Medieval and early modern periods 1206


Download 5.23 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet42/62
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi5.23 Mb.
1   ...   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   ...   62

302 | 

P a g e


 

 

consecrated  in  the  12th  century  and  was  later  patronised  by  the  Mysore  rulers. 



Maharaja  Krishnaraja  III  added  a  Dravidian-style  gopuram  in  1827.  The  temple  has 

silver-plated doors with images of deities. Other images include those of the Hindu god 

Ganesha and of Maharaja  Krishnaraja  III  with his three queens.  Surrounding the main 

palace in Mysore and inside the fort are a group of temples, built in various periods. The 

Prasanna  Krishnaswamy  Temple  (1829),  the  Lakshmiramana  Swamy  Temple  whose 

earliest structures date to 1499, the Trinesvara Swamy Temple (late 16th century), the 

Shweta  Varaha  Swamy  Temple  built  by  Purnaiah  with  a  touch  of  Hoysala  style  of 

architecture, the Prasanna Venkataramana Swami Temple (1836) notable for 12 murals 

of  the Wodeyar  rulers. Well-known  temples  outside  Mysore  city  are  the  yali  ("mythical 

beast")  pillared  Venkataramana  temple  built  in  the  late  17th  century  in  the  Bangalore 

fort, and the Ranganatha temple in Srirangapatna.  

Tipu  Sultan  built  a  wooden  colonnaded  palace  called  the  Dariya  Daulat  Palace 

(lit,  "garden  of  the  wealth  of  the  sea")  in  Srirangapatna  in  1784.  Built  in  the  Indo-

Saracenic style, the palace is known for its intricate woodwork consisting of ornamental 

arches, striped columns and floral designs, and paintings. The west wall of the palace is 

covered  with  murals  depicting  Tipu  Sultan's  victory  over  Colonel  Baillie's  army  at 

Pollilur, near Kanchipuram in 1780. One mural shows Tipu enjoying the fragrance of a 

bouquet of flowers while  the battle is in progress. In that  painting,  the French soldiers' 

moustaches  distinguish  them  from  the  cleanshaven  British  soldiers.  Also  in 

Srirangapatna  is  the  Gumbaz  mausoleum,  built  by  Tipu  Sultan  in  1784.  It  houses  the 

graves of Tipu and Haider Ali. The granite base is capped with a dome built of brick and 

pilaster.  

 

The List of religious buildings and structures of the Kingdom of Mysore includes 



notable  and  historically  important  Hindu  temples,  royal  palaces,  churches,  mosques, 

military  fortification  and  other  courtly  structures  that  were  built  or  received  significant 

embellishment by the rulers of the Kingdom of Mysore. The term "Kingdom of Mysore" 

broadly  covers  the  various  stages  the  Mysore  establishment  went  through:  A 

Vijayanagara  vassal  (c.  1399 

  1565),  an  independent  Hindu  Kingdom  ruled  by  the 



Wodeyar  dynasty  (c.  1565 

  1761),  ruled  by  the  de  facto  rulers  Hyder  Ali  and  Tipu 



Sultan  who  took  control  of  the  Kingdom  (c.  1761 

  1799),  and  a  princely  monarchy 



under  the  British  Raj  (c.  1799 

  1950)  before  the  establishment  became  a  part  of  an 



independent India.  

Name of the 

structure 

Timeline 

Location 

Notes 


Kodi 

Bhairavaswamy (or 

Kodi Someshwara 

Swamy) 


c. 1399 

Mysore palace 

grounds

 

Built by the brothers Yaduraya and 



Krishnaraya (r. 1399

1423), the 



founders of the dynasty 

Lakshmiramana 

Swamy 

c. 1499 


Mysore palace 

grounds 


From the Banni mantapa inscription it 

is known the temple was consecrated 

in 1499 during the rule of Chamaraja 


 

303 | 

P a g e


 

 

Wodeyar II (r. 1478



1513) with later 

additions by Kings Narasaraja 

Wodeyar I (r. 1638

1659) and 



Krishnaraja Wodeyar III in 1851 

Gunja 


Narasimhaswamy

 

16th 



century 

Tirumakudal 

Narasipur

 

The pre-existing temple was under the 



patronage of the local governor of 

Mysore, during the Vijayanagara rule 

over South India.  

Trinayaneshvara 

Swamy 

Earlier 


than c. 

1578 


Mysore palace 

grounds 


Existed before Raja Wodeyar I of (r. 

1578


1617) and was later expanded 

by Kanthirava Narasaraja I (r. 1638

59).  



Lakshmikanta 

c. 1625 


Heggaddevanakote

 

The original 13th-century Hoysala era 



construction was expanded by King 

Chamaraja Wodeyar VI (r. 1617

37). 


Additions included a pillared 

mahamandapa ("large hall") and a 

mukhamandapa ("entrance hall"). An 

inscription on the dhvajastambha 

("flag pillar") in the temple claims King 

Chamaraja Wodeyar VI had it erected 

in c. 1625.  

Narasimha Swamy 

First half 

of 17th 


century 

Srirangapatna

 

The temple was built by Kanthirava 



Narasaraja Wodeyar (r. 1638

1659). 



His statue (dated 17th century) and 

that of the main deity Narasimha were 

re-installed in c. 1826 by King 

Krishnaraja Wodeyar III. An inscription 

on the pedestal in the Kannada script 

confirms it is the statue of "Kanthirava 

Narasaraja Wodeyaravaru". 

Nandi monolith 

c. 1659 

 



1673 

Chamundi Hills, 

Mysore 

commissioned by King Dodda 



Devaraja (also called Dodda 

Kempadevaraja, r. 1659

1673).  


Shveta Varaswamy

 

Late 17th 



century-

early 19th 

century 

Mysore palace 

grounds 

Built by King Chikkadevaraja Wodeyar 

(r. 1673

1704) and later expanded by 



Dewan Puraniah, chief minister of 

King Krishnaraja Wodeyar III ( (r. 

1799



1868).  



Temple tank 

(Kalyani) 

c. 1673 

 



1704 

Shravanabelagola

 

King Chikkadevaraja Wodeyar 



constructed the pond and made a 

large endowments to the Jain 

monastic order at Shravanabelagola.  

Paravasudeva 

c. 1673 

 



1704 

Gundlupet

 

The temple was built in Dravidian style 



during the rule of King Chikkadevaraja 

Wodeyar in memory of his father 

Doddadevaraja Wodeyar.  

Gopala Krishna 

c. 1673 

 



1704 

Haradanahalli 

Built by Chikkadevaraja Wodeyar in 

response to the taunts of the Maratha 

prince of Tanjore.  


 

304 | 

P a g e


 

 

Varadaraja 



c. 1673 

 



1704 

Varkod 


Built by Chikkadevaraja Wodeyar in 

response to the taunts of the Maratha 

prince of Tanjore.  

Mahalakshmi 

c. 1673 

 



1704 

Mysore palace 

grounds 

Built by King Chikkadevaraja Wodeyar 

about the same time as the Shveta 

Varahaswamy temple.  

Kote 

Venkataramana



 

c. 1689 


Bangalore

 

The temple was built in 1689 AD in 



Dravidian and Vijayanagara style by 

King Chikkadevaraja Wodeyar.  

Lakshmikanta

 

Before c. 



1732 

Kalale


 

The pre-existing temple was 

expanded and lavish grants were 

made by King Dodda Krishnaraja I (r. 

1714



1732) before c. 1732.  



Kille Venkatramana 

Swamy 


c. 1734 

 



1766 

Mysore palace 

grounds 

Built by King Krishnaraja Wodeyar II.  

Shivappa Nayaka 

Palace


 

c. 1760 


 

c. 1782 



Shivamogga

 

Though named after the Shivappa 



Nayaka, according to art historian 

George Michell, the palatial bungalow 

was actually built by the Mysore ruler 

Hyder Ali.  

Lal Bagh Botanical 

Garden


 

c. 1760 


Bangalore 

First planned and laid out during the 

rule of Hyder Ali and later adorned 

with unique plant species by Tipu 

Sultan is a popular botanical garden.  

Bangalore Fort 

c. 1761 

Bangalore 

First built in mud in c. 1537 by Kempe 

Gowda I, the founder of Bangalore, 

and later re-built in stone by Hyder Ali 

in 1761 and further improved by Tipu 

Sultan in the late 18th century. It was 

damaged during an Anglo-Mysore war 

in 1791. It still remains a good 

example of 18th-century military 

fortification.  

Madhugiri Fort 

late 18th 

century 


Madhugiri, Tumkur 

district 

The original fort is ascribed to Here 

Gauda, a Vijayanagara vassal of the 

fifteenth century. In c. 1678 the fort 

was captured by Chikka Devaraja 

Wodeyar, the King of Mysore. Haider 

Ali extended and further strengthened 

it.  

Devanahalli Fort



 

c. 1760 


 

1782 



Devanahalli

 

Chieftain Malla Byre Gowda of Avathi, 



a Vijayanagara empire vassal, built a 

mud fort in c. 1501 at Devanadoddi 

(now called Devanahalli). In the late 

18th century, Hyder Ali re-constructed 

the fort in stone resulting in the current 

structure.  

Colonel Bailey's 

Dungeon 


before c. 

1780 


Srirangapatna 

Where Colonel Bailey was imprisoned 

by Hyder Ali and died in 1780.  

Narasimha Swamy

 

Late 18th 



Seebi

 

Built during the rule of Tipu Sultan by 



 

305 | 

P a g e


 

 

century 



(before c. 

1799) 


three wealthy brothers: 

Lakshminarasappa, Puttanna and 

Nallappa, who were the sons of 

Kacheri Krishnappa, a Dewan in the 

court of King Tipu Sultan.  

Daria Daulat Bagh

 

c. 1784 


Srirangapatna 

Tipu Sultan built this wooden this 

colonnaded palace (lit, "garden of the 

wealth of the sea"). Built in the Indo-

Saracenic style, the palace is known 

for its intricate woodwork, striped 

columns, floral designs, and paintings.  

Gumbaz, 


Seringapatam

 

c. 1784 



Srirangapatna 

Built by Tipu Sultan himself, holds the 

graves of Tipu Sultana and his father 

Hyder Ali.  

Tipu Sultan's 

Summer Palace

 

c. 1791 


Bangalore 

The construction of the palace was 

commissioned by Hyder Ali in c. 1781 

and completed by Tipu Sultan in c. 

1791.  

Jama Masjid 



c. 1794 

Srirangapatna 

The Jama Masjid mosque named 

Masjid-e-Ala with two beautiful 

minarets was built by Tipu Sultan in 

1794.  


Tipu Sultan's 

Palace 


Late 18th 

century 


Nandi Hills

 

Interior of Tipu Sultan's summer 



Palace.  

Nandi Hills Fort 

Late 18th 

century 


Nandi Hills 

Fort built by Tipu Sultan on Nandi 

Hills.  

Manjarabad Fort 

c. 1792 

Manjrabad, Hassan 

district 

Built by Tipu Sultan who renamed 

'Balam' as Manjarabad to reflect the 

foggy atmosphere in the fort ("fog" in 

native Kannada is manju) in the 

region.  

Srirangapatna Fort 

Late 18th 

century 

Srirangapatna 

Currently nominated for recognition as 

UNESCO World Heritage Site. 

Epigraphically the fort dates back to c. 

1220 rule of Hoysala Empire King 

Vishnuvardhana. Later the fort 

underwent modifications under the 

Vijayanagara empire and Kanthirava 

Narasaraja Wodeyar of the Mysore 

Kingdom in c. 1654. In c. 1791, the 

fort obtained its current design and 

structure under the rule of Tipu Sultan. 

A military authority who visited 

Srirangapatna in c. 1888 opined that it 

was the second strongest fort in India.  

War Memorial 

After c. 

1799 

Srirangapatna 



Memorial for the British soldiers who 

died in the fourth Anglo Mysore war.  

Sultan Battery

 

Late 18th 



century 

Mangalore

 

A coastal fort built by Tipu Sultan just 



outside Mangalore city. Currently only 

parts of the fortification remain.  



 

306 | 

P a g e


 

 

Tipu's Memorial 



After c. 

1799 


Srirangapatna 

Spot where Tipu Sultan's died after 

Mysore's defeat to the British in fourth 

Anglo-Mysore war.  

Srikanteshwara

 

c. 1799 



 

1868 



Nanjanagud

 

King Krishnaraja Wodeyar caused the 



main gopura (tower over the entrance 

gateway) and other improvements to 

be made in c. 1845. The original 

consecration of the temple dates back 

much further back before coming 

under the patronage of the Mysore 

Kingdom. Karachuri Nanja Raja 

(Dalavoy of Mysore) and Dewan 

Purnaiah expanded the temple 

significantly.  

Wellington Lodge 

c. 1810 


Mysore 

Residence of Arthur Wellesley (later 

called Lord Wellington) after the death 

of Tipu Sultan.  

St. Mark's 

Cathedral, 

Bangalore

 

c. 1812 



Bangalore 

Its architecture is inspired by the 17th-

century St Paul's Cathedral in London.  

Arakeshwara

 

c. 1799 


 

1868 



Hale Yedatore 

King Krishnaraja Wodeyar endowed 

this temple.  

Chamundeshwari

 

c. 1827 


Chamundi Hills, 

Mysore 


This temple has a history dating back 

to the 12th century. Later King 

Krishnaraja Wodeyar III built the 

temple tower (gopura) and presented 

the Nakshatramalika jewel with 

Sanskrit verses inscribed on it.  

Prasanna 

Krishanswami 

c. 1829 

Mysore palace 

grounds 

Built by King Krishnaraja Wodeyar III.  

Kote Anjaneya 

c. 1829 


Mysore palace 

grounds 


Built by King Krishnaraja Wodeyar III 

Chamarajeshwara 

c. 1825 

Chamarajanagara

 

Built by King Krishnaraja Wodeyar III.  



Fernhills Palace

 

c. 1844 



Ooty

 

The summer Palace of the Mysore 



Maharajas, was actually built in 1844 

by Capt. F. Cotton. In 1873, Maharaja 

Chamarajendra Wodeyar X bought the 

palace.  

Bangalore Palace

 

c. 1864 



Bangalore

 

The Bangalore Palace, built on the 



model of Windsor castle was built by 

Rev. Garrett, first Principal of Central 

College. In 1884, it was bought by the 

then Maharaja, Chamarajendra 

Wodeyar X. Modifications continued 

until final completion in 1927.  

Cubbon Park

 

c. 1870 



Bangalore 

Originally the park was laid out in c. 

1870 and was called Cubbon Park 

after Sir Mark Cubbon, the British 

Commissioner. It houses Victorian 

style buildings such as the Karnataka 



 

307 | 

P a g e


 

 

High Court and the City Central library 



(Sheshadri Iyer Memorial hall). In the 

year 1927, the park was officially 

renamed as "Sri Chamarajendra Park" 

to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of 

Maharaja Krishnaraja Wodeyar‘s rule 

in Mysore State.  

Lokaranjan Mahal 

c. 1880 


Mysore 

Completed when Mysore was directly 

under the resident British 

Commissioners and served as a 

summer home for the royal family.  

Jayalakshmi Vilas

 

c. 1887 


 

1891 



Mysore 

The Jayalakshmi Vilas mansion was 

constructed during the rule of 

Maharaja Chamarajendra Wadiyar X.  

Mysore University

 

c. 1887 



 

1891 



Mysore 

The Crawford hall on the campus was 

constructed during the rule of 

Maharaja Chamarajendra Wadiyar X 

Karnataka High 

Court 


c. 1881 

Bangalore 

The High Court is known as Attara 

Kacheri (lit, "Eighteen offices") was 

originally built in 1868 and later 

expanded.  

Mayo Hall 

Late 19th 

century 

Bangalore 

Built in memory of the 4th Viceroy of 

India, Lord Mayo.  

Mysore Palace

 

c. 1897 



Mysore

 

Also known as the Amba Vilas Palace, 



the original complex was destroyed by 

fire and a new palace built in Indo-

Saracenic style was commissioned by 

the Queen-Regent (Maharaja 

Krishnaraja Wodeyar IV) and 

designed by the English architect 

Henry Irwin in 1897.  

Cheluvamba 

Mansion 

c. 1900 


Mysore 

This Mansion was built for the third 

daughter of Krishnaraja Wodeyar IV, 

princess Cheluvajammanni and is 

therefore called Cheluvamba Mansion. 

It now serves as the Central Food 

Technological Research Institute, 

Government of India.  

Jaganmohan 

Palace


 

c. 1910 


Mysore 

The Jaganmohan Palace was 

commissioned in c. 1861 Maharaja 

Krishnaraja Wodeyar III and was 

completed in 1910 during the rule of 

Krishnaraja Wodeyar IV. It is now 

called the Chamarajendra Art Gallery 

and houses a rich collection of 

artifacts 

Karanji Mansion 

c. 1902 

 



1914 

Mysore 


Karanji Mansion in Nazarbad Mohalla 

was constructed for the second 

daughter of Krishnaraja Wodeyar IV, 

princess Krishnarajammanni. The 



 

308 | 

P a g e


 

 

Mansion is built using the Indo-



Sarcenic Renaissance style of 

architecture in 1902. It now serves as 

the Postal Training Institute, 

Government of India.  

Lalitha Mahal

 

c. 1921 



Mysore 

The Lalitha Mahal Palace was built in 

1921 by E.W. Fritchley under the 

commission of Maharaja Krishnaraja 

Wodeyar IV. The architectural style is 

called "Renaissance" and exhibits 

concepts from English manor houses 

and Italian palazzos.  

St. Philomena's 

Church 


c. 1930 

Mysore 


Built during the rule of Maharaja 

Krishnaraja Wodeyar IV is in Gothic 

style with stained glass windows. It is 

one of the biggest churches in India.  

Brindavan Gardens

 

c. 1932 



Srirangapatna 

The work on laying out the garden 

(also called Krishna Raja Sagara) was 

started in the c. 1927 and completed 

in c. 1932 when Sir Mirza Ismail was 

the Dewan of Mysore and Maharaja 

Krishnaraja Wodeyar IV sat on the 

Mysore throne.  

Rajendra Vilas 

Palace 


c. 1938 

Mysore (Chamundi 

hills) 

The Rajendra Vilas palace, built in the 



Indo-British style, was commissioned 

in 1922 and completed in 1938 by 

Maharaja Krishnaraja IV.  

Bhuvaneshwari 

c. 1951 

Mysore palace 

grounds 

Built in 1951 by King 

Jayachamarajendra Wodeyar (r. 

1940


1950; Titular:1950

1974) and 



the famous sculptor Sri 

Siddalingaswamy carved the image of 

the goddess Bhuvaneshwari.  

Gayathri 

c. 1953 

Mysore palace 

grounds 

Built by King Jayachamarajendra 

Wodeyar in 1953.  

 

Military technology 

The  first  iron-cased  and  metal-cylinder  rocket  artillery  were  developed  by  Tipu 

Sultan and his father Hyder Ali, in the 1780s. He successfully used these metal-cylinder 

rockets  against  the  larger  forces  of  the  British  East  India  Company  during  the  Anglo-

Mysore Wars. The Mysore rockets of this period were much more advanced than what 

the British had seen, chiefly because of the use of iron tubes for holding the propellant; 

this  enabled  higher  thrust  and  longer  range  for  the  missile  (up  to  2 km  (1 mi)  range). 

After  Tipu's  eventual  defeat  in  the  Fourth  Anglo-Mysore  War  and  the  capture  of  the 



 

309 | 

P a g e


 

 

Mysore  iron  rockets,  they  were  influential  in  British  rocket  development,  inspiring  the 



Congreve rocket, which was soon put into use in the Napoleonic Wars.  

According to Stephen Oliver Fought and John F. Guilmartin, Jr. in Encyclopædia 

Britannica (2008): 

Hyder Ali, prince of Mysore, developed war rockets with an important change: the 

use of metal cylinders to contain the  combustion powder. Although the hammered soft 

iron  he  used  was  crude,  the  bursting  strength  of  the  container  of  black  powder  was 

much  higher  than the earlier  paper  construction.  Thus  a  greater  internal  pressure  was 

possible,  with  a  resultant  greater  thrust  of  the  propulsive  jet.  The  rocket  body  was 

lashed  with  leather  thongs  to  a  long  bamboo  stick.  Range  was  perhaps  up  to  three-

quarters of a mile (more than a kilometre). Although individually these rockets were not 

accurate, dispersion error became less important when large numbers were fired rapidly 

in  mass  attacks.  They  were  particularly  effective  against  cavalry  and  were  hurled  into 

the air, after lighting, or skimmed along the hard dry ground. Tipu Sultan, continued to 

develop  and  expand  the  use  of  rocket  weapons,  reportedly  increasing  the  number  of 

rocket  troops  from  1,200  to  a  corps  of  5,000.  In  battles  at  Seringapatam  in  1792  and 

1799 these rockets were used with considerable effect against the British."  

Hyderabad State 

Early history 

The  Nizam  of  Hyderabad  was  earlier  the  Mughal  Viceroy  of  the  Deccan.  The 

Asaf Jahi was a dynasty of Turkic origin from the region around Samarkand in modern-

day Uzbekistan, who came to India in the late 17th century, and became employees of 

the  Mughal  Empire.  As  the  Turco-Mongol  Mughals  were  great  patrons  of  Persian 

culture,  language,  literature:  the  family  found  a  ready  patronage.  However,  with  the 

decline  of  the  Mughals  the  Deccan  attained  independence,  though  the  first  Nizam 

continued to owe  allegiance  to the  Mughal Emperor.  The  Deccan  territories  were  thus 

the last survivors of the Mughal empire, along with the Princely state of Awadh (in North 

India). These territories soon came to be known as the 'Nizam's Dominions', which  (in 

the year 1760) included areas from south of Maharashtra to the southern end of Andhra 

Pradesh, encompassing vast territories in Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, and Telangana. 

However, Hyder Ali administered the regions in and around Mysore and did not owe any 

allegiance to the Nizam. 

With the Mughal empire in disarray, this was a time when the French and British 

were  competing  for  supremacy  in  the  Indian  sub-continent.  The  French  exercised 

considerable  influence  in  the  Deccan from  their  stronghold  of  Pondicherry.  In  fact,  the 

Nizam had a French regent stationed at Hyderabad in the later years of the 18th century 

as an important adviser, and there remains to this day a street of Hyderabad city named 

Troop Bazaar, which recalls where the French originally had their military barracks. The 

Nizam's dominions were at their greatest territorial extent at the time of the first Nizam, 

Nizam-ul-mulk, Asaf Jah-I. However, after his death there arose a succession struggle, 


1   ...   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   ...   62




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling