Math and Science Symposium San Antonio, tx april 22-23, 2007 Dr. Frank Lucido, Director


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Math and Science Symposium San Antonio, TX April 22-23, 2007






Numbers

  • Rei

  • Ichi

  • Ni

  • San

  • Shi

  • Go

  • Roku

  • Shichi

  • Hachi

  • Ku

  • Ju











Levels of Language Acquisition

  • Pre-Production

  • Early Production

  • Speech Emergence

  • Intermediate Fluency

  • Advanced Fluency

















Characteristics Common to Effective Programs Fred Genesee, Kathryn Lindholm-Leary, William Saunders, Donna Christian (2005)

  • Attitude that “All Children Can Learn.”

  • Positive school environment.

  • Challenging and meaningful curriculum.

  • Alignment of curriculum to high standards.

  • Administrators and teachers that know

  • and understand theory and goals of program and implement best practices for ELLs.



Characteristics Common to Effective Programs

  • Integrate rather than segregate students.

  • See the program as an enrichment model.

  • Program is sustained over time.

  • Consistent assessment of literacy and

  • academic development.

  • Language development strategies are incorporated into the program.



SCAFFOLDING

  • CUSTOMERANIA-THE FEELING YOU GET IN A STORE WHEN EVERY CLERK COMES AND ASKS, “MAY I HELP YOU?”

  • SOCKDROOP-WHEN THE ELASTIC ON A SOCK WEARS OUT

  • ACELLERYELLER-WHAT YOU DO WHEN THE YELLOW LIGHT COMES ON AT AN INTERSECTION.

  • LEAFTOVER-THE TINY SPECK OF SPINACH LEFT ON YOUR TEETH AFTER DINNER.



Preparation

  • Integration of language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) is evident in observed content area.

  • Integration of language skills is evident throughout the lesson.



Environment

  • Environment supports language acquisition beyond direct instruction (word walls, reference charts, visual cues)

  • Room environment promotes fluency and is grade level appropriate.



Teaching Strategies

  • Consistent use of scaffolding techniques.

  • Use of a variety of questioning types. (Bloom’s Taxonomy)

  • Vocabulary is explicitly taught

  • Vocabulary instruction focuses on the “mortar” as well as the “bricks.”

  • Students are engaged in lesson 90%-100% of the time.



Interactions

  • There are frequent opportunities exist for interaction and discussion between teacher to student and student to student.

  • Interactive learning structures (partners, small groups) support objectives.

  • Appropriate amount of student wait time for student responses.



Assessment

  • Ongoing assessment is evident during the lesson.

  • Assessment drives instruction and planning.

  • Review of key concepts and vocabulary.

  • Provides regular feedback to students.



General Principles and Strategies for Teaching all ELL Students

  • Increase comprehensible input-non-verbal clues such as pictures, objects, gestures, intonation, graphic organizers, peer tutoring.

  • Increase interaction/opportunities to use their language skills in real communication

  • Increase opportunities for higher order thinking-think aloud-modeling “thinking language.”



General Principles and Strategies continued

  • Use Total Physical Response techniques.

  • Incorporate Cooperative learning

  • structures in teaching.

  • Set up dialogue journals.

  • Use native language support when possible. Rely on cognates. Point out specifics about vocabulary.

  • Realia strategies-”Hands on”



General Principles and Strategies continued

  • Simplify instructions if possible.

  • Make it culturally relevant or personal to students.

  • Whenever possible, supplement a lesson with bilingual materials.

  • Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (2006) www.nwrel.org





Institute for Second Language Achievement Texas A& M University-Corpus Christi




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