International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology


Download 24.32 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet57/176
Sana05.12.2019
Hajmi24.32 Mb.
1   ...   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   ...   176

International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



322 

 

 

 



income (taking inflation into account) even with an unfavorable option of implementing the infrastructure 

facility. 

In order to develop the Russian market of infrastructure bonds, it is advisable to study and adopt the 

accumulated positive foreign experience. Abroad infrastructure bonds are issued at the stage of operation of 

the infrastructure facility, when the project independently generates a stable cash flow, which is the source 

of  payments.  This  is  what  determines  the  high  reliability  of  infrastructure  bonds  and,  as  a  result,  their 

attractiveness to conservative investors. Conservative  investors do not accept the risks associated with the 

rising  cost  of  construction.  In  Russia,  project  companies  are  forced  to  finance  the  construction  phase  of 

infrastructure  projects  at  their  own  expense,  including  through  the  issuance  of  infrastructure  bonds. 

Increasing the risk for an institutional investor affects the growth of interest income on infrastructure bonds 

(Shubaeva & Kharchenko, 2016; Metsämuuronen, 2018). 

The  analysis  of  foreign  practice  shows  that  in  the  development  of  the  infrastructure  bond  market  a 

significant role is assigned to state regulation. 

Abroad, the state stimulates the development of the infrastructure bond market with various forms of 

state support for issues, namely: 

 



issues monetary subsidies (the state transfers a sum of money for the project implementation); 

 



guarantees payment (the state accepts the obligations of the buyer in relation to a private person in 

the absence of market demand for a service or product); 

 

guarantees revenue (the state guarantees the minimum income of the project being implemented); 



 

guarantees  the  repayment  of  the  debt  (the  state  guarantees  the  payment  of  money  to  creditors 



(bondholders) in the event of an issuer default; 

 



guarantees  the  estimated  cost  of  construction  (the  state  protects  the  private  investor  from  the 

potential excess of the cost of the project at the stage of its construction). 

Russia  also  uses  forms  of  state  support  for  issues  similar  to  those  in  the  world,  for  example, 

guaranteed payment and a guarantee of revenue. However, for purposes of assessing risks and the quality of 

debt service, it is advisable to take into account other forms of security for obligations on bonds as well as 

state and municipal guarantees. 

In  order  to  unify  the  methodology  for  project  evaluation,  it  is  considered  expedient  to  apply  the 

European Union’s experience in supporting project bonds 2020. Adapting the European experience will help 

maintain  the  rating  of  the  infrastructure  bond  issued  by  the  concessionaire  at  a  constant  level  (for  the 

duration of the loan or the guarantee period) (Joseph, 2013; Fathi & Dastoori, 2014). 



Conclusions and Recommendations 

In  conditions  of  the  budget  deficit,  sanctioning  of  the  Russian  economy  from  Western  countries, 

legislative tightening of infrastructure projects (introduction of Basel III standard), limited stock market for 

finance infrastructure projects, infrastructure bonds as a tool for attracting long-term financing is promising 

for the development and renewal of infrastructure. 

Opportunities  for  structuring  loans,  choosing  a  source  of  redemption  of  bonds,  determining  key  terms  of 

issue,  developing  a  mechanism  for  distributing  income  and  project  risks  allow  the  use  of  infrastructure 

bonds to finance any infrastructure project. 

Analysis of existing issues of infrastructure bonds showed that the infrastructure bond market in Russia is 

not sufficiently developed. 

The infrastructure bond market is characterized by a disproportionate fundraising for federal and regional 

projects. 

An analysis of the institutional and organizational-economic support of the infrastructure bond market has 

made  it  possible  to  identify  a  number  of  limitations  that  impede  the  further  development  of  the 

infrastructure bond market in Russia. 

An  analysis  of  foreign  experience  in  using  infrastructure  bonds  shows  that  those  countries  (Chile,  Peru, 

Brazil) achieved the greatest development in financing infrastructure facilities using infrastructure bonds in 

which pension systems were reformed at the end of the 20th century and restrictions on investing pension 

funds in infrastructure were lifted. 


International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



323 

 

 

 



The existing model for determining the yield of infrastructure bonds, depending on the rate of inflation, the 

consumer price index does not meet the expectations of an institutional investor. 

A number of articles of Federal Law No. 39-ФЗ “On the On the stocks and bonds market” dated April 22, 

1996,  instructions  of  the  Central  Bank  of  the  Russian  Federation,  regarding  the  inclusion  of  infrastructure 

bonds  in  the  Lombard  List  of  the  Bank  of  Russia,  establishing  a  uniform  procedure  for  information 

disclosure by issuers of infrastructure bonds require further improvement. 

It  is  advisable  to  create  a  specialized  platform  on  the  MICEX  where  infrastructure  bonds  will  circulate, 

which will help create an institutionalized market for infrastructure bonds, as well as facilitate the process of 

investment in infrastructure projects by insurance companies and pension funds. 

For  the  further  development  of  the  infrastructure  bond  market,  there  is  an  objective  need  to  approve  a 

uniform  methodology  for  issuing  infrastructure  bonds  for  both  financing  and  refinancing  infrastructure 

projects, which will simplify and make the process of issuing infrastructure bonds more “transparent”. 

To  remove  economic  constraints,  it  is  necessary  to  consider  reducing  tax  payments  for  concessionaires 

issuing  infrastructure  bonds.  The  use  of  the  TIF  mechanism  in  Russia  (the  mechanism  for  encouraging 

investment in infrastructure due to the increase in the tax base from operating the infrastructure facility) will 

allow  the  public  side  to  more  effectively  finance  infrastructure  facilities  and  may  become  a  promising 

direction for the development of state object private partnerships. 

References 

Ahmed, S. D., & Aziz, M. S. (2018). The Effect of Cognitive Modeling Strategy in chemistry achievement for 

students. Opción, 34, 276-294. 

Authers, J. (2015). Infrastructure: Bridging the gap. Financial Times. 

Bogoviz,  A.V.,  Chernukhina,  G.N.,  Mezhova,  L.N.  (2018).  Subsystem  of  the  territory  management  in  the 

interests of solving issues of regional development. Quality  Access to Success, 19(S2), 152-154.  

Ermolovskaya,  O.Y.  Telegina,  Z.A.  Golovetsky,  N.Y.  (2018).  Economic  incentives  of  creation  of  high-

productive  jobs  as  a  basis  for  providing  globallyoriented  development  of  the  economy  of  modern  Russia. 

Quality  Access to Success, 19(S2), 43-47. 

Esty, B. (2009). An Overview of the Project Finance Market. Harvard Business School, 1, 8-13. 

Fathi,  S.,  &  Dastoori,  A.  (2014).  Investigating  the  Impact  of  Women's  Social  Base  on  their  Political 

Participation: a Case Study on Women in Tehran District 2 (Shahrara) , UCT Journal of Social Sciences and 

Humanities Research, 2(2), 81-86. 

Hojati,  M.,  Rezaei,  F.,  &  Iravani,  M.  R.  (2014).  Study  the  Effects  of  Cognitive  and  Metacognitive  Learning 

Strategies to Increase Student Motivation and Probation of Sama Vocational Schools Probation Students of 

Najaf Abad Branches in School Year 2013-2014, UCT Journal of Management and Accounting Studies, 2(2): 

35-40. 

Ivanter, A. (2017). Project bonds: how to unleash the market. URL: http://izvestia.ru/news 



Joseph,  K.  (2013).  Social  Innovation  in  Acceleration:  Building  the  Social  Impact  Bond  Ecosystem. 

URL: http://www.forbes.com/sites/skollworldforum/2013/04/11/building-the-social-impact-bond-

ecosystem/ 

Korovin,  A.Yu.  (2015).  Analysis  of  international  experience  in  financing  infrastructure  projects.  Transport 

Business in Russia, 2, 78-84. 

Larionova, A.A., Tyutyukina, E.B., Danilov, A.I., Zaitseva, N.A., Ushakova, E.O., Kunakovskaya, I.A. (2018). 

Investigation  of  the  factors  determining  the  investment  potential  of  the  tourist  industry  of  the  north 

caucasus. Espacios, 22, 13-25.  

Lower-Basch, 

E. 


(2014). 

Social 


Impact 

Bonds: 


Overview 

and 


Considerations. 

URL: http://www.clasp.org/resources-and-publications/publication-1/CIASP-Social-Impact-Bonds-SIBs-

March-2014.pdf. 

Malinovskaya, O.V., Sapko, E.A., Brovkina, A.V. (2016). Discount rates of cash flows of investment projects 

of  the  transport  complex:  theoretical  foundations  and  assessment.  Financial  analytics:  problems  and 

solutions, 2(284), 15-30. 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



324 

 

 

 



Maslennikov,  V.V.,  Fedotova,  M.A.,  Sorokin,  A.N.  (2017).      New  financial  technologies  are  changing  our 

world. Journal of Finance: theory and practice, 2(98), 6-11. 

Metsämuuronen, J. (2018). Common Framework for Mathematics – Discussions of Possibilities to Develop a 

Set  of  General  Standards  for  Assessing  Proficiency  in  Mathematics. International  Electronic  Journal  of 

Mathematics Education, 13(2), 13-39.  

Shadiyeva,  T.S.  (2016).  Infrastructure  bonds:  reasons  for  unsuccessful  use  in  Kazakhstan.  Journal  "U". 

Economy. Control. Finance, 2, 274-287. 

Shubaeva,  V.G.  &  Kharchenko,  L.P.  (2016).  Construction  of  an  international  financial  centre  in  Moscow: 

exposure vector - the domestic financial market. Journal of Legal and Economic Research, 3, 188-196. 

Yakunina, E. & Galaktionova, A. (2017). Bonds for infrastructure. The state of the infrastructure bond market 

and its development forecast in 2018. URL: ttps: //infraone.ru/analitika/Bondy_dlya_infrastructury.pdf 

 

 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



325 

 

 

 



Confrontation Between Traditional Islam in Russia and Islamic Trends 

Abroad is Inevitable  

 

Sergey S. Oganesyan



1*



Nikolai V. Rumyantsev

2

 and  

Salikh Kh. Shamsunov

3

 

Federal Penal Enforcement Service Research Institute, Moscow, Russia. 



2 Federal Penal Enforcement Service Research Institute, Moscow, Russia. 

3 Federal Penal Enforcement Service Research Institute, Moscow, Russia. 

*corresponding author 

Abstract 

The article examines the conditions under which Russian Islam was formed, with its tolerance of the 

secular  state  power  structures  and  its  tolerance  of  the  world  perception  and  way  of  life  of  other  ethnic 

groups and peoples. It demonstrates that the ideology of hostility, intolerance and militancy with regard to 

dissent characteristic  of many trends of Islam outside Russia force them to be in permanent confrontation 

with  all  the  other  trends  in  Islam,  including  the  Islam  traditional  for  Russia.  This  contradiction  inevitably 

destabilizes the political and socio-economic situation in the country. For example, Wahhabism which arose 

as the religious trend  spearheading  the  national-liberation  movement of some  Arab tribes against Turkish 

rule, contradicts in its forms, methods of self-assertion and activity, the fundamental principles of tolerance 

of other faiths which Russian Islam has traditionally followed. For Russian Islam traces its origin to the early 

Muslims, the followers of the Prophet Muhammad and the Prophet  Himself and is clearly set forth in the 

Koran and Hadith. 



Keywords: Monotheism, traditional Islam, religious tolerance, Koran, Hadith, Torah, the New Testament,  

foreign Islam trends. 

 

Introduction 

Statement of the Problem 

The problem of religious existence of modern mankind is undoubtedly one of the most urgent for all 

states on all the continents. Hardly a day passes without the mass media bringing alarming reports from all 

corners of the earth about terrorist attacks or detention of religious extremists and terrorists. We have shown 

in many of our previous works that humanity has in its development entered a fundamentally new era when 

many  ethnic  groups  and  peoples,  losing  their  religious  perception  of  the  world  under  the  pressure  of 

scientific and technological progress adopt scientific cognition of the world and life activities based on this 

perception.  Predictably,  two  civilizational  mentalities  within  the  same  ethnic  entities  clash  just  like  at  the 

beginning of the first millennium and up until today ethnic entities and peoples who have matured to adopt 

monotheism  have  been  switching  from  the  pagan  perception  of  the  world  (polytheism)  to  monotheism 

(Oganesyan, 2018; Oganesyan, 2015).    

Powerful  integration  and  migration  processes  which  have  spread  their  influence  to  all  the  ethnic 

entities and peoples in the world community have dragged into the maelstrom of worldview passions and 

clashes  many  countries  including  Russia  which  has  over  millennia  been  inhabited  by  ethnic  entities  of 

different mental civilizational levels.  

It has to be stressed that we identify three stages of mental civilizational development of humankind: 

paganism, monotheism and the scientific perception of the world which the world’s countries and peoples 

started to adopt beginning from the epochs of Enlightenment and Reformation in Europe (Oganesyan, 2018; 

Oganesyan, 2015; Mollaei et al, 2014).  

The Goal of the Study 

The purport of this article is to show that Islam as traditionally preached by ethnic entities in Russia 

has nothing in common with the “foreign Islamic trends” in terms of the forms and methods of its existence, 

its activity and interaction  with the secular state as well as with other religions and beliefs existing  in the 

country. Therefore traditional Russian Islam comes under serious pressure on the part of “foreign” Islamic 

trends which became widespread in the country during the period of disintegration of the Soviet Union, the 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



326 

 

 

 



pressure sometimes taking the form of physical elimination of the spiritual leaders of Muslims who espouse 

peaceful coexistence with other religions and religious trends traditional for our country

 

(Ameen et al., 2018; 



saif & Abbas, 2018).  

Research Methods 

The  article  uses  methods  that  are  traditional  for  humanities  studies.  In  particular,  gathering  and 

analysis of specialized literature on the theme. Gathering and analysis of historical sources on the topic of 

study. Analysis of statistical data on the number of Muslim religious organizations in the Russian Empire 

and the USSR. Comparative analysis of monotheistic Scriptures such as the Torah, the New Testament and 

the Koran which the Koran considers to be the three Messages from the One God to humanity. 



Research Issues 

The Islam traditional for Russia is known to be the Islam that most fully corresponds to the teaching of 

the  Koran  (2008)  and  the  Sunna.  The  Islam  which  in  terms  of  its  peaceful  nature,  mercy  and  particular 

religious tolerance  was characteristic  of  the  early  Muslims  who  were  contemporaries of  the  great  Prophet 

and Messenger of the One God, Muhammad, the Islam that was adopted by the ethnic entities of the Russian 

state from its followers.  

However, it is no secret that each of the trends in Islam that arose earlier and exist today considers 

itself to be the “purest”, most correct and righteous both in terms of interpretation of specific tenets of faith 

and  the  rituals  of  worshiping  the  Almighty.  The  reader  at  all  familiar  with  the  history  of  the  existence  of 

religions  knows  that  Islam  is  no  exception  in  that  respect.  No  monotheistic  religion  in  its  historical 

development  has avoided  being  splintered  into  many  conflicting  trends.  This is characteristic  for  Judaism 

and Christianity. Unlike monotheism, paganism, for example, which has a rigorous family and tribal basis, 

has immutable norms and rules and customs of worshiping gods passed on from generation to generation in 

accordance  with  a  strictly  established  procedure  (Oganesyan,  2018;  Oganesyan,  2015;  Zare  &  Rajaeepur, 

2013).       

It  is  also  known  that  many  Muslims  in  Russia  believe,  not  without  reason,  that  they  are  following 

traditional Islam that was preached by Muhammad (Khaidarov, 2010).  

There are of course other points of view which claim that all trends in Islam have the right to exist, 

like in other world religions. For it is only the Almighty who can decide which religious trend is true and 

which is false. They support their claims by citing the Koran and the Prophet’s Hadith. 

Thus the Koran writes: “Indeed, those who have divided their religion and become sects  – you (Oh, 

Muhammad!)  are  not  (associated)  with  them  in  anything.  Their  affair  is  only  left  to  Allah,  then  He  will 

inform them about what they used to do. Whoever comes… with a good deed will have ten times the like 

thereof [to his credit] and whoever comes with an evil deed will not be recompensed except the like thereof; 

and they will not be wronged” (Surah 6:159-160) (The Koran, 2008).  

 In an often-quoted passage the Prophet Muhammad warned his followers that if “the Jews divided 

themselves into 71 trends and Christians in 72, my community will be divided into 73 trends.” However, he 

also warned Muslims that all of them would be “in fire except one.” When his followers asked him who will 

be  spared  fire,  the  Messenger  of  Allah  replied:  “I  and  my  followers”  (Hadith  on  the  Muslim  community 

dividing into 73 trends, 2010). 

Thus in the minds of the Muslim umma (community) of Russia, and of the whole post-Soviet space 

the traditional path is thought to be the one followed by the Prophet Muhammad and his co-religionists, that 

is, the path of “Tradition and Concord.” (Khaidarov, 2010)  

It is the accepted view that the time of actualization of the concept of traditional Islam in our country 

did not coincide with the start of the breakup of the Soviet Union by chance when the previously “totally 

atheistic” population of the country began to revert en masse to religious consciousness (Khaidarov, 2010). 

Without going into an analysis of the religious situation in the post-Soviet space during the period of 

the disintegration of the Soviet Union, let us note that in 1991-1992 the former union republics saw not only 

an avalanche-like dissociation of religious organizations, notably Muslim councils (Trans-Caucasus Muslim 

Councils  —  Wikipedia,  2019)  but  also  the  emergence  of  new  religious  organizations.  They  belonged  to 



International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology    

www.ijaep.com

                                          VOL. 8 (2.1)

 

 



                 

 

 



327 

 

 

 



various  trends  not  only  in  Islam,  but  also  in  Christianity  and  in  paganism  because  a  flood  of  “spiritual 

teachers and mentors” of various persuasions inundated the country. Christian, Islamic, Judaist and Vedic 

pagan missionaries began to preach views that are alien to our ethnic entities but also flooded the country 

with religious literature, including overtly extremist literature.   

While Christian and pagan missionaries preferred to work with flocks inside Russia creating religious 

seminaries  and  schools  in  specially  acquired  or  rented  buildings,  the  leading  Islamic  universities  of  the 

world also flung open their doors for young men and women who decided to preach Islam. Examples are 

the International Islamic University in Malaysia, Al-Azhar University in Cairo, Imam Saud University in El-

Riyadh, Medina Islamic University in Saudi Arabia, International Islamic University of Islamabad and so on.  

It is no secret that the organization of the teaching process in Islamic universities in the Middle East 

was  superior  to  that  of  theological  establishments  in  the  Soviet  Union.  It  had  become  fashionable  and 

prestigious  to  acquire  a  theological  education  abroad.  All  the  more  so  since  as  a  rule  it  was  free  or  was 

provided at a symbolic cost (due to financial support of foreign foundations and sponsors). 

However,  when  they  returned  home  the  graduates  of  foreign  theological  education  establishments 

typically began to preach not the Islam that was traditionally preached in Russia, with its tolerance of the 

authorities,  other  religions  and  denominations,  but  an  openly  radical  Islam  hostile  and  aggressive  with 

regard to any other perception of the world.  

This  is  not  accidental  because  Islam  in  many  countries  of  the  world  (this  needs  to  be  stressed)  was 

formed and existed in conditions that were totally different from those in the Russian Empire and later in the 

Soviet Union.  

The Russian Empire, which considered it self to be an Orthodox power nevertheless did not permit 

itself to meddle in the religious affairs of the numerous peoples inhabiting the Empire in its vast spaces and 

in their traditions and customs.  

Let  us  cite  but  one  eloquent  example.  The  need  to  consolidate  political  power  in  the  hands  of  the 

sovereign forced Peter I to introduce state control over the Orthodox Church which was considered to be the 

ideological  and  intellectual  bulwark  of  the  Russian  Empire.  Thus  in  1721  Peter  I  established  a  Spiritual 

College later renamed the Holy Governing Synod) under his own patronage. Two years later (in 1773) the 

Synod issued a decree proclaiming religious tolerance and religious peace in the state: it was called “On the 

Tolerance of All Religions and  on Forbidding All Archbishops to Be Engaged in Affairs Concerning Other 

Faiths  and  the  Building  of  Prayer  Houses  According  to  Their  Laws  Leaving  it  to  Secular  Administrtions” 

(Decree of the Synod on Tolerance of All Religions – Russian, 2019). 

Under  the  Decree,  Muslims  and  Buddhists,  among  others,  were  not  only  granted  total  freedom  to 

build  mosques  and  datsans,  but  also  to  set  up  religious  schools.  Moreover,  the  Muslim  mullahs  and  the 

Buddhist lamas were paid out of the State Treasury allowances that were often bigger than those allocated to 

Orthodox clergy. 

All the other autocrats of the Russian Empire followed Peter the Great’s religious policy. It is not by 

chance  that  in  1788  a  Muslim  community  of  the  European  Russia  and  Siberia  was  established,  called  the 

Orenburg Muhammadan Spiritual Assembly with its center in Ufa. The statute of the Assembly approved in 

1789, combined the principle of appointed mufti and the principle of election of three Sharia judges (kaziys

from amongst ulema in the Kazan Gubernia. This made it possible to harmoniously combine the interests of 

imperial power and the Muslim umma (Khabutdinov, 2010). 

The Tavrichansky Muhammadan Council was set up in Simpheropol in 1831 and spiritual Councils of 

the Sunnis and Shiites of Transcaucasia were established in Tiflis in 1872 (Khabutdinov, 2010). 

It is very important that all the religious “councils” were based on the principles of non-interference of 

secular authorities in the internal affairs of religious organizations and of allowing them to act in accordance 

with their religious convictions (Khabutdinov, 2010). 

The  Muslim  umma  in  Russia,  given  non-interference  in  its  internal  religious affairs,  in  the  relations 

with the representatives of Christian and Judaist communities was guided by the prescription of the Koran 

to treat them as equals and not to be in conflict with them so as not to provoke enmity and hostility toward 

and hatred of itself. “And do not argue with the People of the Scripture except in a way that is best, except 

for those who commit injustice among them, and say ‘We believe in that which has been revealed to us and 

1   ...   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   ...   176




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling