I n e I g h t V o L u m e s


 The Qarakhanids and the Qarluq, from whom the dynasty very probably sprang


Download 77.41 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet2/90
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi77.41 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   90

1

 The Qarakhanids and the Qarluq, from whom the dynasty very probably sprang, 

have been studied by O. Pritsak. Amongst his many articles on them, see especially "Kara-

hanlilar" in Islam Ansiklopedisi; and on the origins of the dynasty, "Von den Karluk zu 

den Karachaniden Zeitscbrift der Deutschen Morgenldndischen Gesellschaft, pp. 270-300. 

2

 Cf. Barthold, Turkestan, pp. 254-61. 

3

 On the Ghaznavid dynasty, see B. Spuler, " Ghaznavids", Encyc. of Islam (2nd ed.); 

M. Nazim, The Life and Times of Sultan Mahmud of Ghazna; and Bosworth, The Ghaznavids. 

4

 On Sebuk-Tegin's early life and his rule as governor in Ghazna, see Nazim, op. cit. 

pp. 28-33, and Bosworth, The Ghaznavids, pp. 35-44. 

T H E  E A S T E R N  I R A N I A N  W O R L D 

provinces south of the Oxus. These territories were definitely annexed 



in 388/998 by Abu'l-Qasim Mahmud b. Sebuk-Tegin. Meanwhile it 

had proved impossible to dislodge the Qarakhanids from the Syr 

Darya basin, and in 389/999 the Samanid dynasty was definitely over­

thrown in Transoxiana by the Ilig Nasr b.  ' A l i (d. 403/1012-13), 

nephew of Bughra  K h a n Harun. The heroism of the last of the 

Samanids, Isma'il al-Muntasir, could achieve nothing in the face of the 

division of the Samanid empire between the Ilig and Mahmud. In 

391/1001 these two came to a formal agreement whereby the Oxus was 

to be the boundary between the two kingdoms, and in 395/1005 

Isma'il was killed through the treachery of an Arab nomad chief in 

the Qara  Q u m desert.

In the adjacent province of Khwarazm, the classical Chorasmia, the 



days of rule by native Iranian monarchs were also numbered. For 

several thousand years the region of the lower Oxus had held a complex 

of rich agricultural oases linked by irrigation canals, the full extent of 

which has only recently come to light through the researches of 

Soviet archaeologists. (The Iranian scholar al-Biruni says that the 

Khwarazmian era began when the region was first settled and cultivated, 

this date being placed in the early 13th-century  B . C . ) That the ancient 

dynasty of Afrighid Khwarazm-Shahs survived for nearly three cen­

turies after the coming of Islam to their land is unique in the Islamic 

world: al-Biruni lists twenty-two rulers of this line running from 



A . D . 305 to 385/995.

2

 However, the vandalism of Qutaibab. Muslim's 



invading Arabs in 93/712 had an enfeebling effect on the culture of 

ancient Khwarazm, and this seems to have been aggravated by 

economic decline, whose symptoms, according to S. P. Tolstov, in­

cluded the neglect of irrigation works and the decline of urban life. 

The system of large fortified estates, which is characteristic of Khwarazm­

ian agrarian society at this time, was a response to increasing external 

pressure from Turkish steppe peoples, who were attracted not only by 

prospects of plunder but also by the winter pasture available along the 

shores of the Oxus. The Turkicizing of the population of Khwarazm 

probably began during this period.

3

 In the 4th/ioth century there were 



1

 Barthold, Turkestan, pp. 261-721; and idem,  " A Short History of Turkestan", in Four 

Studies on the History of Central Asia, vol. i, pp. 21-4. 

2

 al-Biruni, al-Athdr al-baqiya 'an al-quriin al-khaliya (tr. E. Sachau, The Chronology of 

Ancient Nations), pp. 40-2. 

3

 Sachau, "Zur Geschichte und Chronologie von Khwarizm", S\it%ungs-] B[erichte der] 

W[iener] A[kad. der] W[iss.], Phil.-Hist.  C , vol.

  L X X X I I I ,

 1873; vol.

  L X X I V ,

 1873, pp. 471ft". 

T H E  I R A N I A N  W O R L D  ( A . D . IOOO--1217) 

villages with Turkish names on the right bank of the Oxus. The 

Ghaznavid historian Abu'1-Fadl Baihaqi speaks of Qi'pchaq, Küjet, 

and Chaghraq Turks harrying the fringes of Khwárazm in 422/103o,

1  

and a few years after this the Saljuqs and their followers spent some 



time on Khwárazmian pastures before moving southwards into 

Khurasan. The higher culture of Iranian Khwárazm offered resistance 

to the process of Turkicization, but the trend nevertheless continued 

over the next centuries (see pp. 141-2 below). 

In spite of this, the downfall of the native Afrighid dynasty of 

Khwárazm-Sháhs in 385/995 came about through internal disturbances. 

Gurganj, a town on the left bank of the Oxus, had grown in importance 

as the terminus of caravan trade across the Oghuz steppes to the Volga 

and southern Russia, thereby eclipsing the ancient capital on the right 

bank of Káth. A local Gurganj family, the Ma'münids, succeeded in 

deposing the last Afrighid,  A b ü 'Abdallah Muhammad, and assumed 

the traditional title of Khwárazm-Sháh. But their tenure of power was 

brief. The Sámánids had been nominal suzerains of Khwárazm, though 

in practice they had rarely interfered there; now the shadow of their 

supplanter, Mahmüd of Ghazna, grew menacing for the Ma'münids. 

In 406/1015-16 Abu'l-'Abbás Ma'mün b. Ma'mün married one of 

the Ghaznavid sultan's sisters, Hurra-yi Kalji; nevertheless, Ghaznavid 

pressure was relentless. The 'Abbásid caliph in Baghdad sent directly to 

the Khwárazm-Sháh a patent of investiture for Khwárazm, a standard, 

and the honorific titles 'Ain al-Daula wa Zain al-Milla ("Eye of the State 

and Ornament of the Religious Community  " ) ; but the shah did not dare 

to receive these publicly in his capital Gurganj for fear of provoking 

Mahmüd's wrath. In the sultan's imperial strategy, possession of  K h w á ­

razm was necessary to turn the flank of the Qarakhánids, amongst whom 

the ruler of Samarqand and Bukhara—'AH b. Hasan Bughra Khan, 

known as


  C

AH-Tegin (d. 425/1034)—was showing himself an implacable 

enemy of the Ghaznavids. After an ultimatum to the Khwárazmians, 

which contained humiliating demands and required the renunciation of 

national sovereignty, Mahmüd's troops invaded and annexed Khwárazm 

in 408/1017. The sultan then installed as Khwárazm-Sháh Altun-Tash, 

one of his most trusted slave generals and a former ghuldm or military 

retainer of his father Sebük-Tegin; for the next seventeen years  K h w á -



506; A. Z. V. Togan, "The Khorezmians and their Civilisation", Preface to Zamakhshari's 

Muqaddimat al-Adab, pp. 9-43; S. P. Tolstov, Auj den Spuren der Altchoresmischen Kuliur, 

pp. 9 f. 

1

 Baihaqi, Ta'rikh-i Mas'üdi, p. 86; cf. Bosworth, The Ghaznavids, p. 109. 



T H E  E A S T E R N  I R A N I A N  W O R L D 

razm remained a salient of Ghaznavid power that reached into the 



steppes.

Some Western orientalists have viewed the downfall of these north­



eastern Iranian dynasties through a certain romantic haze. They have 

idealized the Samanids, at whose court the renaissance of  N e w Persian 

culture and literature began—a court adorned by such figures as 

Bal'ami, Rudaki, and Daqiqi; or, mourning the passing of the  K h w a -

razm-Shahs, whose kingdom nurtured the polymath al-Biruni, they have 

called it the end of an epoch, after whicli Iran lost political control of 

its destiny for many centuries.

2

  O n the other hand, as  V . Minorsky 



has justly pointed out, there have been few laments for the passing of 

those Iranian dynasties farther west, that also went down in the course 

of the 5th/nth century under Turkish pressure; yet the Buyids' court 

at Ray and Shiraz, the Kakuyids' at Isfahan, and the Ziyarids' court 

at Gurgan and Tabaristan gave shelter to such diverse geniuses as 

al-Mutanabbi, Avicenna, and al-Biruni.  T o some extent these Western 

attitudes reflect those of the contemporary Sunni Muslim sources 

which are distinctly favourable to dynasties like the Tahirids and 

Samanids, sprung from the landed classes, while they are hostile to 

those of plebeian origin, e.g. the Saffarids or to those tinged with Shfism 

or unorthodoxy, such as the Buyids and Kakuyids.

The collapse of the native Iranian dynasties of the north-east was 



followed within a few decades by a major migration of Turkish peoples, 

the  O g h u z , from the outer steppes. Similar population movements 

have been recurrent features of the history of this region from early 

times, for the Oxus and Syr Darya basins are a transitional zone between 

Central Asia and the lands of ancient civilization in the Near East. 

The mountain chains of the Alburz [Elburz], Pamirs, and Hindu Kush 

are high and, being geologically young, are sharp and jagged, yet they 

have never seriously hindered the passage of armies and other peoples; 

nor have invaders from the steppes ever found that the transition to the 

Iranian plateau necessitated much change in their way of life. In order 

for a pastoralist economy to survive, each summer the flocks and 

1

 Sachau, S.B.W.A.W. vol.

  L X X I V

 (1873), pp. 290-301; Barthold, Turkestan, pp. 233-4, 

275-9; idem, "Short History of Turkestan", pp. 18-19; Tolstov, Auf denSpuren, pp. 253-63, 

286-91. 

2

 See, for example, T. Noldeke, Das Iranische Nationalepos, pp. 40-1; and G. E. von 

Grunebaum, "Firdausi's Concept of History", in Islam, Essays in the Nature and Growth 

of a Cultural Tradition (London, 1955), pp. 168-84. 

3

 See V. Minorsky, Review of Spuler's Iran in friihislamischer Zeit in Gottingische Gelehrte 

Antigen, vol. ccvn (1953), pp. 192-7. 


T H E  I R A N I A N  W O R L D  ( A . D .  I O O O - 1 2 1 7 ) 

I O 

herds should be driven out of their winter grounds to pastures, or 



jailaqs, in the hills. Thus the terrain of Iran was quite well suited to 

the traditional way of life of Central Asian invaders. For instance, the 

oases of Khurasan could provide rich pasture for herds, and certain 

chamans (pasture grounds), e.g. the Ulang-i Radkan between Mashhad 

[Meshed] and Khabushan, and the Marg-i Sa'igh near Nasa, have played 

significant parts in Iranian history as the camping and grazing grounds 

of armies.  A s the Turkmen moved westwards, they found the valleys of 

Azarbaijan and Armenia and the plains of Anatolia highly suitable for 

their flocks. In this way the Saljuq and Mongol invasions inevitably had 

an effect on landholding and land utilization in the Iranian world. 

Y e t these considerations do not explain why the Turkmen succeeded 

in bringing about permanent changes in the ethnography and economy 

of the Iranian world, whereas most of the earlier invaders had eventually 

been absorbed into the existing way of life. It was certainly not through 

sheer weight of human numbers, for there were not many Turkmen 

bands in Khurasan during the reign of Mas'ud b. Mahmud of Ghazna 

(421-32/1030-41), although the damaging effects of their sheep and 

goats as they nibbled across the country's agricultural oases were 

indeed serious.

1

 It seems that in the first half of the 5 th/  n t h century, the 



Iranian bastion of the north-east, whose age-old function had been to 

hold closed this corridor for peoples, lost its resilience and no longer 

possessed the absorptive power it had once had. In the previous 

century the Afrighid Khwarazm-Shahs had every autumn led an ex­

pedition into the steppes against the Turkmen; and the Samanid amirs 

launched punitive expeditions and slave raids across the Syr Darya, 

such as the famous campaign of Isma'Il b. Ahmad (279-95/892-907) 

against the Qarluq at Talas in 280/893.

2

 It is true that the groundwork 



for this collapse had been in some measure prepared, with Turks taking 

part in the internal wars of Transoxiana and also settling peacefully 

within its borders. Furthermore, from the early 3rd/9th century onwards 

Muslim rulers in all parts of the eastern caliphate had been growing 

more dependent on Turkish slave troops, which increased the flow of 

Turks through Transoxiana and Khurasan. This traffic in human beings 

became an important source of revenue for the Samanids,  w h o issued 

licences and collected transit dues; at the same time the amirs became 



1

 Cf. Bosworth, The Gha^navids, pp. 128, 224, 226, 241, 259-61. 

2

 Barthold, Turkestan, p. 224; idem, " Short History of Turkestan "„ pp. 19-20; Tolstov, 

Auf den Spuren, pp. 262-3; Bosworth, op. cit. pp. 31-3. 

T H E  E A S T E R N  I R A N I A N  W O R L D 

dependent on Turkish ghuläms for their own bodyguard, seeking to use 

them as a counterbalance to the indigenous military class of the dihqäns.

1  


T o sum up: the disappearance of the native Khwärazm- Shähs and 

Sämänids meant the end of two firmly constituted states in the eastern 

Iranian world, and the result was a power vacuum. The authority of the 

Qarakhänids in Transoxiana and that of the Ghaznavids in Khurasan 

and Khwärazm had no organic roots; in the first region it was diffused 

and less effective than Sämänid rule had been, and in the other two 

regions it was despotic, capricious, and operating from a very distant 

capital, Ghazna, These points will be examined at greater length in the 

next section. 

I I .  K H U R A S A N :  T H E  D E C L I N E  O F  G H A Z N A V I D  P O W E R 

A N D  T H E  E S T A B L I S H M E N T  O F  T H E  S A L J U Q S 

All through their period of domination the Qarakhänids in Transoxiana 

remained a tribal confederation and never formed a unitary state. Their 

territories straddled the T'ien Shan, where their yailaqs lay, and on 

the facts of geography alone it is hard to see how such an empire could 

have been governed by one power. Originally the dynasty did have 

a certain unity, although there was from the start the old Turkish 

double system of a Great Khan and a Co-Khan. But as early as the first 

decades of the 5th/nth century the sources mention internecine strife 

in the family; and two distinct branches—which may be called after 

their characteristic Islamic names, the 'Alids and Hasanids—begin to 

emerge. After 433/1041-2 there were lines of eastern and western 

Qarakhänids, established at first in Baläsäghün and Uzkand respec­

tively, and then in Käshghar and Samarqand. Within the family there 

existed the complicated system of a double khanate and subordinate 

under-khans, so that several princes might hold power simultaneously 

in various regions; and the family's titulature and onomasticon, 

combining both Turkish tribal and totemistic titles with Islamic names 

and honorifics, was confused and constantly changing. The task of 

sorting out the genealogy of the dynasty has thus been very difficult; 

only the researches of the numismatist R. Vasmer and the Turcologist 

O . Pritsak have thrown light on it.



1

 Bosworth, pp. 208-9. 

2

 Cf. Pritsak, "Karahanlilar", islam Ansik lopedin\ idem "Karachanidische Streitfrage", 

Orlens, pp. 209-28; and "Titulaturen und Stammesnamen der altäischen Volker", Ural-

Alt äische Jahrbücher, vol. xxiv (1952), pp. 49-104. 

I I 


T H E  I R A N I A N  W O R L D  ( A . D .  I O O O - I 2 1 7 ) 

12 


In the early part of the 5th/nth century the administration of 

Transoxiana reverted to a pattern resembling that which had prevailed 

on the eve of the Muslim conquests: small city-states were scattered 

along the Zarafshán, and the middle Syr Darya was under the general 

supervision of Qarakhánid princes. With this trend towards region­

alism, the landed aristocracy enjoyed a resurgence of power. The 

dihqán of Ilaq, on the north bank of the Syr Darya, began for the first 

time to mint his own coins.

1

 The general weight and expense of ad­



ministration decreased. A continuator of Narshakhi, the historian of 

Bukhara, records that the land tax of Bukhara and its environs was 

everywhere lightened after the fall of the Sámánids, in part because 

irrigation works were neglected and land became water-logged and 

unproductive.

2

 Hence after the disappearance of the Sámánid amirs, 



with their centralizing administrative policy and their standing army, 

Transoxiana was ill-prepared to meet fresh waves of invaders from the 

steppes. 

We have seen that Khurasan passed into the Ghaznavids' hands. 

Towards the end of his life the restless dynamism of Sultán Mahmüd 

made him press westwards across Iran against his rivals the Dailami 

Büyids, various branches of whom ruled in western and central Iran 

and in Iraq (see below, section 111, pp. 25 ff.). The ShTism of the 

Büyids and their tutelage of the 'Abbásid caliphs in Baghdad gave the 

early Ghaznavids plausible pretexts for intervention in the west. They 

had grandiloquent plans for liberating the caliphs, opening up the 

pilgrimage route to Mecca and Medina, and then pushing on to attack 

the Shfi Fatimids in Syria and  E g y p t ; but the Turkmen's pressure in 

the east ensured that these designs remained only dreams.

3

 It was not 



until 420/1029, the last year of his life, that Mahmüd came to Ray in 

northern Iran and deposed its Büyid ruler Majd al-Daula Rustam b. 

'All (387-420/997-1029).  A t the same time that the province of Ray 

and Jibal was being annexed, another Dailami ruler, the Káküyid 

'Alá' al-Daula Muhammad b. Dushmanziyár of Isfahan (398-433/1008 

to 1041-2), was made a tributary, and various petty Kurdish and 

Dailami rulers of north-western Persia, such as the Musáfirids of 

Tárum, were also forced to recognize the sultan. The Ziyárid Manü-

chihr b. Qábüs (403-20 or 421/1012-13 to 1029 or 1030) was already 

1

 Barthold, "Short History of Turkestan", in Four Studies, vol. 1, pp. 23-4. 

2

 Narshakhi, Ta'rikh-i Bukhara, ed. Mudarris Ridavi, pp. 39-40 (Frye tr., p. 33). 

8

 Cf. Bosworth, "The Imperial Policy of the Early Ghaznawids Islamic Studies, pp. 67-

74; idem, The Ghaznavids, pp. 52-4. 


T H E  R I S E  O F  T H E  S A L J U Q S 

13 


paying tribute to Mahmüd; now he had to allow Ghaznavid armies 

transit through his territories and was forced on at least one occasion 

to contribute troops to them. (For a detailed survey of these minor 

Dailami dynasties, see below, section  H I . ) In the province of Kirmán 

in south-eastern Iran, which was under the control of the Büyids of 

Fárs and Khüzistán, Mahmüd had in 407/1016-17 attempted to set his 

own nominee on the throne, but without lasting success; thereafter he 

left Kirmán alone. One of Mas'üd b. Mahmüd's armies did temporarily 

occupy the province in 424/1033, but was shortly afterwards driven 

out by the returning Büyids.

When Mahmüd died in 421/1030, the territory of the Ghaznavid 



empire was at its largest. It had become a successor state to the Sámá-

nids in their former lands south of the Oxus, but its original centre was 

Ghazna and the region of Zábulistán on the eastern rim of the Afghan 

plateau.  A s soon as he came to power in Ghazna in 366/977, Sebük-

Tegin began a series of raids against the Hindüsháhi rajahs of Vaihand, 

and Mahmüd gained his lasting reputation in the Islamic world as the 

great ghd^J (warrior for the faith), leading campaigns each winter 

against the infidels of the plains of northern India. Mahmüd's thirst 

for plunder and territory, and also his need to employ a standing army 

of some 50,000 men, combined to give Ghaznavid policy a markedly 

imperialist and aggressive bent;

2

 whilst from the religious aspect, the 



Ghaznavids' strict Sunni orthodoxy enabled the sultan to pose as the 

faithful agent of the caliph and to purge his own dominions of religious 

dissidents such as the extremist Shí'í Ismá'ilis and the Mu'taziiis. 

The spoils of India were insufficient to finance this vast empire; the 

steady taxation revenue from the heartland of the empire, Afghanistan 

and Khurásán, had to supplement them. Khurásán suffered most severely 

from the exactions of Ghaznavid tax collectors, who were driven on 

by the sultan's threats of torture and death for those who failed him. 

For some ten years, until his dismissal and death in 404/1013-14, 

the Vizier Abu'l-'Abbás al-Fadl Isfará'ini mulcted the merchants, 

artisans, and peasants of Khurásán, causing misery and depopulation. 

In the words of the Ghaznavid historian

  c

Utbi, "Affairs were cha­



racterized there by nothing but tax levies, sucking which sucked dry, 

and attempts to extract fresh sources of revenue, without any construc-



Katalog: library
library -> arslikda Vatanimizning qadim zamonlardan to hozirgi davrgacha tgan lni necha mingyillik tarixi oliy quvyurtlariuchuntavsiyaetilgan" zbekiston tarixi" quv dasturi talablari doirasida yoritilgan
library -> Reja: Reja: Natural va tovar ishlab chiqarish ijtimoiy xo`jalik shakllari ekanligi
library -> Toshkent-2012 O‘zbekiston respublikasi oliy va o‘rta maxsus ta’lim vazirligi
library -> Kоrib chiqiladigan savollar
library -> Membranalar tоgrisida tushuncha. Membranalarning vazifalari. Membranalar tоgrisida tushuncha. Membranalarning vazifalari
library -> O’zbekiston Respublikasi sog’liqni saqlash vazirligi Toshkent tibbiyot akademiyasi
library -> Referat mavzulari
library -> Figure Tethered Aerostat Radar System Site Locations tethered aerostat radar system (tars)
library -> Infeksionreaktiv vaskulit yuzaga keladi

Download 77.41 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   90




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling