Life and search of creative boundaries in the soviet epoch


 SCULPTURAL PORTRAITS (1960-1970ss)


Download 17.01 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet25/31
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi17.01 Mb.
1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   ...   31

8. SCULPTURAL PORTRAITS (1960-1970ss)  

 

Portrait is always a double image, - artist’s image and model’s image

True portraitist (who deserves this name) puts his whole personality into portrait and 

above it, eternity. 

 

Antoine Bourdelle



404

 

 

In the late 1960 – 1970ss Nina Slobodinskaya continues developing and working on 

the  genre  of  portrait,  remaining  loyal  to  her  main  subject  –  a  deep  study  and 

psychological analysis of man, seeking for his individuality’s essence and revealing it 

in sculpture. The artist’s social circle was truly vast and quickly expanded due to the 

active social life which leaded her son (creating at their home a place for gathering 

and creative meetings of artists, singers, dancers, poets, scientists, writers).  Thus, it’s 

not  surprising  that  the  sculptor  had  a  rich  variety  of  model’s  choice.  Therefore  the 

majority  of  the  portrayed  belonged  to  the  social  group  of  so  called  cultural 

intelligentsia of Leningrad.  

 

8.1. Feodor Lopukhov – a grand choreographer 



 

In  range  of  interesting  personalities  which  were  sculpted  appears  a  legendary 

Feodor Lopukhov. Feodor Vasilievich Lopukhov was a Russian ballet dancer, teacher 

and  choreographer.  He  was  born  in  1886,  in  St.  Petersburg  and  died  in1973  in 

Leningrad.  He  was  awarded  with  a  title  of  People’s  Artist  of  the  RSFSR  (1956)  in 

Leningrad.  Lopukhov  graduated  from  the  St.  Petersburg  Theatrical  Academy  and 

worked  at  the  Mariinsky  Theatre  from  1905  to  1909  and  in  1911;  at  the  Moscow 

Bolshoi  Theatre  in  1909-10.  Feodor  Lopukhov  directed  the  ballet  company  of  the 

Leningrad Theatre of Opera and Ballet from 1922 to 1930. Regarding his approach 

Lopukhov was never satisfied with existing standard normative of the classic ballet, 

instead  he  created  a  number  of  experimental  dance  works,  introducing  into  a 

dance  a  symphony  The  Majesty  of  the  Universe  to  Beethoven’s  Fourth  Symphony 

(1923); The Night on the Bald Mountain to music by Mussorgsky (1924); the ballet The 

                                                 

404

  Kemeri, S. Visage de Bourdelle. Paris: Chamais, 1931, p.28. 



 

 

338 



Red  Storm  by  Deshevov  (1924)  on  the  revolution;  and  Stravinsky’s  Pulcinella  (1926) 

and The Fox (1927), the ballet Ice Maiden to Grieg’s music (1927)

405

. Revealing new 



means  of  expression,  Lopukhov  further  developed  the  principles  of  XIX  century 

academic  ballet,  reorganizing  the  classical  dance  and  introducing  acrobatic 

elements into it; in addition he made character dances more closely resembling the 

ethnic dances. Further he staged the ballet The Bolt by Shostakovich. He leaded the 

ballet troupe of the Leningrad Maliy Theatre of Opera from 1933 to 1936. In 1920’s he 

staged and enlivened in different theatres many ballets of the classical era, thereby 

helping to preserve and brighten up Russian ballet traditions. The Soviet Union in the 

1920s  accepted  choreographic  experiments  of  Fyodor  Lopukhov  and  others. 

Despite  the  official  imposition  of  socialist  realism  as  the  criterion  of  artistic 

acceptability in 1932, grace to Lopukhov’s efforts ballet gained enormous popularity 

with  the  Soviet  people.  Lopukhov  directed  courses  for  choreographers  at  the 

Leningrad  Choreographic  School,  where  he  worked  from  1937  until  1941.  Lately  in 

1962 he was an artistic director of the choreographic section of the stage being a 

head of Leningrad Conservatory department

406



Among other works was staged the Velichie mirozdaniia in Petrograd in 1922. 



One of the most impressive Lopukhov ‘s ballets was the Limpid Stream or the Bright 

Stream  which  represents  a  ballet  score,  Op.  39,  in  3  acts,  4  scenes,  composed  by 

Dmitri  Shostakovich  on  the  libretto  by  Adrian  Piotrovsky  and  Feodor  Lopukhov, 

choreography  prepared  by  Feodor  Lopukhov,  premiered  in  Leningrad  (The 

Mikhaylovsky Theatre) in 1935. The central line story of the plot tells about a group of 

ballet dancers who have been sent to organize a sophisticated entertainment to a 

new Soviet collective farm. Suddenly it turns out that the honest country-bumpkins, 

controversially, have more to teach the city-folk. The Golden Age in 1930 and The 

Bolt in 1931 - two more ballets which were written by Shostakovich and were banned 

in  a  short  while  after  their  premieres;  this  fact  heavily  damaged  Shostakovich’s 

reputation,  so  much  that  he  was  reluctant  ever  to  write  for  the  lyric  stage  again. 

Leningrad  and  Moscow  from  June  1935  through  February  1936  accepted  with 

                                                 

405


 Слонимский, Ю. Пути балетмейстера Лопухова. Шестьдесят лет в балете. М.: Искусство, 1966, 

C.37-65. 

406

  Lopuchov,  Shest’desiat  let  v  balete:  Vospominaniia  izapiski  baletmeistera  in  Moscow,  The  Great 



Soviet Encyclopedia, M.: Nauka, 1979, pp.30-40. 

 

 

339 



success The Bright Stream. Nevertheless, an editorial in Pravda in early 1936 criticized 

the ballet and its musical suite; as a result both works were taken out of stage

407



As to the sculptor’s experience - Nina Slobodinskaya recalled that in 1970 during the 



obligatory sessions for modelling at her studio, Feodr Lopukhov revealed him-self as a 

person  full  of  humour  and  optimism.  The  choreographer  did  not  stop  making  the 

sculptor laughing. One of the Lopuchov’s anecdotes she shared with her son Andrey 

Gnezdilov:  at one of his ballets premiere there had to be a real cow at the stage 

and  a  farm-woman  had  to  milk  a  cow;  unexpectedly,  it  was  impossible  to  find  a 

cow  and  the  only  option  left  was  to  bring  a  real  bull.  So  the  artistic  decision  was 

found and the bull was decorated with an artificial udder. But during the spectacle 

the  ballet  dancer,  so  called  farm-woman,  unexpectedly  pulled  away  the  udder 

and, being terrified cried. Meanwhile the bull became furious and started to attack 

other  ballet  dancers  from  the  same  troupe.  The  show  had  to  be  stopped.  The 

premier was a real scandal as a result, but their choreographer was ever so much 

laughing in his life as that day. 

 

                          



  

 

N. Slobodinskaya, F. Lopuchov, 1970, bronze, 42 x 23 x 46. 



                                                 

407


 Соколов-Каминский, А. Ф.В. Лопухов и его Симфония танца. Сборник Музыка и хореография 

современного балета, М.: Искусство, 1974, C.174-190.

 


 

 

340 



 

 

                                           



 

Photo of F. Lopuchov, 1970, unknown author.                           Photo of F. Lopuchov, 1950s, unknown author. 

 

 

Photo of sculptor’s family’s friend with Lopuchov’s sculptural portrait, 1970s, unknown author. 



 

The  bronze  portrait  of  the  famous  choreographer,  elaborated  3  years  before  his 

death  shows  a  realistically  elaborated,  detailed  work.  Face’s  wrinkles  are 

emphasized and outline the pronounced traits of his face, branching out a straight 

nose; a character seems to transmit a dignity and inner will. Despite his oldness the 

portrayed expresses inner nobleness; apparently, the whole image is lightened up by 

a strong spirit full of honesty and self-respect. Lopuchov looks straight and his gaze 

reflects  a  memory  of  two  last  centuries:  the  Imperial  Russian  State  and  the 

Communist’s new red era. Sharp, prominent face traits emphasize an impression of 


 

 

341 



his inner firmness and indicate at a strong life’s core which an old man still preserves. 

The sculptor achieves to display a strong complex character and a rich personality 

of  the  portrayed.  After  the  sculptural  portrait  was  over  -  many  Lopuhov’s 

apprentices came to visit sculptor’s studio in order to see the final result of her work. 

Finally the Lopuhov’s sculptural image was purchased by The State Theatre Museum 

in Leningrad where actually belongs.  

 

8.2. Doctor Grigoriy Smirnov – a severe scientist 

 

Among  other  sculptural  portraits  of  this  epoch  we  find  an  image  of  Dr  Grigoriy 



Smirnov  –  a  professor  of  the  Military-Medical  Academy,  a  colleague  of  Vladimir 

Gnezdilov.  A sculptural portrait in bronze was elaborated in a direct contact with a 

model.  Grace  to  the  friendship  of  the  sculptor’s  husband  and  his  colleague  N. 

Slobodinskaya  had  an  interesting  and  expressive  model  for  shaping.  Aside  from 

working  directly  with  the  model  the  author  used  photos  of  Dr  Smirnov  in  different 

focuses in order to achieve a maximum exactitude in its depiction. 

 

 

 



N. Slobodinskaya G. Smirnov, 1970s, plasticine, 47 x 28 x 70. 

 

 

342 



 

         

          

 

Photos of G. Smirnov, 1970s, unknown author. 



 

The sculptural portrait is shaped in detail. Every trait, every wrinkle is pronounced and 

outlined  quite  naturalistically.  The  author  uses  the  realistic  method  of  depiction.  In 

addition to the natural and close similarity of the model’s image the master tends to 



catch  the  character’s  essence.  The  sculptor  definitely  achieves  to  uncover  the 

personality:  we  may  see  a  perfectly  displayed  severe  serious  gaze  emphasized  by 

widely  and  stubbornly  brought  together  eyebrows,  firmly  closed  mouth.  In  the 

apparently withdrawn appearance we may guess a strong and complex character. 

Generally  speaking,  there  was  a  variety  of  sculptural  portraits  elaborated  in  this 

epoch, and as common traits could be determined the following: study of model’s 

deep  psychological  characteristic  and  its  display  in  realistic  style,  search  of  inner 

human essence of a portrayed and the task to transmit visually a complexity and a 

richness of model’s inner life. 

The same approach may be traced in other sculptural portraits of the epoch, such 

as the Lenconcert’s Artist’s image, or the mathematician Fadeev’s portrait.  

 

8.3 Mathematician Fadeev’s portrait – a goal-seeking genius 



 

Fadeev has been a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences since 1976, and is 

a member of a number of foreign academies, including the U. S. National Academy 

of Sciences, the French Academy of Sciences, and the Royal Society. He received 

numerous  awards,  including  the  USSR  State  Prize  (1971),  Danniel  Heineman  Prize 

(1975),  Dirac  Prize  (1990),  Max  Planck  Medal  (1996),  Demidov  Prize  (2002  -  for 



 

 

343 



outstanding contribution to the development of mathematics, quantum mechanics, 

string theory and solutions) and the State Prize of the Russian Federation (1995, 2004). 

He  is  a  former  president  of  the  International  Mathematical  Union  (1986–1990).  The 

Doctor  was  awarded  with  the  Henri  Poincaré  Prize  in  2006  and  the  Shaw  Prize  in 

mathematical  sciences  in  2008.  Also  the  Karpinsky  International  Prize  and  the  Max 

Planck  Medal  (German  Physical  Society).  He  also  received  the  Lomonosov  Gold 

Medal for 2013

408


. Fadeev has also received state awards: the Order of Merit for the 

Fatherland;  3rd  class  (25  October  2004)  -  for  outstanding  contribution  to  the 

development  of  fundamental  and  applied  domestic  science  and  many  years  of 

fruitful  activity;  4th  class  (4  June  1999)  -  for  outstanding  contribution  to  the 

development  of  national  science  and  training  of  highly  qualified  personnel  in 

connection with the 275th anniversary of the Russian Academy of Sciences. 

Faddev  also  got  the  Order  of  Friendship  of  Peoples  (6  June  1994)  -  for  his  great 

personal contribution to the development of mathematical physics and training of 

highly  qualified  scientific  personnel;  the  Order  of  the  Red  Banner  of  Labour;  the 

Order  of  Lenin.  Honorary  citizen  of  St.  Petersburg  (2010);  Russian  Federation  State 

Prizes in Science and Technology 2004 (6 June 2005) - for outstanding achievement 

in  the  development  of  mathematical  physics  and  in  1995  for  science  and 

technology (20 June 1995) - for the monograph Introduction to quantum gauge field 

theory;  USSR  State  Prize  (1971)

409


.Fadeev’s  sculptural  portrait  despite of  the  realistic 

depiction  is  full  of  expressiveness:  a  massive  chest,  wavy  hair,  a  direct  gaze  –  all 

reveals  a  romantic  Russian  legendary  hero-scientific.  His  image  is  full  of  dynamism 

and vividness:  physic, mental  and personal. If  we look  at  a range of  the  scientist’s 

photos  we  may  notice  an  active  energy  in  his  gaze:  whether  explaining  a 

mathematic task to his apprentices, or just looking straight at viewer, you may feel 

                                                 

408


 In general terms, the sculptural portrait genre in this epoch played an important role. The main 

artistic task was considered to be freed from standards and a stereotypic pompous representative  

images which invaded the periodic exhibitions of the post-war period. Life in its dramatic collisions – 

became one of the principle subjects. Artists tended to search for new expressive language in sculpture 

and found it through developing of voluminous- spatial sculptural forms. Slobodinskaya as many other 

sculptors- contemporaries works in a variety of materials. Image’s romanization characterizes this 

period. An admiration of pure severe heroism, intimate interior world’s dramatic expressiveness of 

personage may be marked as a common trait for sculptors. Nina Slobodinskaya together with other 

artists tends to mirror in sculpture aesthetic and spiritual values, which reflect a richness of interior 

spiritual life of sculptural models. To see more on the subject: Сарабьянова, Д.В. Ред. История 



русского и советского искусства. M.: Высшая школа, 1979; Ильина, Т.В. ИСТОРИЯ ИСКУССТВ: 

Отечественное искусствo. Учебник. 3-е изд., М.: Искусство, 2000.  

409


 Тахтаджян, Л.А., Фаддеев, Л.Д. Гамильтонов подход в теории солитонов. М.: Наука, 1986, C.39-45. 

 


 

 

344 



his constant mental work’s process. In my opinion precisely this deep psychological 

characteristic of the mathematician the sculptor successfully achieves to transmit. 

 

 

      



 

N. Slobodinskaya, Mathematician Fadeev, 1970s, plasticine, 38 x 70 x 84.

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Mathematician Fadeev, 1970s, plaster clay, 38 x 70 x 84. 



 

 

 



 

Photo of Fadeev, 1970s, unknown author. 

 


 

 

345 



 

8.4 Andrey Gnezdilov –unique son’s portrait 

 

Among realistic sculptural images of Slobodinskaya stands out  a portrait of her son 



Andrey Gnezdilov

 

     

    

 

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Andrey Gnezdilov, 1960-1970, granite. 



 

             

 

Photo of Andrey Gnezdilov, 1950s, unknown author.     Photo of Andrey Gnezdilov, 1970s, unknown author. 



 

 

 

346 



 

Photo of Andrey Gnezdilov with his family, 1986, unknown artist. 

 

In  his  case  a  character’s  physical  characteristics  are  depicted  quite  symbolically 



and schematically. The form of the head and basic facial features are caught and 

had  been  shaped,  but  by  means  of  face  features’  generalization,  avoiding  the 

detailing,  master  seems  to  accentuate  viewer’s  attention  at  the  psychological 

characteristic of the personality, revealing an inner life of the model through the full 

of calmness and an inner quietness boy’s gaze. As in previous works the portrayed 

remains deep in his thoughts, as if the master would try to commit the personality’s 

state of inner meditation and soul’s contemplation – soul’s dialogue with it-self. It lets 

the  viewer  to  guess  a  secret,  intimate  and  a  very  personal  characteristic  of  the 

model  –  his  inner  life  –  his  individuality’s  inner  essence  and  the  young  man’s  rich 

spiritual life. 

The  artist  shows  himself  not  only  as  a  mature  master  in  technique  –  achieving 

exactitude  and  similarity  in  external  appearance  depiction  of  the  portrayed,  but 

what is even more important, - as deep and rich personality, who seeks to transmit 

not an exterior expressiveness and similarity but an inner personal life of the model in 

its  whole  complexity  and  richness.  This  difficult  highest  creative  task  which  the 

sculptor  defines  to  her-self  and,  moreover,  the  capacity  which  artist  shows  to 

achieve this goal, - all proves that Nina Slobodinskaya pertains by right to the highest 


 

 

347 



range  of  sculptors.  It  is  an  artistic  category  which  not  many  artists  are  able  to 

achieve.    In  my  regard  an  artist  may  be  called  a  real  artist,  first,  if  he  is  a  truly 

independent  personality,  with  a  proper  manner  of  artistic  vision,  secondly,  if  he  is 

sincere  and  honest,  loyal  to  him-self  in  his  work,  following  his  own  visions  and  life 

ideas independently of the social pressure, bravely and fearlessly expressing it in his 

work.  


Returning to Nina Slobodinskaya, I would dare to assert that the sculptor has got her 

proper artistic vision and achieves to transmit it in her sculptures, remaining faithful to 

her-self.  In  addition  I  would  like  to  mention  one  moral  personality’s  characteristic 

which may be traced in Slobodinskaya’s sculpture and which unites all her depicted 

models – person’s inner dignity and honesty. Perhaps, the sculptor intuitively guessed 

this  moral  trait  in  people  and  apart  of  other  qualities,  it attracted  her. It  permits  to 

suppose  that  morality  and  ethic  were  not  just  her  personal  beliefs  but  also  were 

attributes of her creative work. 

 

 

Andrey Gnezdilov, N. Slobodinskaya’s portrait, 1984-1985, plasticine. 



 

 

 



 

 

 

348 



 

9THE GLORY OF COMMUNIST FUTURE IN LENINGRAD’S UNDERGROUND.  

THE NARVSKAYA METRO STATION  

 

9.1 The Soviet metro’s appearance and a new life quality in the USSR 

 

  



        

 

There’s a metro, 1935, propaganda poster. 



We construct the best metropolitan in the world, 1930s, poster.  

 

 

Photo of the Komsomolskaya metro station, 2000s, unknown author, Moscow. 

 

The  Metropolitan  in  Moscow  as  the  first  line  of  the  Soviet  Union  started  working  in 



1935, the Leningrad Metro celebrated the opening of its first underground transport 

system in November 1955

410

. The stylistic similarity of two metropolitans was obvious. 



                                                 

410


 Мотовилов, С. “Ленинградский метрополитэн имени В.И. Ленина вступил в строй" . 

Ленинградская правда, 1, 16 ноября, 1955, C.7. 

 

 

349 



The  Leningrad  stations  were  so  elegantly  decorated  with  an  elaborated  art  that 

often were compared to palaces

411



The first task of artistic decoration was to provide lessons in socialism in aesthetically 



pleasing  environments  for  its  passengers,  the  values  and  priorities  of  the  Soviet 

Communism  were  introduced  in  the  walls  of  the  underground

412

.  The  USSR  had 



changed considerably between the interwar period and the post-war era, and the 

messages  so  far  differed  accordingly.  Such  themes  as  military  triumphs,  domestic 

progress,  and  the  Russian-Soviet  history  were  highly  celebrated  by  its  art.  The 

Leningrad Metro stations displayed especially domestic issues. The  mythologizing of 

the  USSR’s  own  history  was  an  important  purpose  for  the  local  artists  and  the 

architects. The Moscow Metropolitan system portrayed the interwar message of the 

Soviet  Communism’s  bright  future,  the  first  line  of  the  Leningrad  Metro  focused  on 

the story of the politics’ development. It questions the traditional periodization of the 

Soviet history that tends to see Nikita Khrushchev’s Thaw as a liberal departure from 

                                                 

411

 Кузнецов, К.А. Метростоевцы идут вперёдЛенинградский Метрополитэн им.Ленина. 



Ленинград: Лениздат,1956, C.22. 

412


  The  history  of  Russian  and  especially  Moscow’  metropolitan  construction  may  be  conditionally 

divided  into  4  periods.  The  first  –  from  1935  -1938  represents  a  period  of  search  of  image  of  a  new 

transport type, it is also a period of new style’s formation in architecture, which in historical retrospective 

was  called  Stalin’s  empire;  in  the  synthesis  of  arts  forms  of  classical  heritage  were  widely  used.  The 

second  period  from  1943  -1954  –  the  flourishing  of  this  style,  which  is  visualized  in  the  decorative 

pomposity  of  metro  stations.  The  third  period  1950  –  1970ss is  based  on  the  decree  taken  by  The  CK 

KPSS on the destruction of excesses in the projection and construction. Therefore, decorative art almost 

disappeared  from  the  traditional decoration  of  new  metro lines.  However,  sculptural  decoration  was 

preserved, even in the minimalized forms. In order to learn more on the subject: 

Аникина, Н.И.  Иллюзии  и  реальность:  творчество  московских монументалистов 70-  90-х  годов 



глазами  заинтересованного  наблюдателя.  М.  Екатеринбург:  Моск.  комбинат  монумент.-

декоратив.  Искусства,  2005.  Афанасьев, К.Н.  “Новые  станции  Московского  метро  и  их 

скульптурное  убранство”.  Искусствo,  №5,  сентябрь  октябрь,1950,  М.:  Стройиздат,1978. 

Гинзбург, В.П.  Керамика  в  архитектуре.  М.:  Стройиздат,1983;  Баранова, С.И.  Москва  изразцовая

М.: ОАО Московские учебники, 2006; Бассехес, А. Содружество искусств. Архитектура СССР., № 

6,1939;  Беннет,  Д.  Метро.  История  подземных  железных  дорог.  Перевод  с  англ.  М.:  Магма,  2005; 

Беркман, А.С. и др. Декорирование фарфора и фаянса. М.: Росгизместпром, 1949; Веснин,  А. 

“О социалистическом реализме в архитектуре”. Советская архитектура, № 8, 1957; Аркин, Д. “О 

ложной  «классике»,  новаторстве  и  традиции.  Архитектура СССР”.  №  4.  1939;  Голубев, Г.Е. 

“Архитектура  метрополитена  и  задачи  художника”.  Декоративноеискусство  СССР.,  №11,  1974; 

Голубев Г.Е.  Вестибюли  метрополитенов  (Основные  типы  и  планировочные  решения).  Дис.  канд. 

арх., М.: МГУ, 1958; Давыдова, Н., Левинсон, А. “Спор о метро: диалог искусствоведа и социолога. 

Декоративное искусство СССР”. № 7, 1987; Егорьева, Е. “Синтез искусств в Московском метро”. 

(Конференция  Академии  художеств  СССР).  Декоративное  искусство  СССР.,  №  11,  1974; 

Ермакова,  Т.  “Первая  очередь  Московского  метрополитена.  Техническая  эстетика”.  №  11,  1967; 

Зиновьева, Т.А.  “Метро  и  синтез  искусств”.  Декоративное  искусство  СССР.,  №  4  (353),  1987; 

Катцен, И.Е. Метро Москвы. М.: Московский рабочий, 1947; Климов, М.В. Идейно-художественные 

проблемы  архитектуры  Московского  метрополитена  (3-я  и  4-я  очереди).  Дис.  канд.  арх.,  М.: 

Московские учебники, 1952.  

 


 

 

350 



the Late Stalinism

413


. The thematic variety of the underground decoration permits to 

suppose  that  a  liberalization  process  started  already  during  the  Late  Stalinism.  We 

may  observe  a  kind  of  slight  political  relaxation  on  workers’  treatment  which  is 

sculpturally displayed in various metro vestibules. So far some of the characteristics 

associated with the Thaw were awoken in the Late Stalin period

414


.  

 

 



Photo of the Park Kulturi metro station, 2000s, unknown author, Moscow. 

 

Another  important  factor  of  the  metropolitan’s  appearance  –  the  improvement  of 



life quality: people increased their mobility throughout Leningrad. From now and on 

all  citizens  had  direct  communication  and  access  to  the  city  centre  and  an  easy 

and  quick  transport  to  get  to  work.  Architects  and  city-planners  encouraged  the 

metro’s  passengers  to  consider  the  stations’  historical  messages,  which  contained 

themes of fixation on the future industrialization, warfare, militarization, reflecting the 

early  Soviet  epoch’s  dramatic  events  and  challenges.  The  metro  construction’s 

development occurred just before Stalin’s death, but architects and artists had time 

to  display  the  post-war  demands  for  a  better  life.  In  the  end  artists  filled  metro 

stations  with  images  of  Vladimir  Lenin  and  dedications  to  the  October  Revolution, 

sometimes with images of Stalin; finally it turned to be a representation of the post-

war Leningrad, and became an important part of public discourse. But there were 

another ceremonial messages that some of the metro stations brought to the main 

line:  for  instance,  The  Ploshchad  Vosstania  and  The  Avtovo  are  dedicated  to  the 

memory and various cultural victories of the Soviet Communism.  

                                                 

413


 Nealy, James Allen. The metro (metroes): shaping soviet post-war subjectivities in the Leningrad 

underground. Miami: University p.h.d, 2014, pp.9-17. 

414


 Соколов, А.М. Станции Ленинградского метро. Л.: Государственное издательство литературы 

по строительству и архитектуре, 1987, C.16-20.

 


 

 

351 



They  become  a  true  homage  to  the  Russian-Soviet  cultural  heroes  and  history;  its 

main key subject – a representation of Bolshevik lands, and a monument to the two 

wars that made possible the Soviet future

415


.  

 

 



Photo of the Soviet Metro station, 2000s, unknown author, Moscow. 

 

 



Photo of the Kievskaya metro station, 2000s, unknown author, Moscow. 

 

 




Download 17.01 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   ...   31




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling