Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768-1830) was a French mathematician, physi


Download 224.54 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet1/4
Sana07.01.2020
Hajmi224.54 Kb.
#93536
  1   2   3   4
Bog'liq
fourierseries
Sjsjsjjsjshdhsj, Sjsjsjjsjshdhsj, Sjsjsjjsjshdhsj, Mahalliy byudjetni shakllantirish va boshqarish c67f6 1-15, Glossariy, Glossariy, Jumayev Rustambek JI XIM, Jumayev Rustambek JI XIM, Jumayev Rustambek JI XIM, Jumayev Rustambek JI XIM, noananaviy dars reja konspektini tuzish texnologiyasi, Qonun ustuvorligi demokratik, fuqarolik jamiyati qurilishining a, калит, axborot tizimlari haqida tushuncha

Chapter 1

Fourier Series

Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768-1830) was a French mathematician, physi-

cist and engineer, and the founder of Fourier analysis. In 1822 he made the

claim, seemingly preposterous at the time, that any function of t, continuous

or discontinuous, could be represented as a linear combination of functions

sin nt. This was a dramatic distinction from Taylor series. While not strictly

true in fact, this claim was true in spirit and it led to the modern theory of

Fourier analysis with wide applications to science and engineering.

1.1


Definitions, Real and complex Fourier se-

ries


We have observed that the functions e

n

(t) = e



int

/



2π, n = 0, ±1, ±2, · · ·

form an ON set in the Hilbert space L

2

[0, 2π] of square-integrable functions



on the interval [0, 2π]. In fact we shall show that these functions form an ON

basis. Here the inner product is

(u, v) =

Z



0

u(t)v(t) dt,

u, v ∈ L

2

[0, 2π].



We will study this ON set and the completeness and convergence of expan-

sions in the basis, both pointwise and in the norm. Before we get started, it

is convenient to assume that L

2

[0, 2π] consists of square-integrable functions



on the unit circle, rather than on an interval of the real line. Thus we will

replace every function f (t) on the interval [0, 2π] by a function f

(t) such


that f

(0) = f



(2π) and f

(t) = f (t) for 0 ≤ t < 2π. Then we will extend



1

f

to all −∞ < t < ∞ by requiring periodicity: f



(t + 2π) = f

(t). This will



not affect the values of any integrals over the interval [0, 2π], though it may

change the value of f at one point. Thus, from now on our functions will be

assumed 2π − periodic. One reason for this assumption is the

Lemma 1 Suppose F is 2π − periodic and integrable. Then for any real

number a

Z

2π+a



a

F (t)dt =

Z



0



F (t)dt.

Proof Each side of the identity is just the integral of F over one period.

For an analytic proof, note that

Z



0

F (t)dt =

Z

a

0



F (t)dt +

Z



a

F (t)dt =

Z

a

0



F (t + 2π)dt +

Z



a

F (t)dt


=

Z

2π+a



F (t)dt +

Z



a



F (t)dt =

Z



a

F (t)dt +

Z

2π+a


F (t)dt


=

Z

2π+a



a

F (t)dt.


2

Thus we can transfer all our integrals to any interval of length 2π without

altering the results.

Exercise 1 Let G(a) =

R

2π+a


a

F (t)dt and give a new proof of of Lemma 1

based on a computation of the derivative G

0

(a).



For students who don’t have a background in complex variable theory we

will define the complex exponential in terms of real sines and cosines, and

derive some of its basic properties directly. Let z = x + iy be a complex

number, where x and y are real. (Here and in all that follows, i =

−1.)


Then ¯

z = x − iy.

Definition 1 e

z

= exp(x)(cos y + i sin y)



Lemma 2 Properties of the complex exponential:

• e


z

1

e



z

2

= e



z

1

+z



2

• |e


z

| = exp(x)

2


• e

z

= e



z

= exp(x)(cos y − i sin y).

Exercise 2 Verify lemma 2. You will need the addition formula for sines

and cosines.

Simple consequences for the basis functions e

n

(t) = e



int

/



2π, n = 0, ±1, ±2, · · ·

where t is real, are given by

Lemma 3 Properties of e

int


:

• e


in(t+2π)

= e


int

• |e


int

| = 1


• e

int


= e

−int


• e

imt


e

int


= e

i(m+n)t


• e

0

= 1



d

dt



e

int


= ine

int


.

Lemma 4 (e

n

, e


m

) = δ


nm

.

Proof If n 6= m then



(e

n

, e



m

) =


1

Z



0

e



i(n−m)t

dt =


1

e



i(n−m)t

i(n − m)


|

0



= 0.

If n = m then (e

n

, e


m

) =


1

R



0

1 dt = 1.



2

Since {e


n

} is an ON set, we can project any f ∈ L

2

[0, 2π] on the closed



subspace generated by this set to get the Fourier expansion

f (t) ∼


X

n=−∞



(f, e

n

)e



n

(t),


or

f (t) ∼


X

n=−∞



c

n

e



int

,

c



n

=

1



Z



0

f (t)e


−int

dt.


(1.1.1)

This is the complex version of Fourier series. (For now the ∼ just denotes

that the right-hand side is the Fourier series of the left-hand side. In what

3


sense the Fourier series represents the function is a matter to be resolved.)

From our study of Hilbert spaces we already know that Bessel’s inequality

holds: (f, f ) ≥

P



n=−∞

|(f, e


n

)|

2



or

1



Z

0



|f (t)|

2

dt ≥



X

n=−∞



|c

n

|



2

.

(1.1.2)



An immediate consequence is the Riemann-Lebesgue Lemma.

Lemma 5 (Riemann-Lebesgue, weak form) lim

|n|→∞

R



0

f (t)e


−int

dt = 0.


Thus, as |n| gets large the Fourier coefficients go to 0.

If f is a real-valued function then c

n

= c


−n

for all n. If we set

c

n

=



a

n

− ib



n

2

,



n = 0, 1, 2, · · ·

c

−n



=

a

n



+ ib

n

2



,

n = 1, 2, · · ·

and rearrange terms, we get the real version of Fourier series:

f (t) ∼


a

0

2



+

X



n=1

(a

n



cos nt + b

n

sin nt),



(1.1.3)

a

n



=

1

π



Z

0



f (t) cos nt dt

b

n



=

1

π



Z

0



f (t) sin nt dt

with Bessel inequality

1

π

Z



0

|f (t)|



2

dt ≥


|a

0

|



2

2

+



X

n=1



(|a

n

|



2

+ |b


n

|

2



),

and Riemann-Lebesgue Lemma

lim

n→∞


Z

0



f (t) cos(nt)dt = lim

n→∞


Z

0



f (t) sin(nt)dt = 0.

Remark: The set {

1





,

1



π

cos nt,


1

π



sin nt} for n = 1, 2, · · · is also ON in

L

2



[0, 2π], as is easy to check, so (1.1.3) is the correct Fourier expansion in

this basis for complex functions f (t), as well as real functions.

Later we will prove the following basic results:

4


Theorem 1 Parseval’s equality. Let f ∈ L

2

[0, 2π]. Then



(f, f ) =

X



n=−∞

|(f, e


n

)|

2



.

In terms of the complex and real versions of Fourier series this reads

1



Z



0

|f (t)|



2

dt =


X

n=−∞



|c

n

|



2

(1.1.4)


or

1

π



Z

0



|f (t)|

2

dt =



|a

0

|



2

2

+



X

n=1



(|a

n

|



2

+ |b


n

|

2



).

Let f ∈ L

2

[0, 2π] and remember that we are assuming that all such



functions satisfy f (t + 2π) = f (t).

We say that f is piecewise continu-

ous on [0, 2π] if it is continuous except for a finite number of discontinu-

ities. Furthermore, at each t the limits f (t + 0) = lim

h→0,h>0

f (t + h) and



f (t − 0) = lim

h→0,h>0


f (t − h) exist. NOTE: At a point t of continuity of f we

have f (t+0) = f (t−0), whereas at a point of discontinuity f (t+0) 6= f (t−0)

and f (t + 0) − f (t − 0) is the magnitude of the jump discontinuity.

Theorem 2 Suppose

• f (t) is periodic with period 2π.

• f (t) is piecewise continuous on [0, 2π].

• f

0

(t) is piecewise continuous on [0, 2π].



Then the Fourier series of f (t) converges to

f (t+0)+f (t−0)

2

at each point t.



1.2

Examples


We will use the real version of Fourier series for these examples. The trans-

formation to the complex version is elementary.

5


1. Let

f (t) =




0,

t = 0


π−t

2

, 0 < t < 2π



0,

t = 2π.


and f (t + 2π) = f (t). We have a

0

=



1

π

R



0

π−t



2

dt = 0. and for n ≥ 1,

a

n

=



1

π

Z



0

π − t



2

cos nt dt =

π−t

2

sin nt



0



+

1

2πn



Z

0



sin nt dt = 0,

b

n



=

1

π



Z

0



π − t

2

sin nt dt = −



π−t

2

cos nt



0



1

2πn



Z

0



cos nt dt =

1

n



.

Therefore,

π − t

2

=



X

n=1



sin nt

n

,



0 < t < 2π.

By setting t = π/2 in this expansion we get an alternating series for

π/4:

π

4



= 1 −

1

3



+

1

5



1

7



+

1

9



− · · · .

Parseval’s identity gives

π

2

6



=

X



n=1

1

n



2

.

2. Let



f (t) =





1



2

, t = 0


1,

0 < t < π

1

2

, t = π



0

π < t < 2π.

and f (t + 2π) = f (t) (a step function). We have a

0

=



1

π

R



π

0

dt = 1, and



for n ≥ 1,

a

n



=

1

π



Z

π

0



cos nt dt =

sin nt


|

π



0

= 0,


b

n

=



1

π

Z



π

0

sin nt dt = −



cos nt

|



π

0

=



(−1)

n+1


+ 1

=





2

πn



, n odd

0,

n even.



Therefore,

f (t) =


1

2

+



2

π



X

j=1


sin(2j − 1)t

2j − 1


.

6


For 0 < t < π this gives

π

4



= sin t +

sin 3t


3

+

sin 5t



5

+ · · · ,

and for π < t < 2π it gives

π



4

= sin t +

sin 3t

3

+



sin 5t

5

+ · · · .



Parseval’s equality becomes

π

2



8

=



X

j=1


1

(2j − 1)


2

.

1.3



Fourier series on intervals of varying length,

Fourier series for odd and even functions

Although it is convenient to base Fourier series on an interval of length 2π

there is no necessity to do so. Suppose we wish to look at functions f (x) in

L

2

[α, β]. We simply make the change of variables



t =

2π(x − α)

β − α

in our previous formulas. Every function f (x) ∈ L



2

[α, β] is uniquely associ-

ated with a function ˆ

f (t) ∈ L

2

[0, 2π] by the formula f (x) = ˆ



f (

2π(x−α)


β−α

). The


set {

1



β−α

,

q



2

β−α


cos

2πn(x−α)


β−α

,

q



2

β−α


sin

2πn(x−α)


β−α

} for n = 1, 2, · · · is an ON

basis for L

2

[α, β], The real Fourier expansion is



f (x) ∼

a

0



2

+



X

n=1


(a

n

cos



2πn(x − α)

β − α


+ b

n

sin



2πn(x − α)

β − α


),

(1.3.5)


a

n

=



2

β − α


Z

β

α



f (x) cos

2πn(x − α)

β − α

dx,


b

n

=



2

β − α


Z

β

α



f (x) sin

2πn(x − α)

β − α

dx

with Parseval equality



2

β − α


Z

β

α



|f (x)|

2

dx =



|a

0

|



2

2

+



X

n=1



(|a

n

|



2

+ |b


n

|

2



).

7


For our next variant of Fourier series it is convenient to consider the

interval [−π, π] and the Hilbert space L

2

[−π, π]. This makes no difference in



the formulas, since all elements of the space are 2π-periodic. Now suppose

f (t) is defined and square integrable on the interval [0, π]. We define F (t) ∈

L

2

[−π, π] by



F (t) =

 f (t)


on [0, π]

f (−t) for − π < t < 0

The function F has been constructed so that it is even, i.e., F (−t) = F (t).

For an even functions the coefficients b

n

=

1



π

R

π



−π

F (t) sin nt dt = 0 so

F (t) ∼

a

0



2

+



X

n=1


a

n

cos nt



on [−π, π] or

f (t) ∼


a

0

2



+

X



n=1

a

n



cos nt,

for 0 ≤ t ≤ π

(1.3.6)

a

n



=

1

π



Z

π

−π



F (t) cos nt dt =

2

π



Z

π

0



f (t) cos nt dt.

Here, (1.3.6) is called the Fourier cosine series of f .

We can also extend the function f (t) from the interval [0, π] to an odd

function on the interval [−π, π]. We define G(t) ∈ L

2

[−π, π] by



G(t) =



f (t)


on (0, π]

0

for t = 0



−f (−t) for − π < t < 0.

The function G has been constructed so that it is odd, i.e., G(−t) = −G(t).

For an odd function the coefficients a

n

=



1

π

R



π

−π

G(t) cos nt dt = 0 so



G(t) ∼

X



n=1

b

n



sin nt

on [−π, π] or

f (t) ∼



X



n=1

b

n



sin nt,

for o < t ≤ π,

(1.3.7)

b

n



=

1

π



Z

π

−π



G(t) sin nt dt =

2

π



Z

π

0



f (t) sin nt dt.

Here, (1.3.7) is called the Fourier sine series of f .

8


Example 1 Let f (t) = t,

0 ≤ t ≤ π.

1. Fourier Sine series.

b

n



=

2

π



Z

π

0



t sin nt dt =

−2t cos nt

|

π



0

+

2



Z

π



0

cos nt dt =

2(−1)

n+1


n

.

Therefore,



t =

X



n=1

2(−1)


n+1

n

sin nt,



0 < t < π.

2. Fourier Cosine series.

a

n

=



2

π

Z



π

0

t cos nt dt =



2t sin nt

|



π

0



2

Z



π

0

sin nt dt =



2[(−1)

n

− 1



n

2

π



,

for n ≥ 1 and a

0

=

2



π

R

π



0

t dt = π, so

t =

π

2



4

π



X

j=1



cos(2j − 1)t

(2j − 1)


2

,

0 < t < π.



1.4

Convergence results

In this section we will prove Theorem 2 on pointwise convergence. Let f be

a complex valued function such that

• f (t) is periodic with period 2π.

• f (t) is piecewise continuous on [0, 2π].

• f

0

(t) is piecewise continuous on [0, 2π].



Expanding f in a Fourier series (real form) we have

f (t) ∼


a

0

2



+

X



n=1

(a

n



cos nt + b

n

sin nt) = S(t),



(1.4.8)

a

n



=

1

π



Z

0



f (t) cos nt dt,

b

n



=

1

π



Z

0



f (t) sin nt dt.

9


For a fixed t we want to understand the conditions under which the Fourier

series converges to a number S(t), and the relationship between this number

and f . To be more precise, let

S

k



(t) =

a

0



2

+

k



X

n=1


(a

n

cos nt + b



n

sin nt)


be the k-th partial sum of the Fourier series. This is a finite sum, a trigono-

metric polynomial, so it is well defined for all t ∈ R. Now we have

S(t) = lim

k→∞


S

k

(t),



if the limit exists. To better understand the properties of S

k

(t) in the limit,



we will recast this finite sum as a single integral. Substituting the expressions

for the Fourier coefficients a

n

, b


n

into the finite sum we find

S

k

(t) =



1

Z



0

f (x)dx+



1

π

k



X

n=1


Z

0



f (x) cos nx dx cos nt +

Z



0

f (x) sin nx dx sin nt



,

so



S

k

(t) =



1

π

Z



0

"



1

2

+



k

X

n=1



(cos nx cos nt + sin nx sin nt

#

f (x)dx



=

1

π



Z

0



"

1

2



+

k

X



n=1

cos[n(t − x)]

#

f (x)dx


=

1

π



Z

0



D

k

(t − x)f (x)dx.



(1.4.9)

We can find a simpler form for the kernel D

k

(t) =


1

2

+



P

k

n=1



cos nt =

1



2

+

P



k

m=0


cos mt. The last cosine sum is the real part of the geometric

series


k

X

m=0



(e

it

)



m

=

(e



it

)

k+1



− 1

e

it



− 1

so



1

2

+



k

X

m=0



cos mt = −

1

2



+ Re

(e

it



)

k+1


Download 224.54 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2022
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling