Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet89/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   ...   95

Leslie J. Goldman

7

7



Peter Borre´ signed for Goldman above this typed signature.

283. Memorandum From Henry Owen of the National Security

Council Staff to President Carter

1

Washington, September 25, 1980.



SUBJECT

Comments on the Duncan–Yamani Conversation

Although the conflict between Iran and Iraq dominates our imme-

diate concerns about oil supply and prices, I believe the most important

development on the international energy front continues to be Saudi

Oil Minister Yamani’s campaign to institute scheduled OPEC price ad-

justments indexed to OECD inflation, exchange rate movements, and

OECD economic growth rates. As Charles Duncan reported in his Sep-

tember 19 memorandum,

2

Yamani was confident immediately after the



OPEC Vienna meeting that he could win agreement by the time of the

OPEC Summit meeting in Baghdad, November 4–5. Now, of course,

the Iraq–Iran war may force postponement of that meeting and possi-

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, International Eco-



nomics File, Box 48, Rutherford Poats File, Chron, 9/17–30/80. Secret. Sent for

information.

2

Duncan met with Yamani in Geneva on September 19; the memorandum of con-



versation, September 19, is ibid., Brzezinski Material, Country File, Box 68, Saudi Arabia,

8–9/80. Duncan’s memorandum to Carter about the conversation is ibid.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 893

bly also prevent holding preparatory sessions, the first of which was to

be in London October 14.

Yamani gave Duncan a surprising assurance about the most ob-

vious flaw in the scheme’s early draft: it will, he said, contain a supply

management component providing for injection of additional supplies

of oil (from countries with excess capacity) into the market when a

shortage threatens, as well as providing for production cuts when a

glut threatens. If this is confirmed by OPEC decision, the one-sided

floor price scheme that we feared was in the making could become, in-

stead, a price-regulating system designed to bring OPEC prices gradu-

ally up to some notional parity with alternative fuels.

Duncan properly sounds a note of caution on whether a supply as-

surance actually will be adopted by OPEC and given operational mean-

ing. Undoubtedly any supply assurance will be loose enough to permit

use of the oil weapon over Arab-Israeli issues. In addition, the price-

indexation formula now proposed needs adjustment to cure its infla-

tionary bias.

Nonetheless, if Yamani is right in his optimism, we may be within

hailing distance of an OPEC decision that offers a qualified promise of

two years of fairly predictable gradualism in oil prices.

The next step is to work out a common response among the

Summit countries to the pending OPEC price-supply strategy—a re-

sponse designed to produce needed improvements in its terms without

exposing us to pressures for extraneous concessions on aid, trade and

financial issues in the UN North-South arena. Charles Duncan dis-

cussed today with the Italian and French energy ministers the possibil-

ity of an October meeting of officials to this end.


365-608/428-S/80010

894 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



284. Memorandum From the Executive Secretary of the

Department of State (Tarnoff) to the President’s Assistant for

National Security Affairs (Brzezinski)

1

Washington, September 26, 1980.



SUBJECT

The Iran–Iraq Conflict

Described below is the summary outcome of an interagency

meeting on the Iranian-Iraqi conflict held today, chaired by Hal

Saunders, which aimed at anticipating SCC needs for information or

policy suggestions. Participants also reviewed the prospect of new

problems and new opportunities emerging from the crisis.

1. Dealing with the energy implications:



Discussion:

We must prepare for two contingencies: (a) If the

present curtailment of Iranian and Iraqi oil shipments continues for 2–3

months, there will be psychological pressure on prices. Consumers

heavily dependent upon Iraq—France, Brazil, and India for instance—

might feel strongly inclined to resort to the spot market, adding to price

pressures. (b) If exports from a significant number of other Gulf pro-

ducers are also curtailed, we should have assessed the consequences in

advance and readied steps to minimize them.

Decisions:

—to ascertain precisely how much oil the Iraqi pipelines to the

Mediterranean through Turkey, Syria, and now Lebanon could handle

and, conversely, the consequences of shutdown. (Action: State/EB,

State/INR, DOE, Treasury, CIA)

—to estimate how partial or total further curtailment of Gulf oil

production and shipments (caused by harassment of shipping, damage

to facilities, political actions, etc.) might affect the world energy scene.

(Action: DOE, State/EB, State/INR, Treasury, CIA)

—to prepare a paper analyzing in what fashion France and Brazil,

among other major consumers of Iraqi oil, might be protected ade-

quately, noting that France has a closer connection with the IEA than

Brazil. (Action: DOE, State)

—to consider preparing a cable to appropriate posts providing our

assessment of the oil situation, and how key consuming countries

could best deal with the situation through inventory management and

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Country



File, Box 34, Iran/Iraq, 9/80. Secret; Exdis.

365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 895

care in entering the spot market. The principal objective would be to

avoid driving prices up. (Action: State/EB, with DOE and Treasury)

—to identify countries where we have important military strategic

understandings, aside from major states such as France and Brazil,

which might be affected by the oil situation. The ultimate purpose

might be to provide such countries special help in bridging future

supply problems. (Action: State and DOD)

—to consider consulting with the major oil companies to assess the

market picture and potential problems with the most seriously affected

nations. (Action: DOE and State, after consultation with the Justice

Department)

—to consider contingency discussions with major producing states

on accommodating short-term demands and helping to bridge

problems. (Action: State/EB, DOE, Treasury)

—to investigate whether the new tanker routing in the Gulf or-

dered by Iran will prevent or imperil movement of the largest tankers.

(Action: State/EB, with Commerce)

—to continue an informal interagency oil group to monitor these

problems, which would not cut across the Carswell efforts. (Action:

State, DOE, Treasury)

—to consider an early IEA Governing Board meeting to discuss

coordinated action. (Action: State and DOE)

[Omitted here are discussion and decisions on “efforts to end the

war and mediate the crisis.”]



365-608/428-S/80010

896 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



285. Memorandum From Secretary of Energy Duncan to President

Carter

1

Washington, October 10, 1980.



SUBJECT

Trip to Venezuela and Meetings with President Herrera and Minister of Energy

and Mines Calderon Berti

At the invitation of Energy Minister Calderon Berti, I visited Vene-

zuela on September 30 and October 1. Because of the need to monitor

world oil market developments and develop coordinated stocking pol-

icies with our allies, the originally planned three day trip was short-

ened to a day.

The discussion with President Herrera on the morning of October

1 lasted almost an hour and a half and was frank and cordial. The dis-

cussions through the remainder of the day with Energy Minister Cal-

deron Berti covered a broad range of issues, including the world oil

market and the expanding technological cooperation between our two

countries. A speech I gave to the Venezuelan-American Chamber of

Commerce offered the opportunity to stress our own domestic energy

achievements and reassure public opinion that the U.S. and Venezuela

have a growing and mutually beneficial energy relationship.

Attached you will find detailed memorandums of conversation of

these meetings as well as a copy of the joint communique´ we issued.

2

Summary of Meetings

President Herrera asked that the U.S. help insure that major oil

companies act with restraint in world crude markets. He stressed the

importance of the Venezuelan aid program being organized for energy

development in the hemisphere, and asked for our technical and finan-

cial help. He took note of my observation that countries, like Brazil,

heavily dependent on Iraq for oil, will need short-term supply relief

and indicated a desire to settle outstanding nationalization tax claims

with U.S. majors.

In a confidential meeting, Minister Calderon Berti expressed in-

terest in reviewing funding possibilities for heavy oil development

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, North/South



File, Box 47, Pastor Country Files, Venezuela, 1–12/80. Confidential. Carter initialed the

memorandum.

2

The memoranda of conversation are attached but not printed. The joint commu-



nique´ is not attached, but the text was transmitted in telegram 8851 from Caracas, Oc-

tober 6. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D800479–0428)



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 897

through our Energy Security Corporation. He also stated his intention

to help Brazil secure additional oil supplies and to urge Mexico to also

provide such aid. In a wider meeting he expressed approval of our in-

tention to encourage refinery retrofits to use Venezuelan heavy crude

oil, and asked our help in acquiring excess residual fuel oil for the next

two years in exchange for future oil supply assurances. He also asked

our help in securing Canadian participation in Venezuela’s hemi-

spheric energy development program and expressed a desire to settle

the nationalization tax claim issue with U.S. majors, although he said it

might take some time.

Following is a more detailed review of the most significant aspects

of these meetings.



Meetings with President Herrera

• U.S. Oil Companies

The President stressed the importance of the U.S. role in insuring

that major multinational oil companies did not bid up spot prices in the

delicate world oil market brought on by the Iran–Iraq war. The Presi-

dent indicated that Venezuela wanted to be responsible, but if oil com-

pany speculation caused major price rises, the OPEC nations would

find it difficult not to take such additional profits for themselves. I as-

sured him that we had already been in touch with approximately 30 of

the top companies and were working closely with our IEA partners to

develop a coordinated stock policy to insure the continuation of calm

markets.

• Western Hemisphere Energy Facility

The President stressed the importance of Venezuela’s efforts

through the Organization for Latin American Energy Development

(OLADE) to develop a hemispheric aid program designed to support

energy development in the smaller nations. He noted that at the appro-

priate time it would be important for the U.S. to provide technological

and financial support. I indicated that the United States was prepared

to pursue this important objective on a world-wide basis through an

expanded World Bank facility. The President said he would study how

this might fit with the Venezuelan effort.



• Help to Brazil

I indicated the importance, in view of the potential psychological

market difficulties presented by the Iran–Iraq conflict, that hemispheric

countries like Brazil, which were heavily dependent on Iraqi oil, be pro-

vided some kind of temporary aid so as to avoid inflaming the spot

market. I did not press the President for a specific commitment on this



365-608/428-S/80010

898 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

point, but was assured later by Calderon Berti that Venezuela would

help Brazil.



• Nationalization Claims

I concluded by noting the importance of settling the outstanding

oil nationalization tax claims between Venezuela and several U.S.

majors in view of the growing importance of our bilateral relations. The

President expressed a desire to do so, indicated that they would be

moving within the next several weeks on settlements with several

smaller companies, and would continue to seek solutions to the multi-

million dollar claims against the American majors formerly operating

in Venezuela.

Meeting with Calderon Berti

• Confidential Session

In a confidential session I indicated to the Minister that the author-

izing legislation for the Energy Security Corporation

3

provided for two



hemispheric projects outside the United States involving a potential of

several billion dollars. I indicated that the Corporation would be

willing to explore participation in the massive investment that would

be needed to develop heavy oil facilities. The Minister expressed an in-

terest in studying a memorandum we promised to provide on this pos-

sibility. The Minister also expressed Venezuela’s intention to urge

other countries, like Mexico, to help Brazil with oil supplies. He also in-

dicated his strong desire to solve the politically difficult nationalization

claims question. He offered no other details.

• Heavy Crude Oil Trade

He complimented me on my statement before the Chamber of

Commerce referring to the U.S. intention to encourage the construction

and retrofit of refineries to handle Venezuela’s increasing heavy crude

production. He stressed that the greatest quantities of heavy crude

would go to those countries which offered the most in return to Vene-

zuela. While noting that negotiations for guarantees of heavy crude

supplies to some U.S. companies were underway, the Minister said that

Venezuela was very close to closing deals with France and Germany for

specific heavy crude quantities in exchange for broad-ranging assist-

ance programs.

3

The Energy Security Corporation was renamed the Synthetic Fuels Corporation in



the Energy Security Act of 1980.

365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 899



• Residual Fuel Oil Problem

The Minister noted a special refinery problem Venezuela will have

over the next several years and asked for our help. When Venezuela’s

major refinery upgrading program is complete in two years, they will

have maximum flexibility to produce a broad range of crude oil

products. Until then they must refine a minimum amount of residual

fuel oil to meet domestic gasoline demand. This includes a need to sell

approximately 400,000 barrels per day of residual fuel oil to the United

States. In part because of our efforts to back out of oil, residual sales to

the U.S. have sunk to as low as 260,000 barrels per day. The Minister

suggested that if the U.S. could guarantee enough fuel oil sales to solve

this Venezuelan surplus problem over the next two years, Venezuela in

turn would be willing to give some specified level of supply assurance

to the U.S. for the future. In the alternative, the need to sell this residual

fuel oil in European markets would mean less future supplies to the

United States. I promised the Minister to study this matter and get back

to him. We are currently developing options, including the possibility

of using such fuel oil for a regional SPR, to take advantage of this offer.



• Hemispheric Energy Program

The Minister elaborated on Venezuela’s plans for a hemispheric

energy development program. He noted there would be a meeting this

week in Rio de Janeiro of the OLADE countries to continue to develop

their proposal and another meeting at the end of November to finalize

the package. After the first of the year, he expected that the OLADE

countries would be in a position to seek possible technical and financial

participation from the United States and Canada. He specifically asked

my help in convincing the Canadians that this would be a worthwhile

undertaking. While making no long-term commitments concerning our

financial participation, I continued to endorse the general concept and

indicated I would speak to the Canadians.



• Oil Facility Agreement

The Minister also asked if we would help facilitate implementation

of the Venezuelan-Mexican oil facility designed to assist nine small Ca-

ribbean countries with their oil purchases. He noted that implementa-

tion of this agreement would require cooperation from the major oil

companies, an area where we could prove helpful. I observed we had

already responded to such a request from Mexico with regard to Nica-

ragua and stood prepared to help if Venezuela would provide us with

the appropriate specifics.

• OPEC Meeting

The Minister observed that he doubted the November 3 OPEC

heads of state meeting in Baghdad would take place, although he indi-


365-608/428-S/80010

900 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

cated that the October 14 meeting of OPEC oil ministers in London

would now take on new significance in view of the Iran–Iraq conflict.

4

In the afternoon I received a briefing from the Chairman of the



Board of Petroleos de Venezuela concerning Venezuelan heavy oil de-

velopment plans and the massive investment that will be needed to

meet the goal of one million barrels per day of heavy oil production by

the year 2000. In this regard, the Umbrella Agreement on technical co-

operation I initialed with Calderon Berti when he visited here last

March


5

was expanded during this visit by the addition of three more

projects specifically directed at perfecting heavy oil technologies.

The continuing expansion of our technology exchange and the

frank expression of our views concerning the complementary roles of

Venezuela, OPEC, the United States and its consuming allies in acting

responsibly to stabilize world oil markets, served to further develop the

expanding relationship with Venezuela and Energy Minister Calderon

Berti.

6

4



Both meetings were postponed. The Oil Ministers of Saudi Arabia, the UAE,

Qatar, and Kuwait met in Taif on October 10 and agreed to increase production by a mil-

lion barrels jointly. (The New York Times, October 14, 1980, p. D1)

5

The agreement was signed on March 6 during Calderon Bertı´’s visit to



Washington.

6

On October 11, Owen sent a memorandum to the President commenting on



Duncan’s memoranda: “Charles Duncan’s visit to Venezuela appears to have advanced

two of our major energy security purposes: to cement the kind of US-Venezuelan energy

relationship that will help to accelerate the development of Venezuela’s huge heavy

crude oil resources, and to secure reliable access for hard-hit countries to additional Ven-

ezuelan oil supply in an emergency.” (Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Ma-

terial, North/South File, Box 47, Pastor Country Files, Venezuela, 1–12/80)



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 901



286. Briefing Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of State

for Economic and Business Affairs (Hinton) and the

Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs (Vest) to

Secretary of State Muskie

1

Washington, November 11, 1980.



SUBJECT

The Impending Oil Crisis: Policy Options



I. Summary

There is a serious risk the world will face an oil supply shortfall of

1 million barrels per day (mb/d) or more through the first half of 1981.

Unless the U.S. and other major oil importing nations take immediate

and strong actions, we risk a repeat of 1979 when market panic turned a

small shortfall into a more than doubling of oil prices. The world

economy can ill afford another such shock. The present International

Energy Agency (IEA) policy of encouraging stock drawdowns and

avoiding abnormal spot market purchases can be successful only as

long as market participants believe that a resumption of oil supplies

from Iran and Iraq will occur during the first quarter of 1981 or before.

As that belief fades, many companies and governments suffering short-

falls will enter the spot market and drive up prices; this is already be-

ginning. The IEA nations need to act before the end of this year to re-

strain oil import demand and to ensure that oil will be available to

countries and companies experiencing serious shortfalls if we are to

avoid a sharp increase in oil prices. There are four major options for an

internationally coordinated response—reinforce present voluntary pol-

icies, impose politically binding national oil import ceilings, trigger the

IEA emergency oil sharing system, or combine ceilings with a selective

triggering of the IEA system. Under all four options, but particularly

the last three, the U.S. would be required to adopt strong, politically

difficult domestic energy policy measures. State, DOE, and the NSC

(Henry Owen) are consulting with other IEA members and with the

White House and OMB and will have a recommendation for you and

Secretary Duncan to send to the President early next week.



II. The Problem

The war between Iraq and Iran has taken 3.8 mb/d of oil imports

off the world market, over 8% of non-communist production. Since

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P870012–0201.



Confidential; Exdis. Drafted by Hecklinger and Bullen and cleared in E, EUR/RPE, S/P,

NEA/RA, and EA.



365-608/428-S/80010

902 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

world consumption has declined, we can simply do without some of

this oil—about 1 mb/d. Another 1–1.5 mb/d is apparently being made

up through increased production from the Saudis and other OPEC na-

tions. This leaves a shortfall of over 1 mb/d, which is now being met by

above normal stock draw-downs and some belt-tightening by nations

without adequate stocks. Depending on a number of factors—how

much additional supply is made available by OPEC nations, whether

companies and individuals begin to hoard oil, and whether the war ex-

pands or interferes with Gulf shipping, the shortfall could become

much larger.

The current shortfall is not distributed evenly among countries

and companies. The US lost a very small percentage of of its oil. France

lost 30%, Italy 15%, Japan 8%, Turkey 70%, Brazil 43%, and India 45%.

(Turkey and Portugal are in especially difficult straits; supplies prob-

ably can be found for Portugal, but it is proving much more difficult to

meet Turkey’s needs.) Also many small nations depended on Iraq for

most of their oil needs and at concessional terms. Even in countries

which have lost little overall, certain companies have suffered substan-

tial losses. This means that even though world stocks are high, some

nations and companies are experiencing serious difficulties now and

others will soon. If they are unable to secure adequate supplies from

other producers, they will turn to the spot market to make up their

shortfall. India and others have done so already.

Spot market prices have already increased, in some cases over $5

per barrel. As the war and the shortfall continue, prices will rise much

faster; they will soon surpass the $40+ levels reached in 1979 and will

likely break the $50 per barrel level by early 1981. Eventually, as in

1979, official OPEC prices will be raised in response. OPEC ministers

meeting in Bali on December 15 to set new prices will be very attentive

to price trends on the spot market. Also in December, long term con-

tracts for 1981 between producer countries and companies will be ne-

gotiated. Some producers, in response to rising spot prices, will impose

surcharges of probably $5–$7/bbl on their official prices (more than

15% above current prevailing prices).

The consequences of oil price rises are significant. The CIA has es-

timated that each $10 per barrel rise in the price of oil results in a .7%

increase in inflation in the first year in OECD countries (plus another

.7% in the second year) and a .5% decrease in economic growth in the

first year (.3% and .2% in the second and third years). The effects on de-

veloping countries are even more severe.

IEA nations agreed on October 1 to take steps to avoid abnormal

purchases on the spot market and to meet any shortfall through stock

draws. This has had some effect, but cracks in the IEA facade are ap-

pearing. Stocks are largely in private hands and companies will be re-



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 903

luctant to draw them down even at normal rates if they think that the

shortfall will continue into 1981. The current IEA policy is based on

jawboning and persuasion; it cannot force companies to draw down

stocks, nor can it reallocate oil to IEA or non-IEA nations or companies

facing the most serious shortfalls to prevent them from resorting to the

spot market. Producer allocation of additional production will help

some, but far from all, of those in need.

The IEA Governing Board meets November 20–21 and IEA minis-

ters on December 8–9. We believe that strong action must be taken if we

are to avoid another economic disaster on the order of 1979. The IEA

can reduce pressure on prices in two ways: 1) reducing demand for im-

ported oil, thereby making extra oil available generally to nations and

companies which need it, and 2) reallocating oil to those countries and

companies in need. The former is necessary to cover a shortfall, but

taken alone may not be sufficiently rapid or direct to stem rising pres-

sure on the spot market; the latter would better meet the spot market

problem, though there is no formal IEA mechanism to redirect oil to

non-IEA countries.



Procedural and Political Factors:

The actions we propose will depend on what emerges from our

consultations with other IEA nations, especially Japan, the UK, and

FRG, and France and the domestic measures the U.S. is willing to adopt

to support our efforts in the IEA. The IEA Secretariat appears to be ad-

vocating a triggering of the sharing system. We will discuss this with

IEA Executive Director Lantzke in Washington next Sunday. We do not

yet have a full readout of the positions of the other major countries,

though at the October Governing Board meeting

2

the Germans ap-



peared more amenable to setting ceilings than we expected. We foresee

difficulties in persuading the UK to agree to ceilings or triggering. Since

the UK is almost a net exporter, it is shielded from many of the direct

effects of a shortfall; also it fears that a system of ceilings would indi-

rectly give other countries some control over its production levels. Af-

ter we are more certain of what measures we can implement domesti-

cally, we will be able to deal with the British, Germans, Japanese and

others more effectively.



The Options

Option 1: Reinforce Present Policies

IEA nations would continue to persuade their companies not to re-

sort to the spot market and to draw down stocks to meet shortfalls. To

2

The October 21 meeting is summarized in telegram 33213 from Paris, October 22.



(Ibid., D800505–0165)

365-608/428-S/80010

904 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

strengthen our efforts we could use more forceful jawboning and adopt

voluntary stock targets. While this would be the path of least political

resistance in the IEA and would require the least sacrifice by the U.S. in

the short-term, it would not be adequate to prevent a substantial price

increase if the shortfall continues.

Option 2: Adopt National Oil Import Ceilings

IEA nations (and France) could adopt ceilings to reduce oil import

demand by an amount sufficient to cover the entire world shortfall or

the IEA share of that shortfall (over 75%). The reduction could be allo-

cated among IEA nations as a proportion of imports or consumption;

though the former would be more advantageous to the US, it would

more politically feasible and equitable to base ceilings on consumption.

Thus, if the shortfall were 1 mb/d, the US would have to absorb an im-

port cut of 470,000 b/d resulting in an import ceiling of about 6.6 mb/d

(including territories). While some believe we can achieve this through

present policies and mandatory fuel switching by utilities, (assuming

no abnormal stock building), additional measures might be needed.



Advantages:

IEA nations will probably accept ceilings, although ne-

gotiations will be difficult. Ceilings could be set to cover the entire

world shortfall, not just the IEA share as would be the case with the oil

sharing system (Option 3). Ceilings can be flexible enough to take into

account factors such as economic growth prospects, recent changes in

consumption levels, etc., that are not fully taken into account in the oil

sharing system.



Disadvantages:

There is no guarantee that IEA nations will take the

domestic demand restraint measures necessary to achieve their ceil-

ings. Even if they try to do so, they may not succeed since few if any

would adopt a fail-safe measure like a quota. Also nations might not act

with the speed necessary to take pressure off the spot market. Monitor-

ing is difficult; success can only be determined after some months. Ceil-

ings do not provide for directing supplies to oil short IEA and non-IEA

nations; this would have to be done indirectly through consultation

with oil companies. A ceiling system would not automatically provide

legal authority for IEA governments to implement strong domestic

measures.



Option 3: Trigger the Oil Sharing System

A “general trigger” is possible when the IEA as a whole has a

shortfall greater than 7% of a base period (the previous four quarters

with a quarter lag). Any member with a 7% shortfall can pull the “selec-

tive trigger” and the other nations will make up any shortfall above

that 7%. Since IEA oil consumption has been declining, the IEA’s oil

supplies were almost 7% below the base period even before the Iran/


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 905

Iraq war. The shortfall may cross the 7% general trigger threshold if lost

Iranian/Iraqi oil is not substantially made up. If it does not, the general

trigger threshold could possibly be reduced to less than 7% by unani-

mous vote.



Advantages:

This system could be implemented quickly, making

use of a previously agreed mechanism and formula. It would give the

U.S. and other IEA governments legal authority to implement strong

domestic measures such as enhanced demand restraint, domestic oil al-

location, and stock controls. It would make oil available to hard-hit IEA

countries and companies reducing the tendency to resort to the spot

market. Its operation is based on monthly estimated data, ensuring

prompt monitoring and response to changing conditions.

Disadvantages:

The system limits each country to its formula share

of available oil; this could hold Turkey, Portugal, Greece and Italy, for

example, below needed import levels. The U.S. would be required to

supply oil to other countries, amounting to 200,000–300,000 b/d for a

group shortfall of 1–1.5 mbd (however, this will probably be less than

under ceilings). The need to compensate U.S. companies which gave up

oil could eventually force the U.S. to implement domestic oil alloca-

tion—which poses political and practical problems. The system allo-

cates oil according to a base period (July 1979–June 1980) which does

not reflect current oil requirements. It does little for non-IEA countries.

The margin of error of data used makes it difficult to trigger for a small

shortfall. Further, the system, though tested, is yet untried. Finally, trig-

gering could cause market nervousness.



Option 4: Selective Trigger with Ceilings

Oil import ceilings could be combined with a selective triggering

for hard-hit IEA countries such as Austria, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portu-

gal, Spain, and Turkey.

The advantages and disadvantages of an import ceiling system are

applicable to this option. In addition, while this option would provide

some direct assistance to hard-hit countries, relief would be limited to

93% of the base period. These countries might be better off with only a

ceiling system if additional supplies could be assured informally. Also

countries in a technical trigger situation but not really short of oil (Ger-

many, the U.K., Belgium, Switzerland, and probably the U.S.) might be

tempted to trigger to avoid incurring an obligation to supply oil to

other countries; this would make the system unworkable.


365-608/428-S/80010

906 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling