Life and search of creative boundaries in the soviet epoch


 NAMES, PLOTS, SYMBOLS, SIGNS


Download 17.01 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet2/31
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi17.01 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   31

2. NAMES, PLOTS, SYMBOLS, SIGNS 

 

Art does not flourish in peace. Art is the eternal battle. 

Antoine Bourdelle

9



 



2.1 Artists in the post-revolutionary reality: a found freedom or unexpected slavery? 

 

Enough of half penny truths! 

Old trash from your hearts erase! 

Streets for paint-brushes we’ll use, 

our palettes - squares with their wide open space. 

Revolution’s days have yet to be sung by the thousand year book of time. 

Into the streets, the crowds among, 

futurists, 

drummers,  

masters of rhyme! 

 

Vladimir Mayakovsky, An Order to the Art Army, fragment, March, 1918.  



 

 

In attempt to reconstruct the artistic and historical background of the Soviet epoch, 



which  personally,  artistically  influenced  and  formed  sculptor  Nina  Slobodinskaya,  I 

would  like  to  focus  on  the  cultural  atmosphere  and  analyse  the  social  mood  in 

Russia  at  the  early  XX  century.  Despite  the  existing  vision  of  Russia  as  of  the  Euro-

Asian  periphery,  the  artistic  society  was  well  informed  on  actual  European  art 

movements.  Russian  merchants  and  Maecenas  gathered  quite  important 

collections  of  modern  art,  including  works  of  such  significant  artists  as  Cezanne, 

Matisse and  Picasso; besides frequent shows  of  European  avant-garde  works  were 

organized in Russian megalopolises.  

Consequently,  young  Russian  artists  were  often  better  acknowledged  with  recent 

artistic  developments  than  their  European  colleagues.  Grace  to  this  knowledge 

genuinely appeared Russian art, which no longer relied upon Impressionism or post-

Impressionism,  but  instead  searched  and  created  their  proper  artistic  innovations. 

For  instance,  Marc  Chagall  worked  a  lot  in  France  and  Germany,  but  he  took  his 

                                                 

9

 Kemeri, S. Visage de Bourdelle. Paris: Chamais, 1931, p.28. 



 

 

26 



subjects and inspiration from Russian life and folklore, yet his highly personal artistic 

language differed from current Russian styles

10



Regarding  the  period  of  1910  –1918ss,  it  was  obviously  marked  by  the  tendency 



(seen  at  the  exhibitions)  for  entirely  abstract,  nonrepresentational  art.  As  to  Vasiliy 

Kandinsky, he left Russia in 1896 and was on his way to become the first completely 

abstract artist, despite the fact that Russian folk art and culture played a crucial role 

in his development.  Casimir Malevich who’s Black Square of 1914 appeared to be 

the ultimate expression of his suprematism’s school, was truly committed to abstract 

painting,  emphasizing  the  spiritual  values  of  abstract  art  but  basing  his  stylistic 

searches  on  the  ancient  Russian  art

11

.  Tatlin,  Naum  Gabo,  Pevsner,  Rodchenko, 



Lizzitsky, Natalya Goncharova, Mikhail Larionov, and the sculptor Archipenko used to 

shape  an  abstract  sculpture  and  installations  from  modern,  sometimes  industrial 

materials,  having    caused  a  profound  effect  on  the  development  of  European 

sculpture; therefore - no wonder that mostly constructivism inspired the artists. From 

1914  to  1922  Kandinsky  returned  again  to  Russia,  attempting  to  help  and  reform 

Russian art schools and museums.  

Concerning an artistic panorama after the October Revolution, for a brief period the 

mentioned  previously  artists  felt  free  to  develop  and  organize  art  schools, 

establishing  principles  and  methods  which  significantly  influenced  the  Bauhaus. 

These  ideas  were  brought  from  Russia  with  Lissitzky  and  Gabo.  Unfortunately  In  a 

short  while  the  official  social  atmosphere  drastically  changed  and  became  tense; 

the  Communist  Party  decreed  a  socialist  realism  in  art  as  the  only  one  approved 

established style. Consequently there were artists who rejected painting entirely; for 

example  Tatlin  fully  concentrated  his  work  at  industrial  design  and  architecture, 

whilst others, like Lissitzky, created graphics and posters

12



As  we know Russian revolutionary artists were more than active, participating in all 

kinds of cultural and artistic events. The idea which followed new rebirth consisted of 

taking art into streets and to motivate people to become its active participants. No 

wonder  that  three  years  later  stage  director  Vsevolod  Meyerhold  staged  a 

performance which recreated the storming of the Winter Palace at the actual site 

and attracted 6.000 participants. 

 

                                                 



10

 Prutkovsky, E. The Soviet World of art. Moscow: Iskusstvo,1997, p.17. 

11

 Yakovlev, V. “Kakoi nam nujen peizazh? Zametki hudojnika”. Iskusstvo, num.5,1949, p.28. 



12

 Prutkovsky, E. The Soviet World of art. Moscow: Iskusstvo,1997, p.14.

 


 

 

27 



 

  

       



     

                                                               

Malevich, Victory Over the Sun (scenery’s sketch), 1913, pencil, paper,

 

660 × 476. 



Kandinsky, Russian woman in a Landscape, 1905, oil on canvas,

 

400 × 568. 



Malevich, Victory Over the Sun (scenery’s sketch), 1913, pencil, paper, 800 × 642. 

 

The  artists  took  part  in  the  performance  by  creating  scenery,  costumes  for  the 



spectacles, reflected in huge abstract sets of canvas and wood. The Magnanimous 

Cuckold and Tarelkin's Death (both of 1922) symbolically became a culmination in 

these series of sets. Malevich him-self took an active role in theatre’s life, creating the 

most  abstract  works  which  for  the  first  time  were  used  as  scenery  for  Kruchenikh's 

Victory  Over  the  Sun  (1913)

13

.    The  so  called  Agitprop  train  made  a  tour  in  the 



country,  full  of  artists  and  actors  who  created  plays  and  a  broadcasting 

propaganda.  Unfortunately  in  a  short  while  the  theatre’s  activities  in  their 



revolutionary  approach  were  officially  forbidden.  The  only  space  where  original 

vitality and experiment still continued appearing was work of the directors Vsevolod 

Pudovkin and also Serge Eisenstein.  

In  the  end  even  the  avant-garde  art  was  suppressed  by  the  State  as  Stalin's 

government  saw  the  socialist  realism  as  the  unique  reliable  style  which  served  to 

social  propaganda  aims.  The  creation  of  groups  of  artists  who  were  seeking  for  a 

new style, marks the period of 1922–27ss and is visually reflected in the Association of 

Russian  Revolutionary  Artists  (ARRA);  its  members  depicted  topics  such  as  the 

revolution. S. Karpov and painter Katzman were founders and leaders of the ARRA. 

D.  Kardovski  contributed  significantly,  creating  the  whole  series  of  illustrations, 

portraying history of the revolution. In general terms stark realism prevailed in works 

                                                 

13

 Yakovlev, V. “Kakoi nam nujen peizazh? Zametki hudojnika”. Iskusstvo, num.5,1949, p.29. 



 

 

28 



of Soviet artists during the II World War period. Dormidontov's Flames over Leningrad, 

Gaponenko’s  Slaveholders  appear  as  illustrative  examples.  In  regard  of  the 

association’s  activists  such  was  the  artist  Lansere  who  exposed  his  paintings 

(illustrating the work of Soviet construction) at the Moscow railway stations

14

.  


In  regard  of  Soviet  sculpture,  which  treated  the  same  officially  requested  subjects 

and issues, it tended towards the monumental forms. In the sculptural range stand 

out two famous works: the statue of Karl Marx (elaborated in 1918 by A. Matveyev in 

St Petersburg (former Leningrad)) and the colossal Lenin’s memorial near town Tiflis 

created  by  Schadr.  Simultaneously  the  increasing  influence  of  Western  art 

movements  was  casted  away  by  the  state  in  the  early  1930s.  The  painting  duo 

Komar and Melamid in the West gained enormous popularity in the society using an 

academic style to satirize Soviet art and politics in the 1930s

15



Meanwhile Russian goldsmiths’ and silversmiths' work of this period is remarkable for 



splendour,  richness  of  colour  through  polychrome  enamelling,  and  most  known  for 

original use of jewels. In the XVIII century its work was traditionally Muscovite, but the 

XIX  and  XX  centuries  marked  a  tendency  to  French  influences.  Peter  Faberge 

certainly  stands  out  in  a  range  of  Russian  goldsmiths.  It  would  not  be  complete 

without  mentioning  the  Imperial  Easter  Eggs  which  he  elaborated  for  the  Russian 

court  and  which  are  considered  among  the  most  exquisite  of  all  goldsmiths'  work 

ever created

16



 

Matveev, Carl Marx’s monument, 1918, bronze. 

                                                 

14

 Ibid, p.28. 



15

 Arvatov, B. "Iskusstvo v sisteme proletarskoi kul'tury". Na putiakh iskusstva, num.47, 1926, p.12.

 

16

 Prutkovsky, E. The Soviet World of art. Moscow: Iskusstvo,1997, p.19. 



 

 


 

 

29 



 

               

                                              

 

Matveev, Carl Marx’s monument, 1918, bronze. 



Chadr, V. Lenin, 1934, marble. 

 

The  Russian  enamelling  is  presumably  the  most  characteristic  of  all  the  decorative 



arts of Russia, as well as one of the most ancient. The Greco-Scythian work found in 

the  tumuli  of  southern  Russia  gave  evidence  that  Russian  artificers  were  not 

exceptionally  influenced  by  Byzantine  models;  however  there  always  were  many 

renowned  Byzantine  specimens  in  Caucasia.  The  historical  collisions  conditioned 

Mongolian  strong  influences  on  Russian  art  of  enamelling,  as  well  as  on  all  other 

types of art, though at this time Western influences were also making themselves felt. 

Hence the best of Russian enamels are the result of Asian and European influences 

together  with  proper  folk  traditional  art.  The  barbarian  feeling  was  predominant  in 

much  of  Russian  art;  especially  it  may  be  seen  in  the  imperial  orb,  from  the  Old 

Russian  regalia  of  the  XVII  century

17

.  Regarding  Russian  folk  traditions,  they  were 



represented,  for  instance,  in  toys,  domestic  and  farm  utensils,  carvings,  door  and 

window-frame  decorations,  remained  not  influenced  by  Byzantine  and  Western 

traditions. 

 

                                                 



17

 Arvatov, B. "Iskusstvo v sisteme proletarskoi kul'tury". Na putiakh iskusstva, num.47,1926, p.13.

 


 

 

30 



 

Photo of a traditional peasant’s wooden house, XVIII c., Tomsk, unknown author. 

 

 

Photo of a typical peasant’s house, 1950s, Russia, unknown author. 



 

After  the  Revolution  and  especially  after  Stalin’s  political  victory  by  1930,  fields  of 

culture and art in Russia were controlled, determined and dictated exceptionally by 

the governmental policy. Accordingly all artistic aesthetics and style was on service 

of  the  Soviet  regime

18

.  Generally  speaking  we  may  define  three  basic  lines  of  the 



post-revolutionary XX century Russian art. Two of them were a vivid reminiscent of a 

foreign  creative  influence  and  the  third  followed  the  governmental  statements  of 

accusations  of  Western  artistic  styles.  The  first  represented  the  trend,  developed  in 

                                                 

18

 Juviler, N. "Forbidden Fruit". Problems of Communism, XI, Number 3, May/June,1962, p.42. 



 

 

31 



XIX  century.  The  Byzantine  iconography  was  chosen  to  glorify  the  new  Soviet 

regime’s  culture  among  the  masses.  It  stylistically  reproduced  (the  firmly  existing  in 

conscience of the patriarchal society with strong religious beliefs) archetypes using 

icon  painting  style  and  form  in  order  to  introduce  new  politic  ideas.  The  main 

purpose was to replace the traditional religious values: figures of saints, Jesus Christ 

and God had to be substituted with new idols - Soviet Leaders, in order to achieve 

their adoration, what consequently would lead to new regime’s acceptance and a 

faithful  obedience.  In  pursuance  of  achieving  this  goal,  the  state  used  traditional 

devotion of Russian population to icons as a tool to conquer nation’s mind and thus 

created mass-produced iconographic representations. The idolization of Lenin and 

Stalin  had  to  replace  the  religious  feeling  which  was  defined  as  a  superstition, 

neglected and condemned for oblivion. Thus, images of new soviet leaders had to 

be collocated in the place for centuries defined for icons’ veneration and praying – 

Red corner

19

.  



In respect of the second phase of early XX century Russian art, it may be defined as 

the phase of experimentation and can be displayed by the creative work of such 

artists  as  Malevich,  Goncharova,  Larionov,  Popova,  who  created  their  proper 

innovative  artistic  forms  and  styles  having  experienced  an  overwhelming  Russian 

and European artistic education, which, consequently influenced the western artists. 

Those  artists  without  any  doubt  were  on  the  top  of  the  most  experimental 

revolutionary and radical artistic wave of the new Soviet society

20

.  



The  third  phase  of  Russian  art  in  the  early  XX  century  is  traditionally  defined  as  a 

socialist  realist  art  in  approximately  1930.  The  State  by  the  moment  had  clear  and 

determined statements corresponded to art, which was considered as the main and 

effective  tool  to  impose  new  ideas  of  the  new  Communist  Regime  and  to  be 

assimilated by nation’s minds in the shortest terms. 

Some of the main traits of the established official art were following:  

 



Idealization of the surrounding life 

 



Visualization  of  Soviet  leader’s  adoration,  to  be  more  precise  -  an 

implantation of top Soviet figures in people’s conscience and subconscience 

as if they were religious figures, further historically defined as personality’s cult  

                                                 

19

 Simmons, E. Negotiating on Cultural Exchanges. Boston: The World Peace Foundation, 1951, p.268. 



20

 Fox, C. The Exchange of Easel and Plastic Arts: Soviet-American Cultural Relations, 1945-76 (PhD 

Thesis). USA: Tufts University, 1977, p.12-19.

 


 

 

32 



 

New type  of  hero  had  to  be  introduced  and  be  widely displayed  in art  – a 



simple worker, a peasant, always linked to the theme of labour  

At one hand the Soviet government exalted and praised a working class, which now 

was  officially  recognized  as  the  central  figure  in  the  Communist  state,  but  at  the 

other hand the soviet government made obvious its requests towards the mentioned 

class, proclaiming that a Soviet citizen will be honoured only if he will be an active 

constructor  of  the  lighter  future,  serving  and  obeying  his  government’s  policy 

completely and with all his fervent loyalty. Images of Soviet workers in art had to give 

a direct promoting message to all potential spectators – the depicted figures had to 

manifest  their  optimism,  happiness,  trust  and  confidence  in  a  forthcoming  happy 

future,  which  grace  to  the  every  day’s  population’s  efforts  was  quickly 

approximating.  Any  neutral  artistic  subjects  (often  appeared  in  the  Russian  avant-

garde  art)  were  not  approved  as  did  not  carry  in  them  any  use,  not  serving  for 

political aims, and thus were not desirable

21



The  Soviet  government’s  expectations  were  clearly  determined  in  Zhdanov’s 



speech, at the First All-Union Congress of Soviet Writers in 1934: “Artists must know life 

so  as  to  be  able  to  depict  it  truthfully  in  works  of  art,  to  depict  it  not  in  a  dead, 

scholarly way, not simply as objective reality, but to depict reality in its revolutionary 

development. In addition to this, the truthfulness and historical concreteness of the 

artistic  portrayal  should  be  combined  with  the  ideological  remoulding  and 

education of working people in the spirit of socialism”

22

.  


Many  historians  criticize  the  soviet  leadership  for  the  declarations  made  in  the 

congress. Y. Pismenny observes: "There is no other sector of Soviet life in which Party 

policy  has  been  as  inconsistent  as  in  the  arts”

23

.  The  whole  theory  of  a  communist 



state functioning and the main approach was adapted from Karl Marx theoretical 

works. Presumably, the young communists faced troubles in determining the exact 

place of Arts, its main functions and limitations, as in Karl Marx’s works a subject of 

Art’s  role  was  not  widely  discussed  or  defined:  “The  development  in  all  aspects  of 

social reality is determined, in the final analysis, by the self-development of material 

                                                 

21

  Gray,


 

Camilla whose  The  Russian  Experiment  in  Art  (New York:  Harry  Abrams,  1970.)  is a  significant  research  on 

Russian avant-garde art, dates the end of the Russian avant-garde official active appearance at about 1922. While 

Costakis, George  - the preeminent collector of Russian avant-garde art, dated the end of the avant-garde period 

as 1926 or 1927 in a personal interview with already mentioned Camilla Gray on November 16, 1973.  

22

 Zhdanov, A. "Official Speech of Greeting from the Central Committee of the Communist Party and the Soviet 



Government to the First Congress of Soviet Writers in Moscow on August 17, 1934”. Essays on Literature, Philosophy, 

and Music. New York: InternationalPublishers, 1950, pp.15-31.

 

23

 Pismenny, Y.  “Lenin and the Arts.Germany: Institute for the Study of the U.S.S.R.”. April 28, 1970, p.2 .



 

 

 

33 



production. Art, like law or the state, for example, has no independent history, i.e., 

outside the brains of ideologists. In reality, literature and art are conditioned by the 

entire historical development of society”

24

.  



Karl Marx only hinted at the possible fruitful collaboration which may appear if art will 

be at the State’s service. The communist leaders had to develop the methodology 

and strict aesthetic borders by their own means. 

In order to understand the origin and the roots of the planned state’s  Art program 

we  should  address  to  Lenin’s  statements:  “Our  opinion  on  art  is  not  the  important 

thing.  Nor  it  is  much  of  consequence  what  art  means  to  a  few  hundreds  or  even 

thousands out of a population counted by millions. Art belongs to people. Its roots 

should be deeply implanted in the very thick of the  labouring masses. It should be 

understood  and  loved  by  these  masses.  It  must  unite  and  elevate  their  feelings, 

thoughts  and  will.  It  must  stir  to  activity  and  develop  the  art  instincts  within  them. 

Should  we  serve  exquisite  sweet  cake  to  a  small  minority  while  the  workers  and 

peasants masses are in need of black bread”

25

 ? 


Lenin’s opinion is clear and leaves no doubt: art is not precious by itself. It becomes 

only a tool to serve to the party’s needs, - mainly to attract masses.  The very nature 

of Art which signifies personal artistic liberty, and first of all, a freedom of choice, of a 

subject matter, style, motive, genre of depiction, - everything is neglected. So far the 

very condition of Art – a free creativity is disapproved by Lenin. To be more precise, 

he  denies  its  true  essence,  its  independent  value  and  character.  With  a  full 

conscience, he gives a verdict to the further role and fate of all art’s development in 

the communist’s epoch. Lenin turns art into a slave, an obedient tool, a machine - to 

reflect,  to  affirm,  to  promote  and  to  impose  a  mythological  state  of  happiness

utopian dream, which the Soviet State finally uses as promised sweet cake to justify 

an  enormous  work’s  efforts  requested  from  people  by  the  government

26

.  Certainly 



                                                 

24

 Lifshitz, M. The Philosophy of Karl Marx. New York: Critics Group, 1938, p.60. 



25

 Zetkin, Clara. My Recollections of Lenin. Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House, 1956, pp.19-

20. 

26

 In order to get a coherent picture of the approach bases in the official art we should address to the 



main art propaganda sources and glorifiying descriptions of the true Soviet art achievements. There we 

may follow the general line of artists’ approvals whose works are judged under the unique criteria - 

loyalty to the new political regime. To see more on this issue: Сарабьянова, Д.В. Под ред.  История 

русского и советского искусства. M.: Высшая школа, 1979; История советской архитектуры. 1917-

1958. М.:

 

Искусство, 1962; Виноградова, Е. К. Современная советская графика. М.: Внешторгиздат, 



1978; Измайлова, Т.А., Айвазян,  М.А. Искусство Армении. М.: Азбука, 1962; Кириллов, В.В. Путь 

поиска и эксперимента. М.: 1 Наука, 1967; Кудрявцева, З.Н. Искусство Советской Прибалтики. М.: 

Внешторгиздат, 1971; Лебедев, П.И. Советское искусство в период иностранной интервенции и 



гражданской войны. М.-Л.: Искусство, 1949;  Суздалев, П.К. История советской живописи. М.: 

 

 

34 



Lenin is right  when  he  affirms  that in  previous  epoch  the  art  was a  privilege  of  the 

social elite, but its obedience to a principal task as to teach the masses following the 

party’s  instructions  brought  an  unexpected  result  to  the  communists.  What  Lenin 

would  not  consider  it  is  an  existence  of  such  a  notion  in  art  as  truthfulness  of 

depiction,  which  was  able  to  convince  masses  only  if  an  artist  was  sincere  in 

illustration of his ideas on canvas, otherwise it brought a feeling of false and a fraud. 

If  artist  under  the  social  order’s  pressure  creates  a  work  of  art,  he  is  not  able  to 

transmit  the  idea  more  than  formally,  and  masses  will  not  perceive  it  as  a  sincere 

message and unconditional postulate.  

This category reflects spiritual and energetic issues of art, but its visual evidence and 

a negative consequence caused by Lenin’s definition of art as a slave of the state is 

an  ofitsioznoe  iskussto  -  a  post-soviet  determination  given  by  art  historians  to 

evaluate artists and the idealized soviet art, created formally. To be more exact it is 

a  definition  given  to  the  artists  which  accepted  their  role  of  the  State’s  servants  

(sincerely  not  believing  in  communism)  in  exchange  of  social  privileges,  actively 

producing  multiples  images  of  communist  leaders,  Lenin  and  Stalin,  –  always  

positively, idealistically, depicted them as sacred figures as well as creating utopic 

images of a light communism’s future. The idealized happy soviet reality was among 

their favourite subjects, but already in the late 1950s these kinds of artists were highly 

disapproved and secretly criticized by the proper Soviet society; it’s fake and false 

imagery’s  nature  was  too  obvious,  especially  for  the  population  which  stayed  in 

constant fear for their lives.  

Lenin’s role in art’s development did not stop there. He broadened his thoughts and 

shared the more precise vision:” In a society which is based on private property an 

artist produces for market, needs  of customers. Our revolution  frees artists from the 

yoke  of  these  extremely  prosaic  conditions.  It  turned  the  state  into  their  defender 

and  client  providing  them  with  orders.  Every  artist,  and  everyone  who  considers 

himself  such,  has  the  right  to  create  freely,  to  follow  his  ideal,  regardless  of 

everything.  But  then,  we  are  communists  and  ought  not  to  stand  idly  by  and  give 

                                                                                                                                                        

Сов.художник, 1978; Тугенхольд, Я. Искусство Октябрьской эпохи. М.: Гос.Издат., 1935. Хазанова, В. 

Советская архитектура первых лет Октября. М.: Искусство. 1973; Федоров-Давыдов, А.А. 

Советский пейзаж. М.: Сов.художник, 1964. 

 


 

 

35 



chaos free rein to develop. We should steer this process according to a worked-out 

plan and must shape its results

27

“. 


Lenin contradicts him-self promising freedom to the artists, but simultaneously taking 

it away, imposing instead an exact plan to be executed together with the ideals to 

follow.  Saying  that,  Lenin  hints  at  fact  that  the  new  Soviet  state  will  work  and 

collaborate only with artists who share and confess the affirmed ideology. The future 

art  context  in  Russia  will  just  confirm  and  visualize  this  Lenin’s  promise,  and  his  firm 

statements. 

From  the  first  Lenin’s  declarations  artists  are  condemned  to  the  dramatic  conflict, 

which soon is reflected in the field of Art. This conflict became a personal drama of 

an every sincere and independent artist who chose this  profession to be able and 

freely  express  their  feelings  and  beliefs;  meanwhile  the  party  took  charge  of  their 

activities and turned them into a kind of proper slaves. The most important category 

and  condition  of  free  expression  in  Art  –  a  spiritual  category  was  prohibited  and 

neglected.  Effectively on  this  basis art  lost  its  spiritual  aspect  and even its  essential 

sense.  The  final  redefinition  and  kind  of  the  replacement  of  a  notion  of  art  as  a 

synonym  of  true,  sincere  self-expression  happened  in  the  late  1930.  The  bright 

passion to abstract art prevailed in Russia during the years of The Civil War, while the 

government was too busy with the main task of a proper survival and so far closed 

eyes on the independence of art development. Actually this short historical period 

may be defined as the most free and independent for artists and as history shows– 

the  most  creatively  productive  and  brilliant.  Artists  were  full  of  hopes  and  illusions, 

sincerely  believing  that  the  October  Revolution  would  put  an  end  to  the  social 

injustices, bringing a better future. The communist party’s attitude towards the actual 

art development was clearly defined in the article: “A waiting policy with respect to 

the art of painting, as bourgeois influence was still strong in this field and didn't serve 

the  revolution  directly"

28

.  Never  again  the  soviet  reality  could  be  so  proud  of  its 



democratic  approach  as  in  1919.  The  recognized  figures  of  abstract  art  such  as 

Alexander Rodchenko and Malevich were invited as lectures and professors to give 

classes  in  the  Moscow  State  Art  School.  Such  legendary  figures  as  Vladimir  Tatlin, 

Naum Gabo and Antoine Pevsner were also among the teachers. 

                                                 

27

 Zetkin, Clara. My recollections of Lenin. Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House, 1956, pp.19-20. 



28

 Uitz, Bela. "Fifteen Years of Art in the U.S.S.R.". International Literature, n.4, 1933, p.143. 



 

 

36 



Young  artists,  interested  in  abstract  forms  had  chance  to  attend  classes  of  The 

Institute of Art Culture, created in 1920 by V. Kandinsky. 

In a short while the controversy disputes overwhelmed the artistic audiences; in 1920 

professors and apprentices were divided into the discussion of the main role of Art in 

revolution.  They  naively  believed  that  the  party  would  let  them  participate  in  the 

vital artistic debates and in decision taking. The future showed that the party was just 

waiting  in  order  to  strengthen  its  position  and  power,  before  revealing  its  true 

purpose  defined  for  art  (and  the  role  which  it  was  going  to  impose  to  the  free 

thinking artists). The artists who changed the School for the service to the Revolution 

developed  and  expanded  the  art  of  posters  which  would  become  a  one  of  the 

principle tools of the propaganda and mass attraction for the nearest decades.  

The  poster  during  the  first  communist’s  years  of  governing  discovered  itself  as  a 

unique  tool  with  broad  artistic  means  which  was  able  to  expressively  and  brightly 

visualize  the  revolutionary  slogans.  From  now  and  on  poster  becomes  the  most 

significant  ideological  weapon  which  effectively  manipulates  and  leads  the  wide 

population’s  mass.  The  Bolsheviks  quickly  realized  its  aesthetic  effectiveness  and 

accessibility – and by 1930 this art form definitely strengthened its position.  

The  year  of  1922  was  indicative  for  the  clear  definition  of  the  new  government’s 

tendency: the Communist Government celebrated 5 years of its Anniversary. It was 

a  significant  date  and  therefore  a  number  of  official  acts  took  place.  The  artistic 

field  performed  a  fabulous  exhibition,  which  united  the  old  Wanderers  School  of 

nineteenth-century,  realists  together  with  the  contemporary  artists  which  mainly 

welcomed  the  Revolution  and  sincerely  expressed  their  hopes,  fascination,  and 

enthusiasm in the variety of artistic imagery. It was the unique period in Russian art 

development, as the state still did not show its cruelty and suppression to the artistic 

field;  that  was  the  main  reason  why  still  free  artists  sincerely  demonstrated  their 

admiration  and  joyful  satisfaction  of  the  political  events.  This  exhibition  marks  the 

most  exciting  point  the  artists  ever  achieved  under  the  Soviet  regime.  No  wonder 

that  the  mentioned  exhibition  received  the  official  approval  of  the  party  and 

public’s acknowledgement

29

.   


It  is  not  surprising  at  all  that  the  Wonders  got  such  a  high  evaluation  of  the  Soviet 

regime: travelling through the lands of Empire and displaying social disorders, misery 

and  poverty,  which  indicated  at  the  Governmental  equivocations  and  revealed 

                                                 

29

 Uitz, Bela. "Fifteen Years of Art in the U.S.S.R.". International Literature, n.4, 1933, p.40. 



 

 

37 



another face of the Russian reality, they reaffirmed and justified the significance and 

necessity of the October Revolution. Especially Ilya Repin was outlined as an artist. 

Curiously  but  the  artist  himself  neglected  the  social  significance  of  his  painting. 

Apparently Ilya Repin disapproved the new social changes of XX century Russia – it 

explains his exile (on proper initiative) to Finland where he remained till his death

30

.  



 

 

    



 

V. Perov, Children - orphans at the cemetery, 1874, oil on canvas. 

I. Repin, Burlaks on Volga, 1974, oil on canvas. 

 

The new regime’s unacceptance of such a prominent figure in art as Ilya Repin



31

  is 


quite  significant  and  reveals  the  part  of  the  society  –  representatives  of  the  old 

Russia, especially Russian group of intelligentsia; before the Revolution they used to 

criticize  the  Imperial  regime  through  a  variety  of  artistic  and  literary  forms  and 

means,  but  its  criticism  bore  the  form  of  inquiries,  made  to  the  Royal  government; 

they  aimed  to  awake  awareness  of  the  severe  reality in  order  to  achieve  a  social 

and  active  governmental  reaction,  which  would    consequently  awake  a  national 

consciousness  and  give  a  response  to  the  nation’s  needs.  That  criticism  was 

constructive and positive in its appeal, but it did not aim to destruct all the existed 

political and social order.  

                                                 

30

 Грабарь, И. Илья Репин. Монография в 2-х томах, М.: Изд-во АН СССР, 1963, 1964, C.252-281. 



31

 The subject of the Wanderers and their crucial significance for the realist art of the late XIX and the 

early XX century is widely revealed in the epoch’s archivized documents and letters : Товарищество 

передвижных художественных выставок. Письма и документы. Москва: Искусство, Т. 1, 2, 1987. As 

well as in the lectures of  Троицкий, Н. Россия в XIX веке. Курс лекций. М.: Искусство, 1997. The artistic 

approach of the painters and their enthusiastic devotion to the activites of the artists’ group is obvious 

in the work of Нестеров, М. Давние дни. М.: Искусство, 1959, C.34-51. 



 

 

38 



Therefore the same intelligentsia class showed its disagreement with the change of 

the  regime  and  the  imposed  new  values  which  contradicted  and  neglected  the 

very  essence  of  the  national  character,  based  in  deep  religious  feeling.  The 

conceptual and abstract art faced dramatic changes in the social mood during the 

next  few  years,  but  its  crucial  point  was  achieved  in  1924,  when  the  famous 

Discussion  Exhibition  took  place  in  Moscow

32

.  The  artistic  opposition  was  organized 



consciously. Like in the battle’s field the enemies dislocated their troops - just ones in 

front of others. Artworks of avant-garde and the ones of realist artists were exhibited 

separately

33

,  silently  proposing  the  audience  to  make  a  comparison  and  as  the 



public  will  further  understand  –  to  make  a  choice.  Though,  choice  was  quite  an 

illusion,  as  we  already  know  in  the  historical  perspective,  the  party  already  would 

have taken the decision, choosing the visually direct and appealing realism.  

However the party still was hiding its authoritarian nature and did not aim to openly 

impose  its  will,  instead  it  smartly  staged  the  plot  of  the  event  (organizing  the 

inauguration  of  the  exhibition,  where  the  artists  of  the  avant-garde  were  officially 

blamed and neglected) achieving the desirable point – to give its crucial verdict to 

the  left  art  movements.  The  further  events’  development  was  predictable.  The 

suprematism,  cubo-futurism,  constructivism,  and  rayonnism,  among  others  were 

blamed  and  condemned  as  socially  undesirable.  The  party’s  performance  was  so 

well  organized  that  the  artists  felt  totally devastated.  The  official verdict  was  given 

by Nikolai Bukharin which clearly defined the preference of the social mood which 

was given to the realistic art

34

.  



The beginning of a new artistic era was marked by the dramatic expelling of a non-

presentational art. The new artistic direction was clearly defined by the Communist 

leaders. That was a significant historical point for the Fine arts. Finally artists realized - 

the so called artistic freedom will not last anymore and the strengthened State finally 

showed its true aggressive and possessive nature.  

Moreover, it was a point when the creators and followers of a non-presentational art 

had to make a conscientious and a difficult choice: whether they should continue 

being faithful to their artistic preferences and in this case they turned to be a subject 

of social criticism and unacceptance in the fatherland or  whether they should apt 

                                                 

32

 

Революция, быт и труд. Каталог VI выставки картин, М.: АХРР, 1924, pp.11-19.



 

33

 



Иванов, С. Хронология. Неизвестный соцреализм. Ленинградская школа. СПб.: НП-Принт, 2007, 

С.380.


 

34

 



Ibid, pp.357-380.

 


 

 

39 



for compromise with a proper conscience and in that case, they would be able to 

survive in the new state. The challenge was dramatic. Independently of the made 

choice, all artists faced crucial changes and  experienced misfortunes in their lives. 

The  ones  who  had  possibilities  and  left  the  country,  staying  in  the  exile  for  the 

decades,  strongly  felt  rootlessness  and  despair,  missing  their  fatherland,  and  losing 

their inspirational source in face of native land. Meanwhile others who stayed and 

tried to struggle for their independent artistic freedom, soon were oppressed by the 

government by means of social official pressure or even condemned to death and 

oblivion in the camps of concentration, bearing a cliche of a nation’s enemy

35

.  


Would it be justified to suggest that ones or others had a better fate? The response 

would  differ  in  every  case.  The  artists  that  did  not  believe  in  the  new  system  but 

openly  manifested  their  full  obedience  and  acceptance  to  the  social  order,  fully 

devoting  their  creative  work  to  depict  the  series  of  pleasing  to  the  Government 

imagery – gained the state’s awards, financial rewards and official recognition, but 

lost the battle with a proper conscience. Obviously there were artists who sincerely 

believed in a new state and its methods, enthusiastically venerating its ideals in their 

art. There were also artists who remaining under the political and artistic pressure still 

were able to survive creatively and personally, sometimes with the artistic means, in 

some cases finding neutral subjects and genres in art, which did not contradict their 

beliefs  and  convictions.  The  multifaceted  reality  gives  us  the  variety  of  responses, 

mirrored  in  the  individual  fates  of  prominent  artists.  Definitely  the  only  figure  which 

certainly achieved its goals through the means of art in this historical period was an 

impersonal State’s machine, which in shortest terms achieved a sincere admiration 

in hearts of naive people, and the fear of others. 

Exactly  in  Stalin’s  epoch  artists  were  completely  instructed  on  the  subjects  and 

artistic methods they were now obligated to follow and introduce. The severe norms 

were proclaimed. From now and on among the main subjects in art were depiction 

of  soviet  communist  leaders  and  revolution’s  fighters  -  Lenin  and  Stalin.    Even  the 

manner  of  their  portrayal  was  detailed:  the  communist  leaders  had  to  be  shown 

realistically  and  always  glorified.  The  curious  thing  which  apparently  was  never 

officially mentioned during the Soviet epoch but became an unpronounced official 



law  –  both  legendary  leaders  were  visualized  significantly  higher  than  they  really 

                                                 

35

 Солженицын, А.И. Архипелаг ГУЛАГ: Опыт художественного исследования1918–1956. в 3 т., Paris: 



YMCA-Press, 1973—1975, pp.112-138.

 


 

 

40 



were.  Stalin  did  not  request  realistic  justice  and  truthfulness  of  the  depiction  in  his 

proper case

36

.  


Other  subject  approved  by  Stalin  was  labour  and  its  glorification:  workers  in  a 

factory, or a peasant, occupied by work. The party went further – it defined even a 

number  of  strict  norms  of  a  depiction  method.  Realism  became  the  uniquely 

approved style.  As to peasants and working-class depictions, every art piece had to 

manifest  optimism  and  joy,  however  only  a  hint  of  a  smile  on  the  portrayed  faces 

was  allowed.  The  message  had  to  be  clear  and  appealing,  not  containing  any 

other  coded  message.  The  picture’s  composition  had  to  be  laconic  and 

understandable for masses. The idea of communist’s heads consisted of creation of 



Communist’s mythological space – place full of joy and happiness - kind of a fairy-

land of a forthcoming future, which would lead to a permanent state of happiness 

and well-being. The multiplicity of artistic visualizations aimed to provoke associations 

and  in  their  turn  make  the  people  believe  in  achieve  of  the  pictorial  fairy  land  – 

which  in  reality  turned  to  be  a  utopic  dream.  The  Communists  did  not  create 

anything  new,  but  just  used  and  substituted  the  existing  antique  archetype  which 

was always present in the nation’s conscience – a legendary Kitej-Grad

37



 In order to limit a thematic variety the party declared that the use of other subjects 

in art, - pointed at the bourgeois influences of the West, which were unacceptable 

by the Soviet State. In 1928 the new governmental structure in definite terms settled 

its requirements towards the artists under the first five year plan. 

 



Download 17.01 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   31




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling