Life and search of creative boundaries in the soviet epoch


 Uzbek’s portrayal - a tendency in Russian artists’ works


Download 17.01 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet23/31
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi17.01 Mb.
1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   31

6.13 Uzbek’s portrayal - a tendency in Russian artists’ works 

 

A  number  of  ½  of  XX  century  Russian  artists  were  amazed  by  Samarkand  bright 

colours and light’s atmosphere and effects.

 

Petrov-Vodkin visited the Middle Asia in 



1920s  with  a  scientific  expedition  and  describes  his  impressions  in  his  Samarkandia 

Diaries: “Here is Shahi-Zinda, - as soon as I saw its domes – I loved them”. The artist 

observed  colourful  richness  of  Uzbekistan:  “I  could  see  the  sky  at  any  hour.  This 

intersection  of  ultramarine,  sapphire,  cobalt  put  on  fire  the  soil,  rocks,  turning  the 

green  plants  into  nothing,  creating  an  effect  of  silver;  accordingly  such  seems  a 

geographical  colour  of  the  country  –  in  these  two  antipodes  of  sky  and  soil.  It 

provides in Samarkandia a feeling of swelter, heat and fire under the cup of sky. A 

man  feels  uncomfortable  under  these  colourful  poles,  and  the  eastern  creativity 


 

 

309 



allowed an accord, having created a colour of turquoise. It is additional towards to 

the  fire  of  soil;  it  outlines  the  basic  blue,  giving  it  an  exit  by  the  mixture  of  green 

nuances. The Aralskoye Sea hinted artists at this turquoise. My first exclamation to my 

friends  was:  “But  it  is  water!  It  is  a  turquoise  incantation  of  desert’s  fieriness!  In 

guessing  of  this  colour  in  mosaics  and  majolica  consists  a  coloristic  genius  of  the 

East”


377

 



     

 

K. Petrov-Vodkin, Shahi-Zinda, 1920s, oil on canvas.   I. Mashkov, Still-life, 1940s, oil on canvas. 



 

          

 

N. Karahan, Road to Kishlak, 1930-1940ss, oil on canvas.      R. Falk, Samarkand, 1943, watercolour. 



                                                 

377


 Петров-Водкин, К. Хлыновск. Пространство Эвклида. Самаркандия. М.: Искусство, 1970, C.52-79. 

 

 

310 



Speaking in general terms, an interest of Russian artists of XX century towards the East 

was probably even higher than to the West.  D. Sarabianov suggested that Russian 

artists  were  able  to  perceive  the  essence  of  Eastern  beauty,  but  a  viewer  can 

admire  this  Asian  life  from  outside  as  distant  viewers  –  they  are  not  able  to  enter 



inside – this life’s side is not available for him. The East remains as a dream, kind of a 

utopic image, which may be admired at a distance being to the romantic dream. 

Russian avant-garde artists were interested in East by its image’s system and artistic 

language. Velimor Hlebnikov also developed interest towards East. In the early 1910s 

N.  Goncharova  officially  neglected  the  West  and  turned  to  the  East,  identifying 

Russia  with  East

378

.  One  of  the  theoreticians  of  Larionov’s  group  A.  Chevchenko 



developed this idea in one of his books

379


. In his manifests Larionov also indicated at 

the sameness of Russia and East. Iakulov being close to Larionov in 1914 published a 

manifest  We  and  the  West  where  together  with  L.  Lurie  and  B.  Livshits  where  was 

defined  the  Eastern  essence  of  Russian  art  as  a  trait  of  Russian  mentality  was 

observed  tendency  to  subconscious  and  irrational.  Therefore  theoretically  the 

interest  towards  East  existed  among  Russian  avant-garde  artists  especially  in  the 

early  period  of  their  development.  N.  Goncharova  in  her  figurative  compositions 

often  was  oriented  at  Skiff  women  (postures,  schematic  movements).  Skiff  culture 

she  relates  to  the  Eastern  culture  and  suggests  it  as  an  alternative  to  the 

European


380

. Decorativism of her Peacock of 1912 in antique Egyptian style, Persian 

elements, eastern ornaments of wall paper decoration which Goncharova painted 

together with Larionov as a background of her still-lives. All indicates at her interest 

towards East. Larionov often uses Turk motives in lithographic books as Gypsy woman 

(1908),  Eastern  personages  in  and  objects  in  mythic  cycle  Travel  to  Turkey  etc. 

Perfect  image  of  East  as  a  fairy-tale  land  or  dream-land  of  harmony  and  beauty 

unites avant-garde artists with other Russian artists, where a man, nature and culture 

create a harmonic wholeness and union. In general terms: “Eastern world embodies 

an image of the Earth’s paradise. It is a blessed ground, oasis of joy and happiness. 

Almost  all  art  works  fit  into  a  notion  of  East’s  image  and  preserves  traits  of 

utopianism”

381

.  An  interest  to  a  deep  psychological  analysis  in  Uzbek’s  portrayal 



                                                 

378


 Гончарова, Наталия. Предисловие к каталогу выставкиМастера искусства об искусстве. М.: 

Том седьмой, 1970, С.487. 

379

 Шевченко, А. Неопримитивизм. Его теория. Его возможности. Его достижения. М.:



 

Сов. 


художник, 1913, C.25-47. 

380


 Сарабьянов, Д.В. Русская живопись. Пробуждение памяти. М.: Искусствознание, 1998, C.432. 

381


 Ibid, p.432. 

 

 

311 



which showed Russian artists - is not a singular case but rather a tendency which can 

be followed in other art forms and genres. Regarding painting, the best reflection of 

the  common  artistic  purpose  we  can  find  in  K.  Petrov-Vodkin’s  work  Portrait  of  an 

Uzbek boy of 1921: thoughtful and careful artist’s gaze reveals a complex and rich 

inner  psychological  life  of  the  model.  Open  and  direct gaze  of  the  portrayed  boy 

charms  a  viewer,  disclosing  its  inner  purity,  soul’s  beauty,  and  fineness.  The  neutral 

plane background accentuates brightness and vividness of Uzbek boy’s gaze and 

the wholeness of his image, resembling the tradition of icon painting. 

Getmanskaya in her Uzbek’s portrait work also gives a profound characteristic of the 

boy’s  individuality  by  means  of  multiples  contrasts  of  light  and  shadows  which 

emphasize and deepen the controversy and complexity of Uzbek’s personality.  

As  to  Nina  Slobodinskaya’s  fellows-sculptors  contemporaries  -  Leningrad  artist  and 

her  close  friend  and  colleague  A.  Ignatiev  during  few  years  worked  on  sculptural 

image  of  the  famous  Asian  poet  –  Djambul

382


.  Ignatiev  in  realistic  method 

interpreted the rich complexity of the prominent poet. The bronze material outlines 

the  sharpness  of  face  traits  and  reveals  a  deep  mental  work  of  the  portrayed, 

convincing a viewer of his deep wisdom and high spirituality (see cap.3).  



 

Petrov Vodkin, Boys, Samarkandia, 1926, oil on canvas. 

                                                 

382


 It becomes obvious that East motives traditionally inspired the whole Galaxy of artists in the late XIX – 

first half of XX century. However, there were artists in whose creative work East motives take the central 

role not just in artistic aspect, but also in its philosophical world view aspects. In order to learn more on 

this subject one may address to the following materials: Беликов, П.Ф., Князева, В.П. Свет Шамаблы. 



Духовная кульутра Востока в жизни и творчестве Рерихов.  Самара: ГМВ, 1996; Кузнецов П.В. От 

Саратова до Бухары. M.: Горная Бухара, 1923;  Якимович, А.К. Двадцатый век: Искусство; Культура; 

Картина мира: От импрессионизма до классического авангарда. М.: Изобразительное 

искусство, 2003; Тасалов, В.И. Светоэнергетика искусства: Очерки теоретического 



искусствознания. СПб.: Искусство, 2004.О Сарьяне. Страницы художественной критики: Отзывы 

современников. Ереван: Лениздат, 1980; Кузнецов, Павел Варфоломеевич. Альбом. М.: Искусство, 

1968; Сарьян, М.С. Из моей жизни. М.: Изобразительное искусство, 1985. 

 


 

 

312 



7. 

ARTISTIC MATURITY. THE POST-WAR PERIOD (1945-1970) 

 

 

 In 1945 after the Second World War is finally over, Nina Slobodinskaya together with 

her  husband  and  son  returns  to  Leningrad.  The  horrors  of  the  war  were  left  in  the 

past; the joy of the war’s end overpasses a sadness of losses and encouraged the 

sculptor to look at the future with optimism and aspirations for the better life. As to 

Slobodinskaya’s  professional  level,  she  undoubtedly  achieved  a  lot  during  her  life 

and  work  in  Samarkand:  having  become  a  mature  artist  with  an  elaborated 

technique,  a  proper  plastic  language  together  with  the  defined  thematic 

preferences. 

Unfortunately, a return home was not completely unclouded as it also signified a loss 

of creative freedom: a return to the obligatory social artistic structure of the LOSH

383


 

consequently  meant  an  obligation  to  expose  regularly  at  its  shows  and  signified  a 

necessity to detach her work in narrow frames of socialist realism, its main subjects 

and  style.  Obviously,  the  official  requests  and  commissions  limited  the  artist 

thematically. The main subjects in sculpture imposed by the Soviet state continued 

being  the  clear  propaganda  messages  but  now  they  also  reflected  new 

commemorative  forms,  glorifying  war-heroes  and  the  state-winner.  Consequently 

Russian artists had to follow a new thematic line.  

Almost  a  two  years  period  of  a  complete  artistic  liberty  left  in  sculptor  a  taste  for 

freedom  of  artistic  self-expression.  Therefore  it’s  not  surprising  that  Nina 

Slobodinskaya was not ready to easily let the Communist regime to push her around. 

However, the sculptor finds a logic development of her creative interest to  human 

being’s depiction, working on genre of portrait. The work in portrait genre permitted 

the artist to remain faithful to her key interest subject and to concurrently correspond 

to the society’s demands. In case of Slobodinskaya it was not a compromise of an 

artist with life circumstances but rather a coincidence of interests which allowed the 

sculptor  to  peacefully  coexist  with  the  State’s  requests.    Regarding  a  model’s 

choice, the artist usually found prominent, complex and bright personalities who by 

                                                 

383


 The LOSH - Union of Artists of Saint Petersburg was founded on August 2, 1932 as an artistic union of 

the Leningrad artists and arts critics. Prior to 1959, it was defined as the Leningrad Union of Soviet Artists

From 1959 (when it joined the Union of Artists of the RSFSR), it was determined as Leningrad branch of 

Union of Artists of Russian Federation. In 1991, it became known as the Saint Petersburg Union of Artists. 

See: Связь времён. 1932—1997. Художники — члены Санкт-Петербургского Союза художников 

России. Каталог выставки, СПб.: Наука, 1997, C.4-17. 


 

 

313 



their social achievements were highly recognized by the State – the first fact satisfied 

the  sculptor  creatively  and  professionally  and  the  second  responded  to  the 

established  LOSH’s  demands  (social  significance  of  the  portrayed  almost 

guaranteed  sculpture’s  acceptance  to  official  shows  and  could  lead  to  its 

purchase).  

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Academician E.N. Pavlovsky, 1947, bronze, 1 ½ life size. 



 

 

 



        

            

 

Photos of Academician E.N. Pavlovsky, 1943-45, unknown authors. 



 

 

 

314 



  

       


 

N. Slobodinskaya, Academician E.N. Pavlovsky, 1947, marble bust, 1 ½ life size, installed in school named after 

Pavlovsky in Duchambe (Tadzhiikistan). 

N. Slobodinskaya, Academician E.N. Pavlovsky, 1947, marble bust, 1 ½ life size, plaster-clay. 



 

 

 

Documental evidence of Pavlovsky’s bust readiness, which had to be sent to the Pavlovsky’s museum 

in Borisoglebsk, signed by the Combinate DPI director Smirnov, 1940s. 


 

 

315 



 

 

Certificate which proves the official order of E. Pavlovsky’s sculptural portrait’s commission in marble to 



be elaborated in the Leningrad Sculptural Combinate, 1940s. 

 

7.1 Academician Pavlovsky – Scientist and altruist 



 

Nina Slobodinskaya starts working on the portrait’s series. In 1947 on proper initiative 

she  decided  to  sculpt  Academician  Pavlovsky  –  a  famous  scientist  and  her 

husband’s  colleague  in  The  Academy.  Evgeny  Nikanorovich  Pavlovsky(1884, 

Voronezh  Oblast  –  1965,  Leningrad)  became  a  Soviet  zoologist,  entomologist, 

academician  of  the  Academy  of  Sciences  of  the  USSR  (the  Academy  of  Medical 

Sciences  of  the  USSR,  honorary  member  of  the  Tajik  Academy  of  Sciences,  and  a 

lieutenant-general of the Red Army Medical Service in World War II. In 1908, Yevgeny 

Pavlovsky graduated from the Military Medical Academy in Petersburg (he became 

a professor at his alma mater). In 1933-1944, he worked at the All-union Institute of 

Experimental  Medicine  in  Leningrad  and  simultaneously  at  the  Tajik  branch  of  the 

Soviet Academy of Sciences

384

. Yevgeny Pavlovsky held the post of director of the 



Zoology Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences. In 1946, he was appointed as a 

head  of  the  Department  of  Parasitology  and  Medical  Zoology  at  the  Institute  of 

Epidemiology/Microbiology  of  the  Soviet  Academy  of  Medical  Sciences.  Yevgeny 

Pavlovsky  was  declared  the  president  of  the  Soviet  Geographical  Society  in  1952-

                                                 

384


 Иванов, П. Павловский, Евгений Никанорович. (АН СССР. Материалы к биобиблиографии 

трудов ученых СССР. Серия биолог. наук. Паразитология, вып. 1), 2 изд., М.: Либроком, 1956, C.54-

69.  


 

 

316 



1964. Under Pavlovsky’s direction, they committed various expeditions to the Central 

Asia, Transcaucasia, Crimea, Russian Far East and other regions of  the Soviet Union 

to analyse endemic parasitic and transmissible diseases (tick-borne relapsing fever, 

tick-borne  encephalitis,  Pappataci  fever,  leishmaniasis  etc.).  Yevgeny  Pavlovsky 

introduced  and  developed  the  concept  of  natural  nidality  of  human  diseases, 

defined  by  the  idea  that  micro  scale  disease  foci  are  determined  by  the  entire 

ecosystem.  This  concept  laid  the  foundation  for  the  elaboration  of  a  number  of 

preventive  measures  and  caused  the  development  of  the  environmental  trend  in 

parasitology  (together  with  the  works  of  parasitology’s  specialist  Valentin  Dogel). 

Yevgeny  Pavlovsky  researched  host  organism  as  a  habitat  for  parasites 

(parasitocenosis),  numerous  matters  of  regional  and  landscape  parasitology,  life 

cycles of a number of parasites, pathogenesis of helminthic infection. Pavlovsky and 

his  fellow  scientists  analysed  the  fauna  of  flying  blood-sucking  insects  (gnat)  and 

methods  of  controlling  them  and  venomous  animals  and  characteristics  of  their 

venom

385


Evgeny Pavlovsky’s principal works are dedicated to the matters of parasitology. He 

authored  several  textbooks  and  manuals  on  parasitology.  Pavlovsky  was a  deputy 

of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th convocations. He was a 

recipient of the Stalin State Prize, the Lenin Prize, the Mechnikov Gold Medal of the 

Academy  of  Sciences  of  the  USSR  (1949),  and  of  the  gold  medal  of  the  Soviet 

Geographical  Society  (1954).  Evgeny  Pavlovsky  was  awarded  five  Orders  of  Lenin, 

four other orders, and numerous medals

386



 



Regarding  the  sculptor’s  work  manner  -  N.  Slobodinskaya  shaped  portrait  directly 

from  a  model  in  front.  She  continued  using  a  realistic  and  naturalistic  style  in  the 

portraying. A viewer sees a face shaped in detail with pronounced cheek-bones, a 

firm  chin  which  permit  us  suggest  that  this  man  possessed  a  strong  will  and 

character.  In  a  direct  gaze  of  the  portrayed  a  spectator  can  guess  honesty, 

seriousness and strength. The wavy and curvy surface of the base, which seems by 

its  texture  a  natural  unworked  granite  stone,  contrasts  with  carefully  and 

pedantically elaborated realistic model’s portrait,  repeating lines of the man’s hair. 

The chest of the portrayed is shaped schematically and a curvy rough surface of the 

                                                 

385

 “К 70-летию со дня рождения Е.Н. Павловского”. Медицинская паразитология и паразитарные 



болезни, 1954, № 2, C.7-10. 

386


 Иванов, П. Павловский, Евгений Никанорович. (АН СССР. Материалы к биобиблиографии 

трудов ученых СССР. Серия биолог. наук. Паразитология, вып. 1, 2 изд., М.: Либроком, 1956, C.40-

70. 


 

 

317 



bust increases an impression of monolith and solemnity. It also strengthens a feeling 

of additional inner tension of granite and adds a shred of romanticism to the general 

image of the portrayed. The sculptural portrait of the academician was exhibited in 

1947 at the LOSH regular show and was purchased by The Military-Medical Museum 

of Leningrad

387


. The sculptural portrait in marble (1 ½ life size) of Pavlovsky was also 

purchased by Pavlovsky’s Museum in town Borisoglebsk and by Pavlovsky’s school in 

Stalinabad  (now  Duchambe,  Tadzhikistan).  The  artist  achieved  to  give  a  deep 

psychological  interpretation  to  the  sculpted  image  of  the  academician,  what 

probably  may  be  explained  by  their  close  friendly  relations:  Pavlovsky  was  also  a 

colleague  and  friend  of  Nina  Slobodinskaya’s  husband  Vladimir.  Model’s 

individuality’s knowledge permitted the master to depict not just a famous scientist 

who  worked  hard  and  responsibly  for  his  country,  but  also  to  transmit  his  personal 

qualities, such as kindness, directness, honesty and a strong will. 

 

7.2 Alexandre Osip Shabalin – a fearless admiral 



 

The next significant work of Nina Slobodinskaya is the monument of an outstanding 

contra-admiral,  twice  a  hero  of  the  Soviet  Union  -  Alexandre  Osip  Shabalin  (1914-

1982).  It’s  a  granite  bust  (2  natures);  a  pedestal  elaborated  in  collaboration  with 

architect I.I. Fomin in 1951. The new Soviet hero was a commander of torpedo boat. 

The  future  admiral  was  born  in  the  village  Yudmozero  Onega,  Arkhangelsk  Oblast 

region  in  peasant’s  family.  Russian  by  nationality,  he  was  a  member  of  the  CPSU 

since 1943. In 1936, Alexander Osipovich Shabalin was directed to the Soviet Army. 

During  the  Second  World  War,  he  commanded  a  torpedo  boat,  and  then  a 

detachment  of  torpedo  boats  in  the  Northern  and  Baltic  fleets.  He  worshiped and 

transported the enemy with military supplies and troops. He was awarded with many 

orders and medals. The reward of the Hero of the Soviet Union with the award of the 

Order of Lenin and medal Gold Star captain-Osipovich Shabalinu awarded on Feb. 

22, 1944 for the exemplary performance of command assignments, for courage and 

bravery. He was awarded with such a high privilege medals grace to his high level of 

military achievements

388

.  


                                                 

387


 Выставка произведений ленинградских художников. 1947 год. Живопись. Скульптура. Графика. 

Театрально-декорационная живопись. Каталог, Л.: ЛССХ, 1948, C.39-46. 

388


 Khametov, M.I. Light gold stars. Arkhangelsk: North-Zap.kn.izd, 1989, pp.31-53.

 


 

 

318 



                

  

N. Slobodinskaya, Alexandre Osip Shabalin (fragment), 1951, granite. 



 

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Alexandre Osip Shabalin, 1951, plaster cast, monument’s project. 



 

 


 

 

319 



 

                         

 

Photos of Alexandre Osip Shabalin, 1940s, unknown author. 



 

 

Article on Slobodinskaya’s monument Alexandre Osip Shabalin, the Vechernii Leningrad, 1949, N77. 



 

The larger-than-life monument commemorating the Hero of Soviet Union Shabalin - 

the Captain of torperonosets was installed in the central park of town Onega where 

remains till the actual moment. The curious thing about the captain is that when he 

saw his own bust elaborated, he was so impressed by its significance and solemnity 

that he told the sculptor that now he felt obligated to become better. Therefore, he 

promised to stop drinking alcohol

389


.  

                                                 

389

 The recollections of Andrey Gnezdilov, interviewed on 09.08.14. 



 

 

320 



The sculptural image has all attributes of the official representative realistic portrait: 

majestically  and  widely-shaped  breast  is  fully  decorated  by  medals  and  signs  of 

honour. The head’s position is straight and highly cocked with dignity. A head-gear is 

wavy  and  gives  some  vividness  and  fervour  to  the  general  image  together  with  a 

shade of romanticism. Admiral’s face is exposed realistically but it’s unexpectedly for 

the  representative  portrait  full  of  humanity.  Shabalin  gazes  directly  at  viewer  but 

simultaneously he seems to stay deep in his thoughts.  

Once elaborated this monument was successfully approved by the LOSH. No doubt 

-  it  corresponded  to  its  basic  requests:  a  new  outstanding  Soviet  war  hero  of  a 

peasant background (iz naroda) represented in socialist realism style

390



As to the sculptor’s general artistic line of the post war period - Nina Slobodinskaya 



developed a personal style, impervious to fashions and fads, which she maintained 

throughout her career. She created portraits meticulously, often at sittings that lasted 

for  hours.  A  particular  attention  artist  paid  to  her  model’s  eyes  and  line  of  gaze 

which gave rise to sensitive finely composed character’s studies. 

                            

 

Photos of I. Michurin, cut by Slobodinskaya from newspapers, 1920s, unknown authors. Sculptor’s achieve 



                                                 

390


 

It would be important to mention that the general socio-cultural climate in the post-war period 

facilitated sculptural portrait development, supporting a creation of monuments-busts of twice a hero 

of the USSR and twice heroes of Socialistic Labor, which once being completed had to be installed at 

these personages’ native place. Thus, the Soviet Government decree on heroes’ busts’ elaboration 

promoted the increase of monumental tendencies. Hence, sculptural monument together with 

sculptural portrait–bust as genre became highly-sought. In sculptural monuments Soviet sculptors tend 

to combine appearance’s similarity with a generalized image’s shaping, also by an attempt to obtain 

harmony between sculpture and architectural pedestal, finally, attempting to create an image in all it 

clarity and expressivity. As to labor heroes, the main characteristic traits appear: representativeness 

and am effective composition, which had to embody a spirit of victim and a never- ending energy. 

Besides, the subject in sculpture was definitely soldiers’ heroism and the war victims. In this context a 

huge importance was given to memorial, monument-complex; as sculptural –architectural type of 

monument better than others expressed a theme of victory above death. 

To see more on the subject: Сарабьянова, Д.В. Ред. История русского и советского искусства. M.: 

Высшая школа, 1979; Ильина, Т.В. ИСТОРИЯ ИСКУССТВ: Отечественное искусствo. Учебник. 3-е 

изд., М.: Искусство, 2000.  

 


 

 

321 



 

 

N. Slobodinskaya, I. Michurin, 1951, plaster-cast, 2 life size, bust, Sosnovo’s Park.



  

 

 



 

N. Slobodinskaya I. Michurin, 1951, bronze, statuette. 



 

 

322 



 

N. Slobodinskaya, I. Michurin, 1951, plaster-cast, 21 x 14 x 33, figurine. 

 

     


 

N. Slobodinskaya, I. Michurin, 1951, plaster-cast, 21 x 14 x 33, figurine. 

 


 

 

323 



 

 

N. Slobodinskaya, I. Michurin, 1951, plaster-cast, figurine. 



.  

                           

  

M. Obolensky, I. Michurin, 1949



,

 oil on canvas.            A. Gerasimov I. Michurin, 1949, oil on canvas, 620 x 344. 

 

1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   31




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling