker crude price of oil at a ceiling of $32 per barrel starting July 1, a limit

that would be reviewed at an autumn meeting. OPEC also determined that the value dif-

ferentials which would be added over and above the $32 ceiling “on account of quality

and geographical location should not exceed in any case” $5 per barrel. (Telegram 1864

from Algiers, June 11; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D800285–

0481) Telegram 1838 from Algiers, June 9, and telegram 1853 from Algiers, June 10, detail

the meeting’s highlights. (Ibid., D800281–1076, D800283–0407) Excerpts from the June 11

communique´ were published in The New York Times, June 11, 1980, p. D4.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 873

asked him how prices might be moving and whether there was a

chance for pricing unity prior to the next OPEC Ministerial in Novem-

ber. He responded that Venezuela planned to increase its prices ap-

proximately $.50/BBL, effective July 1. He also stated that Saudi Arabia

would probably increase their price to $32/BBL, but in two steps, pos-

sibly to $30/BBL before the next OPEC meeting. He was uncertain

whether such a move would help to achieve price unity. He also indi-

cated that Saudi Arabia might cut production by 2 MMB/D.

The Secretary expressed his concern over possible Nigerian and

Algerian price increases and that the current prices of these countries

were not justifiable based on historical ratios. Assistant Secretary

Goldman stated that the exploration fees being charged by African

countries amounted to a surcharge because few companies had de-

cided to increase exploration activities. The Minister indicated that it

was extremely difficult to convince the African producers and Iran that

prices and production levels could not be discussed separately. The

Secretary stated that the only way to convince them is for the other pro-

ducers to keep substantial supplies available to the market, and that the

OPEC long-term pricing formula can only work when there is unified

pricing. Ambassador Owen asked what was likely to result from the

November Ministerial. The Minister replied that an aid program for the

developing countries was likely to be formulated, but he was uncertain

whether oil price unity could be achieved.

New Role for OPEC

The Minister indicated that OPEC is beginning to realize that its

continuous price increases are contributing to a vicious cycle of infla-

tion which is eroding the economies of Venezuela and other develop-

ing countries. He stated that both the perceived reduction in living

standards, and in some cases, absolute decline in family income would

pose increasing political problems. The Minister indicated that he be-

lieved that OPEC would be broadening its role to include bilateral

agreements whereby producing countries would supply oil and

consuming countries would supply the producing countries with

technical and other services at agreed prices. He indicated that he

believes such arrangements could be beneficial to both producing

and consuming countries by providing the former with badly needed

technology in such areas as housing and agriculture and

the latter with oil at prices which they know will not be arbitrarily

increased.

Ambassador Owen stated that the USG is willing to establish a

USG/GOV Joint Commission to explore the implementation of such

agreements. He pointed out that the USG has a similar arrangement


365-608/428-S/80010

874 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

with Saudi Arabia which has worked very well.

3

Under Secretary



Cooper pointed out that, historically when barter arrangements were

tried between countries, problems arose over the use of money, but he

reaffirmed Ambassador Owen’s recommendation to facilitate a Joint

USG/GOV Commission. Ambassador Perez pointed out that the USG

and GOV already had established a number of joint agreements in the

areas of agriculture, energy, science and technology, and that soon

there would also be a joint agreement in health. Ambassador Owen in-

dicated that the USG was flexible, and that if the GOV preferred, we

could continue to pursue sectoral joint agreements without establish-

ing a joint commission. Minister Calderon indicated that he would

think further about these suggestions and elaborate his ideas in a

month.


Country Energy Assessment

Minister Calderon stated that due to domestic political consider-

ations, it would be necessary for the GOV to conduct the assessment

under the auspices of a Venezuelan university. Assistant Secretary

Goldman stated that under U.S. law, a government-to-government

agreement was required to conduct the assessment. The Secretary and

Minister Calderon agreed that the cooperative country energy assess-

ment was important for both countries and that a way would be found

to overcome any potential legal difficulties. Assistant Secretary Gold-

man suggested that DOE consult our legal counsel and thereafter fur-

ther consultations could be held with GOV officials, if required.

Oil Assistance to Central American and Caribbean Countries

Minister Calderon stated that President Herrera and Mexican Pres-

ident Lopez Portillo will announce, before August 15, an agreement to

share oil supplies for Caribbean and Central American countries. The

announcement will be made in Costa Rica to show support for this

democratic government. Up to 30 percent of the region’s oil purchases

(up to $700 million) will be jointly financed by Mexico and Venezuela

by five-year loans repayable at 5 percent, or convertible to 20 year loans

repayable at 2 percent if the participating country converts the loan to

energy development projects. The Minister indicated that this is the

most important agreement he has negotiated with a non-OPEC country

because he views it as an essential first step toward halting the deterio-

rating political and economic condition in this region resulting from in-

creasing oil prices. Trinidad will also be invited to join the program. He

stated that even though Trinidad exports only about 10 MB/D, its ac-

ceptance into the program would mean that all of the region’s oil needs

3

See footnote 5, Document 143.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 875

could be supplied by these three countries and therefore add solidarity

to the pact. He also indicated that he has discussed the program with

Minister Yamani and believes that a similar program could work in

Asia and Africa.



Western Hemisphere Energy Cooperation

Ambassador Owen asked Minister Calderon how the Venezuelan/

Mexican agreement on oil sales to the Caribbean and Central America

fit into the Minister’s proposal for hemispheric energy cooperation.

Minister Calderon stated that he believed the former agreement to be

an important first step in avoiding further political deterioration in the

region, but that broader hemispheric cooperation must also be imple-

mented to assist these smaller countries to develop alternative energy

supplies which will reduce their dependence on imported oil. He fur-

ther stated the role accorded to the Organization for Latin American

Energy Development (OLADE) in the draft outline developed last

March was too modest.

Ambassador Owen stated that he hoped that during the drafting

of the outline it was pointed out to GOV officials that the USG would

not have funds for participation in such a program. Minister Calderon

indicated that he could approach other countries for financial assist-

ance, but that U.S. trechnical support was essential to the success of any

such program. He pointed out that many of the solutions to energy

supply problems in the region are probably low-cost, but that many of

the countries do not know how to begin—for example, to develop their

geothermal energy resources.

Mr. Fried pointed out that the World Bank oil exploration program

was moving in the direction of increased funding for pre-exploration

and exploration activities, as well as providing governments advice on

exploration contracts with private firms. Under Secretary Cooper

raised the problem of funding such a program, in terms of obtaining

adequate breadth and depth of technical expertise, as well as an ade-

quate funding level. He indicated that one of the problems with the

World Bank program is that risk sharing for dry holes is not spread

among the participating countries, rather each country is responsible

for funding the program within its borders.

Ambassador Perez stated that there was a need for USG financial

participation in a hemispheric energy cooperation program, and that

the Congress might be more amenable to providing funding under the

aegis of energy development rather than foreign aid. Ambassador

Owen indicated that funding was not so much a problem with

Congress as with the Executive Branch’s commitment to maintain an

austere budget with no new funding programs at this time.

Minister Calderon reiterated the importance of implementing a

hemispheric energy cooperation program by pointing out Brazil’s dan-



365-608/428-S/80010

876 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

gerous position as an importer of approximately 700 MMB/D of oil, of

which approximately 80 percent comes from Iraq. The Minister be-

lieves that Iraq’s Government is unstable and that political instability in

that country could cause a major oil supply disruption. He also reaf-

firmed his commitment to funding such an initiative through an inter-

national organization such as the World Bank and that the OPEC Spe-

cial Fund could also be a partial source of funding. Under Secretary

Cooper suggested that even though funding were through the World

Bank, the U.S. would probably have to increase its contribution.

The Secretary indicated that hemispheric energy cooperation was

both in the interest of the USG and the hemisphere. The Secretary and

Minister Calderon indicated that they would separately assess what

might be next steps in implementing hemispheric energy cooperation

and talk again in a few weeks after the Minister’s emissaries return

from Brazil, Argentina, Ecuador and Colombia.

North/South Dialogue

Minister Calderon asked how the North/South Dialogue was

going. Under Secretary Cooper replied that while progress had been

made on some issues, there were several major problem areas. A major

issue was that some of the G–77 countries were demanding that IMF

fund contributions be negotiated in New York. The Under Secretary

stated that this position is entirely unacceptable to the USG due to po-

tential Soviet subversion of the negotiations. He further indicated that

the North/South Summit proposed by the Brandt Commission had

been discussed at the Economic Summit,

4

but was not mentioned in the



communique´ due to divisions among the industrial countries. Ambas-

sador Owen indicated that the Austrian and Mexican Governments

have been pushing for a North/South Summit.

The Ambassador stated that he met privately with Austrian offi-

cials during the Summit and indicated to them that President Carter

had reservations. The President was not sure that concrete objectives

could be achieved at such a meeting, and if they were not achieved, the

USG would be blamed. The President also believes that the agenda for

a North/South Summit would have to be carefully developed.

4

See Document 276. The Independent Commission on International Development



Issues was chaired by former German Chancellor Willy Brandt in 1980.

365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 877



279. Memorandum From the Deputy Assistant Secretary of

Defense for International Economic and Technology Affairs

(Frost) to the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy (Komer)

1

Washington, July 16, 1980.



SUBJECT

Security Implications of the Energy Crunch

You recently asked for an analytical paper on the security implica-

tions of the energy crunch

2

that might be sent to Under Secretary



Newsom, along with the cover memo at Tab A.

3

Attached, next under, is a draft memorandum prepared by Don



Goldstein that builds on your earlier thoughts on this issue.

4

We have coordinated the draft with Major General Boverie.



Ellen L. Frost

5

Attachment

ENERGY AND SECURITY

Summary

The global energy squeeze poses multiple threats to the security of

the United States and the maintenance of international order. It con-

tributes in a major way to international economic problems such as in-

flation, balance of payments deficits, slowed growth, and rising unem-

ployment. In addition to the social and political strains they cause,

these effects impair the ability of the US and our allies to marshall the

resources necessary for the defense of the non-communist world. The

impact of rising energy prices and the concomitant economic slow-

down is burdensome enough in the industrialized countries, but it is

even more serious for the developing countries. The resulting instabil-

ities constitute a danger to the entire Third World, including the major

oil producers.

1

Source: Washington National Records Center, OASD/ISA Files: FRC 330–



82–0263, Box 1, ASD/ISA #3 Policy Files. Secret. Sent through Assistant Secretary of De-

fense for International Security Affairs David E. McGiffert.

2

Komer requested the paper in a June 21 note to McGiffert. (Ibid.)



3

The unsigned and undated cover memorandum from Komer to Newsom is at-

tached but not printed.

4

See, for example, Document 271.



5

Frost signed “Ellen” above this typed signature.



365-608/428-S/80010

878 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

More profoundly, the dependence of most of the non-communist

world on access to Persian Gulf oil affects the way we must think about

our security relationships. Because only the United States can even at-

tempt to guarantee the security of the free world’s major oil supplies,

new demands will fall on us. Because we cannot do that job alone, new

demands will also be placed on others. We must convey the mutual re-

sponsibilities growing out of the energy crunch in a clear and consist-

ent way to our allies, the countries in the Persian Gulf region, and our

friends in the Third World. Our basic message must be that we intend

to assume much of the additional burden of safeguarding access to Per-

sian Gulf oil, but we expect others to share in these burdens as appro-

priate. We especially hope that those who will benefit from our accep-

tance of new responsibilities will not pursue separate courses of action

that make our efforts more difficult.



The Threat to Supply

Both the importance and the vulnerability of Persian Gulf oil can

hardly be overstated. The eighteen million or so barrels of oil that flow

out of the Persian Gulf every day comprise nearly forty percent of

non-Communist oil production. This figure is roughly equal to the total

crude oil imports of the seven largest OECD consumers. Some states,

like France and Japan, depend on the Gulf for over two-thirds of their

crude imports. Despite intense efforts by consumers to diversify their

sources of supply, no other region could substitute totally for the loss

of Persian Gulf oil. While some individual oil importers, such as the

United States, may not currently depend on the Gulf for the bulk of

their supplies, it would be impossible for them to insulate themselves

from the direct or indirect effects of a major cutoff for any great period

of time.


Dependence on Persian Gulf oil is not new. What is new is the

graphic and continuing demonstration of the vulnerability of access to

that oil. The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, whether or not it was part

of a conscious strategy to increase influence in the Gulf, constitutes fair

warning. The Soviets showed that they are willing to use military force

in the pursuit of their interests in a region of vital importance to the

West. The boldness of their action is especially sobering when consid-

ered in the light of the very real prospect that the Soviets may also face

a substantial oil shortfall in the coming decade. We can hardly count on

the Soviets to pass up opportunities in Southwest Asia which may help

improve their situation or worsen ours. Indeed, the evolving situation

in Iran may provide a pretext for a new “phase” of Soviet policy in this

part of the world.

The shocks set off by the Iranian revolution have not yet been con-

tained and still reverberate throughout the region. Perhaps the greatest

effect is the heightened awareness of the fundamental weaknesses of



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 879

the Persian Gulf regimes. They are susceptible to both internal chal-

lenges—religious, tribal, and factional—and external threats—regional

rivals and external powers. Their domestic weaknesses hamper their

ability and willingness to seek the aid we can provide to help meet for-

eign challenges. This makes it difficult for us to prepare to meet threats

originating within the region or arising from outside of it. Even those

states that are willing to cooperate with us do so in a cautious and ten-

tative manner.



The Threat of Rapidly Rising Energy Costs

We all recognize that higher energy costs are inevitable. Indeed,

some have gone so far as to argue that higher oil costs may even be de-

sirable over the long term. More specifically, it is suggested that high

priced oil eventually will lead us to alternative fuels and more efficient

energy use, and will provide additional incentives to reduce current

levels of dependency on imported oil. Whether or not one accepts these

propositions, it is true that increasing prices are one factor contributing

to the transition away from oil—including that from the Persian Gulf.

The nature of this transition is critical, however. If it does not take place

smoothly (i.e. without sudden interruptions of production or jumps in

price), the economies of both the developed and the developing world

could sustain severe damage. The major oil producers must concern

themselves with this damage since it has direct and serious conse-

quences for their security.

The rapid increases in oil prices (some 130 percent) over the last 18

months, far in excess of what economic conditions could justify, poses a

very real strain on the global economy and ultimately international

peace and security. In the first place, the economic foundation on which

our defense effort rests has been hard hit by slowed growth and high

rates of inflation spurred in part by surging oil prices. According to the

IMF, about one-third of the total inflation affecting the major industrial-

ized nations is directly attributable to higher oil prices. The indirect ef-

fects on related prices is believed to raise that fraction even more. A

number of strategically important LDCs find themselves in even more

desperate straits. A major cause of the economic difficulties of South

Korea, Thailand, Pakistan, and Turkey, for example, is the huge growth

in their oil bills. Non-OPEC LDC debt as a whole is predicted to surge

in 1980 to $109 billion, up from $58 billion in 1979. In 1981 the strain will

be even worse. Even though we may be able to scrape through the

enormous recycling difficulties presented—if OPEC countries are co-

operative—it is clear that politically destablizing belt tightening will be

necessary in many LDCs.

The economic problems caused by the surge in oil prices and the

accompanying wealth transfers affects international security in several

ways. First, it reduces the sum of resources available to meet the Soviet



365-608/428-S/80010

880 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

challenge. It is difficult to devote increasing amounts to defense when

the overall economies of the West are constrained by a rapidly rising

energy tax. Also, because of inflationary effects partly derived from oil,

not to mention the higher cost of fuel itself, we simply get less military

strength from the nominal defense dollar. The net result is that the

West’s defense effort falls short of what it should be in the face of the

long-term buildup of the Warsaw Pact and more immediate crises such

as Afghanistan. This is not the only reason, of course, why our military

strength is not what it should be, but it helps explain the difficulties in

redressing our problems.

Secondly, the worsening economic plight of the non-oil producing

LDCs increases the likelihood for internal instability and perhaps re-

gional conflicts. The trade and finance aid efforts of the West are more

than offset by rising oil import costs. As an illustration, Turkey’s oil bill

in 1980 is estimated to be $2.7 billion, totally overwhelming U.S. ($295

million) and other OECD ($866 million) 1980 economic aid pledges.

The entire fabric of international trade, aid, and finance is being

stretched to the limit by the effects of oil price increases. It is impossible

for the West, itself transferring enormous amounts of funds to the oil

producers, to underwrite the oil bills of the LDCs as well. To some ex-

tent the gravity of this problem has been recognized by OPEC in the

creation of recycling facilities. But much more needs to be done if insta-

bility is to be contained in the Third World.

The Response of Consumers

A concerted response is required to meet the challenge presented

by vulnerable supplies and surging energy prices that includes the in-

dustralized democracies, the major producers, and the threatened

LDCs. The OECD countries have taken some effective steps forward in

the energy economic area, as the Venice communique´ shows. We have

adopted measures aimed at reducing our energy consumption. We

have established mechanisms to mitigate the effects of market disrup-

tions. We have agreed to coordinate oil stock policies, and the US is

moving toward renewed fill of the SPR. We are seeking to diversify en-

ergy sources, including greater use of coal. But more needs to be done

in the energy security arena, especially if the military dimension be-

comes paramount.

The United States is committed to defending the oil producing re-

gion of the Persian Gulf. We have increased our presence in the region

and will do more as time goes by. What is required is an equivalent

commitment on the part of our allies in Europe and Asia. This means

we need to urge our allies to shoulder more of the burden of European

and Asian defense. Our European and Asian allies should be queried

about what economic and security assistance responsibilities they

could take on. Increased host nation support for regional and South-


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 881

west Asian contingencies is also required. Cooperation and under-

standing regarding the measures we may need to take to prepare to

fight in Southwest Asia, if need be, is also necessary. For example, over-

flights for ourselves or in support of our friends in the area should not

be a matter of contention. Independent diplomacy on the part of our

allies that pretends that their access to Middle East oil can be divorced

from our ultimate guarantee of Western security should be discour-

aged. In other words, we must impress upon our fellow industrialized

democracies that the burden of protecting the West’s oil supplies must

be responsibly shared.

The friendly oil producers, particularly in the Persian Gulf, also

must be constantly reminded of the mutuality of our interests and our

vulnerabilities. As the Secretary of Defense has noted, it is not reason-

able to believe that the oil producers could continue to profit from their

most precious natural resource if the Soviet Union succeeded in using

its massive military power to envelop the Persian Gulf. Given the

weakness of the regimes there, they must realize they could not with-

stand even serious regional threats without our help. Only the United

States is equal to the task of providing for their security. No other

non-Communist power or combination of powers could provide the

sustained support that they would need if seriously threatened. How-

ever, we need their cooperation if we are to protect them. We must pre-

pare sufficiently in advance so that our efforts will be quick enough and

massive enough to deter, if possible, and defend, if necessary. This

means we need access to facilities, prepositioned supplies, assurances

of military coordination, including assured local fuel supplies, and a

general tolerance of our activities related to providing an effective

defense.


As for the LDCs, we want to work with them to minimize the eco-

nomic damage they are suffering. We wish to join with them and the oil

producers in finding new ways to cope with the taxing effects of higher

oil bills and the accompanying panoply of economic problems growing

out of the energy crunch. The LDCs can help here by more forcefully

bringing home their plight to the oil exporting countries. Additionally,

the LDCs must realize that a Persian Gulf crisis precipitated by a re-

gional conflict would have devastating effects on them. Oil prices

would explode and the LDCs would be the first pushed out of the mar-

ket. They have a very real and direct stake in our guarantee of the free

flow of Persian Gulf oil. Therefore, they should at least show forbear-

ance for our efforts to secure free access to that oil and tolerance of our

attempts to maintain the necessary military presence in the area.


365-608/428-S/80010

882 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling