Hamisah Ismail 1, Roslinda Shamsudin


Download 3.12 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
Sana21.12.2019
Hajmi3.12 Mb.

Journal of The Australian Ceramic Society Volume 52[2], 2016, 163 – 174  

163 


 

Characteristics of β-wollastonite derived from rice straw 

ash and limestone 

 

Hamisah  Ismail



1

,  Roslinda  Shamsudin

2*

,  Muhammad  Azmi  Abdul  Hamid

3

  and  Rozidawati

 

Awang

4

 

 

1-4


School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science & Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, 

Selangor, Malaysia. 

 

E-mail: 


linda@ukm.edu.my

 

 



Available online at: 

www.austceram.com/ACS-Journal

 

 

 

Abstract

 

This study aims to characterise β-wollastonite that was derived from rice straw ash and limestone and also its 



bioactivity by soaking in SBF for 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, and 21 days. Rice straw was fired to obtain SiO

and CaO from 



calcined limestone. The ratio of CaO:SiO

2

 was set at 55:45. The precursor mixture was then autoclaved for 8 h 



at  135

o

C  and  sintered  for  3  h  at  950 



o

C.  The  chemical  composition  of  the  raw  materials  was  obtained  using 

XRF,  which  was  approximately  79.0  wt.%  SiO

2

  and  97.2  wt.%  CaO  for  rice  straw  ash  and  limestone 



respectively. From the phase identification, the rice straw ash has a cristobalite phase, while the limestone has a 

CaO  phase.  The  β-wollastonite  phase  was  obtained  after  both  autoclaving  and  sintering  were  performed. 

Chemical analysis for soaked β-wollastonite showed that the Ca/P molar ratio was 1.66, which is close to that of 

“calcium  deficient”  hydroxyapatite  (CDHA).  FTIR  has  indicated  the  occurrence  of  rapid  adsorption  during 

exposure of β-wollastonite sample to the SBF, which is apparent from the peak of phosphate after one day of 

soaking. SEM has revealed the formation of hydroxyapatite microstructures on the surface of the immersed β-

wollastonite sample. For heavy metal elemental evaluation, metal panel that included As, Cd, Hg and Pb were 

selected  and  both  precursor  and  β-wollastonite  had  fulfilled  the  requirement  of  ASTM  F1538-03  standard 

specification. In conclusion, β-wollastonite produced from rice straw ash and limestone has a characteristic of 

bioactive properties, and is suitable for implant purposes. 

 

Keywords: bioceramics; sintering; β-wollastonite; morphology; hydroxyapatite. 



 

 

1.  Introduction 

Wollastonite  (CaSiO

3

)  is  largely  inert  and  has  a 



polymorph structure, either α-wollastonite (pseudo-

wollastonite), or β-wollastonite [1–3]. Polymorphic 

materials  have  an  identical  chemical  composition 

and  stoichiometry,  but  different  crystal  structures 

[4].  Wollastonite  changes  to  form  pseudo-

wollastonite  at  1125

o

C,  and  congruently  melts  at 



1544

o

C  [5].  Calcium  silicate  hydrates  are 



transformed into β-wollastonite by annealing in the 

temperature range of 800 °C to 1150 °C [6]. 

 

Various raw materials have been used to synthesise 



wollastonite,  derived  from  chemical  or  mineral 

precursors,  to  produce  an  end  product  with 

significant  purity  and  good  mechanical  properties. 

Previous  studies  have  successfully  synthesised 

wollastonite  using  chemicals  and  minerals  such  as 

fumed  silica,  silica  commercial,  silica  sand,  and 

sodium silicate as the precursor for silica [1, 7–11]. 

Thus,  in  this  study,  the  silica  source  was  derived 

from  rice  straw  ash.  Rice  straw  was  traditionally 

removed  from  the  field  by  the  practice  of  open-

field burning [12]; this practice clears the field for 

new  plantings  and  also  cleans  the  soil  of  disease-

causing  agents.  Rice  straw  ash  has  been  widely 

used  as  a  biomass  resource  [13-14],  animal  feed 

[15], a biosorbent, and as bioethanol [16–18], in the 

effort  to  better  manage  this  by-product.  However, 

there  are  fewer  studies  concerning  rice  straw  ash 

relative  to  those  about  rice  husk  ash  [19–21]  for 

biomaterial purposes.

 

 



In  recent  years,  wollastonite  has  been  widely  used 

in  cements  and  ceramics  due  to  its  strength,  low 

shrinkage,  lack  of  volatile  constituents,  and  body 

permeability,  as  well  as  its  fluxing  characteristics 

[22].  Furthermore,  wollastonite  is  also  widely 

applied  in  the  biomaterials  field  owing  to  its 

bioactivity  and  degradable  materials  [23–25]. 

Calcium  silicate  has  been  proven  to  be  an 

extremely  good  material  for  in-vitro  bioactivity 

[26].  The  formation  rate  of  hydroxyapatite  on  its 



Ismail et al. 

          164 

surface is quicker when soaked in SBF compared to 

that  of  other  biocompatible  glasses  and  glass-

ceramics.  

 

A  simulated  body  fluid  (SBF)  is  a  solution  with 



ions  concentration  nearly  to  that  of  human  blood 

plasma,  kept  under  mild  conditions  of  pH  and 

identical  body  temperature  [27].  Composition  of 

the  SBF  solution  as  shown  in  Table  1  is 

comparable  to  the  human  blood  plasma  [28].  SBF 

was  employed  as  an  in-vitro  testing  technique  to 

study  the  formation  of  an  apatite  layer  on  the 

surface  of  implants,  so  as  to  predict  their  in-vivo 

bone  bioactivity.  This  solution  was  first  produced 

by  Kokubo  and  Takadama  [28],  where  the  ion 

concentrations  are  comparable  to  those  of  human 

blood plasma. A bioactive material may be roughly 

defined  as  a  material  that  has  been  adopted  to 

encourage a specific activity when soaking in SBF 

[29].  Examples  of  bioactive  bioceramics  include 

bioactive 

glasses, 

bioactive 

glass-ceramics, 

bioactive  calcium  phosphate  ceramics  and 

bioactive composites and coatings [30].  

 

In  this  study,  we  attempted  the  production  of  β-



wollastonite using rice straw ash and limestone, as 

they are abundant, easy to obtain, and are low-cost 

starting  materials.  It  is  an  alternative  of 

synthesising  β-wollastonite  that  could  be  used  in 

the  biomedical  field  sometime  in  the  future.  The 

precursors  used  in  this  study  did  not  undergo  any 

purification  processes  via  hydrothermal  treatment 

using autoclaving technique. Autoclaving is used as 

an  alternative  technique  because  it  is  safe  and  can 

eliminate  toxic  substances  from  the  precursors.  A 

detailed  study  of  the  bioactivity  of  the  β-

wollastonite  derived  from  different  origins  of  rice 

straw  ash  and  limestone  has  not  been  fully 

performed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the 

characteristics of β-wollastonite produced from rice 

straw  and  limestone,  and  also  to  study  its  density, 

heavy  metal  element  content  and  bioactivity 

properties after soaking in SBF. Characterisation of 

β-wollastonite  was  performed  using  pycnometer, 

ICP-AES, FTIR, XRD and FESEM. 

 

 

2. Materials and methods 



2.1 Preparation of the β-wollastonite rice straw ash 

(β-wRSA) powder 

Rice  straw  was  collected  from  a  paddy  field  in 

Kodiang,  Kedah,  Malaysia,  and  the  limestone 

powder  was  purchased  from  Holy  Mate  (M)  Sdn. 

Bhd. in Selangor, Malaysia. Rice straw ash (RSA) 

was  obtained  after  a  firing  process  at  950  °C  for 

one hour at a heating and cooling rate of 5 °C/min. 

CaO was obtained after calcined limestone at 1100 

°C  for  5  h  at  a  heating  and  cooling  rate  of  10 

°C/min.  

 

β-wollastonite  rice  straw  ash  (β-wRSA)  powder 



was  prepared  via  a  simple  sol-gel  process.  This 

method  was  used  by  Pei  et  al.  [31]  to  produce 

nanowires  of  calcium  silicate;  we  have  devised  an 

alteration  to  make  β-wRSA.  The  CaO:SiO

2

  ratio 


was set at 45:55, which was based on the CaO-SiO

2

 



system  diagram  [32].  10  g  of  the  RSA  and  CaO 

mixture was soaked in 100 ml of distilled water and 

stirred manually for 10 minutes. Next, this mixture 

was autoclaved at 135 °C for 8 h, after which it was 

left  to  cool  at  room  temperature.  The  resulting 

white precipitate was dried at 90 °C in an oven for 

one  day.  Afterwards,  the  dried  white  powder  was 

crushed and sintered at 950 °C for 3 h.  

 

A chemical element analysis of the RSA and CaO 



mixture  was  conducted  using  an  X-ray 

Fluorescence  (XRF,  S8  Tiger,  Bruker).  The 

sintered powder was also characterised using X-ray 

diffraction (XRD, D8 Advance, Bruker) equipment 

with Cu Kα radiation at 40 kV to 20 mA.  Particle 

size  analyses  and  density  of  the  raw  materials  and 

after  sintered  powders  were  measured  using 

particle  sizer  Microtrac-X100  and  Pycnometer 

AccuPyc  1340.  A  Fourier  Transform  Infrared 

Spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR, Pelkin Elmer) study was 

conducted on the β-wRSA powder, containing KBr 

pellets.  The  heavy  metal  element  content  was 

completed  by  Inductively  Coupled  Plasma  Atomic 

Emission  Spectroscopy  (ICP-AES,  Pelkin  Elmer) 

analysis.  Next,  the  morphologic  analysis  and 

elemental  evaluation  of  the  β-wollastonite  powder 

were conducted using the Field-Emission Scanning 

Electron  Microscopy  (FESEM,  Gemini,  Zeiss 

Supra  Series,  Germany)  method  coupled  with 

Energy-Dispersive  X-ray  Spectroscopy  (EDS, 

IncaEnergy,  England).  The  samples  were  gold 

sputter coated prior to analysis and the microscope 

was operated at 3.0 kV. 

 

2.2  In-vitro bioactivity test for β-wRSA samples 

Approximately  1  g  of  the  powder  was  manually 

pressed into Teflon mould using a glass rod into a 

cylindrical  shape  of  12  mm  height  and  6  mm 

diameter for the purpose of bioactivity testing. The 

SBF  was  prepared  according  to  the  method 

described by Kokubo and Takadama [27], with ions 

concentration  nearly  equal  to  that  of  human  blood 

plasma.  Subsequently,  separate  β-wRSA  samples 

were soaked in the SBF at a pH of 7.4 for 1, 3, 5, 7, 

14  and  21  days,  at  a  temperature  of  36.5  °C.  The 

cylindrical  samples  were  weighted  in  the  range  of 

0.4-0.5  g  and  each  sample  used  around  30  ml  of 

SBF  solution.  The  SBF  was  periodically  refreshed 

every  3  days.  After  the  soaking  period,  β-wRSA 

samples were rinsed in acetone for 2 h, rinsed with 

deionised water 3 times to remove buffer salts, then 

dried  in  an  incubator  for  24  h.  Next,  the  β-wRSA 

samples  were  characterised  using  FTIR  and  SEM 

methods, coupled with EDS. The Ca/P molar ratios 


Journal of The Australian Ceramic Society Volume 52[2], 206, 163 – 174   

165 


 

 

of  the  β-wRSA  samples  were  calculated  using  the 



atomic  %  of  Ca  and  P,  which  were  based  on  the 

EDS chemical analysis. 

 

2.3  Degradation study for β-wRSA samples 

The  degradability  of  the  β-wRSA  powder  was 

determined  from  its  weight  loss  percentage  after 

soaking  in  the  SBF,  as  mentioned  in  Section  2.2. 

The cylindrical samples were weighed (mp) before 

soaking  in  the  SBF.  The  weight  after  drying  (md) 

was  calculated,  and  finally  the  weight  loss  of  β-

wRSA was calculated, as shown in Equation (1): 

 

Weight loss (%) = 100 x {(mp-md)/(mp)}           (1) 



 

 

3.  Results and Discussion 



3.1  XRF analysis 

Results for the elemental analyses of the RSA and 

CaO mixture using XRF are listed in Table 1. Silica 

is  the  most  abundant  element  in  the  RSA  at  79.0 

wt.%,  which  is  similar  to  the  figure  quoted  by 

Jenkins  et  al.  [33].  Other  compounds  were  also 

detected  in  the  RSA,  including  K

2

O,  P



2

O

5



,  MgO, 

Al

2



O

3

,  CaO,  MnO,  Al



2

O

3



,  Na

2

O  and  Fe



2

O

3



.  The 

main  factor  for  selecting  RSA  in  this  study  is  its 

higher  silica  content  relative  to  that  of  other 

agricultural  wastes.  Rice  straw  is  also  easily 

obtained  in  Malaysia  but  with  no  in-depth  studies. 

Meanwhile,  the  most  abundant  compound  in  the 

limestone  (post  calcination  process)  was  CaO,  at 

approximately  97.22  wt.%;  the  remaining 

percentage  included  MgO,  SiO

2

,  Fe



2

O

3



  and  Al

2

O



3

 

compounds. 



 

3.2  Phase identification by XRD analysis 

β-wRSA  was  produced  from  a  mixture  of  SiO

2

 

from  RSA  and  CaO  from  limestone.  The  mixing 



ratio of SiO

2

 to CaO, and the sintering temperature, 



have  been  designated  based  on  the  phase  diagram 

of  the  SiO

2

-CaO  system  [32].  The  ratio  of 



CaO:SiO

2

  was  set  at  55:45  and  the  sintering 



temperature  was  set  for  3  h  in  order  to  obtain  β-

wRSA.  The  phase-formation  behaviour  during 

sintering of β-wRSA was studied using XRD. The 

XRD patterns of the raw materials and the sintered 

β-wRSA powders are shown in Fig. 1.  

 

It  has  been  confirmed  that  the  cristobalite  phase 



was  present  (JCPDS  no:  00-82-0512)  and  small 

peak  of  tridymite  (JCPDS  no.  00-42-1401)  at 

cristobalite  shoulder  peak  at  ~21°  upon  firing  at 

950  °C  for  the  RSA.  The  calcined  limestone  peak 

showed  the  presence  of  CaO  (JCPDS  no:37-1497) 

and  Ca(OH)

2

  (JCPDS  no:43-1460),  where  it  is 



difficult for the CaO to stay in this phase due to its 

hydrophilic  properties.  It  can  either  absorb 

moisture  to  become  Ca(OH)

2

,  or  revert  to  its 



original form of limestone [34]. 

 

 



 

Figure 1: XRD pattern for (a) rice straw ash (RSA), (b) calcium oxide (CaO) and (c) β-wRSA 

 


Ismail et al. 

          166 

 

Table 1: Ion concentrations of SBF and human blood plasma 



Ion 

concentration 

Human blood plasma (mM) 

SBF (mM) 

Na



142.0 

142.0 


K

5.0 



5.0 

Mg

2+ 



1.5 

1.5 


Ca

2+ 


2.5 

2.5 


Cl

103.0 



148.8 

HCO


3

-

 



27.0 

4.2 


HPO

4

2-



 

1.0 


1.0 

SO

4



2-

 

0.5 



0.0 

 

Table 2: Compositions of the raw materials 



Composition 

Rice straw ash 

(wt%) 

Calcined calcium 



carbonate (wt%) 

SiO


2

 

79.0 



K

2



9.70 


P

2



O

5

 



1.47 

MgO 



1.21 

2.38 


Al

2

O



3

 

0.23 



CaO 


2.02 

97.22 


Others 

6.37 


0.4 

 

 



3.3 

Particle size and density of RSA, CaO and 

β-wRSA powder 

The RSA has in a range of 3.889 µm to 352.0 µm 

with a mean particle size of 51.66 µm (Fig. 2a) and 

density of 2.42 gcm

−3

. Theoretical density of silica, 



2.65  gcm

−3 


was  used  as  comparison  to  rice  straw 

ash  as  the  main  content  of  the  ash  is  silica  [19]. 

While for CaO has in a range of 1.499 µm to 209.3 

µm  with  a  mean  particle  size  is  6.90  µm  (Fig.  2b) 

and  density  is  3.02  gcm

−3.


,  which  are  close  to 

typical density of 3.35 gcm

-3

 [8]. The β-wRSA has 



in  a  range  of  2.121  µm  to  418.6  µm  with  a  mean 

particle  size  of  38.25  µm  (Fig.  2c)  and  density  of 

3.10 gcm

-3

 respectively, and the density is close to 



its theoretical density of 2.86–3.09 g cm

−3

 [8]. 



 

 

Figure 2: Particle distribution of (a) rice straw ash (RSA), (b) calcium oxide (CaO) and (c) β- 



wRSA. 

Journal of The Australian Ceramic Society Volume 52[2], 206, 163 – 174   

167 


 

 

3.4 Heavy metal element content of RSA, CaO and 



β-wRSA powder 

Table 3 shows the impurities of the RSA, CaO and 

β-wRSA  with    the  heavy  metal  such  as  arsenic 

(As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) had satisfied the 

requirement  to  be  employed  as  a  biomaterial  with 

reference  to  the  standard  specifications  ASTM 

F1538-03[35].  Since  the  Hg  detection  limit  is 

negative  i.e  -4.1  ppm  (for  RSA),  -6.5  ppm  (CaO) 

and -2.1 (β-wRSA), therefore the detection limit is 

considered  as  zero  or  the  Hg  is  not  exist  in  the 

RSA, CaO and β-wRSA. As a result, it established 

that the RSA, CaO and the β-wRSA contents were 

safe to be utilised for implants purposes. 

 

3.5  Microstructure  of  RSA,  CaO  and  β-wRSA 



powder 

Fig. 3 depicts the SEM observations for RSA, CaO 

and  sintered  powder  of  β-wRSA.  The  SEM 

micrographs  have  indicated  that  the  RSA  has 

irregular  shapes  (Fig.  3a),  and  that  the  CaO  has  a 

mixed structure of leaves and flakes (Fig. 3b). After 

the  sintering,  the  β-wRSA  powder  became 

interconnected  and  exhibited  dendritic  structures 

(Fig.  3c).  EDX  analysis  of  the  RSA  powder 

revealed Si, Ca, K, O, small peaks of P, Mg and Al 

(Fig.  3a).  Analysis  of  the  calcined  limestone 

showed Ca and small peaks of Mg (Fig. 3b). EDX 

analysis  of  the  sintered  powder  revealed  peaks  of 

Si, Ca, P and O (Fig. 3c); it was expected that the 

sample would contain only β-wollastonite, because 

the sintering temperature for β-wollastonite starts at 

700  °C and reaches as high as 1100 °C [36]. This 

result  was  verified  by  the  XRD  pattern,  showing 

that  the  majority  of  the  highest  peaks  were 

subjected to β-wollastonite (Fig.1c). 

 

 

 



Figure 3: SEM micrographs and EDX spectra of (a) rice straw ash (RSA), (b) calcium oxide 

(CaO) and (c) β-wRSA. 

a

b

c



Ismail et al. 

          168 

Table 3: Trace heavy metal element of raw materials and β-wRSA 

Sample 


Heavy element content (ppm) 

Arsenic (As) 

Cadmium (Cd) 

Plumbum (Pb) 

Mercury (Hg) 

Rice straw ash (RSA) 

0.015 

0.001 


0.013 

0.0 


Calcium oxide (CaO) 

0.017 


0.0000 

0.058 


0.0 

β-wRSA 


0.045 

0.003 


0.014 

0.0 


ASTM F 1538-03 



30 

 



 

Figure 4: FTIR spectra of β-wRSA before and after soaking in the SBF for (a) control, (b) 1, 

(c) 3, (d) 5, (e) 7, (f) 14 and (g) 21 days. 

 

 



3.6  Characteristics of bioactivity properties for β-

wRSA 

3.6.1 FTIR analyses  

Fig.  4  shows  the  FTIR  spectrum  of  different  β-

wRSA samples that include a control sample of β-

wRSA  before  soaking,  and  also  samples  that  have 

soaked  in  SBF  for  1,  3,  5,  7,  14,  and  21  days.  A 

very wide OH

-

 absorption band from 3800 to 2400 



cm

-1

  and  a  weak  water  absorption  band  at 



approximately  1650  cm

-1

  can  be  seen  in  these 



spectrum,  as    reported  by  Liu  et  al.  [37].  The 

bending  band  of  the  silicon  ion  (Si-O)  at  1011.10 

cm

-1

  and  934.59  cm



-1

  confirmed  the  formation  of 

the β-wRSA phase, as reported by previous studies 

regarding the adsorption bending of β-wollastonite 

[38-39]. The band at 898.66 cm

-1

 has been reported 



to be the stretching band for silicon ions (Si-O-Si), 

which is indicative of β-wRSA phases. In addition, 

the band stretching from 1416 to 1424 cm

-1

 for  β-



wRSA  can  be  related  to  the  carbonate  (CO

3

2-



)  IR 

adsorption [37].  

A previous study has reported that the existence of 

the  non-bridging  oxygen  stretching  modes  at 

1010.59 and 933.91 cm

-1

 mark the beginning of the 



bioactive  process  [24].  The  rate  of  silicate  matrix 

formation in the Si-OH group on the surface of the 

β-wollastonite  was  controlled  by  these  rings.  The 

decreasing intensity of Si ions in β-wRSA samples 

that  have  been  soaking  in  SBF  for  more  than  one 

day confirms that these ions are required to develop 

the Si-OH group, which promotes the formation of 

apatite [24, 38]. Samples that have been soaking for 

14 and 21 days only show the bending band of P-O 

at  1021-1024  cm

-1

,  which  took  place  in 



stoichiometric  apatite  [38].  The  carbon  dioxide 

(CO


2

)  environment  employed  during  the  sintering 

process of the RSA and CaO mixture was detected 

based  on  the  presence  of  carbonate  ions  at 

approximately 

1420-1434 

cm

-1



which 

is 


comparable  with  the  range  reported  in  another 

study  using  silica  sand  and  limestone  [24].  The 

existence  of  α-crystobalite  at  796.22  cm

-1

  bending 



vibrations  can  be  seen  in  both  pre-  and  post-

Journal of The Australian Ceramic Society Volume 52[2], 206, 163 – 174   

169 


 

 

soaking samples, a phenomenon that was also seen 



by  Paluszkiewicz  et  al.  [38].  The  existence  of  the 

cristobalite  phase  was  also  proven  via  the  XRD 

analysis of the RSA (Fig. 1a). 

 

3.6.2 SEM morphology and EDX analyses 

Fig.  5  shows  the  SEM  micrographs  and  the  EDX 

spectrum  of  the  β-wRSA  cylindrical  samples  after 

soaking in the SBF. Based on these SEM images, it 

is clear that all the β-wRSA samples have a porous 

structure,  and  that  the  pore  size  reduces  with  the 

soaking  period.  A  coral-like  structure  has  been 

observed in a sample that had soaked for 21 days, 

which  seemed  to  resemble  a  hydroxyapatite 

structure, and was proved as such using XRD: see 

Fig. 6f [24].  

 

Surprisingly, the mechanism of structural change in 



the  β-wRSA  after  soaking  is  not  clear,  whether  or 

not  it  matches  the  surface-directed  mineralisation 

of  calcium  phosphate,  as  introduced  by  Cölfen 

[40].  This  mechanism  starts  with  an  aggregate  of 

pre-nucleation clusters that are in equilibrium with 

the  ions  in  solution  and  in  order  the  clusters 

approach  a  surface  with  chemical.  Next,  pre-

nucleation clusters aggregate near the surface while 

at  the  same  time  loose  aggregates  remain  in 

solution.  Then,  further  aggregation  occurs  nearer 

the  surface,  becoming  denser.  Nucleation’s  of 

amorphous  spherical  particles  occur  at  the  surface 

only  for  Stage  4.  At  the  last  stage  (stage  5), 

crystallisation  occurs  in  the  region  of  the 

amorphous particles, directed by the surface. In this 

study, the β-wRSA samples simply indicate that the 

two  final  steps  of  the  mechanism  were  met  [39], 

when  the  nucleation  of  the  amorphous  layer  was 

present on the surface of the β-wRSA samples that 

had  soaked  for  3  days  (Fig.  5c).  The  earlier 

mechanisms,  such  as  pre-nucleation  aggregate 

clusters  of  ions,  and  densification  near  the  surface 

caused  by  further  aggregation  processes,  were  not 

present.  The  amorphous  layer  became  thicker  and 

coated the surface of the β-wRSA samples that had 

been soaking between 5 and 21 days (Figs. 5d-5g). 

 

 

Figure 5: SEM micrographs and EDX spectra of β-wRSA before and after soaking in the SBF 



for (a) control, (b) 1, (c) 3, (d) 5, (e) 7, (f) 14 and (g) 21 days. 

 

a



b

c

d



e

f

g



Ismail et al. 

          170 

Table 4: Surface composition (at. %) obtained by EDX of samples before and after soaking in SBF solution. 

Soaking period  

(days) 

Surface composition on β-wRSA (at. %) 



 

Si 


Ca 

Ca/P 



37.61 


9.00 

1.58 


13.75 



20.95 

6.59 


3.18 

12.27 



19.27 

6.98 

2.76 



17.67 



21.12 

8.18 


2.58 

12.91 



14.55 

8.32 


1.75 

14 


13.78 

15.23 


9.77 

1.56 


21 

9.31 


23.47 

14.10 


1.66 

 

 



Figure 6: XRD pattern after before and after soaking in the SBF for (a) 1, (b) 3, (c) 5, (d) 7, (e) 

14 and (f) 21 days. 

 

 

Figure 7: Degradation of the β-wRSAwith soaking time. 



Journal of The Australian Ceramic Society Volume 52[2], 206, 163 – 174   

171 


 

 

Table  4  shows  results  of  EDX  analysis  of  the 



deposited materials on the β-wRSA surface, which 

consisted  of  Si,  Ca  and  P.  These  elements  suggest 

that  the  deposited  material  is  a  type  of  apatite.  It 

can be assumed that the rapid adsorption of Ca and 

also  O-P  ions  from  SBF  is  the  first  step  towards 

bioactivity.  In  addition,  the  control  sample  has  a 

lower P peak, which originated from the RSA (Fig. 

2a).  The  agglomerate’s  pre-soaking  cauliflower-

like  structure  (Fig.  5a)  had  changed  into  a  coral-

like  structure,  due  to  the  formation  of  a 

hydroxyapatite  microstructure  after  14  days  of 

soaking  (Fig.  5f).  This  transformation  was  proven 

by  the  XRD  result  (Fig.  6e).  The  Si  concentration 

rapidly decreased after one day of soaking; this rate 

decreased  over  the  remaining  21  days  (Table  4). 

This  result  is  confirmed  by  the  formation  of  a 

CDHA layer found on the surface of sample, which 

was  rich  in  Ca  and  P  [40].  Dorozhkin  [41]  stated 

that the Ca/P molar ratio for CDHA must lie in the 

range  of  1.5-1.67,  and  that  of  amorphous  calcium 

phosphate (ACP) must be within 1.0-2.2 [41]. 

 

Table 4 also presents the Ca/P molar ratios, ranging 



between  1.5  and  3.2,  calculated  for  the  β-wRSA 

samples  after  the  various  soaking  durations  in  the 

SBF.  These  results  have  proven  that  the  deposited 

apatite  on  the  wollastonite  samples  consists  of 

CDHA  layers  [41].  Based  on  the  information 

contained within Table 4, the Ca/P molar ratio for 7 

soaking  days  is  1.75,  which  matches  the  value  for 

ACP.  This  conclusion  is  confirmed  by  SEM 

observations,  where  the  amorphous  layers  can  be 

seen on Figs. 5c-5e. Starting with samples of 14 to 

21 soaking days (Figs. 5f-5g), the Ca/P molar ratios 

were  calculated  to  be  1.5–1.67,  which  are  within 

the CDHA range [41]. 

 

The  bioactivity  processes  of  the  wollastonite  had 



begun to occur while soaking in the SBF and mixed 

up with the release of the Ca and Si ions from the 

β-wRSA.  Therefore,  the  formation  of  ACP  and 

CDHA may be closely linked to the number of Si-

OH  groups  that  existed  on  the  surface  of  β-wRSA 

materials  [24,  40].  The  bioactive  processes  of  the 

developed  β-wRSA  material  follow  the  principles 

of  the  bioactivity    mechanism  [30,  42].  The 

selected  materials  may  play  one  of  the  two 

principle  roles  in  the  bioactive  process:  Equations 

(2) – (5) [42]. 

 

When  the  β-wRSA  phase  is  in  contact  with  the 



SBF,  it  will  begin  to  react  through  an  ionic 

exchange  of  H

+

  and  OH



  from  the  SBF,  and  Ca

2+

 

and  silicate  anions  from  the  β-wRSA  network, 



which allows the subsequent reactions to occur: 

CaSiO


3(s)

 + H


+

(aq.) 


→ HSiO

3



(aq.)

 + Ca


2+

(aq.)   


 

 

 



 

(2) 


CaSiO

3(s) 


+  OH

(aq.) 



→  Ca

2+

(aq.) 



+  SiO

3

(OH)



3−

(aq.)                       

 

 

 



(3) 

CaSiO


3(s)

  +  H


2

O

(aq.)



→  Ca

2+

(aq.)



+  HSiO

3−

(aq.) 



OH



(aq.)

   


 

(4) 


CaSiO

3(s)


 + H

2

O



(aq.)

→ Ca


2+

(aq.) 


+ SiO

4

4−



(aq.) 

+ 2H


+

(aq.)                               

 

 

(5) 



The  silicate  anions  are  formed  according  to 

Equations  (2)  -  (5).  Magallanes-Perdomo    et  al. 

[42]  reported  that  the  reaction  in  Equation  (2)  has 

the lowest Gibbs Free Energy, and therefore is the 

most  likely  reaction.  Based  on  the  values  of 

constant equilibrium, the reactions may occur in the 

following order; (2), (3), (4), (5), with HSiO

3



 and 

Ca

2+



  being  the  major  ions.  Due  to  the  presence  of 

Ca and P ions from the β-wRSA, numerous Si-OH 

groups  can  be  found  along  the  surface  of  the  β-

wRSA’s amorphous silica-rich phase. These silanol 

groups  may  encourage  the  heterogeneous 

nucleation  of  apatite  from  β-wRSA.  When  apatite 

nuclei  are  formed  on  the  surface  of  the  β-wRSA 

layer, they can rapidly grow by absorbing Ca and P 

ions from the SBF.  

 

3.6.3  Phase  investigation  after  in-vitro  bioactivity 



test 

Fig.  6  exhibits  the  XRD  patterns  of  β-wRSA  after 

different  soaking  durations  in  the  SBF.  The 

crystallinity  of  β-wRSA  decreases  with  increasing 

immersion  time.  Based  on  the  calculated  molar 

ratio  of  Ca/P,  the  amorphous  layer  of  calcium 

phosphate,  ACP,  can  be  found  in  samples  that  are 

soaked  between  5  and  21  days  (Table  4).  The 

deposited layer covered almost the entire surface of 

the  β-wRSA.  This  phenomenon  was  confirmed  by 

the  decreasing  peak  of  β-wRSA  at  30.0°.  A  study 

by Dorozhkin [41] had also revealed a broad XRD 

peak  at  approximately  30.0-35.0°,  which  has  been 

labelled as an ACP structure in Figs. 5e and 5f. In 

β-wRSA samples that soaked for more than 5 days, 

the  previously  unstable  ACP  structure  became 

more prominent [40, 43], and the poorly crystalline 

HA  (JCPDS  no:  72-1243)  began  to  form  from  the 

conversion  of  ACP  [40].  CDHA  is  formed  in 

samples soaking for between 14 and 21 days. No β-

wRSA peaks have been detected in the sample that 

soaked for 21 days; this absence was confirmed by 

EDX  analysis,  where  the  silica  content  had 

decreased  to  a  value  lower  than  the  Ca  and  P 

content (Table 4). 

 

3.7  Degradation study of β-wRSA 

The  degradation  behaviour  of  the  β-wRSA  while 

soaking  in  SBF  is  presented  in  Fig.  7.  The  loss  of 

weight  incrementally  increases  with  increasing 

soaking  time.  The  degradability  value  of  the  β-

wRSA  had  reached  3.54  %  after  one  day  of 

soaking.  After  this  time,  the  percentage  of 

degradation  slowly  increases  to  3.76  %  at  day  3, 

3.88 % at day 5, 4.12 % at day 7, 4.33 % at day 14, 

and  finally  4.34  %  by  day  21.  The  increasing 

weight  loss  may  have  been  induced  by  the 

dissolution  behaviour  of  β-wRSA  particles,  due  to 


Ismail et al. 

          172 

β-wollastonite  releasing  alkaline  ions  while  being 

soaked in SBF, as reported elsewhere [44-45]. 

 

According  to  Li  and  Chang  [45],  the  degradation 



rate  of  β-wRSA  was  also  influenced  by 

crystallinity,  sintering  period  and  microstructure. 

With  regards  to  the  β-wRSA  samples,  the  main 

factor in increasing the degradation rate is porosity. 

This conclusion is based on the SEM images (Fig. 

5),  which  show  the  presence  of  pores,  and  the 

coral-like structure. These characteristics may have 

caused the diffusion of dissolution to occur easily, 

due to the surface area increase. The degradation of 

β-wRSA is therefore determined by the dissolution 

rate, depending on the porosity of the material. 

 

 



4.  Conclusions 

β-wRSA  has  been  successfully  derived  from  a 

mixture  of  rice  straw  ash  and  limestone,  and  has 

exhibited  excellent  bioactivity  properties.  Single-

phase β-wRSA was formed when it was autoclaved 

for 8 h and sintered for 3 h. The degradation rate of 

β-wRSA  increases  with  longer  soaking  periods. 

The  β-wRSA  has  a  porous  structure,  with 

significant  Ca,  P  and  Si  content,  which  aided  the 

formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) 

and  calcium  deficient  hydroxyapatite  (CDHA)  on 

the surface of the β-wRSA samples. It can therefore 

be concluded that the bioactive β-wRSA is suitable 

for dental and implantable biomaterial purposes. 

 

 

Acknowledgements 



The  authors  would  like  to  acknowledge  the 

research grant FRGS/2/2013/SG06/UKM/02/6, and 

thank  the  Ministry  of  Higher  Education  Malaysia 

for  supporting  the  research  through  a  MyBrain 

Scholarship. 

 

 



References 

[1] 


R.  P.  Sreekanth  Chakradhar,  B.  M. 

Nagabhushana, G. T. Chandrappa, K. P. 

Ramesh  and  J.  L.  Rao,  Solution 

combustion 

derived 

nanocrystalline 

macroporous wollastonite ceramics, Mater. 

Chem. Phys. 95 (2006) 169–175. 

[2] 

N. Zhang, J. A. Molenda, S. Mankoci, X. 

Zhou,  W.  L.  Murphy  and  N.  Sahai, 

Crystal  structures  of  CaSiO

3

  polymorphs 



control 

growth 


and 

osteogenic 

differentiation  of  human  mesenchymal 

stem  cells  on  bioceramic  surfaces, 

Biomater. Sci. 1 (2013) 1101–1110. 

[3] 


V.  Swamy  and  L.  S.  Dubrovinsky, 

Thermodynamic  data  for  the  phases  in  the 

CaSiO

3

  system,  Geochim.  Cosmochim. 



Acta 61 (1997) 1181–1191. 

[4] 


C. B. Carter and M. G. Norton, Ceramic 

Materials 

Science 

and 


Engineering, 

Springer: New York, USA, 2007. 

[5] 

E.  Essene,  High-pressure  transformations 

in CaSiO


3

,  Contrib. Mineral. and Petrol. 45 

(1974) 247--250. 

[6] 


A.  Yazdani,  H.  R.  Rezaie  and  H. 

Ghassai,  Investigation  of  hydrothermal 

synthesis  of  wollastonite  using  silica  and 

nano silica at different pressures, J. Ceram. 

Process. Res. 11 (2010) 348–353. 

[7] 

K. Lin, J. Chang, G. Chen, M. Ruan and 

C.  Ning,  A  simple  method  to  synthesize 

single-crystalline β-wollastonite nanowires, 

J. Cryst. Growth 300 (2007) 267–271. 

[8] 


Rashita 

Abdul 

Rashid, 

Roslinda 

Shamsudin,  Muhammad  Azmi.  Abdul 

Hamid 

and 

Azman 

Jalar, 

Low 


temperature  production  of  wollastonite 

from  limestone  and  silica  sand  through 

solid-state reaction, J. Asian Ceram. Soc. 

(2014) 77–81. 

[9] 

M. M. Shukur, E. A. Al-Majeed and M. 

M.  Obied,  Characteristic  of  wollastonite 

synthesized from local raw materials, Int. J. 

of Eng. & Tech. 4 (2014) 426–429. 

[10] 


S.  Vichaphund,  M.  Kitiwan,  D.  Atong 

and  P.  Thavorniti,  Microwave  synthesis 

of  wollastonite  powder  from  eggshells,  J. 

Eur. Ceram. Soc. 31 (2011) 2435–2440. 

[11] 


M.  Mehrali,  S.  F.  Seyed  Shirazi,  S. 

Baradaran,  H.  S.  C.  Metselaar,  N.  A.  B. 

Kadri  and  N.  A.  A.  Osman,  Facile 

synthesis  of  calcium  silicate  hydrate  using 

sodium  dodecyl  sulfate  as  a  surfactant 

assisted  by  ultrasonic  irradiation,  Ultrason. 

Sonochem. 21 (2014) 735–742. 

[12] 


K.  Kanokkanjana  and  S.  Garivait, 

Alternative 

rice 

straw 


management 

practices  to  reduce  field  open  burning  in 

Thailand,  Int.  J.  Environ.  Sci.  Dev.  4 

(2013) 119–123. 

[13] 

Z.  Liu,  A.  Xu  and  T.  Zhao,  Energy  from 

combustion  of  rice  straw:  status  and 

challenges  to  China,  Energy  Power  Eng.  3 

(2011) 325–331. 

[14] 

H.  Liu,  Y.  Feng,  S.  Wu  and  D.  Liu,  The 

role  of  ash  particles  in  the  bed 

agglomeration  during  the  fluidized  bed 

combustion  of  rice  straw,  Bioresour. 

Technol. 100 (2009) 6505–6513. 

[15] 


G.  H.  Laswai,  J.  D.  Mtamakaya,  A.  E. 

Kimambo,  A.  A.  Aboud  and  P.  W. 

Mtakwa,  Dry  matter  intake,  in  vivo 

nutrient  digestibility  and  concentration  of 

minerals  in  the  blood  and  urine  of  steers 

fed  rice  straw  treated  with  wood  ash 

extract,  Anim.  Feed  Sci.  Technol.  137 

(2007) 25–34. 



Journal of The Australian Ceramic Society Volume 52[2], 206, 163 – 174   

173 


 

 

[16] 



C.  G.  Rocha,  D.  A.    Zaia,  R.  V.    Alfaya 

and  A.  A.    Alfaya,  Use  of  rice  straw  as 

biosorbent  for  removal  of  Cu(II),  Zn(II), 

Cd(II)  and  Hg(II)  ions  in  industrial 

effluents,  J.  Hazard.  Mater.  166  (2009) 

383–388. 

[17] 


P. Binod, R. Sindhu, R. R. Singhania, S. 

Vikram,  L.  Devi,  S.  Nagalakshmi,  N. 

Kurien,  R.  K.  Sukumaran  and  A. 

Pandey,  Bioethanol  production  from  rice 

straw:  An  overview,  Bioresour.  Technol. 



101 (2010) 4767–4774. 

[18] 


J.  K.  Ko,  J.  S.  Bak,  M.  W.  Jung,  H.  J. 

Lee,  I.-G.  Choi,  T.  H.  Kim  and  K.  H. 

Kim,  Ethanol  production  from  rice  straw 

using optimized aqueous-ammonia soaking 

pretreatment 

and 


simultaneous 

saccharification 

and 

fermentation 



processes,  Bioresour.  Technol.  100  (2009) 

4374–4380. 

[19] 

J. P. Nayak, S. Kumar and J. Bera, Sol–

gel  synthesis  of  bioglass-ceramics  using 

rice  husk  ash  as  a  source  for  silica  and  its 

characterization,  J.  Non.  Cryst.  Solids  356 

(2010) 1447–1451. 

[20] 


N.  S.  C.  Zulkifli,  I.  Ab  Rahman,  D. 

Mohamad and A. Husein, A green sol–gel 

route  for  the  synthesis  of  structurally 

controlled silica particles from rice husk for 

dental  composite  filler,  Ceram.  Int.  39 

(2013) 4559–4567. 

[21] 


M.  Noushad,  I.  Ab  Rahman,  N.  S.  Che 

Zulkifli,  A.  Husein  and  D.  Mohamad

Low  surface  area  nanosilica  from  an 

agricultural  biomass  for  fabrication  of 

dental  nanocomposites,  Ceram.  Int.  40 

(2014) 4163–4171. 

[22] 


Y. H. Yun, S. B. Kim, B. A. Kang, Y. W. 

Lee,  J.  S.  Oh  and  K.  S.  Hwang,  β-

wollastonite 

reinforced 

glass-ceramics 

prepared  from  waste  fluorescent  glass  and 

calcium  carbonate,  J.  Mater.  Process. 

Technol. 178 (2006) 61–66. 

[23] 


H.  Li  and  J.  Chang,  Preparation  and 

characterization 

of 

bioactive 



and 

biodegradable wollastonite/poly(D, L-lactic 

acid)  composite  scaffolds,  J.  Mater.  Sci. 

Mater. Med. 15 (2004) 1089–1095. 

[24] 

R.  A.  Rashid,  R.  Shamsudin,  M.  A.  A. 

Hamid  and  A.  Jalar,  In-vitro  bioactivity 

of  wollastonite  materials  derived  from 

limestone  and  silica  sand,  Ceram.  Int.  40 

(2014) 6847–6853. 

[25] 

S.  K.  Padmanabhan,  F.  Gervaso,  M. 

Carrozzo, F. Scalera, A. Sannino and A. 

Licciulli, 

Wollastonite/hydroxyapatite 

scaffolds  with  improved  mechanical, 

bioactive  and  biodegradable  properties  for 

bone  tissue  engineering,  Ceram.  Int.  39 

(2013) 619–627. 

[26] 

X. Wan, C. Chang, D. Mao, L. Jiang and 

M. Li, Preparation and in vitro bioactivities 

of  calcium  silicate  nanophase  materials, 

Mater. Sci. Eng. C 25 (2005) 455–461. 

[27]      T. Kokubo, Bioactive glass ceramics:  

             properties and applications, Biomaterials    

             12 (1991) 155-163. 

[28] 

T.  Kokubo  and  H.  Takadama,  How 

useful  is  SBF  in  predicting  in  vivo  bone 

bioactivity?,  Biomaterials  27  (2006)  2907-

2915. 


[29] 

L.  N.  Niu,  K.  Jiao,  T.  Wang,  W.  Zhang, 

J. Camilleri, B. E. Bergeron, H.-L. Feng, 

J. Mao, J. H. Chen, D. H. Pashley and F. 

R.  Tay,  A  review  of  the  bioactivity  of 

hydraulic calcium silicate cements, J. Dent. 



42 (2014) 517–533. 

[30] 


L.  L.  Hench,  Bioactive  Materials,  Ceram. 

Int. 8842 (1996) 493–507. 

[31] 

L. Z. Pei, L. J. Yang, Y. Yang, C. G. Fan, 

W.  Y.  Yin,  J.  Chen  and  Q.  F.  Zhang,  A 

green and facile route to synthesize calcium 

silicate  nanowires,  Mater.  Charact.  61 

(2010) 1281–1285. 

[32] 

U.  J.  G.  Erlend,  F.  Nordstrand,  A.  N. 

Dibbs, A. J. Eraker, E. F. Nordstrand, A. 

N. Dibbs, A. J. Eraker and U. J. Gibson, 

Alkaline  oxide  interface  modifiers  for 

silicon  fiber  production,  Opt.  Mater. 

Express 3 (2013) 651-656. 

[33] 

B. M. Jenkins, L. L. Baxter, T. R. M. Jr 

and T. R. Miles, Combustion properties of 

biomass, Fuel Process Tech. 54 (1998) 17-

46. 

[34] 


T.  N.  Blanton  and  C.  L.  Barnes, 

Quantitative  analysis  of  calcium  oxide 

desiccant  conversion  to  calcium  hydroxide 

using  x-ray  diffraction,  Adv.  X-Ray  Anal. 



48 (2005) 45–51. 

[35] 


ASTM,  Standard  Specification  for  Glass 

and  Glass  Ceramic  Biomaterials  for 

Implantation, ASTM F1538-03 (2008). 

[36] 


L.  H.  Long,  L.  D.  Chen  and  J.  Chang

Low 


temperature 

fabrication 

and 

characterizations  of  β-CaSiO



3

  ceramics, 

Ceram. Int. 32 (2006) 457–460. 

[37]   X.  Liu,  C.  Ding  and  Z.  Wang,  Apatite 

formed  on  the  surface  of  plasma-sprayed        

wollastonite coating immersed in simulated 

body  fluid,  Biomaterials  22  (2001)  2007–

2012. 


[38] 

C.  Paluszkiewicz,  M.  Blażewicz,  J. 

Podporska and T. Gumuła, Nucleation of 

hydroxyapatite  layer  on  wollastonite 

material  surface:  FTIR  studies,  Vib. 

Spectrosc. 48 (2008) 263–268. 

[39] 

S.  J.  Gadaleta,  E.  P.  Paschalis,  F.  Betts, 

R. Mendelsohn and A. L. Boskey, Fourier 

transform  infrared  spectroscopy  of  the 

solution-mediated 

conversion 

of 


Ismail et al. 

          174 

amorphous 

calcium 


phosphate 

to 


hydroxyapatite:  new  correlations  between 

X-ray  diffraction  and  infrared  data,  Calcif. 

Tissue Int. 58 (1996) 9–16. 

[40] 


H.  Cölfen,  Biomineralization:  A  crystal-

clear view, Nat. Mater. 9 (2010) 960–961. 

[41] 

S.  V.  Dorozhkin,  Amorphous  calcium 

(ortho)phosphates, Acta Biomater. 6 (2010) 

4457–4475. 

[42] 


M. 

Magallanes-Perdomo, 

Z. 

B. 

Luklinska,  A.  H.  De  Aza,  R.  G. 

Carrodeguas,  S.  De  Aza  and  P.  Pena

Bone-like  forming  ability  of  apatite-

wollastonite  glass  ceramic,  J.  Eur.  Ceram. 

Soc. 31 (2011) 1549–1561 

[43] 

E.  D.  Eanes,  Amorphous  calcium 

phosphate,  Monogr.  Oral  Sci.  18  (2001) 

130–147. 

[44] 


F.  Zhang,  J.  Chang,  K.  Lin  and  J.  Lu, 

Preparation,  mechanical  properties  and  in 

vitro 

degradability 



of 

wollastonite/tricalcium 

phosphate 

macroporous scaffolds from nanocomposite 

powders,  J.  Mater.  Sci.  Mater.  Med.  19 

(2008) 167–173. 

[45] 

H.  Li  and  J.  Chang,  Fabrication  and 

characterization 

of 

bioactive 



wollastonite/PHBV  composite  scaffolds, 

Biomaterials 25 (2004) 5473–54. 

 


Journal of The Australian Ceramic Society Volume 52[2], 206, 163 – 174   

175 


 

 


Download 3.12 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling