Medieval and early modern periods 1206


Download 5.23 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet52/62
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi5.23 Mb.
1   ...   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   ...   62

377 | 

P a g e


 

 

Guru  Har  Gobind  was  Guru  Tegh  Bahadur's  father.  He  was  originally  named 



Tyag  Mal    but  was  later  renamed  Tegh  Bahadur  after  his  gallantry  and  bravery  in  the 

wars  against  the  Mughal  forces.  He  built  the  city  of  Anandpur  Sahib,  and  was 

responsible  for  saving  the  Kashmiri  Pandits,  who  were  being  persecuted  by  the 

Mughals.  

After  the  execution  of  Guru  Tegh  Bahadar  by  Mughal  Emperor  Aurangzeb,  a 

number of Sikh temples were built in his and his associates' memory. The Gurdwara Sis 

Ganj  Sahib  in  Chandni  Chowk,  Delhi,  was  built  over  where  he  was  beheaded.[35] 

Gurdwara  Rakab  Ganj  Sahib,  also  in  Delhi,  is  built  on  the  site  of  the  residence  of  a 

disciple  of  Teg  Bahadur,  who  burnt  his  house  in  order  to  cremate  his  master's  body. 

Another  Gurudwara  by  the  same  name,  Gurudwara  Sis  Ganj  Sahib  at  Ambala  City 

where that man halt for a night with Teg Bahadur's head after that he went for Anandpur 

Sahib in Punjab. Gurudwara Sisganj Sahib in Punjab marks the site where in November 

1675,  the  head  of  the  martyred  Guru  Teg  Bahadar  which  was  brought  by  Bhai  Jaita 

(renamed Bhai Jivan Singh according to  Sikh rites) in defiance of the Mughal authority 

of Aurangzeb was cremated here.  

Guru  Tegh  Bahadur  has  ever  since  been  remembered  for  giving  up  his  life  for 

freedom  of  religion,  reminding  Sikhs  and  non-Muslims  in  India  to  follow  and  practice 

their beliefs without fear of persecution and forced conversions by Muslims. Guru Tegh 

Bahadur  was martyred,  along with fellow devotees  Bhai Mati Dass, Bhai Sati Das and 

Bhai Dayala. 

Guru Tegh Bahadur spoke out amid this persecution.  

Effect on Sikhs 

Guru  Tegh  Bahadur's  execution  hardened  the  resolve  of  Sikhs  against  Muslim 

rule  and  the  persecution.  Pashaura  Singh  states  that,  "if  the martyrdom  of  Guru  Arjan 

had  helped  bring  the  Sikh  Panth  together, Guru  Tegh  Bahadur's  martyrdom  helped  to 

make  the  protection  of  human  rights  central to  its  [Sikh]  identity".  Wilfred  Smith  states 

that, "the attempt to forcibly convert the ninth Guru to an externalized, impersonal Islam 

clearly  made  an  indelible  impression  on  the  martyr's  nine  year  old  son,  Gobind,  who 

reacted  slowly  but  deliberately  by  eventually  organizing  the  Sikh  group  into  a  distinct, 

formal, symbol-patterned community". It inaugurated the Khalsa identity.  

Places named after Guru Teg Bahadur 

A number of places are named after the ninth guru of Sikhs, Guru Teg Bahadur. 

  Shri 


guru 

Teg 


Bahadur 

Senior 


Secondary 

School, 


PATLI 

DABAR,Sirsa(Haryana) 

  Gurdwara Sri Guru Tegh Bahadur Sahib, Assam. 



  Sri Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital, Delhi 



 

378 | 

P a g e


 

 



  Sri Guru Teg Bahadur Khalsa Institute of Engineering & Technology, Malout 

  Sri Guru Teg Bahadur Institute of Technology 



  Sri Guru Teg Bahadur Integration Chair, Punjabi University, Patiala 

  Sri Guru Teg Bahadur Railway Station, Mumbai(G.T.B. Nagar) 



  Guru Teg Bahadur Public School, Durgapur 

  Guru Tegh Bahadur Khalsa Senior Secondary School, Malout 



  Gurudwara Sri Guru Tegh Bahadar Langar Saheb, Aurangabad, Maharashtra 

  Sri Guru Tegh Bahadar English High School, Aurangabad, Maharashtra 



  Sri  Guru  Teg  Bahadur  Khalsa  Collge  (SGTB  Khalsa  Collge),  University  of 

Delhi 



  Guru Tegh bahadur 3rd centenary public school, New Delhi 



  Guru Teg Bahadur Charitable Hospital, Ludhiana 

  Guru Teg Bahadur Public School, Patran (District Patiala) 



  Gurudwara Sahib, Sri Guru Teg bahadur Nagar, Jalandhar (Punjab) 



 

Guru Gobind Singh 

Family and early life 

Gobind Singh was the only son of Guru Tegh Bahadur, the ninth Sikh guru, and 

Mata Gujri. He was born in Patna while his father was on a preaching tour in Assam. A 

shrine, Takht Sri Harimandar Sahibas, marks the site of the house where he was born 

and spent his early childhood. In March 1672 the family moved to Anandpur, where his 

education  included  Punjabi,  Persian,  Sanskrit  and  martial  skills.  After  the  execution  of 

his father in November 1675, Gobind Singh was installed as Guru on Vaisakhi in March 

1676. 


Guru Gobind Singh had three wives:  

  Mata Jito, married 21 June 1677 at Basantga



h, 10 km north of Anandpur. 

  The couple had three sons: Jujhar Singh, Zorawar Singh and Fateh Singh. 



  Mata Sundari, married 4 April 1684 at Anandpur. 

  The couple had one son, Ajit Singh. 



  Mata Sahib Devan, married 15 April 1700 at Anandpur. 

  Mother of the Khalsa. 



Leaving Anandpur Sahib and Return 

Gobind  Singh's  father  Tegh  Bahadur  founded  the  city  of  Chakk  Nanaki,  now 

known  as  Anandpur  Sahib,  in  1665,  on  land  purchased  from  the  ruler  of  Bilaspur 

(Kahlur).  Gobind  Singh  moved  there  in  March  1672.  In  April  1685,  he  shifted  his 

residence to  Paonta in Sirmaur state  at  the invitation of Raja Mat Prakash of  Sirmaur. 

According to the gazetteer of  the Sirmur State,  the Guru was compelled to quit Chakk 



 

379 | 

P a g e


 

 

Nanaki  due  to  differences  with  Bhim  Chand,  and  went  to  Toka.  From  Toka,  he  was 



invited to Nahan, the capital of Sirmaur by Mat Prakash. From Nahan, he proceeded to 

Paonta. Mat Prakash invited the Guru to his kingdom in order to strengthen his position 

against  Raja  Fateh  Shah  of  Garhwal.  At  the  request  of  Raja  Mat  Prakash,  the  Guru 

constructed  a  fort  at  Paonta  with  help  of  his  followers,  in  a  short  time.  The  Guru 

remained at Paonta for around three years, and composed several texts. 

The hostility between  Nahan King and Fateh Shah,  the Garhwal king continued 

to  increase  during  the  latter's  stay  at  Paonta,  ultimately  resulting  in  the  Battle  of 

Bhangani near Paonta.  Fateh Shah attacked on 18 September 1688;  the battle ended 

with the Guru's victory. In the Battle of Nadaun in 1687, the armies of Alif Khan and his 

aides were defeated by the allied forces of Bhim Chand, Guru Gobind Singh and other 

hill rajas. According to Bichitra Natak and the Bhatt Vahis, Guru Gobind Singh remained 

at Nadaun, on the banks of the River Beas, for eight days, and visited various important 

military  chiefs.  In  November  1688  after  the  Battle  of  Bhangani,  at  the  request  of  Rani 

Champa,  the  dowager  queen  of  Bilaspur,  Gobind  Singh  returned  to  Chakk  Nanaki, 

which he renamed Anandpur, after one of the forts which he erected to guard the city.  

In  1695,  Dilawar  Khan,  the  Mughal  chief  of  Lahore,  sent  his  son  to  attack 

Anandpur.  The  Mughal  army  was  defeated  and  Hussain  Khan  was  killed.  After 

Hussain's  death,  Dilawar  Khan  sent  his  men  Jujhar  Hada  and  Chandel  Rai  to  Sivalik 

Hills. However, they were defeated by Gaj Singh of Jaswal. The developments in the hill 

area  caused  anxiety  to  the  Mughal  emperor  Aurangzeb,  who  sent  forces  under  the 

command of his son, to restore Mughal authority in the region. 

Founding the Khalsa[edit] 

In  1699,  the  Guru  sent  hukmanamas  (letters  of  authority)  to  his  followers, 

requesting them to congregate at Anandpur on 30 March 1699, the day of Vaisakhi (the 

annual  harvest  festival).[11]  He  addressed  the  congregation  from  the  entryway  of  a 

small tent  pitched on a small hill (now called Kesgarh Sahib). He  first  asked everyone 

who he was for them? Everyone answered  - "You are our Guru." He then asked them 

who were they, to which everyone replied - "We are your Sikhs." Having reminded them 

of this relationship, He then said that today the Guru needs something from his Sikhs. 

Everyone said, "Hukum Karo, Sache Patshah" (Order us, True Lord). Then drawing his 

sword he asked for a volunteer who was willing to sacrifice his head. No one answered 

his first call, nor the second call, but on the third invitation,  Daya Ram (later known as 

Bhai  Daya  Singh)  came  forward  and  offered  his  head  to  the  Guru.  Guru  Gobind  Rai 

took  the  volunteer  inside  the  tent. The  Guru  returned  to  the  crowd  with  blood  dripping 

from  his  sword.  He  then  demanded  another  head.  One more  volunteer  came forward, 

and entered the tent with him. The Guru again emerged with blood on his sword. This 

happened  three  more  times.  Then  the  five  volunteers  came  out  of  the  tent  in  new 

clothing unharmed. 

Guru  Gobind  Singh  then  poured  clear  water  into  an  iron  bowl  and  adding 

Patashas  (Punjabi  sweeteners)  into  it,  he  stirred  it  with  double-edged  sword 



 

380 | 

P a g e


 

 

accompanied  with  recitations  from  Adi  Granth.  He  called  this  mixture  of  sweetened 



water and iron as Amrit ("nectar") and administered it to the five men. These five, who 

willingly volunteered to sacrifice their lives for their Guru, were given the title of the Panj 

Pyare ("the five beloved ones") by their Guru.[11] They were the first (baptized) Sikhs of 

the Khalsa: Daya Ram (Bhai Daya Singh), Dharam Das (Bhai Dharam Singh), Himmat 

Rai  (Bhai  Himmat  Singh),  Mohkam  Chand  (Bhai  Mohkam  Singh),  and  Sahib  Chand 

(Bhai Sahib Singh). 

Guru  Gobind  Singh  then  recited  a  line  which  has  been  the  rallying-cry  of  the 

Khalsa  since  then:  'Waheguru  ji  ka  Khalsa,  Waheguru  ji  Ki  Fateh'  (Khalsa  belongs  to 

God; victory belongs to God). He gave them all the name "Singh" (lion), and designated 

them collectively as the  Khalsa, the body of baptized Sikhs. The Guru then astounded 

the five and the whole assembly as he knelt and asked them to in turn initiate him as a 

member, on an equal footing with them in the Khalsa, thus becoming the sixth member 

of  the  new  order.  His  name  became  Gobind  Singh.  Today  members  of  the  Khalsa 

consider  Guru  Gobind  as  their  father,  and  Mata  Sahib  Kaur  as  their  mother.[11]  The 

Panj  Piare  were  thus  the  first  baptised  Sikhs,  and  became  the  first  members  of  the 

Khalsa  brotherhood.  Women  were  also  initiated  into  the  Khalsa,  and  given  the  title  of 

kaur ("princess").[11] Guru Gobind Singh then addressed the audience - 

 



From  now  on,  you  have  become  casteless.  No  ritual,  either  Hindu  or 

Muslim,  will  you  perform  nor  will  you  believe  in  superstition  of  any  kind,  but 

only  in  one  God  who  is  the  master  and  protector  of  all,  the  only  creator  and 

destroyer. In your new order, the lowest will rank with the highest and each will 

be  to  the  other  a  bhai  (brother).  No  pilgrimages  for  you  any  more,  nor 

austerities  but  the  pure  life  of  the  household,  which  you  should  be  ready  to 

sacrifice at the call of Dharma. Women shall be equal of men in every way. No 

purdah (veil) for them anymore, nor the burning alive of a widow on the pyre of 

her  spouse  (sati).  He  who  kills  his  daughter,  the  Khalsa  shall  not  deal  with 

him. 


 

Five K's 

  Kesh: uncut hair is a symbol of acceptance of your form as God intended it to be, 



and to give an unmistakable visual identity to the Khalsa. 

  Kangha:  a  wooden  comb,  a  symbol  of  cleanliness  to  keep  one's  body  and  soul 



clean. 

  Kara:  an  iron  or  steel  bracelet  worn  on  the  wrist,  to  remind  the  Khalsa  of  their 



vows and as a mark of iron self-restraint. 

  Kirpan:  a  sword  to  defend  oneself  and  protect  the  poor,  the  weak  and  the 



oppressed, regardless of religion, race or creed. 

  Kacchera:  shorts,  which  are  riding  breeches  cut  off  at  the  knee,  to  keep  the 



soldiers of the Khalsa always ready to go into battle on horseback 

 


 

381 | 

P a g e


 

 



 

Smoking  being  an  unclean  and  injurious  habit,  you  will  forswear.  You 

will love the weapons of war, be excellent horsemen, marksmen and wielders 

of the sword, the discus and the spear. Physical prowess will be as sacred to 

you as spiritual sensitivity. And, between the Hindus and Muslims, you will act 

as a bridge, and serve the poor without distinction of caste, colour, country or 

creed.  My  Khalsa  shall  always  defend  the  poor,  and  'Deg'  -  or  community 

kitchen  -  will  be  as  much  an  essential  part  of  your  order  as  Teg  -the  sword. 

And,  from  now  onwards  Sikh  males  will  call  themselves  'Singh'  and  women 

'Kaur'  and  greet  each  other  with  'Waheguruji  ka  Khalsa,  Waheguruji  ki  fateh 

(The Khalsa belongs to God; victory belongs to God).  

 



A result of the Guru's actions is arguably that the strength of Sikhi in the 18th and 

19th  centuries  was  based  on  the  third,  fourth,  and  fifth  orders  of  Indian  society,  even 

though  some  of  its  leaders  still  came  from  the  Kshatriya  varna.  An  interesting 

representation of the first amrit ceremony is found in the paintings that show two dead 

hawks,  lying  on  their  backs  on  the  ground,  while  their  killers,  two  doves,  sit  upon  the 

bowls  of  amrit.  Symbolically,  the  Sikhs,  the  doves,  had  gained  the  strength  of  hawks, 

the strong, militant people who lived on all sides of them.  

Guru  Gobind  Singh's  respect  for  the  Khalsa  is  best  represented  in  one  of  his 

poems:  

All 


the 

battles 


have 


won 

against 


tyranny 

have 



fought 

with 


the 

devoted 


backing 

of 


the 

people; 


Through 

them 


only 

have 


been 


able 

to 


bestow 

gifts, 


Through 

their 


help 

have 



escaped 

from 


harm; 

The 


love 

and 


generosity 

of 


these 

Sikhs 


Have 

enriched 

my 

heart 


and 

home. 


Through 

their 


grace 

have 



attained 

all 


learning; 

Through 


their 

help 


in 

battle 


have 


slain 

all 


my 

enemies. 

was 


born 

to 


serve 

them, 


through 

them 


reached 


eminence. 

What 


would 

have 



been 

without 


their 

kind 


and 

ready 


help? 

There 


are 

millions 

of 

insignificant 



people 

like 


me. 

True 


service 

is 


the 

service 


of 

these 


people. 

am 



not 

inclined 

to 

serve 


others 

of 


higher 

caste: 


Charity 

will 


bear 

fruit 


in 

this 


and 

the 


next 

world, 


If 

given 


to 

such 


worthy 

people 


as 

these; 


All 

other 


sacrifices 

are 


and 

charities 

are 

profitless. 



From 

toe 


to 

toe, 


whatever 

call 



my 

own, 


All I possess and carry, I dedicate to these people. 

 

Conflicts with the rajas of Sivalik Hills 



 

382 | 

P a g e


 

 

The  formation  of  the  casteless  military  order  Khalsa  did  not  go  well  with  the 



Hindu rajas of the Sivalik Hills, who in turn got united to evict the Guru from the region. 

After  seeing  the  rajas'  desire  to  become  the  Guru's  disciples,[who?]  told  the  hill  rajas 

that  fighting  alongside  the  low-caste  members  of  the  Sikhs  would  pollute  their  Khatri 

caste status. The hill rajas' expeditions during 1700-04 were unsuccessful. 

Balia Chand and Alim Chand - two of the hill chieftains made a surprise attack on 

the  Guru,  while  he  was  on  a  hunting  expedition.  In  the  ensuing  combat,  Alim  Chand 

managed to escape, while Balia Chand was killed by Guru's aide Ude Singh. 

After several failed attempts to check the rising power of the Sikhs, the hill chiefs 

petitioned  the  Mughal  rulers  for  help.  The  Mughal  emperor  of  Delhi  sent  his  generals 

Din Beg and Painda Khan, each with an army of five thousand men. The Mughal forces 

were  joined  by  the  armies  of  the  hill  chiefs.  However,  they  failed  to  defeat  the  Guru's 

forces, and Painda Khan was killed in the First Battle of Anandpur (1700). 

Alarmed at the Guru's rising influence, the rajas of several hill states assembled 

at  Bilaspur  to  discuss  the  situation.  The  son  of  Bhim  Chand,  Raja  Ajmer  Chand  of 

Kahlur, suggested forming an alliance to curb the Guru's rising power. Accordingly, the 

rajas  formed  an  alliance,  and  marched  towards  Anandpur.  They  sent  a  letter  to  the 

Guru,  asking  him  to pay  the  arrears  of  rent  for  Anandpur  (which  lay  in  Ajmer  Chand's 

territory), and leave the place. The Guru insisted that the land was bought by his father, 

and is therefore, his own property. A battle, dated from 1701 to 1704, followed. The hill 

rajas were joined by a large number of Gujjars, under the command of Jagatullah. Duni 

Chand led five hundred men from Majha region to assist the Guru. Reinforcements from 

other  areas  also  arrived  to  help  the  Guru.  The  conflict,  known  as  the  First  Battle  of 

Anandpur resulted in retreat of the hill rajas.  

Later, the hill  rajas  negotiated a  peace agreement  with  the  Guru, asking  him  to 

leave  Anandpur.  Accordingly,  the  Guru  left  for  Nirmoh  village.  Meanwhile,  Raja  Ajmer 

Chand  had  sent  his  envoys  to  the  Mughal  viceroys  in  Sirhind  and  Delhi,  seeking  their 

help against the Guru. The army of Sirhind viceroy Wazir Khan arrived to assist the hill 

rajas. Seeing that Nirmoh was not fortified, Raja Ajmer Chand and the Raja of  Kangra 

and the Mughal force launched an attack on the Guru's camp, but were repulsed. After 

that the Guru withdrew to Basoli. An alliance of the hill rajas, led by Ajmer Chand, made 

a heavy attack, but were driven off in the Battle of Basoli,(1702).  

After repeated pleas for assistance from the hill rajas, the Mughal emperor sent 

an  army  under  Saiyad  Khan's  command.  Saiyad  Khan  was  a  brother-in-law  of  Pir 

Budhu Shah, and defected to the Guru's side, after the Pir spoke highly of him. Ramzan 

Khan then took the command of the imperial army, and allied with the hill rajas to attack 

Anandpur in March 1704. It was the crop-cutting time of the year, and the majority of the 

Guru's followers had dispersed to their homes. Guru was assisted by two of his Muslim 

admirers,  Maimun  Khan  and  Saiyad  Beg,  however  his  men  were  outnumbered,  and 

decided to vacate Anandpur. The Mughal army plundered the city, and then proceeded 

to  Sirhind.  On  their  way  back,  they  were  caught  in  a  surprise  attack  by  the  Guru's 



 

383 | 

P a g e


 

 

forces,  who  recovered  the  booty  captured  from  Anandpur.  The  Guru  then  returned  to 



Anandpur. 

Evacuation from Anandpur 

The  hill  chiefs  then  decided  to  approach  the  Mughal  Emperor,  Aurangzeb, 

through  his  Governor  in  Punjab,  Wazir  Khan,  to  help  them  subdue  the  Sikhs.  Their 

memorandum spoke of his establishing the new order of Khalsa 

 

Which is contrary to all our cherished beliefs and customs. He (Gobind 



Singh) wants us to join hands with him to fight our Emperor against whom he 

harbours profound grudge. This we refused to do, much to his annoyance and 

discomfiture.  He is now  gathering  men and arms from all over the country to 

challenge the Mughal Empire. We cannot restrain him, but as loyal subjects of 

your Majesty,  we seek your assistance to drive him out  of Anandpur and not 

allow  grass  to  grow  beneath  your  feet.  Otherwise,  he  would  become  a 

formidable challenge to the whole empire, as his intentions are to march upon 

Delhi itself.  

 

At  the  plea  of  Raja  Ajmer  Chand,  the  Mughal  emperor  ordered  the  viceroys  of 



Sirhind,  Lahore  and  Kashmir  to  proceed  against  the  Guru.  The  Mughal  forces  were 

joined  by  the  armies  of  the  hill  rajas,  the  Ranghars  and  the  Gurjars  of  the  area.  The 

Guru  also  made  preparations  for  the  battle,  and  his  followers  from  Majha,  Malwa, 

Doaba and other areas assembled at Anandpur. 

The imperial forces attacked Anandpur in 1705, and laid a siege around the city. 

After a few days of the commencement of the siege, Raja Ajmer Chand sent his envoy 

to  the  Guru,  offering  withdrawal  of  the  siege,  in  return  for  Guru's  evacuation  from 

Anandpur.  The  Guru  refused  to  accept  the  offer,  but  many  of  his  followers,  suffering 

from  lack  of  food  and  other  supplies,  asked  him  to  accept  the  proposal.  As  more  and 

more followers pressured the Guru to accept Ajmer Chand's offer, he sent a message to 

Ajmer  Chand  offering  to  evacuate  Anandpur,  if  the  allied  forces  would  first  allow  his 

treasury and other property to be taken outside the city. The allied forces accepted the 

proposal.  The  Guru,  in  order  to  test  their  sincerity,  sent  a  caravan  of  loaded  bullocks 

outside the fort. However, the allied forces attacked the caravan to loot the treasure. To 

their  disappointment,  they  found  out  that  the  caravan  carried  no  treasure.  The  Guru 

then decided not to vacate Anandpur, and refused to accept any further proposals from 

the allied forces. 

Finally,  the  Mughal  emperor  Aurangzeb  sent  a  signed  letter  to  the  Guru, 

swearing  in  name  of  Quran,  that  the  Guru  and  his  followers  would  be  allowed  a  safe 

passage if he decided to evacuate Anandpur. The Guru, hard pressed by his followers 

and his family, accepted the offer, and evacuated Anandpur on 20

21 December 1705. 


1   ...   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   ...   62




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling