Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Memorandum From the President’s Deputy Assistant for


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet9/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   95

12.

Memorandum From the President’s Deputy Assistant for

National Security Affairs (Scowcroft) to President Ford

1

Washington, October 25, 1974.



Secretary Kissinger asked that I pass you the following message:

2

“Once again the French have unilaterally gone public with a major



initiative without any prior consultation.

3

Giscard has invited selected



producers, consumers and Less-Developed Countries to discuss the en-

ergy problem. Giscard also proposes a system of indexing which be-

cause of continued inflation in consuming countries will certainly lead

to higher oil prices. Such a meeting is contrary to our strategy—and the

strategy agreed by most of France’s partners—that the consumers must

first develop a common program before they will have anything to talk

to producers about. This France rejects by refusing to join the energy

coordinating group.

“While this initiative may cause a certain amount of confusion, it

cannot really get anywhere. A meeting with producers without a

common consumer position is an invitation to confrontation or sur-

render. Giscard invites the EC–9 to act as a unit. This gives the Europe-

ans a dilemma which may cause the FRG, UK and Italy to waffle in

dealing with us without being able to work with France, for in the end,

these countries will have to cooperate with us because that is the only

way to meet the financial crisis. In short, the French initiative is charac-

teristic of French policy over the past decade; it is vain, useless and de-

structive of any cooperative effort. No possible good can come of it.

“Our strategy should be to let the producer-consumer meeting

take its course and proceed to organize our consumer group. The

French saw that we were beginning to succeed and that is why they

moved at this time. They obviously prefer being bailed out by OPEC

1

Source: Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Kissinger Papers, Box CL 140,



Geopolitical File, France, September 7–December 20, 1974. Secret; Sensitive. Sent for in-

formation. Ford initialed the memorandum.

2

Kissinger was in Moscow to meet with Soviet officials.



3

On October 24, Giscard held a press conference to announce that France “planned

to contact consumer and producer governments at once to see whether a produc-

er-consumer conference could be organized early next year.” Brunet spoke with the Em-

bassy’s Charge´ d’Affaires and the Economic Affairs Minister on October 25 about Gis-

card’s statement and formally invited the United States to participate in the preparatory

conference that the French President had proposed. He further explained that France

wanted to invite “officials of rich consumers, poor consumers and producers to partici-

pate in a preparatory meeting in Paris next month,” although a date had not been chosen.

Finally, he told them that Sauvagnargues had cabled Kissinger in Moscow on October 23

(see footnote 2, Document 16) to give him advance notice of Giscard’s intentions. (Tele-

gram 25419 from Paris, October 26; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy

Files, D740306–0775)


365-608/428-S/80010

60 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

than by the US. Yet in time we shall prevail despite French sabotage.

This is an area where we have had a consistent, imaginative policy and

your Administration can take credit for what we have been trying to ac-

complish behind the scene.”



13.

Telegram From the Department of State to Secretary of State

Kissinger in Islamabad

1

Washington, October 31, 1974, 1744Z.



Tosec 412/239404. Subject: French Energy Initiative.

1. Ambassador Kosciusko-Morizet requested an appointment

today to discuss the French initiative for a producer/consumer

meeting on petroleum. He described Giscard’s initiative generally

along the lines presented to our Embassy in Paris last Friday,

2

ending



with the questions, what is the US reaction and do you accept the invi-

tation to participate in the preparatory meeting suggested for late

November?

2. When I asked Kosciusko-Morizet what the French expected to

achieve at such a conference he talked vaguely of some form of price

indexation whereby the prices producers paid for technology, indus-

trial products and food would be related to the price they receive for

oil. He distinguished those producer countries such as Iran and Nigeria

that would use their oil revenues to industrialize their countries from

those producers who want primarily to maintain the value of their

money over the next 10–15 years. He also acknowledged that the

present price of oil is perhaps too high and therefore not an acceptable

base level for such a system.

3. When I noted our concern at the announcement of the French in-

itiative with such short notice and without prior consultation

Kosciusko-Morizet replied that it should not have been a complete sur-

prise since this is an old idea raised initially by Yamani

3

and that the



1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D740311–0715.

Confidential; Immediate; Exdis. Drafted by Ernest H. Preeg (EUR), cleared in EB and

EUR, and approved by Ingersoll. Repeated Immediate to London for Sonnenfeldt and

Hartman and to Paris.

2

October 25. See footnote 3, Document 12.



3

See footnote 9, Document 10.



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 61

subject had been broached during the Camp David discussion.

4

Fur-



thermore, Kosciusko-Morizet saw no contradiction between the French

initiative and continued progress in the small Group of Five consumer

countries.

4. I responded that it was still not clear what could convince pro-

ducers to lower prices. I did not answer the two questions raised by

Kosciusko-Morizet but said that we would study the French proposals

and be back in touch with them.

Ingersoll

4

See Document 9.



14.

Telegram From the Department of State to Secretary of State

Kissinger in Isfahan

1

Washington, November 2, 1974, 0508Z.



Tosec 549/241788. Subject: Camp David Follow-up. For the Secre-

tary from Enders.

1. We had an encouraging meeting with the British (Maitland of

the Foreign Office, Mitchell of the Treasury, Taylor of the Energy Min-

istry) today in Washington on your energy initiatives.

2. At the close, the British agreed with the following summing up

of the proposals officials should now make to their Ministers:

(A) Each country should develop a national program of conserva-

tion measures, which would then be collated into collective whole, re-

viewed for adequacy of burden sharing and total impact, and repack-

aged into a group forecast of reduced import needs (Brits have

something in their budget for presentation in two weeks; they didn’t

give us details);

(B) An analogous process would occur on the supply side, with

each country’s Project Independence to be set side by side and collated

into a group forecast;

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files



for Middle East and South Asia, Box 13, Iran—State Department Telegrams from

SECSTATE–NODIS (1). Secret; Immediate; Nodis. Drafted by Enders on November 1.

Also sent Immediate to Tehran.


365-608/428-S/80010

62 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

(C) On financial solidarity the main effort, and it must be very sub-

stantial, will be among the consuming countries themselves; this would

not exclude some expansion of IMF facilities, with particular reference

to LDC needs;

(D) On procedure, implementation should start as early as possible

with the latter part of November an appropriate date, with two ap-

proaches available.

—One would be to continue to attempt to use the Five to develop

concepts, with a meeting in Paris on November 19, followed by a new

Camp David meeting in January.

—A second approach, not necessarily exclusive of the first, would

be to aim at a meeting of Foreign and Finance Ministers of a larger

group of industrial countries in mid-January, with existing organiza-

tions (the Group of 10

2

for finance and the new International Energy



Agency for conservation and supply) to start off to implement the main

elements of your initiatives already beginning in November. This latter

procedure might be preferable in that (A) it would cut off Van Lennep

who could attend Group of 10 meetings and present his plan, but

would not control the venue for negotiations and (B) it would be much

less vulnerable to French obstructionism than the smaller (and still not

established) Group of Five.

3. The British thus at official level have come around to all intents

and purposes to supporting our proposals. They said that Callaghan is

very anxious to get on with it, and would welcome an early opportu-

nity to meet at political level. They agreed strongly that with this

second round of consultations we should now fix on a specific proposal

and start to run.

4. On the Giscard initiative

3

the British started out wobbly. They



cited a Callaghan statement from a speech in the House of Commons

on October 30 reading “President Giscard d’Estaing has recently made

an interesting proposal for an international discussion between pro-

ducers, consumers and developing countries on the question of oil sup-

plies. We shall certainly wish to consider his proposal constructively. It

would be necessary to work out an agenda carefully in advance and we

should be ready to join in discussion for this purpose.” British said that

they do not interpret this statement as committing them to attend a

2

The Group of 10 (G–10) industrialized countries consulted and cooperated on eco-



nomic, monetary, and financial matters. The members were Belgium, Canada, France,

West Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, the United King-

dom, and the United States. The group was established when the original 10 members,

which did not include Switzerland, agreed in 1962 to participate in the General Arrange-

ments to Borrow (GAB), a supplementary borrowing facility to the IMF. Switzerland

joined the group in 1964 but the name remained the Group of 10.

3

See Document 12.



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 63

prepcon, and made much of the fact that Callaghan mentions no dates.

They said that they continue to think that a producer/consumer confer-

ence is premature, and likely to fail. They said their intention would be

to slow down such a conference through the EC, in preparatory discus-

sions, with the hope that the initiative will collapse. However, they ar-

gued the French proposal is an established fact which we cannot now

ignore.

4. I countered with these points:



(A) We do not believe that the objective conditions for the success

of a producer/consumer conference have been realized, with the con-

sumers still in disarray and only beginning to tackle the hard issues of

conservation and alternative supply;

(B) That we are disturbed by the substance of Giscard’s proposal,

particularly indexing;

4

whatever French officials say (and they are



downplaying substantive remarks) his stand would prejudice the

conference;

(C) The French are clearly scared to death that the producers will

raise prices this winter, thus aggravating the French balance of pay-

ments and either destroying their ceiling on oil payments or forcing the

French Government into rationing; their proposal and its haste is in-

tended in part to ward off such an increase; we do not see why a short

term gain for the French has to be traded against a long term and major

cost for the industrial countries as a whole;

(D) The lack of consultations raises the most serious question

about French motives, given your initiative in picking up a French idea

to create the Camp David group as a private forum; and

(E) We do not know what our response will be to the French

proposal.

5. In the course of conversation, the British officials came closer

and closer to accepting this view. They argued that French initiative

made it immeasurably more difficult to deal with serious problems;

they said that they too could not square the Giscard initiative with a co-

operative stance in energy as a whole; they concluded that the initiative

should if possible be killed or at least delayed.

6. It would be wrong to put much store in the toughening attitude

of these officials during their Washington talks; I have no doubt that

they personally share our disapproval of this French action, but from

Callaghan’s statement it would appear doubtful that the British will do

much more than applaud privately whatever we can do to cause the

French to fail.

4

Indexing the price of oil to inflation.



365-608/428-S/80010

64 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

7. However, with little encouragement it may be possible to get the

Europeans and Japanese to put enough sand in the gears to slow the

French down to a crawl. I am leaving Monday, November 4 for bilat-

erals in Tokyo and Bonn, to be followed by an ECG meeting on Novem-

ber 8 in Brussels. I would like your authority to take a similar tough,

skeptical position on the Giscard initiative, without moving into a posi-

tion of drumming up reaction against it.

8. As you know, French Foreign Ministry Director for Economic

Affairs Brunet is coming here the evening of November 3 to see the

Acting Secretary on the Giscard initiative. I will see him the evening of

November 2. We request your authority to take a hard-nosed

non-committal stance in those talks.



Ingersoll

15.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassies in

Japan and West Germany

1

Washington, November 3, 1974, 0029Z.



241954. Subject: Camp David Followup.

1. Following is text of an informal paper for Enders and Cooper

discussions next week. Request that Tokyo pass to Miyazaki and Yo-

shida and Bonn to Poehl and Hermes. Please stress to recipients that

this paper is of the highest sensitivity and is for their eyes only. Request

that no distribution be made in Embassy.

2. Begin text. A Proposal for More Comprehensive Collaboration

Among the Industrialized Countries.

3. In light of the dangerous situation facing them, particularly as a

result of the oil price increases, the industrialized countries should un-

dertake a more comprehensive collaboration with the objectives of:

bringing about lower costs for their oil supplies; reducing the damage

to their economies caused by the higher costs of their imports; pre-

venting disruption of the basic cohesion of the countries of the Free

World; and creating procedures to improve their capacity to respond to

unforeseen future events.

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for



East Asia and the Pacific, Box 8, Japan—State Department Telegrams from SECSTATE–

NODIS (1). Secret; Priority; Nodis. Drafted by Enders on November 2.



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 65

4. In undertaking this more comprehensive collaboration, the in-

dustrialized countries must build upon what has already been accom-

plished and is already being undertaken in various existing interna-

tional bodies, including the IMF, the OECD, and the IEA.

5. As the next step toward this desired collaboration, further dis-

cussions should be held among the Foreign and Finance Ministers of

the five major nations in an effort to reduce differences in their percep-

tions of problems and opportunities before formal discussions of closer

cooperation are undertaken with a wider group of industrialized

countries.

6. A program of additional cooperation is desirable: one in which

the different parts reinforce one another both politically and

economically.

7. Included in the program should be: (A) An internationally

agreed set of additional measures intended to reduce reliance by the in-

dustrial countries on imports of oil from outside the group, to be re-

ferred to below as “conservation measures”; (B) A new set of commit-

ments and procedures by which the group could provide economic

support, as needed, in the form of loans to those members of the group

which would otherwise suffer acute economic damage as a result of in-

ternational economic developments, to be referred to below as “finan-

cial solidarity measures”; and (C) An undertaking to attempt to de-

velop various other forms of collaboration on measures supportive of

the activities included in A and B, referred to below as “other sup-

portive measures”.

8. Conservation measures. Additional measures by the major in-

dustrialized countries to reduce their reliance on high cost oil imports

are desirable: to reduce vulnerability to future interruptions in supply;

to limit the real burden being placed on their economies by the neces-

sity of paying either currently for the costly imports or ultimately for

amortization of debt being undertaken to finance the current consump-

tion of energy; to reduce the danger of potential disruption to the

world’s financing system as a result of concentration of large holdings

of financial assets in the hands of a small number of producing country

governments; and to demonstrate to the producers more promptly the

damage which will be done to their economic welfare, as well as that of

the consuming nations, by attempts to prolong current high oil prices.

9. The most appropriate mix of additional conservation measures

will vary from country to country. Among the important types of meas-

ures are likely to be removal of official restraints on the cost of energy

to consumers, imposition of additional taxation on consumption of im-

ported energy, and inducements to switch from oil to other sources of

energy.


365-608/428-S/80010

66 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

10. The higher prices which have been allowed to take effect in the

market place have already reduced oil consumption. Not only have the

5% to 10% increases forecast earlier for consumption growth in 1974

not taken place, but recent consumption levels in the major industrial

countries have been running 5% to 10% below the levels before the out-

break of the Mid-East war in October 1973. Some of the reductions in

consumption are attributable, however, to the slower overall rates of

economic growth being experienced in the industrialized countries,

and there is no assurance that in the absence of new government meas-

ures there will be no resurgence of demand in 1975 when higher rates

of economic growth resume and when the shock of the sudden move to

higher prices is further in the past. Under the circumstances, additional

conservation and production-encouraging measures are desirable in all

countries, and probably in every country it will be easier to gain legisla-

tive and popular acceptance of additional measures if they are taken in

the context of an equitably shared comprehensive program of interna-

tional cooperation.

11. It is probably neither practical nor desirable to expect gov-

ernments to commit their countries to specific maximum amounts of oil

imports in 1975 or to adopt identical programs or standards of conser-

vation measures. But individual country programs for 1975 should be

collated into a total international program, which would then be re-

viewed for the adequacy of its total impact and for the equity of distri-

bution of national contributions, and adjusted as necessary. It should

be useful to establish an agreed timetable for the development of na-

tional programs and their international review and adjustment. Based

on experience, in the course of 1975 additional measures could be con-

sidered, if necessary, for implementation later in 1975 or in 1976.

12. As a first approximation, it is suggested that measures be

sought which would result in total member country imports in the

third quarter of 1975 of at least 20%, about 5½ million barrels a day,

below their imports of about 27½ million barrels a day in the third

quarter of 1973. Already, by the third quarter of 1974, their imports had

been reduced to almost half the amount proposed for the third quarter

of 1975. The cutback in consumption could alternatively be expressed

in terms of reduction in consumption below levels which would have

prevailed in the absence of new conservation measures.

13. Financial solidarity. Despite the reduction in oil import costs

which can be achieved by additional conservation measures, and de-

spite the desirable impact which such conservation may have in pre-

venting further increases in oil prices and possibly in bringing about

some price reductions, the industrialized countries are likely to be

faced, in 1975 and later years, with enormous oil import bills. Vast

changes in the pattern of international trade and investment flows will



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 67

result. Adjustment of these flows is likely to take place in many dif-

ferent ways, both through the many existing channels of contact be-

tween the oil-producing countries and the industrialized countries and

through various new channels.

14. In this process, however, there is the danger that—in the ab-

sence of new measures of international cooperation—particular indus-

trialized countries might be faced with acute economic hardship or

with the necessity to rely on financial help from producing countries on

terms which should be considered politically or economically unac-

ceptable to the community of industrialized nations. To counter this

danger, it would seem highly desirable that the industrialized coun-

tries develop among themselves a new set of commitments and proce-

dures by which the group could provide economic support in the form

of loans, when appropriate, to individual member countries of the

group. What is needed is more likely to prove a safety net than an artifi-

cial limb, but the safety net would need to be designed for use in any

emergency which might arise in order to provide countries in advance

with a confidence which would allow them to avoid internationally

disruptive economic policies which might otherwise be undertaken out

of extreme fear of the future.

15. To be effective in combatting fear, the potentially available

loans would have to be very large. On the other hand, such loans could

not be promised to any member of the group automatically. The avail-

ability of the loans would have to be conditioned upon judgment on be-

half of the group that a prospective borrowing nation was following

reasonable policies of self-help.

16. As a preliminary proposal to meet the need for a safety net, it is

suggested that consideration be given to an agreement among industri-

alized countries that they would—in the context of a larger program of

collaboration on conservation and other energy matters—agree to un-

dertake loan commitments callable on demand by a common fund

when loan assistance was needed and approved for a particular

member country.

17. The principles on which the fund would be based could be as

follows: (A) The total size of the fund would be related to the estimated

annual combined deficit on current account of participating countries

vis-a`-vis outside oil suppliers (an appropriate number for the first year

might be one half, which would provide a fund on the order of $20 or

$25 billion). (B) Each country’s maximum lending obligation and max-

imum borrowing limit would be identical. (C) These limits would be

determined basically by reference to an appropriate formula incorpo-

rating relevant considerations; an appropriate formula might be based

on oil imports from outside the group, participation in foreign trade,


365-608/428-S/80010

68 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

and GNP. (D) Participants would share in financing loans on the basis

of their shares in the fund.

18. Additional commitments would be anticipated for 1976. Each

loan from the common fund would be approved by a board of trustees

acting on a qualified weighted voting basis on behalf of the member na-

tions in the group. The discretion of the board should probably be lim-

ited by agreed guidelines. The board might well be associated with the

OECD. Presumably, the loans to and from the common fund would be

on commercial terms. Loan assistance from the common fund should

probably be made conditional on the borrower making appropriate use

of other assets available to it and making efforts to obtain capital from

other sources on reasonable terms. Borrowers would also be expected

not to take trade or other restrictive measures inconsistent with their

GATT, IMF, and OECD obligations.

19. An important feature of the financial safety net, as described

above, would be that the assistance to any particular nation would nei-

ther be, nor appear to be, dependent on the approval of one or more of

the oil-producing countries. The assistance would be on a mutual

self-help basis among the industrialized countries. Each of those coun-

tries could raise the funds for its contribution as it saw fit: from cash on

hand, from taxation, or from new borrowing. Such new borrowing

could, in effect, be from an oil-producing government if an oil producer

happened to purchase the debt obligations sold by the borrowing gov-

ernment on the market, or if a loan were arranged directly by the bor-

rowing country government from an oil producer. But, in the usual—

and preferable—case, lending to the common fund would be but one of

the many ways in which an industrialized country government was

disbursing funds, and it would not be possible to make an unam-

biguous connection between one source of funds for the government

and one use of funds by that government.

20. It would also be possible to provide that the trustees of the

common fund would be empowered to make investments in promising

internationally significant research and development projects when

appropriate.

21. As an alternative to loans to the common fund, consideration

could be given to borrowing by the fund on the strength of guaranties

provided by the cooperating governments, presumably in about the

same proportions as loans might be made to the common fund. In some

countries, it might be that such guaranties would appear less onerous

to legislatures than direct loans to a common fund, even though the risk

exposure to the governments would be the same by either method. On

the other hand, the guaranty method would have a significant political

disadvantage in that the political credit for the assistance might tend to

accrue in large measure to the provider of the loan funds, quite possibly



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 69

an oil producer, rather than to the providers of the guaranties who

would be the real bearers of the risk. The guaranty route would also

have the disadvantage that the rate of interest paid on the guaranteed

borrowings would probably be higher than that paid on average by

governments borrowing their separate shares of the needed funds di-

rectly on their own separate full legal obligations. In view of frequent

public failure to understand the nature of guaranties, there would also

be some danger that the guaranty route would be treated as a “some-

thing for nothing” method and would thus lead to less careful moni-

toring of the assistance involved.

22. It would also be possible, as an alternative to the common fund

outlined above, to consider attempting to use the International Mone-

tary Fund as the provider of the desired safety net for the industrialized

countries. That alternative would have the advantage of making use of

an existing institution without requiring establishment of a new

common fund. On the other hand, there would be a number of disad-

vantages of attempting to use the IMF. Establishment within the IMF

of a safety net of the large size necessary to accomplish the desired ob-

jective for the major industrialized countries would lead to extreme

pressures within the IMF for large, comparable facilities for the

less-developed countries, even though such facilities would not be ap-

propriate to the needs of most such countries. For many of them, con-

cessional lending in smaller amounts would be appropriate. It would

also be more difficult to develop an integrated program of conserva-

tion, financial solidarity, and other supportive measures, if the safety

net were attempted in the IMF, which includes in its membership both

the oil-producing countries and many other countries which would not

be likely participants in the proposed integrated program.

23. In any event, whatever method of financial support is chosen

for industrial countries, the need to provide additional concessional

assistance to developing countries will need to be considered. To the

extent that financial solidarity leads to improved economic perform-

ance in industrial countries, lesser amounts of direct financial assist-

ance to developing nations will be required however.

24. Other supportive measures. Although conservation efforts and

financial solidarity would be the two most important individual com-

ponents of a comprehensive program of cooperation, there are likely to

be many other individual forms of cooperation which, in combination,

could be significantly supportive of the two main measures. A compre-

hensive program should, therefore, include an undertaking by the gov-

ernments involved to attempt cooperation in other ways contributing

to the same objectives.

25. For this purpose economic relations with producers would be

reviewed in an effort to identify ways and means in which oil company



365-608/428-S/80010

70 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

policies on pricing and the distribution of liftings, consuming country

import and export policies, export credits, and loans and policies of in-

ternational financial institutions could be managed to yield a better bal-

ance of bargaining power with the producers. Timing and context of bi-

lateral and eventual multilateral producer/consumer contacts should

also be studied.



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling