International and Cultural Psychology For other titles published in this series, go to


Download 3.52 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet16/31
Sana17.11.2017
Hajmi3.52 Kb.
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   31

Figure 5.3
 
Ecological factors, social self, and self-efficacy

108
5 The Paths of Bondage and Liberation 
the dissolution of the social self, as the model posits, then to advance on the spiritual 
path  one  has  to  get  rid  of  these  elements  of  self-efficacy.  In  other  words,  the 
self-efficacy that makes us so effective in the material world may become a burden 
while pursuing a spiritual journey. In Indian philosophy, ego has been considered a 
major hurdle in one’s spiritual advancement, and part of the challenge in making 
spiritual progress is to be able to get rid of the sense of agency, and self-efficacy is 
nothing but innumerable aspects of that ego and being an agent in countless situa-
tions over the duration of one’s life. Whereas in the context of self-efficacy or social 
cognition  theory,  the  model  may  seem  like  a  mere  theoretical  conjecture,  in  the 
context of this model, self-efficacy is limited to people pursuing Path 1. It is also 
not clear how self-efficacy would be  conceptualized for people who believe that 
they have a metaphysical self over and above the physical and social selves. Can self-
efficacy be divided into two categories, one set for the outer world (for the expanding 
social self), which would capture the conceptualization presented by Bandura and 
colleagues, and the other for the inner world (the shrinking social self), which is 
likely to be found in India? If so, research needs to explore how people develop this 
new type of self-efficacy not addressed in the literature.
Applying self-efficacy theory to people following Path 2 raises some other interesting 
questions. According to self-efficacy theory (Bandura, 1977), though self-efficacy 
can be altered by bogus feedback unrelated to one’s performance or by bogus normative 
comparison,  performance  accomplishment  is  the  most  reliable  way  of  boosting 
self-efficacy.  Therefore,  those  following  Path  2  must  have  necessarily  acquired 
their self-efficacy through the practice of “not paying attention to the fruits of their 
effort.”  But  this  skill  is  not  readily  available  to  model  in  the  society,  since  most 
people follow Path 1. Therefore, it is plausible that this mindset is acquired vicari-
ously first, by simply getting the concept cognitively, and then through self-exper-
imentation with the idea. Path 2 may, therefore, offer some interesting insights into 
the process of self-efficacy development, especially as it pertains to spiritual self-
growth, which has not been hitherto thought about.
Another issue related to self-efficacy deals with social learning theory (Bandura, 
1986). The self-efficacy that we can perform a task or act in a certain way is devel-
oped  through  actively  performing  a  task  or  modeling  a  social  behavior,  which  is 
applicable to human behaviors while following Path 1 (see Figure 
5.1
). It makes intui-
tive sense that as people make progress on Path 2, they are also likely to develop a 
 self-efficacy in performing their dharma or duties without pursuing the fruits of their 
effort. But this efficacy is developed by constantly watching oneself, and in that sense 
it is self-learning rather than social learning. An experienced guru or mentor could 
provide insightful feedback when one is confused, but still the decisions have to be 
made  by  people  based  totally  on  their  personal  experience.  Thus,  social  learning 
theory may not work for self-learning, and the link between self-efficacy and social 
learning theory, which is so well established for Path 1, does not seem to work for 
Path 2, and thus questions the generalizability of the theory to the domain of spiritual 
learning and growth. Also, dharma seems to guide people in dealing with their inter-
dependent concept of self as opposed to what is referrred to as collective self-efficacy 
in western psychology (see Figure 
5.3
). This too is a unique contribution of the model 
to global psychology.

109
Implications for Global Psychology
Finally, according to self-efficacy theory, the higher the perceived self-efficacy, 
the  longer  the  individuals  persevere  on  difficult  and  unsolvable  problems  before 
they quit. Also, the stronger the perceived self-efficacy, the higher the goals people 
set for themselves and the firmer their commitment to them. Path 2 is intuitively 
more difficult than Path 1, as the spiritual path has been compared to “walking on 
the razor’s edge (Maugham, 1944).” Therefore, those pursuing Path 2 are likely to 
have a much higher self-efficacy in letting go of the fruits of their effort than those 
following Path 1. One of the attributes of spiritually inclined people Pursuing Path 
2 is the higher degree of detachment (vairAgya) from material entities around them. 
Therefore, it is quite likely that detachment from material entities is closely associ-
ated with spiritual self-efficacy, which has not been hitherto thought about. It is also 
plausible  that  this  higher  level  of  self-efficacy,  a  form  of  spiritual  self-efficacy, 
helps  spiritual  leaders  like  Gandhi,  Martin  Luther  King,  and  Mother  Teresa  to 
address  challenging  and  serious  social  problems  that  are  chronic.  These  leaders 
with spiritual self-efficacy are clearly much more persistent than the garden variety 
of politicians whose job it is to solve social problems. Thus, future research needs 
to address the construct of spiritual self-efficacy.
The model also raises questions about what we know about goal setting. In the 
light of current knowledge about goal setting, it is difficult to visualize how one 
may  proceed  to  perform  one’s  work  without  concern  for  the  fruits  of  his  or  her 
effort, lacking the basic motivation that is provided by goals (Locke, 1986). One who 
pursues Path 2 is likely to set goals to plan one’s day, week, or year, and then reschedule 
the next day, week, or year based on how much gets done, without either celebrating 
the  success  or  expressing  frustration  about  the  failure.  When  working  with  the 
intention not to chase the fruits of our efforts, one enters a zone where goals are not 
important, and they lose their motivating potential. In such situations, the person 
becomes  an  observer  of  his  or  her  own  work  and  behavior  (draSTA)  rather  than 
being an agent setting goals and taking actions (or kartA) to meet those goals.
The model also has consequences for the concept of independent and interdepen-
dent  concepts  of  selves  (Markus  &  Kitayama,  1991),  which  have  come  to  shape 
major theories like individualism and collectivism (Bhawuk, 2001b; Triandis, 1995). 
As shown in Figure 
5.3
, the social self includes both interdependent and independent 
concepts of selves, and as predicted individualists would have an independent con-
cept of self and collectivists would have an interdependent concept of self. As col-
lectivists, Indians are likely to have an interdependent concept of self, and be guided 
by their dharma in managing these relationships. However, in the Indian conceptu-
alization of self, the self also extends to the metaphysical self (i.e., Atman), beyond 
the social self, and so an Indian is also likely to have an independent concept of self. 
Thus, there is a need to synthesize the dichotomy of independent and interdependent 
concept of self rather than view them as exclusive.
The model also offers some value for practice as one can use the model for his 
or her personal growth and test its validity for oneself by reflecting on changes in 
life in terms of reduced attachment to various social selves, increase in felt calm-
ness and peace, and a clear reduction in work and social stress. As a practitioner, 
based  on  my  personal  experience,  I  am  comfortable  stating  that  the  model  does 
seem to work.

110
5 The Paths of Bondage and Liberation 
To conclude, this chapter shows that it is possible to develop indigenous models 
from the philosophical traditions of a culture by starting with a non-Western model, 
instead of starting with the existing literature, to avoid imposed etic or pseudoetic 
approach guided by Western models and worldview. It is hoped that by developing 
models from other cultures of how people can lead a spiritual life, we will be able 
to  enrich  our  understanding  of  cross-cultural  similarities  and  differences  in  the 
pursuit  of  spirituality.  This  chapter  contributes  by  attempting  to  show  how  for 
global-community  psychology  useful  psychological  models  can  be  derived  from 
indigenous  psychology  and  further  bolsters  the  idea  that  models  can  be  derived 
from classical texts. The chapter raised many questions for the mainstream psychology 
and  hopefully  answers  to  these  questions  would  facilitate  the  development  of 
global-community psychology in the future.

111
D.P.S. Bhawuk, Spirituality and Indian Psychology, International and Cultural Psychology, 
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-8110-3_6, © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011
Psychologists have argued about the primacy of cognition and emotion for decades 
without  any  resolution.  Deriving  ideas  from  the  bhagavadgItA,  in  this  chapter, 
cognition, emotion, and behavior are examined by anchoring them in desire. The 
model presented here posits that cognition, emotion, and behavior derive signifi-
cance when examined in the context of human desires, and starting with perception 
and volition, cognition emerges when a desire crystallizes. Desires lead to behav-
iors, and the achievement or nonachievement of a desire causes positive or negative 
emotions. Through self-reflection, contemplation, and the practice of karmayoga 
desires can be better managed, which can help facilitate healthy management of 
emotions. It is hoped that insights provided by this model would stimulate research 
for further examination of the role of desire in understanding and predicting cogni-
tion, emotion, and behavior.
In this chapter, the literature on emotion is briefly reviewed to set the stage 
for the presentation of an indigenous model derived from the bhagavadgItA. By 
utilizing an ecological perspective, the model shows how the self interacts with the 
environment to develop cognition, emotion, and desire and how the self performs 
actions to achieve the desire leading to positive or negative effects. The generaliz-
ability of the model is examined by testing how it fits with other Indian texts like 
pataJjali’s yogasutras
 and vedAntic texts like yogavAsiSTha and vivekcudAmaNi
Finally, implications of this model for global psychology and future research are 
discussed.
Emotion in Anthropology and Psychology
Emotion can be defined at the microbrain chemistry level as well as at a macropsy-
chological  construct  level  (Marsella,  1994).  Measuring  and  studying  emotion  at 
both  levels  serve  important  functions.  Cook  and  Campbell  (1979)  asserted  that 
there is value in studying variables at the molar or macro level, despite the evidence 
that mediating variables are present at the micro level. This suggests there is value 
in studying emotions as psychological constructs (e.g., anger, and greed) as well as 
in understanding the brain chemistry of emotions. Borrowing the objective–subjective 
Chapter 6
A Process Model of Desire

112
6 A Process Model of Desire
framework presented by Triandis (1972) in the study of culture, it could be argued 
that  the  physical  symptoms  of  emotions  are  objective  aspects  of  emotion 
(e.g., independent observers would agree to seeing tears in the eyes of a person), 
whereas the psychological elements constitute the subjective culture.
Following  the  same  principle  that  causation  can  be  studied  at  a  macro  level 
despite our knowledge of how micro-level variables cause certain phenomena, the 
debate about the origin of emotion, whether it is biological first and then psycho-
logical  (Archer,  1979;  Blanchard  &  Blanchard,  1984,  1988;  Izard,  1972,  1991; 
James, 1890; Plutchik & Kellerman, 1986; Svare, 1983), is less rewarding. Having 
gone through thousands of years of socio-cultural change or “evolution,” it is quite 
meaningful  to  study  emotions  as  shaped  and  moderated  by  cultural  values  and 
practices, albeit in the ecological context (Damasio, 1999; Wentworth & Yardley, 
1994), and certainly, it is not of less value than the genetic makeup of our emotional 
expressions,  which  the  proponents  of  evolutionary  nature  of  emotion  strongly 
adhere to (Wilson, 1984).
Anthropologists have studied emotions as either a biological or a cultural phe-
nomenon (Leavitt, 1996). Biologically, emotions are physical feelings, have evolu-
tionary roots, and are therefore etics or universals. Culturally, emotions are socially 
constructed, their meaning transmitted from generation to generation through lan-
guage and nonverbal communication, and thus are emics or culture specific. Leavitt 
(1996) posited that there was a need to synthesize both the feeling and meaning 
aspects  of  emotions,  and  this  perspective  is  gaining  support  in  anthropology 
(Lupton, 1998; Milton, 2005).
Some researchers accept the dual nature of emotion; however, they assert the pri-
macy of emotion as a social phenomenon (Hochschild, 1998; Lyon, 1998; Parkinson, 
1995;  Shweder,  1993;  Williams,  2001).  Much  like  ecological  psychologists  who 
stress  the  conjoint  nature  of  behavior  settings  and  behaviors  (Barker,  1968),  these 
researchers stress that emotions are a function of the socio-cultural contexts in which 
they arise, are expressed using cultural symbols, and are interpreted in the meaning 
system of the particular culture. In other words, the same physical feeling may be 
expressed (using different languages), interpreted (using different meaning systems), 
and dealt with (using different behaviors) differently across cultures. This has been 
further supported by cross-cultural psychologists (Markus & Kitayama, 1991, 1994). 
Thus, there is merit in studying emotions in the socio-cultural context.
Mishra (2005) reviewed the Indian literature on emotion and also presented an 
anthropological report on indigenous emotional concepts of rasa and bhAvarasa 
means the sap or juice of plants, and by implication it refers to the essence or the 
best or finest of anything. In poetry and dramaturgy, rasa refers to the taste or char-
acter of a work or the feeling or sentiment prevailing in it. The eight rasas are zR
gAr
  (love),  vIra  (heroism),  bIbhatasa  (disgust),  raudra  (anger  or  fury),  hAsya 
(mirth), bhayAnaka (terror), karuNA (pity), and adbhuta (wonder). zAanta (tranquility 
or contentment) and vAtsalya (paternal fondness) are two other rasas that have been 
added to the list. bhAva translates as emotion and is of two types: sthAyin or primary 
and vyabhicArin or subordinate. sthAyin bhAvas refer to the same 8 (or 9 including 
zAntarasas, whereas the vyabhicArin are of 33 (or 34) types. Thus, though we find 

113
Anchoring Cognition, Emotion, and Behavior in Desire
a typology of emotions in the Indian literature, much of the psychological research 
has not used them in any way in measurement or theory building. In this chapter, a 
more basic issue, the relationship between emotion, cognition, desire, and behavior 
is modeled, and it is hoped that future research would take advantage of the existing 
typology of emotion for further theory building.
Anchoring Cognition, Emotion, and Behavior in Desire
In the second Canto of the bhagavadgItA, a process of how anger is generated is pre-
sented, which is delineated in the 62nd verse.
1
 When a person thinks about an object (or 
a subject), he or she develops an attachment for it. Attachment leads to desire, and from 
desire anger is manifested. The above process is captured in Figure 
6.1
.
As stated in the verse, and shown in the schematic diagram, through the pro-
cess of perception, a person develops the cognition or thinks (dhyAyataH) about 
Figure 6.1
 
Desire as the locus of cognition, emotion, and behavior (adapted from Bhawuk, 2008c)
1
 Verse 2.62: dhyAyato viSayAnpuMsaH saGgsteSupajAyate; saGgAtsaJjAyate kAmaH kAm Atkro­
dho’bhijAyate
.

114
6 A Process Model of Desire
an object. Constant thinking about the object leads to saGga (or attachment) to 
the object. Attachment clearly has an affective component, which is built on the 
cognitive component coming from the thinking or cognitive stage. Attachment is 
often found to be associated with an object, an idea, or a concept. Therefore, hav-
ing a cognitive schema of such an object, idea, or concept is a precondition for 
attachment to develop. Thus, attachment has both cognitive and affective compo-
nents. Attachment leads to desire (kAma) for the object. As a desire crystallizes, 
emotion  and  cognition  become  clear  to  the  person,  and  in  effect  should  be 
describable or measurable. Since the human mind is a thought factory that con-
stantly churns out thoughts, thoughts in themselves may be difficult to measure 
and study. But those thoughts that lead to desires through attachment have impact 
on our behavioral intentions and future behavior. Thus, desire is plausibly the first 
significant  psychological  construct  that  leads  to  behavior  (Bhawuk,  1999; 
Perugini & Bagozzi, 2001).
Though not explicated in the verse, it is reasonable to postulate that desires lead 
to the setting of goals, which can be financial, academic, personal (e.g., health, how 
one looks, and so forth), etc., through which desires can be achieved. Thus, desires 
drive behavior, which is directed toward goals. The verse states that desires lead to 
anger. Clearly, if desires are not met as planned, we are likely to get angry. Though 
the verse posits that desires lead to anger, it seems reasonable that this happens only 
when desired outcomes are not achieved. It should be noted that unfulfilled desire 
does lead directly to anger in the interpersonal context. When we expect a certain 
behavior from somebody, we want that person to act in a certain way in a given 
context or situation. Interpersonal expectation clearly is a form of desire. When the 
person  does  not  act  as  expected,  oftentimes  our  knee-jerk  response  is  an  angry 
admonition,  a  firm  warning  where  anger  is  socially  shaped  into  an  acceptable 
expression,  or  a  simple  sign  of  outrage  as  seen  in  honking  of  cars  on  American 
streets or freeways. Thus, often when desires are not met we do become angry, and 
this is aptly captured in the verse.
The bhagavadgItA does not discuss what happens if the desires are fulfilled, but 
it makes intuitive sense that fulfillment of desires is likely to lead to a positive feel-
ing,  happiness,  or  joy.  It  seems  reasonable  that  when  goals  are  met,  the  person 
either  moves  on  to  something  else  or  continues  to  pursue  the  behavior  to  obtain 
more of the same or something higher or better. In fact, in a verse in the third Canto 
of the bhagavadgItA, desires are compared to fire that is never satiated.
2
 Therefore, 
in Figure 
6.1
, greed is posited as a consequent of fulfillment of goals. Thus, inter-
acting with ecology and thinking about the objective or the subjective worlds lead 
a  person  to  develop  attachment  to  elements  of  these  worlds  (see  Figure.  3.1). 
Attachment leads to the development of desire for the object. Thus, an individual is 
directed toward goals through dhyAyan (or thoughts), saGga (or attachment), and 
kAma 
(or desire). When desired goals are not met, the person is unhappy, i.e., anger 

Verse  3.39:  AvRtaM  jnAnametena  jnAnino  nityavairiNA;  kAmarUpeNa  kaunteya  duSpUreNA­
nalena ca
.

115
A General Model of Psychological Processes and Desire
is generated. When desired goals are attained, the individual wants more, i.e., greed 
is generated. Thus, desires are at the center of both emotions – greed and anger.
The significance of desire can be seen in that to obtain harmony one has to learn to 
deal with one’s own desires. In verse 2.71 of the bhagavadgItA, it is stated that the 
person who gives up all desires attains peace by dwelling in the world without any 
sense of ownership, identity, or greed (see Bhawuk, 1999; also Chapter 7 for a model 
that captures the process of how one achieves peace). Further, in verse 3.41, it is stated 
that we can go beyond desires or we can conquer desires by regulating our senses.
3
 The 
choice of words is quite strong in this verse. Desires are referred to as the destroyer of 
jnAna
 and vijnAna, or all knowledge, and thus are labeled, pApmAnam, or the great 
sin, and kRSNa asks arjuna to kill (prajahi) desire by regulating the senses.
A General Model of Psychological Processes and Desire
In verse 40 of the third Canto of the bhagavadgItA, it is stated that desires reside in 
the sense organs (eyes, ears, nose, tongue, and skin), manas (or mind), and buddhi 
(intellect or ability to discriminate right from wrong), and that desires are so power-
ful  that  they  cover  the  person’s  jnAna  (i.e.,  knowledge  or  ability  to  discriminate 
between right and wrong)
4
 and bewilder him or her. Clearly, the self interacts with 
body and manas, and then with the elements of the environment or ecology, and this 
interaction leads to perception and cognition of what the environment has to offer. 
The ecology or environment is referred to here as the material world, to remain faith-
ful  to  the  indigenous  worldview  and  also  to  provide  an  indigenous  flavor.
5
  From 
many alternatives, the self cognitively chooses some elements from the environment, 
which leads to attachment to these elements. Following this attachment, which has 
both cognitive and affective elements, a desire is born, but not all desires catch our 
attention since we only have limited personal resources and we cannot pursue all 
desires.  Thus,  the  self  pursues  few  objectives  or  the  objects  of  the  selected  few 
desires. Achievement of such desires leads to positive affect or emotion, whereas 
nonachievement of the desires leads to negative affect or emotion (see Figure 
6.2
).
Negative  affect  or  emotions  are  clearly  the  sources  of  unhappiness,  but  the 
bhagavadgItA
 also suggests that even positive affects resulting from the achieve-
ment of desires ultimately lead to unhappiness. Desires are by nature insatiable, as 
the fulfillment of one leads to the emergence of another. In verse 22 of the fifth 

Verse  3.41:  tasmAttvamindRyANyAdau  niyamya  bharatrSabha;  pApmAnaM  prajahi  hyenaM 
jnAnavijnAnanAzanam
.

Verse 3.40: indriyaNi mano buddhirasyAdhiSThAnamucyate; etairvimohayatyeSa jnAnmAvRtya 
dehinam
.
5
 Often the environment or ecology in which we operate is referred to as the material world in the 
Indian worldview to separate the material from the spiritual and to separate the mundane or ever 
changing from the sublime or intransient. Thus, I refer to the ecology or environment as the mate-
rial world in the model to capture and to remain faithful to the indigenous spirit and worldview 
and also to provide an indigenous flavor.

116
6 A Process Model of Desire
Canto, it is stated that all enjoyments resulting from the contact between human 
body (and manas) and the environment sooner or later lead to distress. Therefore, 
those who are wise do not take delight in worldly activities.
6
 Further, in the 14th 
Canto, it is stated that rajas or the mode of passion leads to work (verses 14.9 and 
“When I pushed forward, I was whirled about. When I stayed in place, I sank. And so I crossed the flood 
without pushing forward, 
without staying in place.”(Buddha:  ogha-tarana sutta, samyutta nikaya
Feedback to Attenuate Desires: 
DESIRE MANAGEMENT 
SELF
ELEMENTS OF 
MATERIAL WORLD 
COGNITION 
(THOUGHT) 
COGNITION + AFFECT 
(ATTACHMENT) 
DESIRE
ACHIEVEMENT OF DESIRE 
(POSITIVE AFFECT) 
NON-ACHIEVEMENT OF 
DESIRE 
(NEGATIVE AFFECT) 
INSATIABLE DESIRE CYCLE 
(ULTIMATELY 
UNHAPPINESS) 
UNHAPPINESS 
sthitaprajna  
(BEYOND COGNITION & EMOTION) 
(BEYOND HAPPINESS -- TO BLISS) 
manan-cintan 
(SELF-REFLECTION) 
brahman
BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION 
abhyAsa  (practice) & vairAgya  (detachment)
karmayoga 

Download 3.52 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   31




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling