Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Memorandum From Secretary of Energy Duncan and


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet90/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95

287. Memorandum From Secretary of Energy Duncan and

Secretary of State Muskie to President Carter

1

Washington, November 19, 1980.



SUBJECT

IEA Measures for Dealing with the Continuing Oil Supply Crisis



Summary

The increasing possibility of a longer Iran–Iraq war and a longer

repair period for damaged oil facilities once the war ceases lead to the

conclusion that stronger measures by consuming countries will be

needed if we are to avoid a sharp increase in oil prices such as occurred

during the 1979 Iran crisis. We seek your approval of a two stage

strategy, involving a U.S. lead effort to secure informal oil allocations

by relatively crude-rich multi-national oil companies for those IEA

countries most immediately hurt by the supply disruption, and rapid

negotiation within the IEA of realistic national oil import ceilings for

1981.

Background

The continuation of hostilities, as well as increasing damage in re-

cent weeks to Iraqi oil facilities, leads to the conclusion that a normal oil

market is unlikely for the next several months. Both sides seem capable

of several more months of war and while the intensity of the fighting

should decline due to the advent of winter, our judgment is that hostil-

ities are unlikely to end soon. At present, we estimate a 3- to 6-month

period will be needed to repair facilities before Iraq can begin to export

more than 1 million barrels per day (MMB/D) (prewar exports were 3.1

MMB/D). Even with the increased production from other OPEC coun-

tries, we expect that the shortage in the first quarter of 1981 will be

some 2.5 MMB/D. Cumulative losses to the world oil market are, there-

fore, expected to reach at least 300 MMB, and could exceed 500 MMB or

750 MMB. This can be compared to the 200 MMB shortfall experienced

during the Iran crisis of 1979, which resulted in a doubling of world oil

prices. We are indeed fortunate that inventories are substantially

higher today, but the potential for price increases is real.

While the United States imported no oil from Iran and very little

from Iraq (35,000 B/D from Iraq), IEA countries such as Turkey and

Portugal lost 70 percent and 50 percent of their consumption needs re-

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, International Eco-



nomics File, Box 49, Rutherford Poats File, Chron, 11/12–30/80. Secret. Carter initialed

the memorandum.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 907

spectively, while Spain, Italy, and Japan also lost large volumes. Allow-

ing for production increases and stock drawdowns, these IEA countries

will be left with an aggregate shortage in the range of 500 MB/D, mov-

ing into the first quarter of 1981. Several non-IEA countries, such as

France, Brazil, and India were also hurt.

Spot market prices began increasing in October as an initial re-

sponse to the fighting. They have been rising slowly but steadily since

then, and are now about 30 percent above pre-war levels though

volume has been thin thus far. In the coming months one can expect

further and perhaps accelerated increases to levels well above $40, and

perhaps approaching $50 if a way other than the spot market is not

found to meet the shortfall of the most affected countries. As happened

in 1979, this could give OPEC Oil Ministers a rationale to increase offi-

cial prices substantially, and press reports indicate this possibility.

The first IEA response to the crisis was appropriate; on October 1,

the IEA members agreed to encourage companies to avoid abnormal

spot purchases and to draw stocks in the fourth quarter to meet short-

falls.


2

However, with the worsening situation of the West European

and Mediterranean countries and the date for resumption of full pro-

duction receding, these measures will have to be augmented if we are

to avoid the potential of significant price pressures in early 1981.

Approach

As the first step in our preferred strategy, the United States and

other principal IEA members would launch a vigorous, informal effort

to have multinational companies (predominantly the ARAMCO part-

ners) redistribute supplies to those IEA countries most in need. Initially

this means Turkey and Portugal, perhaps to be followed by others as

we move into the first quarter of 1981.

Simultaneously, we would push for the negotiation and adoption

of realistic national oil import ceilings, to be set for 1981 and reviewed

quarterly, by the IEA countries and France. Earlier this year the IEA

agreed to adopt such a system for converting national oil import yard-

sticks into binding ceilings if market conditions warranted. Our objec-

tive at the December Ministerial would be to adopt the ceilings for

1981; if this proves too difficult, we would at least aim to have com-

pleted the difficult ceiling negotiation and put in place a system for im-

mediate adoption by the IEA Secretariat and/or Ministers of binding

ceilings if they believe rising spot prices early next year so require.

2

The IEA members, noting lowered oil consumption, high levels of oil stocks, and



spare production capacity, were convinced that “overall supply of IEA Countries and

other countries can be managed so as to meet demand over the next few months.” (Scott,



The History of the International Energy Agency,

vol. III, pp. 121–123)



365-608/428-S/80010

908 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

The United States is in a strong position to initiate this action. The

supply shortfall to us is minimal, while our stocks are at historic levels

and our consumption is declining. In the IEA negotiations, we would

make it clear that we are prepared to urge our companies, particularly

the ARAMCO partners, to redistribute supplies to the five troubled

IEA countries, in exchange for assurances that all members were pre-

pared to abide by the ceiling levels once established. We have already

contacted the four ARAMCO partners (Texaco, Exxon, Mobil, Socal);

they have indicated a willingness to discuss an effort to avoid the for-

mal triggering of the IEA allocation system.



Implementation

If you concur in the proposed action, we will need to move quickly

with our IEA partners to begin the yardstick/ceilings negotiations with

other consuming nations. The IEA Governing Board meets November

20–21, and IEA Ministers meet December 8–9. The Europeans and Japa-

nese are reviewing options and the time to propose a U.S. initiative is

now. High-level EC meetings, at which the Europeans will firm up

their positions, are scheduled for November 27 with Energy Ministers,

and December 1–2, at the Heads of Government level. Our initial

soundings with EC officials indicate that if we are able to assist the

most severely affected countries in their short run allocation problems

via the ARAMCO partners, then the EC may be forthcoming on the

ceiling negotiations.

The character of the U.S. domestic response will be a crucial tool in

persuading our partners to follow our lead. A separate memorandum

concerning recommended domestic initiatives is being prepared for

you.

3

Recommendation



That you authorize us to seek in the IEA an informal allocation

agreement to distribute supplies to those IEA countries most seriously

affected and to undertake the process of establishing national oil im-

port ceilings. This approach is also supported by Bill Miller, Charlie

Schultze, Stu Eizenstat and Henry Owen.

4

3



Not found.

4

Carter checked the Approve option and initialed.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 909



288. Memorandum From Secretary of Energy Duncan to the

President’s Assistant for National Security Affairs

(Brzezinski)

1

Washington, November 20, 1980.



SUBJECT

DOE Response to Persian Gulf Security Framework Memorandum

2

Our response is limited to the two sections dealing with DOE re-



lated oil issues:

(A) Current Status of Goals: Economic Component, Oil

We believe the oil outlook is less favorable than suggested in the

memorandum. If Persian Gulf military hostilities continue through the

winter, as now seems likely, oil exports from the Gulf will not approach

pre-war levels until after mid-1981. Spot prices are rising steadily, al-

though thus far most buyers have remained publicly calm and re-

frained from large-scale purchases. However, with heavier demands

for winter heating supplies, recent warnings by Saudi officials that the

world may be on the verge of a new round of panic oil buying and a

world-wide reluctance to deplete existing stocks, the situation could

easily deteriorate. If buyers panic, producers may seek to impose

higher contract prices and premiums on their long-term customers.

(B) Goals for the Future: Economic Component, Oil

We agree that continued progress on oil pricing, availability and

conservation is critical. We also feel that prices might soon rise as much

as $8, $10 or even by much larger increments per barrel if a more

widely destructive war, a harsh winter, or other unforseeable risks

occur. We should seek IEA agreement on oil import ceilings for 1981 to

reduce pressure on the world oil market. We could also take the lead by

adopting a variety of moderately stimulating energy supply enhance-

ment, fuel switching, and oil demand-restraint measures. These actions

1

Source: Department of Energy, Executive Secretariat Files, Job #8824, International



Affairs, 10/80–12/80. Secret.

2

Brzezinski’s November 5 memorandum to Muskie, Brown, Miller, Duncan, McIn-



tyre, Jones, and Turner on the Persian Gulf Security Framework noted that the loss of

Iraqi oil due to the Iran–Iraq war was “yet to be felt” because Saudi Arabia and others

helped make up for the shortfall. Brzezinski added: “Prices are stable and consumption

in the West is down. We have begun to fill the strategic petroleum reserve. The Venice

Summit and actions by the IEA have helped convince oil producers that we are serious

about our energy policies and have helped stabilize the oil market.” (Ibid.) Brzezinski

sent an earlier memorandum on the subject to the same recipients on June 3. It included a

summary of the status report that was sent to Carter based on the 12 SCC meetings on the

security framework for the Persian Gulf. (Carter Library, Brzezinski Donated Material,

Box 5)


365-608/428-S/80010

910 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

could provide the basis for a multilateral effort to impose import fees or

other measures that would pre-empt producer price increases and min-

imize economic damage to consumer economies.

289. Memorandum From Secretary of Energy Duncan to President

Carter

1

Washington, December 4, 1980.



SUBJECT

Further IEA Measures for Dealing with the Continuing Oil Supply Crisis



Summary

On November 19, you approved a two stage U.S. strategy for the

upcoming IEA Ministerial in Paris on December 8 and 9.

2

This involved



a U.S.-led effort to secure informal oil allocations by relatively

crude-rich multinational oil companies for those IEA countries most

immediately hurt by the Iraq–Iran war, and rapid negotiation within

the IEA of politically-binding national oil import ceilings for 1981.

At the November 21 IEA Governing Board meeting,

3

the will-



ingness of the U.S. to help correct supply imbalances was well received,

but most member countries indicated reluctance to adopt national oil

import ceilings at this time. Another meeting was set for December 5,

however, to review the country-specific numbers that would be re-

quired to establish binding import ceilings for 1981 to bring supply and

demand into balance.

In addition, the Reagan transition organization

4

has advised me



today that it is opposed to the concept of import ceilings, thus implying

that efforts by me to persuade the IEA to adopt binding ceilings now

would be disavowed by the new administration when it takes office.

My judgment is that market conditions still warrant the adoption

of import ceilings now. The spot market has been calmed somewhat by

the reopening of the Turkish and Syrian pipelines from Iraq, but the

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, International Eco-



nomics File, Box 49, Rutherford Poats File, Chron, 12/1–8/80. Confidential.

2

See Document 287.



3

Telegram 36747 from Paris, November 24, summarizes the meeting. (National Ar-

chives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D800563–0317)

4

Republican nominee Ronald Reagan won the November 4 Presidential election.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 911

potential for significant supply problems in 1981 if member countries

do not take measures to reduce import levels still remains very high.

However, given the clear reluctance of other member countries to

adopt binding import ceilings now and the views of the Reagan organi-

zation on ceilings, it is not realistic to expect that the upcoming Ministe-

rial meeting will adopt import ceilings.

In these circumstances, I request your approval of a strategy that

would have the U.S. delegation state at the IEA meeting that:

• It is our view that ceilings should be adopted now;

• If adoption of ceilings is not a realistic alternative at this time,

the ministers should agree to a standby mechanism that could be im-

mediately implemented by a Secretariat decision that would result in

a Ministerial convocation on 48 hours notice for purposes of quick

implementation.

In addition, we would continue to offer U.S. assistance in cor-

recting informally the supply imbalances that currently exist.

The annual IEA import reduction level I would propose for the

standby program would be in the range of 1.5 MMB/D. Based on our

share of IEA oil consumption, this would imply a U.S. import ceiling

no lower than 6.5 MMB/D. (U.S. oil imports will average about 6.6

MMB/D in 1980, but less than that in recent weeks.)

Background

The U.S. delegation at the November 21 meeting of the Interna-

tional Energy Agency made some progress in moving the member

countries towards serious consideration of realistic national oil import

ceilings for 1981, although several members still have a wait-and-see at-

titude. The resumption of Iraqi crude exports via pipelines to Turkey

and Syria, and the continuing exports of modest quantities of Iranian

oil, combined with higher production from Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Ni-

geria and a few others, have had a temporary calming effect on the spot

market, where prices have recently declined slightly for the first time in

ten weeks. This temporary market reaction, however, belies the serious

risks which lie ahead. Even with the improved supply picture, world

oil production will fall some 2 MMB/D short of projected demand in

the first quarter of 1981. Even with a gradual restoration of Iranian and

Iraqi export facilities, the shortfall could average 1 MMB/D for the

year.


Approach

Under the agreement reached last May in the IEA,

5

members have



tentatively agreed upon likely levels of pre-war imports for 1981. These

5

See Document 273.



365-608/428-S/80010

912 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

yardsticks amount to about 22.5 MMB/D. They have also agreed to

convert these yardsticks into binding levels of imports, called ceilings,

if market conditions so warrant. Our objective in the upcoming De-

cember 5 meeting and the Ministerial on December 8 and 9 will be to

agree upon an appropriate aggregate reduction in the yardsticks that

will bring supply and demand into balance and secure a commitment

from all countries to reduce their yardsticks proportionately to accom-

modate this shortfall and turn them into binding ceilings. The ceilings

would be implemented on a quarterly basis to allow for market

tracking and timely review.

The IEA Secretariat, which essentially agrees with our analysis of

the situation, assumes that the reduction in imports which each country

undertakes should be proportional to that country’s oil consumption,

not its level of imports. The Secretariat, backed by most member coun-

tries, argues that a consumption-based cutback is most equitable since

a nation’s potential for conserving oil is related to its total oil consump-

tion, not just imports. It is argued that countries with a high level of im-

ports would be penalized with a greater conservation requirement by

an import-based sharing of the shortfall. It will be most difficult for us

to convince either the Secretariat or other countries to allocate the

shortfall pursuant to imports.

The table below gives the import ceilings for the U.S. and other

IEA countries plus France under varying levels of worldwide shortfall.

The figures in parentheses show what the respective import ceilings

would be if they were based on imports rather than consumption.

U.S. and IEA Import Levels

Estimate of

Shortfall

Import Ceilings Based on Consumption and (Imports)

Other IEA Countries

Total IEA

U.S.*


Plus France

0

22.5



7.18

(7.18)


17.47 (17.47)

1.0 MMB/D

21.5

6.7


(6.86)

16.89 (16.7)

1.5 MMB/D

21.0


6.5

(6.7)


16.57 (16.32)

2.0 MMB/D

20.5

6.27


(6.54)

16.45 (15.94)

*Includes U.S. Territories and 100,000 B/D for SPR.

With the recently-reported resumption of Iraqi exports to the Med-

iterranean via Turkey and Syria and periodic reports of Iranian exports

from Kharg Island and the lower Gulf, we could prudently seek to have

IEA import demand reduced by 1.0 to 1.5 MMB/D in the first quarter.

If the situation does not deteriorate, and if key non-IEA members such

as France participate in the reduction of import needs, an effort of this

magnitude gives us the prospect of heading off significant price

increases.


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 913

On a consumption basis, the U.S. would have an import level for

1981 in the range of 6.5–6.7 MMB/D under a 1.0 to 1.5 MMB/D world-

wide shortfall. This compares to a projected 1980 import level of 6.6

MMB/D. Without any further price increases, this estimate is at the low

end of the range of U.S. oil import requirements for 1981 presented in

the latest forecast by DOE’s Energy Information Administration, and

could well require additional pricing, demand restraint, or fuel switch-

ing measures to fulfill. If new initiatives should prove necessary, either

you, or more likely the Reagan Administration, could decontrol gaso-

line, accelerate the decontrol of crude, impose an import fee or imple-

ment mandatory demand restraint or fuel switching measures. In any

event, the implementation and full effects of additional measures,

should they be needed, would come well after the imposition of ceil-

ings at these recommended levels.



Implementation

In the upcoming meeting leading to the Ministerial, other coun-

tries will continue to press us to exert ourselves with those U.S. com-

panies with large inventories to correct short-term imbalances. This, as

well as growing concern about the oil market, will give us an opportu-

nity to press for a serious effort to cut back oil import demand in 1981

through negotiation and adoption of binding national oil import

ceilings. While we will express our view of the need for adoption of

1981 ceilings now consistent with the 1.0 to 1.5 MMB/D worldwide

shortfall we realistically will be in a position only to seek the placement

of the appropriate ceilings in a standby status that could be triggered

quickly following the December 8 and 9 meeting in the face of rapidly

rising spot market prices.

Recommendation

That you authorize us to seek a 1.0 to 1.5 MMB/D reduction in the

projected IEA oil import demand of 22.5 MMB/D and seek a procedure

to transform this cutback into country-specific, politically-binding na-

tional oil import ceilings (6.5 to 6.7 MMB/D for the U.S.) for 1981 at the

December 9 meeting or at the earliest required time thereafter.

6

6

Carter checked the Approve option and wrote: “Make our case publicly as much



as possible. J”

365-608/428-S/80010

914 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



290. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

Saudi Arabia

1

Washington, December 4, 1980, 0302Z.



320369. Subject: Ambassador West’s Meeting with Yamani. Ref:

State 302502, State 283573.

2

1. Confidential—entire text.



2. There are several points which we would like you to include in

your discussion with Yamani December 4, as discussed below. These

cover five general areas: exchange of views on oil market situation; dis-

cussion of consumer country (IEA) actions; Saudi efforts to assist Iraq’s

customers; expression of concern for supply to Portugal and Turkey;

and the OPEC meeting in Bali.

3. Oil Market Situation. We are grateful for incremental production

provided by Saudi Arabia and (to extent it has occurred) some other

Gulf states. Resumption of Iraqi pipeline exports through Turkey and

possibly Syria, and small Iranian exports, are positive developments

but these supplies remain vulnerable. Spot prices appear to have

turned around, showing again how meaningless the spot market is in

terms of long-term prices. However, the oil market will continue to call

for the best efforts by all of us until the Iraq–Iran war ends and nor-

malcy returns.

4. IEA Measures. The consuming countries grouped in the IEA,

have, as you know, been taking measures to help cope with the situa-

tion. At the beginning of October, the IEA countries agreed to encour-

age their companies to refrain from abnormal spot market purchases,

and to draw on stocks as needed to balance the market.

3

Total U.S. oil



stocks have been drawn down by more than 300,000 B/D since late

September. We also agreed to encourage further conservation efforts.

Similar decisions on stock management, spot market restraint, conser-

vation, and maximizing domestic production have been taken by the

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D800577–1002.



Confidential; Niact; Immediate. Drafted by Bullen; cleared by Morse and Twinam and in

EUR/RPE, EUR/WE, EUR/SE, E, DOE/IA, and DOE/IE; and approved by Hinton. Re-

peated Immediate to Lisbon, Ankara, and Paris, and Exdis to USOECD Paris.

2

The reference to telegram 302502 to Kingston, November 13, which concerns an



unrelated matter, is apparently an error. (Ibid., D800543–0500) Telegram 283573 to Jidda,

October 24, instructed West to take the opportunity, if he felt it “appropriate,” to seek

Yamani’s “assessment of the progress of efforts to assist countries most seriously affected

by the cut-off of Iranian and Iraqi exports.” (Ibid., D800507–0486)

3

See footnote 2, Document 287.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 915

EEC countries at the EEC Energy Ministers’ meeting and Heads of

Government meeting during the past week.

4

5. We are now looking forward to further strengthening the IEA



measures at the IEA Ministerial meeting scheduled for December 8–9 in

Paris. The Ministers will discuss the full range of options for strength-

ening consumer country efforts in the light of rapidly changing market

conditions, including the possibility of instituting import ceilings if

needed in accord with the decision of the previous IEA Ministerial last

May, or of meeting again on short notice to do so. Secretary Duncan

would be more than willing to come to see Yamani in Saudi Arabia on

the 10th or the 11th to give him a full briefing of the results of the Minis-

terial and our current view of the market situation.

6. Iraq’s Customers. We are grateful to Saudi Arabia for under-

taking to fulfill partially Iraq’s commitments to its customers through

incremental production. We hope Saudi Arabia will monitor the needs

of these customers as they secure alternative supplies and allocate its

incremental production to help assure that country imbalances are cor-

rected and not exacerbated.

7. Turkey and Portugal. We continue to be concerned about sup-

plies to these two countries. Turkey is in a very tight situation because

of its lack of stocks. We understand that the Saudis are planning to

supply increased amounts of oil to Turkey in 1981, and that will be a

great help. The Turks are, however, so close to being out of stocks that

anything which can be done to ensure a prompt start-up of 1981 deliv-

eries in January, or pre-delivery of some volumes in December, would

be of real benefit to the Turks.

8. Portugal, a strategically important country, is able to handle its

oil needs through December by using stocks, but has been unable to

line up adequate supplies for 1981. We understand the Portuguese are

approaching the Saudis about 1981 purchases, and hope that it will be

possible to be responsive.

9. We would also like you to check with Yamani our impression

that the OPEC conference at Bali is now likely to go ahead as planned,

and if this reading is correct, to explore his thinking on what decisions

may be reached. In this connection, you might note with appreciation

the indications we have seen of Saudi opposition to a price increase at

this time, a position that we believe has had a constructive impact on

the market.

10. (FYI. Ed Deagle of Rockefeller Foundation reports on basis of

recent conversations with Yamani and Petromin officials Saudi concern

4

The leaders of the European Economic Community nations met in Luxembourg



December 1–2.

365-608/428-S/80010

916 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

about publicity on high SPR fill rates. If appropriate, use following

points to correct their misapprehensions. End FYI) SPR. Saudis may be

under mistaken impression that US Strategic Petroleum Reserve is be-

ing filled at rate of 300,000 B/D. Such is not the case. Recent legislation

does mention the 300,000 B/D rate as a target, but that legislative lan-

guage is not mandatory, and administration is not filling at that rate.

Current fill rate on an annualized basis is 100,000 B/D; however, prede-

liveries have raised the fill rate temporarily to about 140,000 B/D. An

average of 100,000 B/D for the full year FY-81 is the minimum possible

under existing law without reducing Elk Hills production. (The stock

drawdown given in para. 4 above takes into account these additions to

the SPR).

5


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling