Life and search of creative boundaries in the soviet epoch


Download 17.01 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet29/31
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi17.01 Mb.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31

10.7 Jesus Christ, knocking the door of a heart 

 

Jesus  Christ,  knocking  the  door  of  a  heart  is  an  allegorical  sculptural  image 

representing  the  figure  of  Jesus  knocking  on  unopened  door.  This  motive  visually  

illustrates  The  Revelation  3:20:  "Behold,  I  stand  at  the  door  and  knock;  if  any  man 

hear My voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and 

he with Me".  

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Jesus Christ, knocking the door of a heart, 1975-78, plasticine, 17 x 12 x 28. 



 

                                                 

490

 Протоиерей Дьяченко, Г. Полный церковно-славянский словарь. M.: Сергиев Посад, 1900, С. 



447.  

 

 

402 



   

N. Slobodinskaya, Jesus Christ, knocking the door of a heart, 1975-78, plaster cast, 17 x 12 x 28. 

 

 

                                    



 

William Holman Hun, The Light of the World, 1853-54, oil on canvas. 

Peter Carl Geißler, Jesus Christ, XIX c., steel engraving. 


 

 

403 



The door in the sculptural image has no handle, and may therefore be opened only 

from the inside. The sculptural image symbolizes the obstinately shut mind, but also a 

never ending hope of The Jesus Christ, believing that the door of people’s heart will 

be open one day

491



The  small  format  plaster  cast  bas-relief  is  shaped  schematically.  Only  the  main 



motive is pronounced and accentuated: the figure of Jesus Christ humbly knocking 

the  door.  The  background  is plane.  The  author  seems  to  pay  viewer’s  attention  at 

the  very  action  of  this  biblical  allegory  where  the  key  message  is  –  the  desperate 

attempt  of  God’s  Son  to  awake  people’s  hearts.  As  believer,  the  sculptor  tries  to 

transmit  her  personal  spiritual  feeling  of  this  allegorical  call  of  Jesus  Christ  and  to 

embody it in the sculptural form. By its quite simplified delineated and symbolic style 

it  reminds  early–Christian  icons  or  the  ancient  Russian  mural  painting  manner  of 

figures’ depiction. However, a three-dimensional form seems to transmit more depth, 

realism and vividness to this symbolical scene. 

The  unique  neutral  colour  of  the  bas  relief  gives  wholeness,  organic  harmony  and 

accentuates  the  compositional  simplicity  and  clarity.  Slobodinskaya  achieves  to 

transmit  a  message  of  a  silent  appeal,  emotional  fullness  and  tension  in  simple, 

laconic sculptural forms. 

 

10.6 The Virgin Mary  



 

One of the most traditional depictions of a figure in a posture of prayer in Christian 

art is the orant, which usually is standing upright with raised arms. This type of posture 

reminds a typical manner of praying used by the first Christians. Thus the orant image 

type  is  often  found  in  Early  Christian  art  (II–VI  c.),  particularly  in  the  frescoes  and 

graffiti  of  Roman  catacombs  from  the  II  century  on.  The  faithful  personages  who 

seek a divine Salvation in the Old Testament scenes are often depicted in the orant 

posture. 

Among N. Slobodinskaya’s sculptural images of The Virgin Mary there two belonging 

to Oranta type. 

                                                 

491


 Лосский, Владимир, Успенский, Леонид. Смысл икон. M.: Православный Свято-Тихоновский 

гуманитарный университет, 1997, C.25-41. 



 

 

404 



 

N. Slobodinskaya, The Virgin Mary, 1975-1978, coloured plaster cast. 

 

 

N. Slobodinskaya, The Virgin Mary, 1975-1978, coloured plaster cast. 



 

 

405 



                                

 

 



The Orans of Yaroslavl (Great Panagia), c. 1220, tempera, icon. 

The Virgin, XI c., mosaics, Santa Sofia, Kiev. 

 

 



 

              

 

 

The Virgin Orans, XV c., icon, Russia. 



The Orant, late III c., fresco, in the crypt of La Velata, the Catacomb of Priscilla, Rome. 

 

 



 

 

406 



  

              

 

Raphael, Heads of the Virgin and Child, 1508-1510, drawing. 



The Virgin, XII c., church decoration, stone. 

  

One is more schematic and simply formed while another - more elaborated and is 



shown with a Jesus Christ nested at her knees.  The Virgin OransOranta – originally 

belongs to the Byzantine iconography. Her main characteristic is her posture in pray 

with extended, stretched and open arms.  The Great Panagiais is widely interpreted 

and followed in Christian imagery, especially in the Eastern Orthodox tradition.  This 

depiction of the Virgin Mary varies: sometimes she is accompanied with a figure of 

Jesus  Christ  and  occasionally  she  is  pictured  alone.  The  Virgin's  solemn  and  static 

posture,  the  characteristic  folds  of  her  garments  and  her  full  of  meditation  and 

thought  face  expression  prove  that  the  design  was  strongly  influenced  by  the 

Byzantine  art

492


.  In  Eastern  tradition  her  image  aimed  to  defend  the  population  of 

country and historically believers affirmed that The Virgin Mary helped to survive and 

to  save  many  cities  from  destruction.  Consequently  the  image  became  a  sacred 

symbol of the highest importance in the Eastern Europe

493

.  


The first Oranta sculptural image is schematic. The composition is strict, simple and 

laconic. The central figure is The Virgin Mary with extended in praying gesture arms. 

The  figure  is  in  static  position.  The  lines  of  her  cloth  together  with  the  upper  round 

arch underline the nimbus of the Virgin Mary’s head, hinting at the sacred meaning 

                                                 

492


 Кондаков, Н.П. Иконография Богоматери. Т.I, СПб.: Elibron Classics, 2003, C.37-58. 

493


 Ibid, pp.37-58.

 


 

 

407 



of  the  image.  Her  face  expression  is  meditative.  The  handkerchief  on  her  belt 

traditionally was meant to serve for wiping away the tears of those who search the 

mercy. 

The sculptural form transmits the same message as other Orthodox icons of this type 



– the defence and care which a believer can find, addressing in his praying to The 

Virgin  Mary.  The  Russian  Orthodox  Church  never  completely  welcomed  the 

depiction  of  Jesus  Christ,  Virgin  Mary  figures  in  sculpture.  The  church  institution  in 

Russia never definitely neglected the very idea of their depiction in sculptural forms 

but  it  clearly  showed  their  disapproval

494


.  That’s  the  reason  why  I  regard  the 

sculptor’s  decision  and  determination  to  work  on  Christian  imagery  (regardless  the 

possible  opposition  or  unacceptance)  as  a  brave  and  fearless  gesture.  Moreover, 

let’s not forget that the State and its official artistic representation institution LOSH did 

not approve the religious subject in fine arts.  

As  a  consequence  Nina  Slobodinskaya  condemned  herself  immediately  to  be  an 

artist – outsider: to be deprived of the official LOSH exhibitions participation, plus to 

get  no  financial  reward  for  her  works.  It  shows  Nina  Slobodinskaya  as  a  strong, 

determined character, which is faithful to her inner inclinations and does not enter 

into  compromise  with  her  conscience.  Nina  Slobodinskaya  was  already  in  her  70s, 

when she worked on religious art, following her proper  spiritual vision; these factors 

add even more respect towards the artist.  

The second image of God’s Mother with a Jesus Christ pretended to symbolize the 

defence and care of the whole nation, - was created as a symbol of protection of 

Leningrad. Zachitnitsa goroda – that is how the sculptor called the created image

495


Iconographical  image  follows  the  strict  rules  of  the  figure’s  posture,  but  if  viewer 

attentively looks at the faces, it becomes obvious that while The Virgin Mary’s face is 

meditative and calm, Jesus Christ’s face is full of emotional appeal, spirituality, inner 

tension  and  outburst.  The  bas-relief  image  is  truly  expressive  and  the  plane 

background emphasizes even more the message of closeness and accessibility of a 

sacred  world,  Virgin  Mary’s  and  Jesus  Christ  involving  and  participation  into  the 

world’s sufferings, pain and misery. 

Through  this  sculptural  religious  series  Nina  Slobodinskaya  shows  her-self  capable 

even more to transmit this icons’ main message of transcendence, implication and 

                                                 

494


 Лосский, Владимир,  Успенский, Леонид. Смысл икон. M.: Православный Свято-Тихоновский 

гуманитарный университет, 1997, C.39-85. 

495

 Personal recallings of Andrey Gnezdilov, interviewed on 09.09.14.



 

 

 

408 



interconnection  of  the  Sacred  World  with  our  human’s  one.  Hence,  the  subject  of 

Christian  images,  which  cults  sacred  figures’  transcendence  become  the  main  in 

creative  searches  of  the  artist.  The  sculptor  attempts  to  obtain  maximally  possible 

expressiveness  in  sculptural  form  (in  order  to  make  these  sacred  figures  more 

emotionally appealing for believers).  

As  the  main  creative  purpose  Nina  Slobodinskaya  sees  now  a  symbolical 



approximation of sacred figures of Jesus Christ and Virgin Mary to a viewer, in order 

to  obtain  a  maximally  strong  spiritual  interconnection,  to  achieve  a  true  artistic 

expressiveness, visualizing her own strong religious belief. Presumably it was her main 

creative, artistic idea and task during the last life period. 

Sculptor’s fervent faith was reflected not only in sculpture, but also in her life:  there 

are  multiples people  (mainly  her son’s friends  and  patients)  who  after  meeting  her 

on  few  occasions  sincerely  turned  into  the  religion.  It  shows  how  strong  her 

conviction, will and faith were. 

 

10.9 Spas Nerukotvornii – Image of Edessa 

 

Spas  Nerukotvornii  (Image  of  Edessa)  -  a  one  of  the  most  traditional  depictions  of 

Christ’s portrayal in The Orthodox Church, believed to be of divine origin

496

.   


Formally  the  iconographic  tradition  of  depiction  is  strictly  followed:  classical  face’s 

proportions,  symmetry,  ideal  traits.  But  all  mentioned  would  not  be  enough  to 

express the enormous emotionally appealing impression of truthfulness, vividness and 

actual feeling of presence and reality of the Jesus Christ’s face. 

The  plastering  sketch  still  remains  in  the  artist’s  studio;  and  by  Gnezdilov’s  words, 

often occurs, that when a person for the first time enters the room and just passes by, 

for just an instant viewer has a full impression of seeing a real vivid face. Only in the 

second instance a person realizes that he sees a sculptural portrait. It’s really difficult 

to  understand  with  what  means  of  artistic  plastic  language  the  artist  achieves  to 

reveal such a strong truthfulness of image’s depiction, o rather a direct implication, 

full  transcendence  and  a  strong  emotional  appeal  of  the  Jesus  Christ’s  Sacred 

Figure’s  physical  presence;  perhaps  it  could  be  explained  in  terms  of  Orthodox 

images’ interpretation. 

                                                 

496

 Деяния Вселенских Соборов. Т.75, M.: Собор Никейский 2-й, Вселенский Седьмой Деяние, 



1994, C.201. 

 

 

409 



 

      


 

The Mandylion Edessa, 1100, icon, Novgorod. 

The Mandylion Edessa, XII –XIV c., icon, Russia. 

 

 



               

 

The Mandylion, XVc., icon, from the Northern Russian town of Novgorod. 

A. Rubliov, Christ The Redeemer, ca.1410, icon, wood. 

 

 



 

 

410 



 

N. Slobodinskaya, Spas Nerukotvornii, 1977-80, plasticine, 50 x 47 x 50. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

N. Roerich, And we see, 1922, tempera. 



 

 

411 



 

N. Slobodinskaya, Spas Nerukotvornii, 1977-80, plasticine, 50 x 47 x 50. 



 

 

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Spas Nerukotvornii, 1977-80, plaster cast, 50 x 47 x 50. 

 

 

 



 

 

412 



The only explanation that comes to my mind consists of the icon painter’s approach, 

expressed in tradition to stay in pray and in fast before and during Christian image’s 

creation. Apparently, strong religious belief together with a spiritual effort permitted 

to achieve the maximum expressiveness and a feeling of  image depiction’s reality 

(to  which  many  generations  during  centuries  addressed  in  pray  and  in  hope).By 

strength  of  conviction,  by  symbolic  spiritual  content  of  the  depiction,  by  detailed 

characteristic  and  classical  interpretation  of  Jesus  Christ’s  face  N.  Slobodinskaya’s 

image is also accordant to N. Roerich.  Let’s not forget that N. Roerich was a kind of 

unspoken  leader  of  contemporary  to  Slobodinskaya  Russian  intelligentsia’s  spiritual 

searches. His emblematic figure embodied the highest searches of human spirit, who 

in search of Truth and true beauty, aimed to unite all cultures of the world. 

 

10.10 Crucifixion – last sculptural image 



 

The  last  resultive  sculptural  image  of  Nina  Slobodinskaya  which  also  became  the 

final not only in the series of religious images but also concluding in her proper life is 

the  Crucifixion.  Symbolically  she  aimed  to  elaborate  a  sculptural  image  for  her 

proper  grave.  The  first  sculptor’s  idea  consisted  of  creating  a  traditional  sculptural 

image  of  the  Crucifixion  with  its  base  in  form  of  cross,  but  which  would  remind  a 

traditional  wooden  icon,  which  may  be  closed  by  wooden  doors,  which  would 

remind shutters. However, according to her son’s memories, at that moment she did 

not have any necessary wooden base’s material, so, instead, sculptor took decision 

to use a half of a wine’s pipe as a base to The Jesus Christ’s figure. 

The  created  composition  permits  to  give  a  multiplicity  of  allegoric  interpretations 

and to suggest a variety of symbolic messages. First of all the wooden base reminds 

a  symbolical  divine  lightening  -  the  sun  shine  which  appears,  growing  from  Jesus 

Christ’s  figure,  while  the  pedestal in  form  of stairs seems  to  symbolically express  an 

accessibility, a direct connection between Christ’s figure and viewers, to show a kind 

of spiritual link, which exists between His Sacred figure and the world. 

The schematic Cross looks more as a hint than a real object. Further, a round frame 

resembles a form of circle and reveals an archetype of the World and Universe. 


 

 

413 



 

N. Slobodinskaya, Crucifixion, 1981, tinted plaster cast. 

 

In  this  approach  Jesus  Christ  seems  to  embrace  the  entire  world  and  the  very 



subject of His Crucifixion symbolizes  the enormous significance of this event for the 

whole Universe. The scale of the dramatic event is defined as crucial for the whole 

Universe and logically for the whole mankind

497


                                                 

497

 

The iconographical tradition of The Crucifixion of the Eastern Orthodox Church differs from the 



Western Catholic Church. The Catholic tradition is clearly historic and naturalistic. The crucified Christ is 

shown hanging on His hands; The Crucifixion transmits martyrish sufferings and death of Jesus Christ. 

From XV century a popular interpretation is based on revelations of Brigitte the Swedish (1302-1373), 

brightly visualized in the Crucifixion of Grunwald (Matiss Nithardt). The ancient Russian images of the 

Crucifixion are severe and even ascetic. Jesus Christ is depicted not just vivid, resuscitated, but also as 

reigning Savior, the Almighty, the Pantocrator and calls in his embrace the whole Universe. That’s why 

Jesus Christ in the Orthodox version is definitely shown with open palms. The motives of the western 

depiction, appeared in the early XVII century were strictly judged.  Another difference in characteristic 

of catholic Crucifixion – crossed and perforated with one nail both foots of the Savior. In the Orthodox 

tradition every foot is perforated separately, by one nail each foot. 



 

 

414 



 

 

 

N. Slobodinskaya, Crucifixion, 1981tinted plaster cast. 



 

                                                                                                                                                        

See more on the subject of the Orthodox Crucifixion’s interpretation: Филатов, В.В. Словарь изографа. 

Библиотека клирика. М.: Православное издательство Лествица, 2000; Басов, Д. Иконы в храме и в 

вашем доме. СПб.: Изд-во А.В.К.-Тимошка, 2001; Райгородский, Л.Д. Беседы о русских иконах. 

СПб.: Глаголъ, 1996; Топоров, В.Н. Крест. Мифы народов мира. Т.2, М.: Современный Дом, 1992; 



Настольная книга священнослужителя. Т.4, М.: Прометей, 1983; Покровский, Н.В. Евангелие в 

памятниках иконографии. M.: Ладья, 2000; Ориген. Толкование Евангелия по Матфею.  XIII, M.: 

Белфакс, 1997; Тертуллиан. Против Маркиана. Богословский сборник. М.: Азбука, 2005; Василий 

Великий, святитель. Толкование на пророка Исаию. Творения иже во святых отца нашего Василия 

Великого, архиепископа Кесарии Каппадокийския. М.: Наука, 1845; Покровский, Н.В. Евангелие в 

памятниках иконографии. M.: Искусство, 2000; Дамаскин Иоанн, преподобный. Точное 

изложение православной веры. СПб.: Репринт, 1984; Майкапар, Александр. Новозаветные 

сюжеты в живописи: Распятие Христа. Приложение к газете Первое сентября, № 42 (210), Ноябрь, 

2000. 

 


 

 

415 



In the sculptural composition viewer may find a multiplicity of symbolical meanings 

but the central part of composition - The Jesus Christ’s figure – is the most appealing. 

The schematic frame just accentuates the realistically shaped Christ’s human figure 

on the Cross. The most expressive appears to be his face, which seems to transmit all 

the  sorrow,  grief,  pain,  solitude  and  emotional  heaviness  of  the  dying  God’s  Son. 

Presumably, the artist aimed to show the most painful moment of Jesus Christ’s life – 

a  moment  of  human  death,  approximating  to  Jesus  Christ  and  the  pain  of  God’s 

Son who feels so lonely and left by His Father. A moment when God’s Son proclaims:  

"Боже Мой, Боже Мой! для чего Ты Меня оставил?"  ("My God, my God, why hast 

thou forsaken me?" (Math 27:46Мk 15:34). 

 

 

 



 

Photo of N. Slobodinskaya working on the Crucifixion, 1981, unknown author, this one is almost the last 

photo of the sculptor before her death. 

 


 

 

416 



 

N. Slobodinskaya, Crucifixion, 1981, coloured plaster cast. 

 

Despite the fact that Jesus Christ’s eyes are fully closed, his body seems to visualize 



his  soul’s  scream  filled  with  an  inner  and  physical  pain.  Nevertheless,  Jesus  Christ’s 

hand’s  gesture  seems  to  be  calling  and invocatory.  The  cross  which  appears  here 

only  as  a  hint,  symbolically  transmits  the  idea  that  Jesus  Christ  is  represented  here 

more Calling to humanity, Appealing to all mankind in His will to embrace the whole 



world with His Love, and to lead a man to Salvation. The circle frame around Jesus 

Christ’s figure in this context symbolizes God in His Glory, the grandeur Of His act of 

Love  for  the  whole  humanity  and  the  Universe.  By  this  appealing  message 

Slobodinskaya’s  interpretation  is  close  to  S.  Konenkov’s  Jesus  Christ

 

walking  above 

waves,  1935,  although  his  Jesus  Christ  is  not  crucified;  while  by  expressive  drama, 

concentrated  inner  spiritual  tension  of  the  Saviour’s  face,  by  a  realistically  and 

delicately shaped face, by a chosen material and the light yellow-brown colour of 

the sculptural image, - N. Slobodinskaya’s Jesus Christ’s image is consonant with A. 

Golubkina’s Christ (see p.199 of this research). 

There is no other thematic image which would be so much explored by art as The 

Crucifixion.  It  deserves  a  separate  approach  and  research  which  is  not  our  aim  in 

this study. The medieval art,

 

Michelangelo’s drawings, Russian wooden sculpture of 



XVIII and XIX centuries, contemporary Russian sculptors as Konenkov (who reveals a 

personality of Jesus Christ in its grandeur, spiritual strength and expressive dramatism) 



 

 

417 



and  French  sculptor  Germaine  Richier  (who  represents  the  Calvary  in  a  truly 

schematic way) – all they most brightly contribute to this theme suggesting universal, 

vivid and always actual Christ’s vision.  The conscience  of  Jesus Christ‘s suffering  to 

death  and  his  sacrifice  full  of  Love  for  all  humanity  –  the  grandeur,  moment’s 

significance and all dramatic tension of Christ’s state - is the main masters’  creative 

idea  which  she  successfully  transmitted  -  the  past  and  always  the  present  central 

moment in The Gospel. The image appears to be a direct appeal to human’s heart - 

to reveal their souls and to help them to discover their way towards Jesus Christ. 

Such was the last sculptural message left by the sculptor.  The Crucifixion framed in 

an original artistic form – complex and full of enormous emotional significance and 

spiritual  symbolism.  In  my  opinion  –  a  truly  honourable  life  result  creatively  and 

personally. 

 

 

 



M. Antokolskiy, Jesus Christ in front of people’s judgment, 1874, marble. 

 

 

418 



 

           

 

Ugolino-Lorenzetti, Calvary, XIV c.                                           Calvary, XVIII c., wood, Perm. 



 

        


 

 Calvary, XVIII c., wood, Perm.                                       Michelangelo, Crucifixion, 1541, drawing. 

 


 

 

419 



       

 

S. Konenkov, Jesus Christ, 1930s, marble. 



S. Konenkov, Jesus Christ walking above waves, 1935, bronze. 

 

 



 

 

Germaine Richiere, Christ d’Assy, 1950, bronze, 48 x 32 x 11. 



 

 

 

420 



 

 

 


1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling