I n e I g h t V o L u m e s


Download 77.41 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet19/90
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi77.41 Mb.
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   90

138 

S A N J A R ' S  S U L T A N A T E 

490/1097; the throne then passed quickly to a Mahmud-Tegin and to 

Harun b. Sulaiman b. Qadir Khan Yusuf,  w h o died in 495/1102. In 

this year Transoxiana was invaded by Qadir Khan Jibra'Il b. 'Umar of 

Talas and Balasaghun,  w h o led an army which included both Muslim 

and pagan Turks. Berk-Yaruq and Muhammad were at this time 

involved in warfare, whilst Sanjar was in Baghdad, and the Qarakhanid 

Muhammad b. Sulaiman b. Da'ud fled to Sanjar's capital at Marv; but 

Qadir Khan Jibra'il pressed through Transoxiana, across the Oxus, 

and into Khurasan, aided by the defection of one of Sanjar's own amirs, 

Kun-Toghdi. In the end the invader was halted and then defeated 

and killed near Tirmidh by Sanjar,  w h o had hurried eastwards, whilst 

Kun-Toghdi fled to the court of the Ghaznavid Mas'ud III b. Ibrahim. 

Sanjar then sent troops into Transoxiana and placed Muhammad on 

the throne in Samarqand; the latter took the Turkish ruling title of 

Arslan-Khan and remained ruler there till 524/1130. Sanjar also con­

cerned himself with the religious leadership in Transoxiana, and it was 

at this point that he gave the leadership of the Hanafis there to Sadr 

'Abd al-'Aziz b. 'Umar of the Al-i Burhan. Like his father, Arslan-

Khan Muhammad was linked to the Saljuqs by a marriage alliance 

with one of Sanjar's daughters, and on two occasions in the next few 

years (496/1103 and 503/1109) Sanjar gave him military help against 

another Qarakhanid claimant, Saghun  B e g .

1

 This rival has been 



identified by Pritsak as the Hasan  b .  ' A l l  w h o m Sanjar was to place 

on the throne of Samarqand in 524/1030. The poet and literary stylist 

Rashid al-Din Vatvat gives Hasan Khan the title of Kok-Saghun, 

and it is probable that he came from the line of

  c

A l i b. Bughra  K h a n 



Harun, known as 'Ali-Tegin, who had ruled in Soghdia a century 

before and whose descendants had remained in Farghana.

This rivalry excepted, Arslan-Khan Muhammad enjoyed a reign 



which was peaceful almost to the end of this life. He became noted as 

a great builder, rebuilding the citadel and walls of Bukhara and 

constructing there a fine Friday mosque and two palaces. He under­

took regular campaigns into the surrounding steppes, presumably 

against pagan Qipchaq, bringing back slaves and gaining the title 

Ghazi.


3

 Despite these laudable activities, the tension between the 

dynasty and the religious classes was not stilled. It may well have been 

1

 Bundari, p. 262; Husaini, p. 90; Ibn al-Athir,  v o l .  x , pp. 239-41, 252; Barthold, 



Turkestan, pp. 318-19; idem, "History  o f the Semirechy6", in Four Studies on the History 

of Central Asia, vol. 1, p. 98. 

2

 Cf. Pritsak, "Karahanlilar", Islam Ansiklopedisi.



 8

 Bundari,  p . 264. 



I 3 9 

T H E  I R A N I A N  W O R L D  ( A . D .  I O O O - I 2 1 7 ) 

140 

religious elements  w h o in 507/1113-14 complained to Sanjar about the 

khan's tyranny, a trait which does not accord with the rest of our 

knowledge of him. In any case the khan was obliged to seek the inter­

cession of the Khwarazm-Shah Qutb al-Din Muhammad and of 

Sanjar's Amir Qaimaz, and to  g o personally and meet the sultan.

1

  A t 


the end of his reign Arslan-Khan Muhammad became embroiled with 

the Saljuqs. By now a sick man, he ruled in association with his son 

Nasr. But an 'Alid faqih and the ra'Is of Samarqand, leaders of a group 

representing religious interests, conspired together and killed Nasr, 

whereupon the khan appealed to Sanjar for help and appointed 

another son, Ahmad, in Nasr's place. Ahmad assumed the title of Qadir-

Khan and took draconian measures against the leaders of the plot, but 

Sanjar was now on his way with an army. Friction occurred between 

the khan's followers and the Saljuq army, and Sanjar captured Samar­

qand, plundering part of the city (524/1130). The sick Arslan-Khan 

surrendered to Sanjar, and, because he was the father of Sanjar's 

Qarakhanid wife Terken Khatun, was allowed to stay in the sultan's 

harem. He died soon afterwards, and in his place Sanjar appointed 

Hasan b.  ' A l l ; on his death in 526/1132, Sanjar chose Arslan-Khan's 

brother Ibrahim, and he was followed by a third son of Arslan-Khan, 

Mahmud, later to be ruler of Khurasan during Sanjar's captivity 

amongst the Ghuzz (see below, pp. 153-7).

2

 It was this Mahmud 



who was reigning in Transoxiana when the Qara-Khitai appeared there 

a few years later. 

The province of Khwarazm had passed into Saljuq hands on the 

defeat of Shah Malik, the son of the  O g h u z  Y a b g h u of Jand and 

Yengi-Kent (see p. 18 above). It had then come under governors 

representing the Saljuqs, and for the next few decades Khwarazm 

made little impact upon eastern Islamic history. Alp-Arslan came thither 

in 457/1065 to suppress a revolt, visiting Jand and pushing westwards 

across the list Urt plateau towards the Manqishlaq peninsula (see 

p. 65 above).

3

 He then appointed Arslan-Arghun as governor, and 



this man remained in office during the early part of Malik-Shah's 

1

 Ibn al-Athir, vol.  x , pp. 348-9. 



2

 Bundari, loc. cit.; 2ahir al-Din NIshapuri, p. 44; Ravandi, p. 169; Husaini, p. 92; 

Ibn al-Athir,  v o l .  x , pp. 465-6; JuvainI, Tarikk-i jahan-Gusha, vol. 1, pp. 278-9; Barthold, 

Turkestan, pp. 320-2; Koymen, Buyuk Selfuklu Imparatorlu^u tarihi, pp. 158-63. 

3

 The Soviet authority on this region, S. P. Tolstov, has surmised from the name  o f 



one of these rebels in Khwarazm. given by Mirkhwand as Faghfur. that this man might 

possibly have been a survivor from the old Afrighid line  o f Khwarazm-Shahs. See Auf 



den Spuren der altchoresmiscben Ku/tur, p. 292. 

S A N J A R ' S  S U L T A N A T E 

reign: an exception to the general rule of the time, for Khwarazm was 

usually granted to ghulam commanders rather than to members of 

the Saljuq dynasty itself, who, by the province's isolation, might rebel. 

It seems that the revenues of Khwarazm were used in Malik-Shah's 

reign to defray the expenses of a particular office in the royal household, 

that of the keeper of the wash-bowls (tasht-dar), for the ghulam Anush-

Tegin Gharcha'i held this office and also bore the title " shahna of 

K h w a r a z m " .

The presence of Turkish governors in Khwarazm after the over­



throw of the Ma'munid Shahs in 408/1017—at first they had ruled on 

behalf of the Ghaznavids, and then on behalf of the Saljuqs—must 

have favoured the process whereby Khwarazm was gradually trans­

formed from an ethnically and culturally Iranian land into a Turkish 

one. For many centuries the distinctive local language of Khwarazm 

had been an Iranian tongue with affinities to Soghdian and, to a lesser 

extent, to Ossetian. It was still in full use during the Saljuqs' hegemony, 

not merely for speech but also for writing, with special diacritical 

marks added to the Arabic alphabet to express the sounds peculiar to 

Khwarazmian; these are found in some manuscripts of the Khwar-

azmian al-Biruni's works. Khwarazmian speech probably lasted in upper 

Khwarazm till the end of the 8 th/14th century, but in lower Khwarazm 

and Gurganj, the region nearest to the Aral Sea, the process of Tur-

kicization was complete in the 7th/i3th century, according to informa­

tion deducible from the travel narrative of the Franciscan John of Piano 

Carpini. Today the Khwarazmian language has to be reconstructed 

from such materials as odd words and phrases in al-Biruni's works, 

from the glosses on an Islamic legal text, and from a single literary 

work, a Khwarazmian version of an introduction to Arabic grammar 

and language by the famous exegete and grammarian, al-Zamakh-

shari (d. 5 38/1141). 

Geographically Khwarazm was a peninsula of advanced cultural and 

economic life jutting out into the Turkish steppes, and thus its Iranian 

character was made vulnerable to external ethnic and political as well 

as linguistic pressure. In the second half of the  j t h / n t h century these 

steppes were controlled by Turks of the Qipchaq, Qanghli, Qun, and 

Pecheneg groups, not all of whom had yet become Muslim; the middle 

stretches of the Syr Darya were still Dar al-kufr ("lands of unbelief") in 

the 6th/12th century. The Saljuq governors recruited auxiliary troops 

1

 Juvaini, trans. Boyle, pp. 277-8; Turkestan, pp. 323-4. 



141 

T H E  I R A N I A N  W O R L D  ( A . D .  I O O O - I 2 1 7 ) 

142 


from these nomads, and in the latter half of the 6 th/12th century the  K h w a -

razm-Shah Atsi'z and his successors relied heavily on the Qipchaq, 

Qanghli, Yimek, and associated tribes for their armies. Hence they 

were brought within the boundaries of sedentary Khwarazm, and 

by settlement and intermarriage the older Iranian population was 

eventually diluted; already in the  5 t h / n t h century the physical 

approximation of the Khwarazmian people to the Turkish type was 

noted.


This linguistic and ethnic change was not, however, accompanied 

by any material or cultural impoverishment. Under the dynasty of 

Atsi'z, Khwarazm became for the first and last time in its history the 

centre of a great military empire which embraced large parts of Central 

Asia and Iran. The Khwarazmians were always great travellers, and 

their merchants continued to journey across the Eurasian steppes as 

far as southern Russia and even the Danube basin, where certain place-

names attest their presence. Intellectually, Khwarazm was never so 

brilliant as in the 6th/i2th and 7th/13th centuries, when it produced 

great theologians and literary men, and in particular remained a centre 

of Arabic learning. The much-travelled geographer Yaqut (d. 626/ 

1229), writing on the eve of the Mongol invasion, said that he had 

never seen such urban and agricultural prosperity as in Khwarazm; 

and the walled cities and fortified villages, canals and irrigation works 

disclosed by Soviet archaeologists confirm the view that the area of 

cultivated land expanded in the course of the 6th/12th century.

In the latter part of Malik-Shah's reign the governor of Khwarazm 



was, at least titularly, the ghulam Anush-Tegin Gharcha'i. (The nisba 

probably refers to the region of Gharchistan in northern Afghanistan, 

where Anush-Tegin had been originally bought by a Saljuq amir; 

Kafesoglu has conjectured that he was of Khalaj Turkish origin.)

Ekinchi b. Qochqar, a ghulam of Qun origin, was appointed as Khwar-



azm-Shah, probably on the occasion of Berk-Yaruq's expedition to 

Khurasan in 490/1097 against Arslan-Arghun.  A s Minorsky has 

1

 Cf.  A .  Z .  V . Togan and  W . Henning, " Uber die Sprache und Kultur der alten Chware-



zmier", Z.D.M.G. vol.  x c ; Togan, The Khore^mians and their Civilisation, pp. 20 ff.; 

Henning,  " T h e Khwarezmian  L a n g u a g e Z e k i Velidi Togan'a Armagani(Istanbul, 1955), 

pp 420-36; idem, in Handbuch der Orientalistik, vol. IV, Iranistik, no. 1, Linguistik (Leiden, 

Cologne, 1958), pp. 56-8, 81-4, 109-20. 

2

 Togan, he. cit.\ Barthold, Histoire des Tures d'Asie Centrale, pp. 109-15; Tolstov, 



Auf den Spuren, pp. 295-310. 

3

 See his long discussion  o f Anush-Tegin's origin in his Hare^msahlar devleti taribt, 



pp. 38-43. 

S A N J A R ' S  S U L T A N A T E 

H 3 

pointed out, Ekinchi must have had considerable renown, as well as a 

great knowledge of events in the region of Khwarazm and the steppes, 

to be nominated to this important post.

1

  A t the end of the same year, 



however, Ekinchi was killed by rebellious Saljuq amirs, so that Berk-

Yaruq's representative in Khurasan, the Amir-i Dad Habashi, appointed 

in his stead Anush-Tegin's son Qutb al-Din Muhammad.  A s Khwarazm 

Shah from 490/1097 till his death in 521/1127 or 522/1128, Qutb al-Din 

had the reputation of being a just ruler  w h o was always obedient to his 

master Sanjar.

2

  A t various points during the Saljuq succession-disputes 



in western Iran, he fought for Sultan Muhammad b. Malik-Shah and 

for Sanjar, and in 507/1113-14 he mediated between Arslan-Khan 

Muhammad of Samarqand and Sanjar (see above, p. 140). 

'Ala' al-Din Atsiz succeeded his father and reigned as nominal vassal 

of the Saljuqs till his death in 551/1156. He came to the governorship 

of Khwarazm with a reputation, like that of Qutb al-Din Muhammad, 

for loyalty and submissiveness towards Sanjar. Despite this, the course 

of events was to show that Atsiz had his own ambitions to make 

Khwarazm as autonomous as possible, and although he had many 

reverses he pursued this goal with determination, feeling his way 

between the two neighbouring powers of the Saljuqs and the Qara-

Khitai, and laying the foundation for the fully independent policy of 

his successors. Juvaini and  ' A u f i also praise Atsiz for his culture and 

learning, ascribing to him the composition of verses in Persian. 

In his early years as Khwarazm-Shah, Atsiz aimed primarily at 

securing the long and vulnerable frontiers of his principality against 

the nomads; since many of these were still pagans, his efforts earned 

him amongst the orthodox the tide of Ghazi.  O f particular strategic 

importance here were the steppes between the Aral and Caspian seas, 

together with the adjacent Manqishlaq peninsula where many 

nomads had summer pastures, and the lower Syr Darya region from 

Utrar down to Jand. Both these areas had long been spring-boards 

for attacks on Khwarazm, and it was to Manqishlaq and Jand that 

the followers of Ekinchi b. Qochqar's son Toghril-Tegin had fled in 

490/1097 after the latter's bid to regain Khwarazm had been frustrated 

by Qutb al-Din Muhammad.

3

 Atsiz attended Sanjar regularly, being 



1

 Minorsky, Sharqf al-Zamdn Tdhir Marva^t on China, the Turks and India (London, 1942), 

pp. 101-2. 

2

 Ibn al-Athir,  v o l .  x , pp.  1 8 1 - 3 ; Juvaini,  v o l . 1, pp. 277-8, quoting Ibn Funduq's 



Mashdrib al-tajdrib (probably also the source for Ibn al-Athir). 

8

 Ibn al-Athir,  v o l .  x ,  p . 183. 



T H E  I R A N I A N  W O R L D  ( A . D .  I O O O - I 2 1 7 ) 

144 


with him, for example, in the Transoxianan campaign of 524/1030, 

but he did not neglect the frontiers of Khwarazm. According to Ibn 

al-Athir, he had already secured Maqishlaq during his father's life­

time, and in 527/1133 he led a campaign from Jand into the Qipchaq 

steppes; Yaqut quotes a line of verse in praise of the Manqishlaq 

victory. After 536/1141 he secured the lower Syr Darya against the 

Qara-Khitai by paying them an annual tribute in cash and kind.

It was not long before Atsi'z's relation with his suzerain Sanjar 



became strained. The sultan allegedly began to grow cold towards 

the Khwarazm-Shah during the campaign of 529/1135 against the 

Ghaznavid Bahram-Shah (p. 159 below), and in a proclamation of 

victory issued after his triumph at Hazarasp, Sanjar accused Atsi'z of 

killing Muslim ghazis and murabitun (frontier fighters) at Manqishlaq 

and Jand. In 533/1138 Atsiz rebelled openly, flooding much of the 

land along the Oxus to impede the advance of Sanjar's army.  Y e t this 

did not prevent the sultan from defeating the Khwarazmian army, 

which included some pagan Turks, at the fortress of Hazarasp; he then 

executed Atsi'z's son Atligh. He occupied Khwarazm and granted it to 

his nephew Sulaiman-Shah b. Muhammad, providing him with a 

vizier, an atabeg, and other administrative officials, but the advent of 

direct Saljuq rule proved irksome to the Khwarazmians.  A s soon as 

Sanjar had left for Marv, Atsi'z returned from his refuge in Gurgan, 

and the people rose and expelled Sulaiman-Shah. Then in 534/1139-40 

the Khwarazm-Shah took the offensive, capturing Bukhara from its 

Saljuq governor and destroying the citadel there. The extent to which 

Atsiz clearly commanded the sympathies of the Khwarazmians is an 

indication of the province's continued individuality and its need for a 

local ruler  w h o could look after its special political and commercial 

interests. For all this, Sanjar's power and prestige were still formidable, 

and in 535/1141 Atsi'z found it expedient to submit to him.

Four months later, Sanjar's unexpected and crushing defeat by the 



Qara-Khitai in the Qatvan steppe was obviously opportune for Atsi'z, 

so much so that several sources accuse him of having incited the 



1

 Ibid.; Yaqut, " ManqashlaghMu'Jam al-bulddn, vol. v, p. 215; Juvaini, vol. 1, pp. 

278-9, 356; Barthold, Turkestan down to the Mongol Invasion, p. 324; idem,  " A History  o f the 

Turkman People", in Four Studies, vol.  i n , pp. 126-7; and Kafesoglu, Hare^msahlar 

devleti tarihi, p. 45. 

2

 Continuator  o f Narshakhi, Td'rikh-i Bukhara, p. 30 (R.  N . Frye tr., pp. 24-5); Ibn 



al-Athir, vol.  x i , pp. 44-5; Juvaini, vol. 1, pp. 279-82; Barthold, Turkestan down to the 

Mongol Invasion, pp. 324-6; Koymen, Buyuk Selfuklu Imparatorlugu tarihi, vol. 11, pp. 312-23; 

Kafesoglu, op. cit. pp. 46-9. 



S A N J A R ' S  S U L T A N A T E 

Qara-Khitai to rise against the sultan as an act of revenge for the 

killing of his son  A t l i g h ;

1

 but according to Juvaini, the invaders also 



passed from Transoxiana into Khwarazm, devastating the province 

and compelling Atsiz to pay tribute. When San jar fell back before the 

Qara-Khitai to Tirmidh and Balkh, Atsiz made two incursions into 

Khurasan in the course of 536/1141-2. In the first expedition he took 

Sarakhs and Marv, either killing or carrying off several of the local 

ulema, and appropriating the state treasury at Marv; he then returned 

the next spring to occupy Nishapur (where the khutba was made for 

him over the next three months), Baihaq, and other parts of Khurasan. 

Through his court poet Rashid al-Din Vatvat, the Khwarazm-Shah 

boasted that the power of the Saljuqs was at an end and his own dynasty 

was in the ascendant, but early in 537/1142 Saljuq rule was re-estab­

lished in Khurasan. In retaliation, the sultan in 538/1143-4 invaded 

Khwarazm, besieged Gurganj, and compelled Atsiz to submit and to 

return the treasuries taken from Marv; but once more the country 

proved too hostile for the Saljuqs to remain there.

T o Sanjar's troubles with the Qara-Khitai were now added the first 



rumbles of discontent from the Ghuzz in Khurasan. Atsiz again showed 

himself rebellious, plotting the sultan's assassination by means of hired 

Isma'ilis and executing an envoy sent from the court at Marv. In 542/ 

1147 San jar marched into Khwarazm for the third time, capturing 

Hazarasp and Gurganj, but in 543/1148 he allowed the Khwarazm-

Shah to make a grudging submission. Atsiz's adventures in Khurasan 

and his attempts to throw off Saljuq suzerainty accordingly came to 

nought, so he turned once more to his original sphere of activity, the 

steppes surrounding Khwarazm. One of the consequences of his pre­

occupation with events in Khurasan and the south had been the loss 

of Jand, which had passed to one Kamal al-Din b. Arslan-Khan Mah-

mud, apparently a Qarakhanid and son of the khan who ruled in 

Samarqand from 526/1132 to 536/1141.  A n expedition left Khwarazm 

in the summer of 547/1152 and occupied Jand without striking a 

blow. Although Juvaini states that Kamal al-Din had been a friend 

of Atsiz and of Vatvat, he was seized and jailed for the rest of his life. 

Jand was now placed under the governorship of Atsiz's son and 

1

 E.g. Ibn al-Athir, vol.  x i , p. 53. 



2

 Ibn Funduq, Tcfrikh-i Baihaq, p. 272; Bundari, pp 280-1; Zahir al-Din Nishapur 1, 

p. 46; Ravandi, p. 174; Husaini, pp. 95-6; Ibn al-Athir, vol.  x i , pp. 53, 58-9, 63; Juvaini, 

vol. 1, 280-4; Barthold, op. cit. p. 327; Koymen, Biiyiik Selfuklu Imparatorlugu tarihi, 

pp. 336-45; Kafesoglu, Hare^sahlar devleti tarihi, pp. 54-7. 

10

 145



  B C H 

T H E  I R A N I A N  W O R L D  ( A . D .  I O O O - I 2 1 7 ) 

146 


successor Il-Arslan—an illustration of the importance attached to the 

town.


During Sanjar's captivity amongst the Ghuzz, Atsiz remained essen­

tially loyal to the Saljuq connexion. He did try to get Sanjar to grant 

him Amul-i Shatt, the strategically important crossing on the river 

Oxus, but its castellan refused to yield up his charge.  A t one point 

the Khwarazm-Shah's brother Inal-Tegin marched into Khurasan, 

where he devastated the Baihaq oasis in 548-9/1154; Ibn Funduq 

says that the resultant destruction and depopulation were still visible 

fourteen years later.

2

 The Qarakhanid Mahmud Khan,  w h o had been 



chosen as ruler of Khurasan by that part of Sanjar's army which had 

not joined the Ghuzz, now began negotiating with Atsiz for the dis­

patch of a Khwarazmian army into Khurasan to quell the Ghuzz. 

Atsiz and his son Il-Arslan set out for Khurasan, leaving a further son 

Khitai-Khan as regent of Khwarazm (551/1156), and whilst at Shahr-

istan they received news of Sanjar's escape from the Ghuzz. Mahmud 

Khan and the other Saljuq amirs now regretted having invited the 

ambitious Atsiz into Khurasan, but in fact the latter behaved with 

restraint and did nothing provocative. He met Mahmud Khan and 

summoned for aid the Saffarid Abu'1-Fadl, the Bavandid Ispahbadh 

Shah Ghazi Rustam, and the Ghurid  ' A l a ' al-Din Husain; he sent 

Sanjar a florid letter of congratulation; and he warned Tuti Beg, most 

prominent of the Ghuzz leaders, of the consequences of further 

rebelliousness. Whatever Atsiz's real intentions, all was now ended, for 

he died at this point, nine months before Sanjar's own death. Thus he 

died as a vassal of the Saljuqs, yet the conquests he had made in the 

steppes and the assembling of a powerful mercenary army enabled his 

successors to make Khwarazm the nucleus of a powerful empire in the 

decades before the Mongol invasion: an empire whose part in attracting 

the Mongols westwards was to have incalculable consequences for the 

greater part of the Islamic world.

Until the eighth century  A . D . , there had been a certain amount of 



direct contact between the Iranian and the Chinese world. The T'ang 

dynasty (618-906) never believed that Transoxiana and the formerly 

Buddhist lands on the upper Oxus were totally lost to the Chinese 

1

 Juvaini, vol. 1, pp. 284-5; Barthold, op. cit. pp. 327-9; Koymen, op. cit. pp. 345-53; 



Kafesoglu, op. cit. pp. 58-61. 

2

 Juvaini, vol. 1, pp. 285-6; Ibn Funduq, p. 271. 



3

 Ibn al-Athir, vol.  x i , p. 138; Juvaini, vol. 1, pp. 286-7; Barthold, op. cit. pp. 330-1; 

Koymen, op. cit. pp. 45 2-63; Kafesoglu, op. cit. pp. 65-72. 

1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   90




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling