Let the wine happen


Download 51.22 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
Sana14.08.2018
Hajmi51.22 Kb.

Let the wine happen... With his Moric wines, grown in Mittelburgenland and on the 

Leithagebirge, Roland Velich has discovered a new, great red wine for the world:  Blaufränkisch. 

Additionally, there's a rather incomparable Grüner Veltliner... 

 

text, Stephan Reinhardt 



 

Visiting Roland Velich at his tastefully restored estate in Grosshöflein near Eisenstadt, after the 

first introductory chat in the courtyard, we took off on a trip through Roland's very own 

Burgenland: not to Apetlon, where he grew up in the Seewinkel, where his younger brother 

Heinz manages the family's Velich Wine Estate, but rather to St Georgen, St Margarethen and 

Zagersdorf; to Rust, and from there to Neckenmarkt and Lutzmannsburg in Mittelburgenland; 

then subsequently over the Ödenburg Mountains all the way down into Südburgenland and the 

Eisenberg. And in the process always heading down along the Hungarian border, a somewhat 

painful boundary for free spirits and cosmopolitan individuals like Roland Velich.  ‘My homeland,’ 

Velich repeats: ‘my Burgenland, a wonderful big wine country with a fantastic history, colossal 

potential, and—one hopes—a rosy future.’ 

 

But the history of Burgenland took a turn toward nowhere after the end of the First World War. 



For several hundred years the region had been part of the kingdom of Hungary, and with its 

sweet specialty Ruster Ausbruch created one of the most valuable and long-lived wines in the 

world. But with the founding in 1921 of the province Burgenland—now part of Austria—and the 

loss of its former capital Sopron, the region quickly lost its customary lustre and sense of 

sophistication. But things were to get even worse. ‘I grew up at the hind-end of the world,’ says 

the 50 year-old Roland Velich, whom I am meeting for this portrait in the Berlin restaurant 

Margaux

, significantly just a stone’s throw from the onetime death strip, right at the Brandenburg 



Gate. 

 

The winegrower was remembering with some discomfort what life had been like in Apetlon, in 



the shadow of the Iron Curtain. But where one could once hear the rifle shots of border patrols, 

today—‘all along the watchtower’—Velich produces great and truly individualistic wines under the 

name Moric (pronounced 

Moritz


; a Hungarian c like the z in Mozart): primarily from 

Blaufränkisch, but there’s also a Grüner Veltliner. Ten years ago, the Moric wines were 

considered to be the 

avant garde 

of the 

avant garde



, but today these stylistic icons don’t merely 

move the emotions of the fine-wine world, they have also brought about a quiet revolution in 

Austria. Velich’s troupe of disciples has steadily grown—as has the number of those who’ve 

jumped on the bandwagon. 

 


Roland Velich figures among those vintners who don’t evaluate wines based on points, but rather 

according to whether they have a soul, and are capable of transporting, seducing and 

emotionally moving the taster by means of their sensuality, charisma and quality of expression. 

In connexion with this, Velich speaks of 

beauty

 and 


aesthetics

—categories that reach beyond any 

purely sensory analysis into the realms of art and philosophy, and touch upon lifestyle as well. As 

a matter of fact, Velich scrupulously avoids referring to concepts that have become empty and 

formulaic—

authenticity

terroir


—but actually he’s concerned in practice with nothing but: the 

essence of the place, seeking to get at its culture and potential, trusting in its own particular 

magic, and allowing this to express itself in the wine, whereby it can becharm the world as a 

liquid ambassador. 

 

Velich withheld his wines from the Austrian critics for a long time, because in blind tastings, more 



opulent though superficial wines with more horsepower, lots of oak and concentration were 

highly rated, while with his own bottlings it has always been more a matter of sublimation than 

one of declamation. ‘One must work at wine in a sensual fashion,’ Velich emphasises. And adds 

that the human palate is not equipped to taste entire growing regions inside of a few hours, just 

to spit them out unswallowed into a bucket. 

 

Velich is also determined not to rely upon media accolades from Vienna and the neighbourhood. 



He's got Burgenland in his heart, but the world on his radar—modern and open organisations, 

tasting groups included, which move unprejudiced throughout the world of wine, who possess 

adequate self-confidence to decide for themselves which wines speak to them and which do not. 

‘True wine connoisseurs seek to amplify the specific, the detail, the niche,’ Velich had noticed. 

They take their time, allow the wine to express itself to them, engage the wine intellectually and 

emotionally as well. ‘This speaks for the fact that our wines are not only good, but also beautiful, 

that they have the power and energy to provoke an emotional response.’ 

 

Against All Opposition 

Roland Velich is enjoying the success of the last few years, and 

can be proud of what he—against all possible opposition, particularly in his own homeland—has 

accomplished over the past decade. His new style of wine, bent on expressing the heritage of its 

origins, was originally greeted with incomprehension, especially since the first vintage was 

produced from the rather cool 2001 vintage, which had to follow the very warm and ripe ‘red-

wine-wonder’ years of 1997, 1999 and 2000. The Austrian wine press was at that time exulting in 

superlatives over the new red wine cuvées, primarily from Burgenland, which were best able to 

express the prevalent clichéd characteristics of the big international reds. Moric, on the other 

hand—this pure, vibrantly acidic and unvarnished, unpolished Blaufränkisch from the 


Lutzmannsburger Plateau—was the antithesis to the fashionable dark red mishmash. Here it 

wasn't about power and opulence, but rather about finesse, elegance, freshness and fine 

expression. ‘Burgenland is a cool-climate place’ wrote Roland in his notebook; he knew already 

that the Blaufränkisch was capable of far more than being an anonymous partner in an 

internationally-styled cuvée. 

 

He recognised that this was ‘an incorruptible grape variety,’ that its inherent character shone 



through even in the most heavily manipulated wines, and realised that the grape could be an 

engaging ambassador for the exciting 

terroirs

 of Burgenland, in which the variety had developed 

over hundreds of years—although there had never been a tradition of ‘great’ Blaufränkisch wines. 

‘Nobody was waiting for Austrian red wines; we possessed neither a tradition nor an image, and 

were first obliged to conquer a market for ourselves,’ recalls Velich, the networker and creative 

spirit. In 2004 he gathered a number of stylistically rather varied Blaufränkisch growers—Ernst 

Triebaumer, Paul Achs, Albert Gesellmann and Uwe Schiefer—to put on a presentation called 

‘Blaufränkisch Unplugged’ in a Vienna coffee house. Stuart Pigott provided the moderation and 

the floor-show, and the wine-world in attendance was astonished: Yes, it seemed that the 

Blaufränkisch 

did

 have talent. ‘You can make things happen,’ believes Velich, ‘because wine as an 



entity is capable of affecting people. When you’re open to it and enthusiastically embark upon 

the adventure of quality, 

and if

 in your approach to wine haven’t already become too 



sophisticated and spoiled...’ 

 

If one doesn't know the taste of a great Blaufränkisch, then you’ve just got to patiently seek it 



out, and let the wine show it to you. For this reason, Velich looked for sites with very old 

plantations of vines and a venerable past. He started with the plateau of Lutzmannsburg, and 

then added the higher-altitude vineyards of Neckemarkt; later came Sankt Georgen, Zagersdorf, 

Sankt Margarethen, and most recently Müllendorf. He chooses the higher-elevated, later-ripening 

vineyards in order to preserve the fine aromatic byplay of the Blaufränkisch and its acidity. He 

selected sites and grapes, allowed the spontaneously fermented—and without 

pied de cuve

grapes to lie a long time on their skins in open fermenters, but eschewed any temptation to 



extraction and the use of new barriques. Instead, he utilised larger, more neutral casks ranging 

from 300 to 3000 litres, which, upon assemblage of the many individual vinifications, allowed the 

terroir-distinctions of the smallest parcels to remain clear; the wines are bottled unfiltered after 

fifteen to twenty-four months. ‘If one wants to find out what the Blaufränkisch has up its sleeve, 

then you’ve got to allow it the freedom to express itself, and can’t impose a particular style, or 

subordinate yourself to any external concepts,’ says Velich. He has been admonished for 

confusing Burgenland with Burgundy, for producing atypical, too-prissy Blaufränkers, but this 


accusation is absurd. Velich says that already, older Blaufränkisch wines—because of the fruit, 

the spice and the structure of the wines—put him in mind of other regions: the Nebbiolos of 

Piemonte, the Syrahs of the Northern Rhône, and—yes—the fine Pinot Noirs of the Côte d'Or, for 

which he has had a predilection ever since he was a lad. 

 

The Blaufränkisch of My Life  

For our meeting in Berlin, he chose to show his Alte 

Reben (

vieille vignes



) Blaufränkische from Lutzmannsburg (vines up to 110 years old, growing in 

limestone-rich loess and loam) and Neckenmarkt (vines aged up to 90 years at elevations up to 

400 metres, soils based in primaeval stone) alongside 

grands crus

 from Burgundy and the finest 

Barolos. Not in order to incite a spirit of competition, but rather simply to demonstrate that 

Blaufränkisch does indeed belong among the great red wine varieties of the world. And truthfully, 

Roland Velich’s Moric wines have ‘the grandeur of a special perfume,’ as the grower himself says: 

a solid connexion to the place of their heritage, one that remains totally undistorted. 

We are tasting the 2007er Lutzmannsburger Alte Reben—like all the wines, poured into a Zalto 

Burgundy goblet. The scent of wild cherries is intense and dense, but at the same time 

uncommonly precise and focused, fresh, and multifaceted, the wine unbelievably delicately 

structured and fine on the palate; it finishes with a fine impression of mineral salts. The 2006er is 

riper, more substantial and more powerful, while remaining fine and pure. The 2006 Alte Reben 

from Neckenmarkt shows fine floral notes among the wild and vivid fruit. It shows a warm 

spiciness, is ripe, intense and sweet, but still delicate, silky and long. Above all: this one has  

breathtakingly fine tannins. Roland Velich has allowed the greatest Blaufränkisch of my life to 

happen—magical!  

 

Roland Velich   

The winegrower, born in 1963, comes from Apetlon on Lake Neuisiedl. 

After a classical Austrian career as university-dropout, ski-instructor and croupier, he managed 

the family wine estate throughout the 1990s along with his younger brother Heinz, making it one 

of the finest in the region, and created—in the Burgundian idiom, from a parcel laid out in 1961 

as a Weissburgunder vineyard—one of the best Chardonnays in Austria, Tiglat. This was one of 

the first white wines in Austria to be aged in barrique, but showed a definite Burgundian style. 

Roland Velich soon found his way to Blaufränkisch, and with it his true passion. In 2001 he 

started his Moric project on the Lutzmannsburger Plateau, initially in cooperation with Erich 

Krutzler from Südburgenland. One year later, he added the venerable Neckenmarkter vineyards, 

and then in 2006 an old Grüner Veltliner vineyard in St Georgen near Eisenstadt. In 2008 he 

embarked upon the Jagini project in Zagersdorf with Hannes Schuster, in order to preserve the 

last remaining old Blaufränkisch vines in the neighbourhood. Roland Velich lives with his wife 

Dagmar, their two children and a Hungarian hunting-dog in Grosshöflein near Eisenstadt. 



 

 

Indescribable Moric Wines      

—a fellow can abandon himself to wine, when he's earned it. And the wine can then simply reign over me... 

please! 


 

1. 


St Georgen Grüner Veltliner 2010  

 

 



 

 

18.5 points 2013-2021 



Deep straw-yellow Veltliner from old vines growing limestone, at some elevation in St Georgen north of 

Eisenstadt. The wine is more distinctively stamped by the fossil-rich soil than it is by the grape variety. Very 

profound and concentrated bouquet of rather dried fruits, along with delicate herbal notes. Nothing at all 

like the Veltliners from Lower Austria (Wachau, etc). Powerful and mineral-driven on the palate, 

unbelievably multi-faceted, a fine purist—but at the same time a big fellow with lots of muscle, that one 

should drink from a large Burgundy goblet like a 

premier cru Chablis—not too cold and not too quickly, but 

with devotion.    

 

 

 



 

 

 



Price circa 35€ 

 

2. 



Blaufränkisch Burgenland 2011   

 

 



 

 

17 Points 2013-2019 



Dark, blue-violet toned ruby colour. Wild and spicy cherry aromas, thick-skinned berry fruit, very natural and 

authentically scented, no cosmetics, wonderfully concentrated. Silky, fine and fresh in the mouth. The pure 

and fleshy berry fruit shows an animated acidic structure, just like you were eating Blaufränkisch berries 

from the vine. Absolutely pure and intense in the cherryish finish. Something like a grandmaster-design 

Blaufränkisch from a great vintage... 

  

 



 

 

Price circa 14€ 



 

3. 


Moric Reserve 2010 

 

 



 

 

 



 

18 Points 2013-2020

 

And here in the reserve wine it suddenly seems quite fine and delicate, what had begun as an elemental 



expression of Blaufränkisch, grown nearly 90% in limestone soils in Mittelburgenland. Somewhat reductive 

at first, but equipped with patience and a large glass, that proved but a minor hindrance. Black olives and 

blue berries, a hint of liquorice, pepper and leather, dried violets. I think immediately of the Cornas from 

August Clape, but then the cool freshness of the fruit brings me right back to Burgenland. Silky, perfectly 

balanced texture with almost Mediterranean spice and herbal notes. Densely woven with very fine tannins, 

at one with the delicate acidity. Once must almost sing in order to adequately describe this wine, but I’d 

rather drink it. 

What are you doing now, my good fellow? Or are you perhaps a woman? Whichever—I'm all 

yours...    

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Price circa 28€



 

 

 



4. Lutzmannsburg Alte Reben 2007   

 

 



 

 

18.5 Points, 2013-2018 



Intense wild cherry in a profound, very clear, fresh and fine bouquet. On the palate delicate, silky and fresh, 

persistently mineral-driven, with great finesse and elegance.    

 

Price circa 70€ 



 

5. Neckenmarkter Alte Reben 2006   

 

 

 



 

19 Points, 2013-2020 

...the finest and most dramatic Blaufränkisch since Paris was founded.    

Price circa 70€ 




Download 51.22 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling