I n e I g h t V o L u m e s


Download 77.41 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet14/90
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi77.41 Mb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   90

1

 Husaini, loe. cit.; Ibn al-Athir, vol. x, p.  i n ; Jüzjáni, Tabaqat-i Ndsirl (Raverty tr., 

vol. i, pp. 103-4, 107); Mirzá Muhammad Qazwini, " Mas'ud-i Sa'd-i Salman ", J.R.A.S 

pp. 711-15; Kafesoglu, Sultan Meliksah, pp. 29-30. 

2

 Sourdel, Inventaire des Monnaies Musulmanes Anciennes du Muse'e de Caboul, pp. xiii-xiv. 

3

 (Anon.), Tdríkb-i Sistán, p. 383; Kafesoglu, op. cit. pp. 117-19. 

M A L I K - S H A H ' S  R E I G N 

95 


ments for their forces; this importance was recognized by the sultan's 

eventually placing the whole of the Arran-Azarbaijan area under his 

cousin Qutb al-Din Isma'il b. Yaquti,  w h o was given the title Malik. 

When Malik-Shah came to the throne, he considered that he needed 

to strengthen the somewhat nominal dependence of Fadl (Fadlun) III 

b. Fadl II, the Shaddadid ruler of Ganja and  D v i n  w h o had succeeded 

his father in 466/1073. Accordingly, the sultan sent an expedition to 

Arran; Ganja was occupied and Fadl deposed, receiving in exchange 

Astarabad in Gurgan. Sav-Tegin, already familiar with the area from 

his campaigns there in Alp-Arslan's time, was installed in Ganja as 

governor (?468/io75-6; the chronology of these events is uncertain). 

But aggressive activity by the king of Georgia, Bagrat  I V ' s son Giorgi 

II (1072-89), led to the temporary recapture of Kars by the Christians. 

The sultan came personally to Georgia in 471/1078-9, and shortly 

afterwards he entrusted operations there to the Turkmen amir Ahmad, 

who regained Kars in 473/1080 and, after returning to his base in 

Arran, sent two more Turkmen begs,  Y a ' q u b and 'Isa Bori, against 

Georgia. They penetrated as far as Lazistan and the Chorukh valley 

on the Black Sea coast and they also threatened Trebizond; according to 

Anna Comnena, this city was in fact taken, but was recaptured soon 

afterwards by a Byzantine general.

A revolt by the restored Shaddadid Fadl III, probably after the death 



of Sav-Tegin in 478/1085, necessitated Malik-Shah's appearance in the 

Caucasus in 478/1086. After receiving the homage and tribute of the 

Shirvan-Shah Fariburz b. Sallar, the sultan reached the Black Sea 

coast, where the slave commander Bozan was detailed to take Ganja. 

Fadl was finally deposed and the Shaddadid line in Ganja extinguished, 

although the collateral line in Ani, under Amir Abu'1-Fadl Manuchihr, 

one of Malik-Shah's faithful vassals (?464-r. 512/? 1072-r. 1118), con­

tinued to flourish in the 6th/12th century. The Shirvan-Shah seems to 

have exercised some influence over Arran, but much of the Araxes 

basin was doubtless parcelled out into military fiefs and absorbed into 

the existing pattern of Turkmen occupation in Azarbaijan; the region 

as a whole was under the control of Qutb al-Din Isma'il.



1

 Allen, A History of the Georgian People, pp. 93-4; Yinanc, Anadolu'nun fethi, pp. n 0-13; 

Cahen, "La Premiere Penetration Turque en Asie-MineureBy^antion, p. 49; Minorsky, 

Studies in Caucasian History, pp. 67-8. 

2

 Caucasian History, pp. 68, 81-2; idem, A History of Sharvan and Darband, pp. 68-9; 

idem, and Cahen, "Le Recueil Transcaucasien de Mas'ud b. Namdar (debut du VI

e

/XJI



siecle) J.A. pp. 119-21. 


T H E  I R A N I A N  W O R L D  ( A . D .  I O O O - 1 2 1 7 ) 

96 


The sons of Qutlumush had arrived in Anatolia at the beginning of 

Malik-Shah's reign and had put themselves at the head of certain of 

the Turkmen bands which were gradually isolating and compelling the 

surrender of the remaining Byzantine strongholds in Anatolia. The 

later historiography of the Rum Saljuqs posits that Malik-Shah 

officially invested these sons with the governorships of Anatolia, 

intending the region to be an appanage of the Saljuq empire as Khura­

san, Kirman, and Damascus had been under Tutush. In fact, relations 

here were never very cordial. Assumption of the title Sultan by 

Qutlumush's sons (this occurred after c. 473/1080-1) seems to have 

been a unilateral act and cannot have pleased Malik-Shah, whose own 

title of Supreme Sultan implied an overlordship of the Saljuq family. 

Indeed, in 467/1075 two of Qutlumush's sons—Alp-Ilig and Daulab, 

in the view of Cahen—were fighting in Palestine for the Fatimids 

against Malik-Shah's lieutenant Atsiz b. Uvak.

In Anatolia itself, the other sons Sulaiman and Mansur were taking 



advantage of the succession disputes which racked Byzantium until 

the last and most successful claimant, Alexis Comenus (1081-1118), 

emerged triumphant. The various contenders—Michael Dukas, Nice-

phorus Botaniates, Nicephorus Melissenos, and Alexis himself—all 

sought help from the Turks, with the result that by 474/1081 Sulaiman's 

forces had reached the shores of the Sea of Marmara and had taken 

Nicea (Iznik). Malik-Shah regarded his cousins in Anatolia as semi-

rebels, and he cannot have viewed their successes with enthusiasm; 

his attitude towards Byzantium was no doubt the same as his fathers: 

that the two empires of the Greeks and the Saljuqs should exist side by 

side (see p. 62 above). Barhebraeus speaks of a punitive expedition 

under Amir Bursuq, sent by Malik-Shah c. 470/1077-8; though it 

succeeded in bringing about Mansur's death, Sulaiman had to be left 

with most of the western and southern parts of Anatolia.

2

 In Cappa-



docia, Pontus, and the east there were several other Turkmen begs, 

some related to the Saljuqs, others independent of them. Certain of 

the legends and traditions which surround the beginnings of the 

Turkmen Danishmand Beg ascribe to him a part in the victory of 

Malazgird, and they ascribe a similar role to Artuq, Mengiijek, and 

Saltuq, other Turkmen amirs  w h o later became famous.

3

 In reality, 



1

 Cf. Cahen, By^antion (1948), pp. 35-6.

 2

 Barhebraeus, Cbronography; p. 227. 

3

 This tradition is found in the works of the 8th/14th-century historian of the Rum 

Saljuqs, Aqsarayi, and it is also mentioned by the later Ottoman historians. 

M A L I K - S H A H ' S  R E I G N 

97 


B C H 

Danishmand Beg does not become a historically authenticated figure 

till the time of the First Crusade, in Berk-Yaruq's reign, but it is quite 

possible that the foundations of the important Danishmanid princi­

pality were being laid in the regions of Sivas, Kayseri, Amasya, and 

Tokat during the latter part of Malik-Shah's reign.

However, events in the Anatolian interior were of less immediate 



importance to the Great Saljuqs than were those taking place on the 

south-eastern fringes of Anatolia, in al-Jazireh and in Syria. South of 

the Taurus and the Anatolian plateau we are outside the Irano-Turkish 

world on which the Saljuqs' political power and culture were based, 

and only a brief outline of the extension of Saljuq influence as against 

that of the Fatimids in Syria and Arabia need be given here. The tasks 

of Saljuq arms and diplomacy in the shifting and complex politics of 

this region to the south of Anatolia were, first, to ensure that cities like 

Antioch, Aleppo, and Edessa were in friendly Sunni Muslim hands; 

and second, to bring into the Sunni-Saljuq sphere of influence the local 

Arab amirates (e.g. those of the Mirdasids, the Banu Munqidh of 

Shaizar, and the Banu 'Ammar of Tripoli) as well as the tribal groups, 

such as those of Kilab and Numair, many of which were Start and 

possibly pro-Fatimid in sentiment. Roving Turkmen bands injected a 

fresh element of unrest into the region; and in the years after Malaz-

gird an ephemeral but significant Greco-Armenian principality grew up 

along the Taurus under the leadership of Philaretos, a former general 

of Romanus Diogenes, who extended his power from Hisn Mansur, 

Abulustan, and Mar'ash, over the cities of Malatya, Samosata, Edessa, 

and Antioch.

Malik-Shah's reign saw the destruction of the Marwanids, the long-



established Kurdish dynasty in Diyarbakr, although there are no 

indications that this action came from deliberate Saljuq policy; it was 

some decades since Fatimid influence had been a danger in this area. 

After the death of Nasr al-Daula Ibn Marwan in 453/1061, the power 

and splendour of the dynasty waned perceptibly under his sons, and its 

end came when the private ambitions of the Banu Jahir finally worked 

upon Malik-Shah and Nizam al-Mulk.

3

 Accompanied by a Saljuq army 



1

 Cahen, By^antion (1948), pp. 35 ff.; I. Melikoff, Lageste de Melik Danismend, etude critique 

du Danismendname (Paris, i960), vol. 1, pp. 71 ff.; idem, "DanishmendidsEncyc. of Islam 

(2nd ed.). 

2

 J. Laurent, "Des Grecs aux Croises; Etude sur l'Histoire d'Edesse entre 1071 et 1098 ", 

By%antion, pp. 387 ff.; Honigmann, Die Ostgren^e des By^antinischen Reicbes, pp. 142-6; 

Cahen, By^antion (1948), pp. 39-41.

 3

 See p. 24 above. 

T H E  I R A N I A N  W O R L D  ( A . D .  I O O O - I 2 1 7 ) 

98 


and by the ghulam generals Qasim al-Daula Aq-Sonqur and Gauhar-

A'ln, and later helped by Artuq Beg, Fakhr al-Daula Ibn Jahir conducted 

a long and strenuous campaign in 477-8/1084 against the Marwanids in 

Amid, Mayyafariqin, and Jazirat ibn 'Umar, afterwards annexing 

Diyarbakr to the Saljuq empire and appropriating for his personal use 

the Marwanids' treasury.

The disappearance of the Marwanids was a palpable threat to another 



local power, the 'Uqailids. By 477/1084 the dominions of the very 

capable Sharaf al-Daula Muslim b. Quraish stretched from Mosul 

through Diyar Rabi'a and Diyar Mudar to Manbij and Aleppo, and he 

had reached an entente with the Armenian general Philaretos,  A t the 

beginning of his reign Malik-Shah had sent his brother Tutush to hold 

Syria as an appanage, and from his base of Damascus, Tutush and later 

Artuq Beg conquered all the territories in southern Syria and Palestine 

formerly held by Atsi'z b. Uvak. The prize of Aleppo brought Tutush 

into rivalry with its ruler, Sharaf al-Daula Muslim, and in 477/1084 

a complex pattern of warfare broke out in the region of Aleppo and 

Antioch, involving Tutush, Sharaf al-Daula Muslim, Philaretos, 

Sulaiman b. Qutlumush, and an army from Isfahan under the personal 

command of Malik-Shah and his generals Bozan and Bursuq. In the 

fighting the 'Uqailid was killed (478/1085), while Sulaiman either died 

in battle or else committed suicide (479/1086). The sultan's Syrian 

campaign was crowned with triumph as one after another Mosul, 

Harran, Aleppo, and Antioch submitted, and he was at last able to 

let his horse stand on the shores of the Mediterranean. When Tutush 

and Artuq had withdrawn to Damascus and Jerusalem respectively, 

Malik-Shah installed ghulam governors in Antioch (Yaghi-Basan), 

Aleppo (Aq-Sonqur), and Edessa (Bozan).

Saljuq influence during his reign was even carried into the Arabian 



peninsula. In 469/1076-7 Artuq marched through al-Ahsa' in eastern 

Arabia as far as Qatlf and Bahrain Island, attacking the local Qarmatian 

sectaries en route. After the sultan's second visit to Baghdad, in 484/1091, 

he conceived the idea of making it the centre of his empire (see below, 

p. 101), and it was probably in connexion with this that he deputed 

1

 Bundari, Zubdat al-nusra, pp. 75-6; Ibn al-Athir, al-Kamil, vol. x, pp. 86-8, 93-4; 

Amedroz, " The Marwanid Dynasty at Mayyafariqin in the Tenth and Eleventh Centuries 

A . D . " ,

 J.R.A.S. pp. 146 ff.; Kafesoglu, Sultan Meliksah, pp. 46-56; Cahen, " Djahir (Banu) 

Encyc. of Islam. 

2

 Ibn al-Athir, vol. x, pp. 75-72 bis, 74, 82, 89-91, 96-8, 107; Barhebraeus, pp. 230-1; 

Kafesoglu, op. cit. pp. 40-5, 86-94. 


M A L I K - S H A H ' S  R E I G N 

99 


7-2 

Gauhar-A'in and Chabaq to bring the Hijaz and the Yemen under his 

power. Through his diplomacy the khutba at Mecca was returned to 

the 'Abbasids in 468/1075-6, which meant in effect that he had out­

bid the Fatimids for the support of the venal Sharif of Mecca— 

although according to Ibn al-Jauzi, there was also a project for the 

sharif to marry one of the sultan's sisters. In the last year of Malik-

Shah's life, Gauhar-A'in sent a force of Turkmen under Tirsek and 

Chabaq, and the Yemen and Aden were temporarily occupied.

The exclusion of the 'Abbasid caliphs from secular affairs in Iraq 



was maintained during Malik-Shah's reign, and on his first visit to 

Baghdad, in 479-80/1086-7, he had received the formal grant of this 

secular authority from al-Muqtadi. Within Baghdad the sultan's 

shahna, or military commander, was Gauhar-A'in, who had been 

appointed in his father's reign.  N o t only did he have the task of 

keeping public order in the city and of mediating among the hostile 

factions of Shfis, Hanbalis, 'ayyars, and so on, but Gauhar-A'in also 

had a general responsibility for the security of Iraq; thus when in 483/ 

1090 a force of 'Amiri Bedouins from the Qarmatians of al-Ahsa' 

sacked Basra, he had to come from Baghdad and restore order.

Financial and civil affairs in the capital and in Iraq in general—including 



supervision of those iqta's allotted to the caliph, together with the 

transmission to him of their revenues—were the responsibility of a 

civilian 'amid or governor. In the latter part of Malik-Shah's reign, 

when relations between sultan and caliph became very strained, the 

c

 amid clearly had the power of making life unpleasant in many ways for 



the caliph. One 'amid, Abu'l-Fath b.  A b i Laith, even interfered with the 

caliph's own court and retinue, until in 475/1082-3 al-Muqtadi com­

plained to the sultan and Nizam al-Mulk.

For most of Malik-Shah's reign Nizam al-Mulk was left to mould 



Saljuq policy towards the caliphate, and this meant that he was thrown 

into close contact with the caliph's viziers; down to 507/1113-14, with 

only a few breaks, the vizierate for the 'Abbasids continued to be held 

by the Banu Jahir, namely Fakhr al-Daula and his sons 'Amid al-Daula 

and Za'Im al-Ru'asa'. Saljuq pressure on the caliphate increased during 

this period, as the firm hand of Gauhar-A'in in Baghdad showed.  A t 

the opening of the reign Nizam al-Mulk had reversed his previously 

conciliatory attitude, and the climax of this new harshness came in 



1

 Bundarl, pp. 70-1; Ibn al-jauzl, vol. vm, p. 298; Ibn aJ-Athir, vol. x, p. 137. 

2

 al"Kanril, vol. x, pp. 103-4, 121-3.

 3

 Ibid. p. 81. 

T H E  I R A N I A N  W O R L D  ( A . D .  I O O O - 1 2 1 7 ) 

I O O 

4 7 1 / 1 0 7 9 , when he secured Fakhr al-Daula's dismissal on the pretext 

that he was behind Hanbali attacks on the Nizamiyya madrasa. He 

even tried, without success, to impose on the caliph his own son 

Mu'ayyid al-Mulk as vizier. The family's fortunes were restored 

through the tact of 'Amid al-Daula Ibn Jahir,  w h o came personally to 

Nizam al-Mulk's camp to intercede for his father's restoration, and 

who in the following years grew so close to Nizam al-Mulk that he 

was given successively two of the vizier's daughters in marriage.

1

 Over 



the next few years the Banu Jahir oscillated between support for the 

interests of the sultan and for those of the caliph. In  4 7 4 / 1 0 8 1 - 2 Fakhr 

al-Daula and Nizam al-Mulk arranged the betrothal of one of Malik-

Shah's daughters to the caliph, but the condition was imposed on al-

Muqtadi that he should take no concubine and no other wife but this 

Saljuq princess. Hence by  4 7 6 / 1 0 8 3 - 4 al-Muqtadi had lost all patience, 

and he installed as vizier a firm supporter of his own interests,  A b u 

Shuja' al-Riidhrawari; Nizam al-Mulk was furious that his ally 'Amid 

al-Daula should be dismissed, and according to Sibt b. al-Jauzi he 

even contemplated abolition of the caliphate.

Harmony was restored for a time when Malik-Shah, victorious after 



his Syrian campaign, visited Baghdad for the first time. Nizam al-Mulk 

took the opportunity of impressing the caliph with the military might 

of the sultanate by parading before him the Saljuq amirs—they 

numbered over forty—while he detailed their iqta's and the number of 

their retainers. The sultan's euphoria at this time was such that he 

increased the caliph's own iqta's, and at the same time abolished 

throughout Iraq illegal taxes, transport dues on goods, and the transit 

payment levied on pilgrims.

3

 The marriage alliance with the caliphate 



was celebrated in 480/1087 with enormous pomp, in the presence of 

Nizam al-Mulk,  A b u Sa'd the Mustaufi, Terken Khatun, and the 

caliph's vizier  A b u Shuja'. Very soon a son was born, the short-lived 

Abu'1-Fadl Ja'far.

4

 Nizam al-Mulk's reception at Baghdad turned him 



into a warm partisan of the caliphate, but the marriage did not bring 

the expected harmony between sultan and caliph.  A s early as 481/1088 

the Turks  w h o had accompanied the Saljuq princess were expelled 

1

 Ibid. pp. 74-5; Ibn al-Jauzi, vol.

  V I I I ,

 pp. 317-19. 

2

 Bundari, pp. 72-3, 77-8; Ibn al-Jauzi, vol. ix, pp. 2-3, 5-6; Ibn al-Athlr, vol. x, 

pp. 77, 83; Bowen, "Nizam al-Mulk Encyc. of Islam (1st ed.). 

3

 Bundari, pp. 80-1; Ibn al-Jauzi, vol. ix, pp. 28, 30, 35-6; Ibn al-A^hir, vol. x, pp. 103-5, 

i n . 

4

 ai-KamJl, vol. x, pp. 106-7; Ibn al-Jauzi, vol. ix, pp. 30, 36. 


M A L I K - S H A H ' S  R E I G N 

from the caliph's harem because of their rowdiness. By the next year 

the princess was complaining to her father of al-Muqtadfs neglect of 

her, so Malik-Shah demanded the return of his daughter and his grand­

son Ja'far; she died shortly after reaching Isfahan, but her son, the so-

called "Little Commander of the Faithful", became the sultan's 

favourite.

During Malik-Shah's second visit to Baghdad relations with al-



Muqtadi were at their nadir, and the sultan ignored him. He resolved, 

however, to make Baghdad his winter capital, and in the winter of 

484-5/1091-2 extensive building operations were begun in the city, 

comprising a great mosque, markets, and caravanserais, while the im­

portant ministers such as Nizam al-Mulk and Taj al-Mulk were ordered 

to build houses there for themselves. The sultan came to Baghdad again 

at the end of 485/1092. Nizam al-Mulk had just been assassinated and 

the sultan, freed from all restraint, decided to expel the caliph from his 

ancient capital, delivering this ultimatum to him. "  Y o u must relinquish 

Baghdad to me, and depart to any land you choose." It seems that the 

sultan had the idea of setting up his grandson Ja'far as caliph, even 

though his tender age of five years made him ineligible according to 

Islamic law.  A s events turned out, al-Muqtadi was saved when Malik-

Shah died from a fever, fifty-three days after the passing of Nizam 

al-Mulk.

During the last two or three years of Malik-Shah's reign, certain 



disquieting events occurred which showed that his impressive empire 

was not unassailable. In 483/1090, for example, Basra was savagely 

sacked by Qarmatians.

3

 More serious was the emergence of several 



centres of Isma'iH activities within the empire, notably in Syria, al-

Jazireh, and Persia. Propagandists having connexions with the Nizari 

faction in Fatimid Egypt began work in such parts of Iran as Kirman, 

Tukharistan, Kuhistan, Qumis, the Caspian provinces, and Fars (see 

above, p. 90). Those regions where there were already pockets of 

Shi'ism or of older Iranian beliefs seem to have been particularly 

susceptible. The Isma'ilis were even active in the capital city of Isfahan, 

under the da'i

  c

A b d al-Malik b. 'Attash and his son Ahmad, who in 



Berk-Yaruq's reign was to seize the nearby fortress of Shahdiz. Another 

da'I, Hasan-i Sabbah, worked in Ray during Malik-Shah's time, and in 



1

 al-Munta^am

y

 vol. ix, pp. 44, 46-7; Ibn al-Athir, vol.  x , pp. 109, 116. 

2

 Bundari, p. 70; Zahir al-DIn NIshapuri, p. 35; Ravandl, p. 140; Ibn al-Jauzi, vol. ix, 



pp. 60-2; Ibn al-Athir,  v o l . x, pp. 133-5; Barhebraeus, pp. 231-2. 

8

 Ibn al-Athlr, vol. x, pp. 121-3. 



I O I 

T H E  I R A N I A N  W O R L D  ( A . D .  I O O O - I 2 1 7 ) 

I 0 2 


483/1090 he seized the fortress of Alamüt in the Alburz mountains 

near Qazvin. In the last year of his life Malik-Sháh, conscious of this 

threat to the line of communications through northern Persia, sent the 

amirs Arslan-Tash and Qizil-Sarigh against the Isma'ilis of Alamüt 

and Kühistán, respectively, but operations were broken off at his 

death.


A t Sihna, a place in Fárs on the Isfahan-Baghdad road, Nizam al-

Mulk had met death at the hands of a Dailami youth, ostensibly a 

fida'i (assassin) of the Isma'ills.

2

 Several sources state that shortly before 



this killing, the sultan had dismissed him and several of his proteges in 

the administration, putting in their places Táj al-Mulk and his friends; 

it is also possible that Nizam al-Mulk, now at an advanced age, laid 

down office of his own accord.  Y e t one of the earliest sources,  A n u -

shírván b. Khálid, says nothing of Nizam al-Mulk's departure from 

office. Contemporaries generally attributed his death to the machina­

tions of Malik-Shah and Táj al-Mulk, and the view is expressed by the 

later historian Rashid al-Dln (d. 718/1318) that the vizier's enemies at 

court concocted the murder in association with the Assassins; in view 

of Rashid al-Din's access to the Isma'IlI records at Alamüt, the story is 

worthy of consideration. The last weeks of Malik-Shah's own life were 

spent in drawing up his extravagant plans for the deposition of al-

Muqtadi. After 485/1092 the caliphs would never again have to fear so 

powerful a member of the Great Saljuq dynasty.

V I I I .  T H E  F I R S T  S I G N S  O F  D E C L I N E :  B E R K - Y A R U Q  A N D 



M U H A M M A D  B .  M A L I K - S H A H 

The twelve years that followed Malik-Sháh's death were ones of 

internal confusion and warfare, ended only by Berk-Yaruq's death in 

498/beginning of 1105. Despite this, the external frontiers of the empire 

held firm thanks to Malik-Shah and his vizier, whose policy had been 

to buttress the north-western frontiers through the concentration of 

1

 Cf. ibid. pp.  2 1 5 - 1 7 ; Juvaini, Tarzkh-i Jahán-Gusha^ vol.  n , pp. 666 if.; Kafesoglu, op. 



cit. pp. 128-35; Hodgson, The Order of Assassins, pp. 47-51, 72-8, 85-7. 

2

 Bundárí, pp. 62-3; Ravandi, p. 135; Ibn al-Jauzi, vol. ix, pp. 66-7; Husaini, Akhbar a/-



daula, pp. 66-7; Ibn al-Athir, vol. pp.  1 3 7 - 9 ; Ibn Khallikán, Wafaydt al-a'ydn, 

vol. 1, pp.  4 1 4 - 1 5 ; Subki, Tabaqát a/-Shdfi



t

iyya al-kubrd, vol. 111, pp. 142-4; Kafesoglu, 

op. cit. pp. 203-7. 

3

 Cf. Houtsma,  " T h e Death  o f the Nizam al-Mulk and its ConsequencesJournal of 



Indian History, pp. 147-60; Bowen, Encyc. of Islam (1st ed.); and  K . Rippe,

  4 4


 Uber den 

Sturz Nizám-ul-Mulks", Kdprülü Armaganí, pp. 423-35. 



B E R K - Y A R U Q  A N D  M U H A M M A D 

Turkmen in Azarbaijan and Arran, and to hold the Qarakhanids 

firmly in check on the north-eastern borders. Sanjar's governorship in 

eastern Khurasan and Tukharistan from 490/1097 onwards discouraged 

possible moves by the Ghaznavids at this time, though they might 

well have seen in this period of Saljuq confusion a heaven-sent chance 

to recover their terra irredenta. Only in the extreme west was there 

potential disquiet with the appearance in 1097 of the First Crusade: 

within three years the Franks had entrenched themselves on the Levant 

coast, had advanced as far as western Diyarbakr, and had taken such 

key cities as Jerusalem, Antioch, and Edessa.  Y e t the Islamic world 

had seen aggressive infidels on its borders before. Moreover the Saljuq 

sultans were never directly threatened by the Crusaders, and they 

regarded the troubles of Tutush and his family in Syria as his own 

affair. When the news of the First Crusaders' successes in Syria first 

reached Baghdad, Berk-Yaruq wrote letters to the various amirs 

urging them to  g o and fight the unbelievers (Rabf II 491 /March 1098), 

but this exhortation seems to have exhausted his concern.

1

 There are 



few indications that thoughts of the Frankish threat seriously worried 

at any time the contestants  w h o fought over the heartland of the 

empire, Iran and Iraq. 

When Malik-Shah died, Taj al-Mulk and Terken Khatun acted 

vigorously. Their policy in building up a party amongst Nizam al-

Mulk's enemies in the army and bureaucracy, together with the fact 

that they happened to be in Baghdad at the crucial time, enabled them 

to place the four-year-old prince Mahmud on the throne as sultan, the 

caliph being reluctantly forced to grant him the honorific Ndsir al-

Dunya waH-Dtn (" Helper in Secular and Religious Affairs  " ) . Occupation 

of Isfahan was now the next aim, for despite large accession subsidies 

the army was again restive for pay. Mahmud was placed on the throne 

in Isfahan and the royal treasuries thrown open. Meanwhile the rival 

party of the Nizamiyya, which contained the great vizier's relatives 

and partisans, led by the ghulam Er-Ghush, had managed to seize the 

armaments stored up by the vizier at Isfahan and had taken with them 

to Ray the twelve-year-old Abu'l-Muzaffar Berk-Yaruq (Turkish for 

"strong brightness").  A t Ray the ra'ts, or chief notable, crowned him 

sultan. Anushirvan b. Khalid states that only obscure, people and 

opportunists supported Berk-Yaruq and that the majority favoured 

Mahmud; but this merely reflects Khalid's partisanship for Berk-Yaruq's 

1

 Ibn al-Jau2i, aI-Munta%am



9

 vol.  i x ,  p . 105. 



Katalog: library
library -> arslikda Vatanimizning qadim zamonlardan to hozirgi davrgacha tgan lni necha mingyillik tarixi oliy quvyurtlariuchuntavsiyaetilgan" zbekiston tarixi" quv dasturi talablari doirasida yoritilgan
library -> Reja: Reja: Natural va tovar ishlab chiqarish ijtimoiy xo`jalik shakllari ekanligi
library -> Toshkent-2012 O‘zbekiston respublikasi oliy va o‘rta maxsus ta’lim vazirligi
library -> Kоrib chiqiladigan savollar
library -> Membranalar tоgrisida tushuncha. Membranalarning vazifalari. Membranalar tоgrisida tushuncha. Membranalarning vazifalari
library -> O’zbekiston Respublikasi sog’liqni saqlash vazirligi Toshkent tibbiyot akademiyasi
library -> Referat mavzulari
library -> Figure Tethered Aerostat Radar System Site Locations tethered aerostat radar system (tars)
library -> Infeksionreaktiv vaskulit yuzaga keladi

Download 77.41 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   90




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling