Ieee transactions on antennas and propagation, vol. 46, No. 12, December 1998


Download 41 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi41 Kb.

1886

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION, VOL. 46, NO. 12, DECEMBER 1998

achieved this limit. In essence, the continuously inhomogeneous

medium is most similar to a boundary diffraction problem for which

the smooth boundary is permitted to evolve toward an edge, for

example. Finally, we have avoided the issue of turning points since

our asymptotic development is not valid in this situation and the

turning point phenomenon is well-understood [2], [3].

A

CKNOWLEDGMENT



We are indebted to the late James R. Wait for his important

comments on this work.

R

EFERENCES



[1] P. M. Morse and H. Feshbach, Methods of Theoretical Physics—Part II.

New York: McGraw-Hill, 1953, pp. 1092–1106.

[2] J. R. Wait, Electromagnetic Waves in Stratefied Media.

New York:

IEEE Press, 1996, pp. 85–105.

[3] A. Ishimaru, Electromagnetic Wave Propagation, Radiation, and Scat-



tering.

Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1991, pp. 62–68.

[4] C. M. Bender and S. A. Orszag, Advanced Mathematical Methods for

Scientists and Engineers.

New York: McGraw-Hill, 1978, pp. 14–20.

[5] D. Bouche, f. Molinet, and R. Mittra, Asymptotic Methods in Electro-

magnetics.

Berlin, Germany: Springer-Verlag, 1994, pp. 91–120.



Tilting Aplanat RF Telescope

R. L. Lucke



Abstract—Beam steering by tilting the secondary is common in two-

mirror RF telescopes, but it is not generally recognized that optical quality

need not suffer as the beam is steered: a tilting aplanat can maintain

diffraction-limited performance over fields of a few degrees.

Index Terms—Beam steering, mirror, radio astronomy.

I. I


NTRODUCTION

Ordinarily, RF remote sensors must cover their fields of regard

by moving the entire telescope assembly. But for small fields and

the proper choice of mirror shapes beam steering without loss

of resolution can be accomplished in a two-mirror telescope by

tilting only the secondary mirror. Weight savings can be realized

in mechanical structures and in drive motors and the platform will

be subjected to lower reaction torques—features that are especially

desirable for space-borne instruments. These advantages must be

balanced against the disadvantage of the design: it requires a larger

primary mirror to accommodate beam walk as the secondary is tilted.

Manuscript received March 30, 1998; revised August 3, 1998.

The author is with the Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7227, Washington,

DC 20375 USA.

Publisher Item Identifier S 0018-926X(98)09721-X.

Fig. 1.


Telescope schematic. The secondary is tilted by angle

 to redirect

the chief ray, which strikes the primary a distance

x from its vertex, through

angle

2  and achieve observation angle  with respect to the z axis. h is the



off-axis distance in the focal plane of the primary of the point at which rays

from field angle

 are directed. Other symbols are defined in the text.

The tilting aplanat prescription for two-mirror telescopes using

conic-section mirror shapes was given by Bottema and Woodruff [1]

who applied it to optical systems with modest

f numbers and much

smaller tilt angles than are contemplated here. This paper will apply

it to RF telescopes, which, in order to prevent obscuration of the

primary by the secondary, generally use reflecting surfaces that are

off-axis segments of larger figures with radical

f numbers. It will

be seen that RF tilting aplanats work well if a small departure from

conic shape is applied to one of the mirrors. Depending on the size

and shape of the segments used, further refinements in the optical

prescription such as nonaxisymmetric shapes can be made to improve

performance, but will not be considered here.

II. O


PTICAL

D

ESIGN



Notation will follow that used by Schroeder [2]. The telescope

is shown schematically in Fig. 1, adapted from [2, Fig. 2.7]. The

primary mirror has a vertex radius of curvature

R

1



and a focal length

of

f



1

= 0R


1

=2 (the sign convention is discussed by [2, pp. 8;

11–12]; since the primary is convex, its focal length is always taken

as positive). The secondary’s vertex radius of curvature is

R

2

. The



nominal length of the telescope

d is the distance between the vertices

of the primary and secondary mirrors. The design parameters defined

by [2, pp. 16–17] are

m; ; k;  ; where m = (d +  f

1

)=(f



1

0 d) is


the magnification of the secondary,

 = R


2

=R

1



; k = (f

1

0 d)=f



1

is the ray-height ratio (the vertical distance from the vertex of the

secondary to the point at which the ray strikes it, divided by the

same distance for the primary), and

 determines the back focal

length (BFL), measured from the vertex of the primary as a fraction

of

f

1



:

BFL =  f


1

. Note that

k = (1 +  )=(m + 1). As shown in

Fig. 1, by Schroeder’s sign convention,

R

1

,



R

2

,



h are negative and

f

1



,

d, x, m, , k,   are positive. A convex secondary is assumed

because it gives the most compact design for a desired final focal

length and

f number, but the formulas given below apply without

change if the secondary is concave (for a concave secondary,

R

2

is



positive, while

m, , k are negative).

The chief ray is that ray which, after reflection from the secondary,

lies along the

z axis, i.e., along the centerline of the feedhorn,

U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.



IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION, VOL. 46, NO. 12, DECEMBER 1998

1887


which is located at the final focal point. The secondary is tilted

an angle


 to achieve observation angle , so the chief ray, before

reflection from the secondary, makes an angle

2  with the z axis.

As shown in Fig. 1,

 and  , incidence angles on the primary and

secondary, respectively, are negative. The chief ray, before it strikes

the secondary, is directed toward a focus in the focal plane of the

primary mirror, a distance

h off axis. h is given to first order by

h = f


1

. Also,


h = 2 (f

1

0 d). Therefore,   = =(2k), where k



is the telescope parameter introduced above. The height at which the

chief ray strikes the primary is

x = 02 d = 0f

1

(m 0  )=(1 +  ).



This means that to accommodate a scan range of

6, the vertical

dimension of the primary must be oversized by

2x compared to what

it would be if only on-axis use were required.

In the most basic form of the two-mirror telescope, the classical

Cassegrain, the shape of the primary mirror is paraboloidal—that

of the secondary hyperboloidal. This gives aberration-free imaging

of on-axis sources, but the images of off-axis sources suffer from

substantial coma. In the Ritchey–Cretien telescope design, the conic

constants of the two mirrors are chosen to eliminate third-order spher-

ical aberration and coma. This property—aplanatism—results in a

fairly wide field with minimal aberrations but, for the Ritchey–Cretien

design, the aplanatic condition is not fulfilled if the secondary is

tilted. The primary and secondary mirror conic shapes that maintain

the aplanatic condition at the focal point when the secondary is tilted

were given by Bottema and Woodruff [1]. They can also be derived

using the formalism of Schroeder [2]: inspection of [2, eq. (6.3.2)]

shows that tilting the secondary about any axis perpendicular to and

intersecting the optical axis merely adds another term to the coma

coefficient of a two-mirror telescope, which is given in [2, Table

6.4]. The result can be set equal to zero and solved for the conic

constants of the mirrors. It was assumed by Bottema and Woodruff

[1] and will be assumed here that the secondary is tilted about its

vertex. Then

K

1



and

K

2



, the conic constants of the primary and

secondary, respectively, are

K

1

= 01 0 (1 +  )(m



2

+ 1)


m

2

(m 0  )



K

2

= 0 m + 1



m 0 1

2

0 m(m + 1)(m



2

+ 1)


(m 0  )(m 0 1)

3

:



(1)

Equation (1) can be compared to [2, eqs. (6.2.4), (6.2.5)] for

the Ritchey–Cretien prescription. The difference is that the quantity

m

2



+ 1 appears in the above expressions where the quantity two

appears in the Ritchey–Cretien prescription. Since

m is almost never

less than two and may be four or greater,

m

2

+ 1 is substantially



larger than two, which means that the tilting aplanat prescription

is even farther from the paraboloidal primary condition (that is,

K

1

= 01, which gives zero spherical aberration to all orders) than



is the Ritchey–Cretien prescription, hence, should be expected to

have higher fifth-order spherical aberration. Test computations with

the BEAM4 [3] optical ray-tracing code confirm this: fifth-order

spherical aberration can easily be an order of magnitude larger than

for the Ritchey–Cretien prescription. The most effective means of

solving this problem is to allow the mirror shapes to have nonconic

components: fifth-order spherical aberration can be eliminated with

a fifth-order deformation parameter (a shape term proportional to the

sixth power of the mirror’s radius) added to either mirror.

III. C


ONCLUSION

A few design examples were evaluated with BEAM4 [3] to

verify that the tilting aplanat design gives diffraction-limited perfor-

mance over few-degree observation angles. With third- and fifth-order

spherical aberration and third-order coma eliminated, the dominant

aberrations are astigmatism and field curvature, the effects of which

depend on the observational problem under consideration. The prob-

lem that led to this work concerned studies of the atmosphere at the

earth’s limb as seen from space, where it is customary to require high

resolution only in the vertical direction, which means that astigmatism

is unimportant and only tangential field curvature remains. For this

case (even at 600 Ghz) it is not difficult to achieve diffraction-limited

performance over a

62





field, adequate to cover the atmosphere in

a compact telescope design having both nominal length

d and the

primary mirror’s diameter equal to 1 m.

The effect of tangential field curvature is (for most mirror confi-

grations) to move the focal point toward the secondary. If tilt angles

large enough for this effect to be important are needed, it can be

compensated by translating the secondary toward the feedhorn. For

the 1-D application considered here, a simple mechanical design can

effect both the tilting and translating motions with a single actuator.

The disadvantage of reducing the distance between the secondary and

the feedhorn is, of course, that it changes the amount of spillover of

the beam.

R

EFERENCES



[1] M. Bottema and R. A. Woodruff, “Third-order aberrations in Cassegrain-

type telescopes and coma correction in servo-stabilized images,” Appl.



Opt., vol. 10, p. 300, 1971.

[2] D. J. Schroeder, Astronomical Optics.

New York: Academic, 198, chs.

2, 67.


[3] M. Lampton, BEAM4 Optical Raytracer, Stellar Software, Berkeley,

CA.

Download 41 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling