Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Paper Prepared by the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet92/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95

293. Paper Prepared by the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy

for International Affairs (Treat) and Rutherford Poats of the

National Security Council Staff

1

Washington, undated.



Contingency Planning for Energy Emergencies: Agenda for

International Action



Background

Through the IEA, we have improved our capability to deal with oil

supply emergencies. As a result of the 1979 experience, the IEA has be-

gun to develop a graduated response capacity, which offers three levels

of policy options:

(1) Stock Management—Use of stocks is the first line of defense. The

October 1 IEA decision,

2

as amplified by the December 9 Ministerial de-



cision, exercises this option, which is most appropriate for an interrup-

tion of 100–200 million barrels.

(2) Import Ceilings—The transformation of oil import “yardsticks”

into binding oil import ceilings is the second level of response, most ap-

propriate for a somewhat larger and/or longer interruption in the

range of 200–400 million barrels. In such a situation, stocks would be

increasingly difficult to draw down; demand restraint measures should

be initiated as early as the limitations of stock management can be fore-

seen and intensified as may be required, using prepared authorities

and procedures. An informal reallocation/balancing of world supplies

by oil companies would be an important supporting action, if anti-trust

concerns could be appropriately handled.

(3) Emergency Sharing System—Triggering the formal IEA sharing

system at the 7% or higher shortfall level would be the third level of re-

sponse. It would probably require parallel national allocation meas-

ures, as well as tax measures to balance demand with supply. This re-

sponse probably will be appropriate only for shortfalls of 400 million

barrels or more. The system has now been tested three times, but the

lack of agreement on pricing could prove to be extremely contentious.

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, International Eco-



nomics File, Box 49, Rutherford Poats File, Chron, 12/9–23/80. Confidential. Sent to

Hinton and Goldman under a December 19 covering note by Poats, in which he wrote: “I

would like to offer the successors to Zbig and Henry an agenda for action to improve our

energy security in the near term. John Treat and I have drafted the attached skeletal out-

line of an objectives paper with this in mind. Please let me have your thoughts on this set

of ideas by January 5 or 6.”

2

See footnote 2, Document 287.



365-608/428-S/80010

928 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



Discussion

The IEA response capacity has been improved in the past year by

the partial development of stock management and import ceiling op-

tions to deal with supply interruptions which fall short of the 7% level

necessary to trigger the IEA agreement. However, additional measures

to improve each of these options is essential. In addition, the growing

dependence of Western Europe on gas imports, particularly from the

Soviet Union, constitutes a political/security vulnerability which

should be addressed by the EC and NATO. Finally, the US Government

itself should organize better its own response capabilities.

In support of these objectives, the following actions should be

initiated:

• International Energy Agency—The IEA should remain the focus of

our international response efforts. Additional pressure should be

brought to bear on the French, after the spring 1981 French Presidential

elections, to bring the French into IEA.

Within the IEA, we should concentrate on two issues:

(1) Increase IEA national stocks susceptible of government control, so as



to strengthen their reliability in both minor and major shortages and develop

an emergency stock-sharing system

(see Tab A for further discussion).

(2) Elaborate the IEA import ceiling option (2 above) to provide for oil

company participation through international allocation.

• NATO and EC:

(1) Continue to push for development of Western European nat-

ural gas contingency plans, including serious analysis of a strategic gas

reserve using spare capacity in the Netherlands and/or North Sea and

enhanced readiness for fuel-switching.

(2) Try to overcome European resistance to joint contingency plan-

ning for military action in the Middle East, including heightened read-

iness to deter/respond to attacks on major oil facilities.

• USG—Two areas deserve increased attention:

(1) Better coordination of energy security policy through the establish-

ment of an NSC energy security committee.

(2) Development of “snap back” plans to restore major oil facilities in

the event of attack, with the cooperation of host governments and pri-

vate companies. Evaluate need for USG stockpiling of critical

equipment.

Timetable

US initiatives on the IEA actions should be prepared for presenta-

tion early in the new Administration. An EC study of an enhanced

Western European gas reserve system should be urged now; a NATO

staff study already has been proposed by the USG. The USG actions


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 929

should be pursued in the light of the new Administration’s organiza-

tional decisions. International objectives requiring additional political

impetus may be pursued in preparations for the Ottawa Economic

Summit.


Tab A

3

Coordinated Stock Policy Issues



Background

If a coordinated stock policy is to become a more effective option

for dealing with supply interruptions, a number of crucial issues

should be resolved. Some of these issues must be decided to implement

the IEA Ministerial decision of December 9; others should be decided

in 1981 to improve IEA response capability to future supply crises.

Broadly speaking, the issues are:

• Optimum level of stock requirements, including at least three sub-

sidiary issues:

—Should IEA mandatory stock levels be increased above 90 days?

By how much?

—Should IEA stocks be defined in terms of consumption versus

imports?

—Should minimum IEA stock requirements be adjusted to reflect

actual availability, i.e., excluding pipeline fill, tank bottoms, etc.?

• Coordinated stock drawdowns—How/when should stocks be

drawn down and how should imbalances be corrected, e.g., Giraud

plan.


• Government control over private stocks—should the US expand its

control over private stocks.



Discussion

The principal objective of US policy in this area should be to en-

couage other countries to follow our lead to build up stocks, under gov-

ernment control, which can be used to offset the loss of supplies. Spe-

cific issues are discussed below:

• Level of Reserves. The United States is building a Strategic Reserve

which, depending on its eventual size, will increase aggregate US

stocks to well over twice the 90 day minimum agreed by the IEA. In-

creasing the IEA minimum level of stocks would exert pressure on our

allies to match our efforts. While more analysis needs to be done on the

optimum level, an increase of minimum levels in annual increments of

3

No classification marking.



365-608/428-S/80010

930 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

5–10 days to at least 120 days of imports seems highly desirable. This

would increase IEA minimum stocks by more than 600 million barrels.

Planned increases in the US SPR would more than account for our con-

figuration. Scheduled increases in the Japanese and German reserves

would also make a contribution, but other IEA countries would have to

take new action. Some consideration could be given to considering

surge production capacity and gas reserves as substitutes for oil stocks.

• Definition of Reserves. Since disruptions are most likely to affect

imports, we should continue to define reserve levels in terms of im-

ports, not consumption. An import basis also serves US national in-

terests by multiplying the size of our reserves. Since a somewhat larger

percentage of US commercial stocks are not usable in an emergency

(i.e., pipeline fill, tank bottoms, working inventories), we should also

resist efforts to redefine stocks.

• Coordinated Stock Drawdown. Stock drawdowns offer an appro-

priate policy response to supply disruptions which are of longer and/

or deeper duration, stock drawdowns also offer an initial response

measure to “buy time” for demand restraint action. Since supply dis-

ruptions will not necessarily hit all countries equally, however, there

needs to be an agreed formula/procedure for ensuring that countries

which have to draw down their national stocks more rapidly will be

compensated by the less affected countries.

The IEA should develop urgently such a procedure. Several op-

tions are available:

(1) Coordination of national stock draws by an agreed formula,

similar to the IEP formula; or

(2) Establishment of a stock “pool” with drawing rights and obli-

gations on a dedicated volume of oil held separately from national

reserves.

Option 1—Coordination of National Stocks

This approach would parallel the allocation formula of IEA Emer-

gency Sharing system, assigning stock rights and obligations to indi-

vidual countries on the basis of consumption shares. This difference be-

tween such an approach and the full-scale allocation program would

be:


(1) lower trigger level—perhaps 1–2%, and

(2) periodic reallocations (perhaps every 60–90 days) would be re-

quired, rather than attempting a daily reallocation effort, as attempted

[called for?] by the IEP.



Option 2—Stock Pool

A more formal approach to the issue would be a stock “pool” as

proposed by French Energy Minister Giraud, to provide an “interme-

diate” response option short of full-scale international allocation



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 931

through the IEA and EC. His proposal remains ill-defined, but seems to

include the following elements:

Size: About 160 million barrels, although could range from

140–200 million barrels (20–50 million tons). Pool would not be counted

as part of “national” stocks.

Contribution: Each country would contribute stocks equivalent

to 4 days’ consumption, implying that the US would provide about

45%, Europe about 30% and Japan, 15%.

Drawing Rights: Each country could draw in excess of its own

contribution, up to 50% of the total. If two countries simultaneously

drew, the limit would be 67% (2/3 of the total). If three countries drew,

the limit would be 75%. Drawing on the stock pool beyond the national

contribution would be approved by a “qualified majority” of the partic-

ipating countries.

Stock Ownership: Giraud is flexible on who owns the stocks, as

long as government retains effective control.

The Giraud proposal has conceptual merit but would have to be

modified considerably to gain our support. The limitation of drawing

rights to 50% of the total pool would severely limit the attractiveness of

the proposal to the U.S., which would be contributing about 45% of the

entire pool. It would be more appropriate to define drawing rights in

terms of multiples of national contributions.

Both these options should be further developed with the participa-

tion of the IEA Secretariat, which should be asked to prepare a recom-

mendation for further action within 90 days. In particular, the IEA

should be asked to address:

(1) The appropriate size of the pool;

(2) The appropriate “trigger” for its activation;

(3) The size/distribution of national drawing rights;

(4) The mechanism by which such rights could be exercised;

(5) Period and method for payback;

(6) Legal authorities necessary to establish such a pool; and

(7) Proposed timetable for establishing such a pool.

Government Control Over Private Stocks

An important implementation issue, particularly in the United

States, is how government can induce private stockholders to act in

support of an IEA decision, particularly if U.S. stocks must be drawn

down to offset a shortfall which has little or no direct impact on the U.S.

market. DOE should urgently address the US issue, including regula-

tory authorities and possible anti-trust implications. A number of op-

tions are available:

(1) Mandatory Private Stock Levels—as required in many European

countries, large consumers can be required to hold a certain level of

stocks; this is the concept of the Industrial Strategic Reserve (ISR).


365-608/428-S/80010

932 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

(2) Public Private Corporation either to hold mandatory stocks or, on

a voluntary basis, to reduce costs of stocks through economies of scale.

The corporation could be financed either by the companies or privately

(through bonds) or publicly.

(3) Tax Incentives to encourage appropriate stock management con-

sistent with USG policy goals.

(4) Voluntary Targets (Jawboning), backed up by the threat of man-

datory allocations, as used in 1979 to build up distillate stocks.

Concurrently the IEA should review the issue in all IEA countries.

294. Memorandum From Rutherford Poats of the National

Security Council Staff to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of

State for International Energy Policy (Morse)

1

Washington, December 23, 1980.



SUBJECT

Approach Paper on OPEC Long Term Strategy

Your planning paper on an Ottawa Summit approach to a deal

with oil producers on long-term supply and pricing principles

2

would


be most useful if it forced us to recognize, and at least start the process

of reconciling, conflicting US ambitions. As you know, much of the talk

within the USG and among the IEA countries about a producer-

consumer deal derived from the OPEC Long Term Strategy has fallen

short of resolving the hard choices among alternative consumer goals.

Your paper might helpfully delineate our price, supply, and political

objectives.

For example, do the industrial nations want to minimize OPEC

price increases and rely on means other than international oil prices to

keep demand and supply balanced and to allocate supply among na-

tions? Or do we want steady, predictable real OPEC price increases to

assure market allocation of supply and guide decisions in oil-importing

nations on energy-related investments and conservation?

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, International Eco-



nomics File, Box 49, Rutherford Poats File, Chron, 12/9–23/80. Confidential.

2

Not found. The seventh G–7 Summit was held in Ottawa in July 1981.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 933

Do the industrial nations want rising OPEC production, including

higher Persian Gulf production, so as to permit rising or at least stable

oil consumption by the industrial countries, with consequent faster de-

pletion of reserves and narrower margins of stand-by production ca-

pacity than otherwise? Or do we want a stable and predictable supply,

implying a slowly declining availability of OPEC oil to the industrial

nations but prolongation of reserves and greater surge capacity for

emergencies?

Are we ready to accept, much less rely on, intergovernmental as-

surances of oil supply containing an express exception for politically

determined oil export embargoes, thus implicitly condoning Arab use

of the oil weapon? Or do we prefer to leave the OPEC supply assur-

ances loose and unspecific rather than encourage injection of Middle

East political issues into the producer-consumer negotiation?

These questions simply illustrate the point. We need to deal with

objectives in addition to terms and conditions of a deal.



365-608/428-S/80010

934 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



295. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

the United Kingdom

1

Washington, January 8, 1981, 2313Z.



5142. Subject: North Sea Oil Prices. Ref: (A) London 119, (B) Ku-

wait 48.


2

1. Embassy is requested to advise HMG at an appropriate level of

our continuing concern over oil prices, including those for the North

Sea.


3

While we appreciate BNOC’s relative moderation, we regret that

it apparently feels constrained to match Algeria’s and Nigeria’s $3 in-

creases. We understand that commercial considerations require BNOC

and other North Sea producers to relate their prices to those for African

crudes, but believe that an increase somewhat below $3 would still

meet these considerations while strengthening consumer country ef-

forts vis-a`-vis OPEC to slow the oil price spiral. We trust that in any

case, the new forties field marker price will not exceed the $39.25 level

mentioned in ref A. Many analysts believe the more extreme increases

(e.g. Libya) may prove to be excessive if current market conditions

prevail.


2. FYI: Our concern over price movements is a general one, and we

appreciate the fact that BNOC has not taken the lead in price increases

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D810011–0674.



Confidential; Immediate. Drafted by R. Knickmeyer (EB/IEP/EPC); cleared by Bullen

and in EUR/NE, EUR/RPE, EB/IEP/ECC, E, and the Department of Energy; and ap-

proved by Morse. Repeated Priority to Oslo, Kuwait, and Jidda.

2

In telegram 119 from London, January 5, the Embassy reported that the British



National Oil Company made its quarterly adjustment in the price of North Sea crude oil,

which, effective retroactively to January 1, was “likely to settle at $39.25 per barrel,” a

$3 increase. The Embassy added that the British Government and the BNOC “waited

to move until the post-Bali price conduct of West African light crude producers became

apparent,” including Libya’s $4 increase to $41 per barrel, Nigeria’s $3 increase to $40

per barrel, and Algeria’s $3 increase to $40 per barrel. (Ibid., D810007–0113) In telegram

48 from Kuwait, January 6, the Ambassador commented: “If British National Oil Corpo-

ration makes quarterly upward adjustment in price as indicated in reftel, I hope Depart-

ment will express same public and private criticism that price increase is not justified as it

has to OPEC governments for price decisions taken at OPEC meetings.” (Ibid.,

D810007–0077)

3

The Embassy in Oslo was instructed to take the same approach with the Norwe-



gian Government. (Telegram 6139 to Oslo, January 9; ibid., D810012–1137) Embassy of-

ficers met with Johan Nic Vold, Deputy Director General of the Energy Policy Depart-

ment of the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy, who promised to bring the views of the

U.S. Government to the Minister of Petroleum and Energy. Vold stressed that Norway’s

overall interests placed it in the ranks of “nations which favor oil price moderation,” but

added: “At the same time, given present private nature of Norwegian oil trade, GON had

little ability to restrict private firms from acting with a maximum of freedom in a market

whose terms of reference are heavily influenced by the African producers.” (Telegram

274 from Oslo, January 19; ibid., D810027–0875)


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 935

recently. However, we believe that it is valuable to give the British an

expression of our continuing concern. It may also be useful in our con-

tacts with certain OPEC countries (e.g. Kuwait) to be able to say that we

have expressed concern to the UK about North Sea prices.

4

Muskie

4

The Embassy in London replied that it had previously “urged HMG to use as



much price moderation as possible,” and did so again using the arguments provided by

the Department. It concluded: “To review, the ability of HMG and BNOC to maneuver is

limited by the existing mandatory participation agreements. These are a legacy of the for-

mer Labor government, but they are continued under the current government and will

also be a feature of contractual obligations for oil discovered under current exploration

licensing rounds. They enable BNOC to pre-empt up to 51 percent of all oil produced; in

return, BNOC is obligated to pay the companies market prices for the oil. If BNOC does

not, the companies can go to arbitration.” (Telegram 609 from London, January 12; ibid.,

D810016–0197)

296. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

Kuwait

1

Washington, January 13, 1981, 2250Z.



9129. For Ambassador fm Under Secty Cooper. Subject: North Sea

Oil Prices. Ref: Kuwait 48.

2

1. Confidential entire text.



2. I agree that our criticism of oil price increases should not be re-

served solely for OPEC or Arab producers. We have criticized other

producers, including BNOC for increases in the past and are again ap-

proaching the British and Norwegians now re North Sea prices. At the

same time, there are a number of differences between OPEC’s Decem-

ber 16 announcement

3

(and previous OPEC price announcements) and



the impending actions of North Sea producers which account for the

milder tone and private nature of our representations to the British and

Norwegian Governments. Most significantly, the OPEC announce-

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D810018–1028.



Confidential; Immediate. Drafted by Knickmeyer, cleared by Patterson, Twinam, Morse,

Johnston, Conway (E), and Hecklinger (DOE/IA), and approved by Cooper. Repeated

Immediate to Jidda, London, Oslo, Abu Dhabi, Doha, Paris, Jakarta, Caracas, Algiers,

Lagos, Cairo, Mexico, and USOECD Paris.

2

See footnote 2, Document 295.



3

See footnote 6, Document 292.



365-608/428-S/80010

936 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

ments generally lead the way and establish the floor for official prices

of all producers, OPEC and non-OPEC. Also, as London 119

4

points


out, announcement of BNOC’s (and Statoil’s) new prices will follow

those of the African producers and are likely to be maintained slightly

below the official prices (much less the prices with surcharges) of com-

parable African crudes. Finally, we have generally not spoken out pub-

licly against price rises by individual producers, except in some cases

where these have been clearly out of line with prevailing price levels,

e.g. Iran in 1979. In our public statements on OPEC decisions, we have

generally noted our appreciation to those OPEC countries, e.g. Saudi

Arabia, which have shown restraint.

3. You may draw on the above, including the fact that we are

making representations to the North Sea producers in your conversa-

tions with Kuwait officials as you deem appropriate.

4. Septel

5

follows providing talking points requested Kuwait 104.



6


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling