Germany Department of Computer and Information Science


Download 5.41 Mb.
Sana21.03.2020
Hajmi5.41 Mb.
  • Rainer Kuhlen University of Konstanz
  • Germany
  • Department of Computer and Information Science

Collaborative knowledge management in an e-learning environment (K3)

  • Rainer Kuhlen Informationswissenschaft – Universität Konstanz FB Informatik und Informationswissenschaft
  • NETHICS
  • Rainer Kuhlen University of Konstanz
  • Germany
  • Department of Computer and Information Science

Collaborative knowledge management in an e-learning environment (K3)

  • Rainer Kuhlen Informationswissenschaft – Universität Konstanz FB Informatik und Informationswissenschaft
  • NETHICS
  • Rainer Kuhlen University of Konstanz
  • Germany
  • Department of Computer and Information Science
  • also an opportunity to identify and to overcome gender barriers

Collaborative knowledge management in an e-learning environment (K3)

  • Rainer Kuhlen Informationswissenschaft – Universität Konstanz FB Informatik und Informationswissenschaft
  • NETHICS
  • Rainer Kuhlen University of Konstanz
  • Germany
  • Department of Computer and Information Science
  • also an opportunity to identify and to overcome gender barriers
  • This document will be published under the following Creative-Commons-License:
  • http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/de//
  • Universities of Applied Science (Polytechnics)
  • Darmstadt
  • Hamburg
  • Hannover
  • Köln
  • Leipzig
  • Potsdam
  • Stuttgart
  • Universities
  • Berlin HU
  • Berlin FU
  • Saarbrücken
  • Regensburg
  • Hildesheim
  • Düsseldorf
  • Konstanz
  • 2
  • The Chair of Information at Konstanz University was established in 1980. After being affiliated with different departments, the Chair became part of the Department of Computer and Information Science in the year 2000. Information Science courses are curricular part of Information Engineering Bachelor and Master Studies.
  • Information Science in Konstanz is known for having coined the concept of the „pragmatic primacy“ of information: information is knowledge relevant for action, or to put it in a formula – information is knowledge in action.
  • The consideration of social, cognitive, political, economic, ethical, and cultural implications of information complements the often predominating technical approach to information.
  • Current book project
  • a2k4oi
  • access to knowledge for open innovation
  • Content – Topics
  • Gender
  • differences -
  • findings from
  • research
  • Gender
    • differences
    • in role
    • behaviour
  • Conclusion
  • K3
    • collaborative
    • e-learning
    • paradigm
  • Gender
    • differences
    • in
    • discourse
  • K3
  • didactic concept
  • K3
  • system
  • features
  • 3
  • K3
    • collaborative
    • e-learning
    • paradigm

K3 (German acronym for communication, collaboration, competence) is a knowledge management system in learning environments for higher level academic teaching.

  • K3 (German acronym for communication, collaboration, competence) is a knowledge management system in learning environments for higher level academic teaching.
  • K3
    • collaborative
    • e-learning
    • paradigm
  • K3 as a tool for collaborative work
  • to enable virtual groups (and in them, of course, individual learners)
  • to acquire information and communication competence
  • K3
    • collaborative
    • e-learning
    • paradigm
  • to produce content and acquire knowledge in the special course domain
  • K3
  • didactic concept

Blended learning

  • Blended learning
  • Mixture of constructivism and instructionalism
  • K3
  • didactic concept

Blended learning - didactic mix

  • Blended learning - didactic mix
    • virtual group work
    • individual work
    • classic lectures
    • class room discussion
    • video conference presentations
  • K3
  • didactic concept

Combination of constructivism and instructionalism

  • Combination of constructivism and instructionalism
  • discourse types
  • roles
  • reference objects
  • summaries
  • presentation
  • K3
  • didactic concept
  • K3
    • collaborative
    • e-learning
    • paradigm
  • K3 in a nutshell
  • Collaborative e-learning in K3
  • firstly, to enable virtual groups (and in them, of course, individual learners) to produce content and acquire knowledge in the special course domain, and,
  • secondly, to enable virtual groups to acquire information and communication competence.
  • K3
  • didactic concept

Moderator

  • Moderator
  • Presenter
  • Communication competence
  • Information competence
  • Summarizer
  • Researcher
  • role concept
  • K3
  • didactic concept
  • K3
  • system
  • features

K3 K3 Courses since 2004

  • Information ethics
  • Joint course Univ, Konstanz – Univ. Zürich
  • Joint course Univ.Konstanz – Univ. Genf
  • technical course
  • Joint course Univ. Konstanz – Univ. Berlin
  • discourse-oriented
  • Joint course Univ.Konstanz – Univ. Berlin – Univ. Hildesheim

Types of K3 courses

  • K3 as a management tool for organizing courses
  • K3 as a knowledge base for single courses and for the whole curriculum
  • K3 as a tool for collaborative work in virtual groups
  • K3 5-level architecture
  • (1) course
  • (2) main topics
  • (3) work assignments
  • (4) specific tasks
  • (5) discourse objects
  • (5) discourse objects
  • (5) discourse objects
  • (5) discourse objects
  • (6) reference objects
  • bibl. references
  • web links
  • upload files
  • summaries
  • presentations
  • 4

Course – level 1

  • Objectives
  • Target groups
  • Didactics
  • Language
  • Main topics
  • Discourse types
  • Information ethics
  • Reference objects
  • Short course description
  • Learning contract
  • Extended course description

Main topics - level 2 (instructional mode)

  • What is information ethics?
  • K1 Privacy
  • B1 Human rights
  • B2 Knowledge ecology
  • K2 Digital divide
  • KB3 Who owns knowledge?

Main topics - level 2 (instructional mode)

  • Work assignments
  • Reference objects
  • Main topic
  • K1 Privacy in electronic environments

Work assignments - level 3

  • Topic work assigment: What is information privacy?
  • Beginning/end of group work
  • Work assigment description
  • Assigned roles for work assignment
  • Evaluation of group work - by course instructor
  • Work tasks
  • Filter:user
  • Filter:
  • discourse type
  • Filter:roles
  • Filter: date
  • Filter: free text

Work tasks - level 4

  • Discourse
  • Work task „Privacy – data traces“
  • Results:
  • Summaries
  • presentation

Work tasks - level 4

  • Discourse for work task „privacy - data traces“

Work tasks - level 4

  • Role: Researcher
  • Discourse type: Addendum
  • Reference objects
  • hyperlinks
  • literature

Discourse objects – level 5

  • (1) Role specification (M=moderator; P= presenter; S= summarizer)
  • (2) Discourse type (Kritik=criticism; These= thesis; Frage=question; Ergänzung=addendum;...)
  • (3) New contribution, so far unread
  • Fig.4
  • K3 discourse with discourse objects – in the thread paradigm
  • 8
  • Gender mainstreaming
    • in
    • e-learning
  • Gender mainstreaming
  • The gender concept, in contrast to the bi-polar sex concept, considers differences between male and female behavior and their norms/value systems to be socially and culturally constructed.
  • Gender mainstreaming
  • Gender mainstreaming is not the same as the promotion of women or a politics of equalization of women, but rather a politics of equalizing the opportunities for development both for men and women.
  • http://www.bmbf.de/pub/women_in_education_and_research.pdf.
  • Gender mainstreaming
    • in
    • Germany
  • „Innovation and work place in the information society of the 21st century“
  • equal Internet access for men and women
  • a 40% contingent of women in IT-related professional training and in the first semester in computer science
  • a significant consideration of women in other government programs, such as media and e-learning
  • objectives
  • http://www.bmbf.de/pub/women_in_education_and_research.pdf.
  • Gender
  • differences -
  • findings from
  • research
  • Gender
  • differences -
  • findings from
  • research
  • Women tend to underestimate their computer competence compared to men even if they have a higher competence profile than that of their male colleagues.
  • Gender
  • differences -
  • findings from
  • research
  • Some findings from research
  • Confidence levels of the female CS majors are often lower even than the male non-majors.
  • Gender
  • differences -
  • findings from
  • research
  • Some findings from research
  • Male students prefer individual work whereas female students like group work.
  • Gender
  • differences -
  • findings from
  • research
  • Some findings from research
  • Women are less likely to engage in criticism of one other.
  •  
  • Gender
  • differences -
  • findings from
  • research
  • Some findings from research
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 5
  • Gender
  • differences -
  • findings from
  • research
  • Some findings from research
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 5
  • Gender-mixed course in information ethics
  • 23 participants, 12 from Berlin (library science), 11 from Konstanz (information engineering)
  • 11 male (7 Konstanz, 4 Berlin)
  • 12 female (4 Konstanz, 8 Berlin)
  • 6
  • Blended learning – Phases in the information ethics course
  • Gender-mixed course in information ethics
  • Hypotheses
  • H1 There are gender- and domain-specific differences in course activity.
  • H2 Men, independently of their domain of study, tend to take over more prestigious roles in virtual group work, whereas women are willing to take over the remaining, more service-oriented roles.
  • Gender-mixed course in information ethics
  • 7
  • H3 Men tend to be more initiative-oriented and critical in discourse, whereas women act more cooperatively by reacting to other people’s comments.
  • H4 The gender composition in virtual group work has an effect on the performance of the virtual work.
  • Hypotheses
  • Gender-mixed course in information ethics
  • 7
  • Discourse objects as typed objects
  • Organization of discourse
  • Initialization of discourse (to get discourse started): question, thesis, new topic
  • Enhancement of discourse: addendum, critique
  • Results of discourse: summaries, presentations
  • Gender-mixed course in information ethics
  • 8
  • Gender
    • differences
    • in
    • discourse
    • in detail
  • Gender
    • differences in
    • discourse
  • H1 There are gender- and domain-specific differences in course activity
  • The median of the total number of gender-specific contributions shows clearly more activity on the part of the women.
  • This is true both for the total number of comments (column 9 median/f=61 vs. median/m=51)
  • and for the number of reference objects (column 13 median/f=29 vs. median/m=18).
  • 10
  • H1 There are gender- and domain-specific differences in course activity
  • Gender
    • differences in
    • discourse
  • 9
  • Men in the male-dominated Konstanz group are more active than men in total (58,5/m/KN vs. 51/m/total), and men in the female-dominated Berlin environment are even dramatically less active (36/m/B vs 51/m/total and 58,5/m/KN).
  • The same is true for the women’s behavior (but not as significant as for that of the men): (65,5/f/B - 61/f ; 65,5/f/B – 59/f/KN).
  • Gender-mixed course information ethics
  • Data
  • Male/female in male/females groups
  • 11
  • H1 There are gender- and domain-specific differences in course activity
  •   Significant differences can be seen with respect to the reference objects. All female-related values are much higher than those of the male-related ones: f/total vs. m/total; B/total vs. KN/total; B/f only vs. B/m only; K/f-only vs. KN/M-only.
  • Gender
    • differences in
    • discourse
  • 13
  • Gender-mixed course information ethics
  • Data – total – Konstanz - Berlin
  • 12
  • Gender-mixed course information ethics
  • Data
  • 11
  • Data – total – Konstanz - Berlin
  • Gender
    • differences in
    • discourse
  • H1 There are gender- and domain-specific differences in course activity
  •   Women add more information to existing discourse objects than men – thus they contribute considerably to the success of collaborative work.
  • All female-related values are significantly higher than those of the male-related ones: d/total vs. m/total; b/total vs. KN/total; B/f only vs. B/m only; K/f-only vs. KN/m-only.
  • 13
  • Gender-mixed course information ethics
  • Data
  • 11
  • H1 There are gender- and domain-specific differences in course activity
  •  Women added significantly more new themes to their group work – this is true for all values in column 4, whereas men (data in column 6) seem to be more willing to criticize other group members´ contributions (without necessarily knowing the sex of the criticized person).
  • Gender
    • differences in
    • discourse
  • 13
  • But:
  • Women in their own environment tend to be more critical than in a male dominated environ- ment
  • whereas men seem to be more constant in their critical behavior.
  • Gender-mixed course information ethics
  • H2 Women in general are more willing to take on role responsibility and thus feel more responsible for the success of collaborative work.
  • Gender
    • differences in role
    • behaviour
  • 14
  • H2 The higher degree of female responsibility is also supported by their willingness to take on the moderator´s role (internal group work activity).
  • Gender
    • differences
    • in role
    • behaviour
  • 14
  • H2 Men tend to take on the more prestigious or more visible presenter role (external work), whereas women are willing to take over the remaining, more service-oriented internal roles.
  • Gender
    • differences
    • in role
    • behaviour
  • 14
  • Gender
    • differences
    • in
    • discourse
  • H3 Men tend to be more initiative-oriented and critical in discourse
  •  This hypothesis can only be confirmed partially and needs more detailed investigation.
  • The average values for men with respect to “question” (column 2) and “thesis” (column 3) are slightly higher
  • and with respect to “critique” (column 6) significantly higher compared to the ones for women,
  • whereas the values for women with respect to “new theme” are significantly higher than the corresponding ones for men.
  • Gender
    • differences
    • in
    • discourse
  • H4 The gender composition in virtual group work has an effect on the performance of the virtual work
  •   This hypothesis could not be fully tested so far.
  • Data in the discussion of H1 show that men and women are in general more active in those environments where their sex is dominant.
  • Other results support the interpretation that both female-dominated virtual groups and male-dominated groups achieved better results (the female groups with slightly higher ratings) compared to gender-mixed groups.
  • Conclusion
  • Conclusion
  • What do these gender-specific differences mean?
  •   Do we accept these differences, although we know that they are (widely) socially and culturally constructed and that they can be changed if the environment changes, for instance via gender mainstreaming politics?
  • Conclusion
  •   Should we encourage men to reduce the extent of critical and dominating discourse behavior and to take on more service-oriented roles in group work rather than aspiring to roles which give immediate reward in the public?
  • What do these gender-specific differences mean?
  • Conclusion
  • Should women be encouraged to be more aggressive and self-confident in their communicative style and to take on roles which make more activity in the public necessary?
  • What do these gender-specific differences mean?
  • Conclusion
  • We support the postulate that men and women not only have the same potential
  • but also that a learning environment should provide both sexes with equal opportunities to develop the skills and the behavior
    • that they consider adequate (for themselves) and
    • that the environment (in society, politics and professional life) expects of them.
  • 15
  • Conclusion
  •    Major objective
  • Promoting individual talents and preparing students for a successful and rewarding professional and public life has always been a major objective in learning, and it should be in e-learning as well.
  • Thank you for your attention
  • Power point slides – under open CC licence – can be downloaded:
  • http://www.kuhlen.name
  • or send an email to:
  • rainer.kuhlen@uni-konstanz.de
  • to receive both the full text file and the powerpoint file
  • 16

Functions of constructivism

  • Cognitive: Learning produces sustainable results when external information or the requirements of a task can be embedded in already existing cognitive structure, be it as confirmation, modification or contradiction of the learner’s existing knowledge
  • Motivation: The learning process will be better accepted and will lead to permanent (sustainable) knowledge when learning can be experienced as the result of one’s own activity, not as a mere adaptation to the knowledge of other people
  • Social construction: Understanding, knowledge acquisition and production is to a great extent socially constructed, based on collaborative knowledge-sharing interaction with others.


Download 5.41 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling