November 1897 7 June 1978 Ronald George Wreyford Norrish, 9


Download 0.78 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet1/10
Sana26.05.2018
Hajmi0.78 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

November 1897 - 7 June 1978

Ronald George Wreyford Norrish, 9

Sir Frederick Dainton, F. R. S. and B. A. Thrush, F. R. S.

1981

, 379-424, published 1 November



27

1981 


Biogr. Mems Fell. R. Soc. 

Email alerting service

here


corner of the article or click 

this article - sign up in the box at the top right-hand 

Receive free email alerts when new articles cite

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/subscriptions

, go to: 

Biogr. Mems Fell. R. Soc.

To subscribe to 

 on May 24, 2018

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 

 on May 24, 2018

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



 on May 24, 2018

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 


RONALD  GEORGE  WREYFORD  NORRISH

9  N o v em b er  1897 —  7  Ju n e   1978

E lected  F .R .S .  1936

B

y



 

S

ir

  F

r e d e r ic k

  D

a i n t o n

F .R .S ., 



a n d

 

B.  A. 


T

h r u s h

F .R .S .



R

o n a l d

  G

e o r g e

  W

r e y f o r d

  N

o r r i s h

 

was  b o rn   in  C am b rid g e  on  9 

N o v e m b e r  1897  and   died  in  A d d en b ro o k e’s  H o sp ital  th e re  on  7  Ju n e 

1978.  H e  was  ed u cated   at  th e  P erse  School  and  th e n   at  E m m an u el 

College,  C am b rid g e,  and a p a rt fro m  his service in W o rld  W ar  I  sp en t his 

e n tire life in C am b rid g e.  F o r n early 30 years he was P rofessor o f Physical 

C h em istry  in th e U n iv ersity .  H e w as one o f th e p ioneers of p h o to c h em is­

try   and  also  carried   o u t  m u c h   research  on  chain  reactions  and  po lym er 

ch em istry .  F o r  his  w ork  in  developing  flash  photolysis  as  a  m eans  of 

stu d y in g  rap id  chem ical reactions he  sh ared  th e  N o bel P rize for C h em is­

try   in  his  seventieth   year.

F

o r e b e a r s

 

a n d

 

e a r l y

 

c a r e e r

N o r r is h ’s father,  H e rb e rt, was a p h arm aceu tical ch em ist w ho had lived 

in  N e w p o rt  and  R yde on  the  Isle  o f W ig h t  and  in  O xford  before  settling 

in C am b rid g e w here he died in  1961  at th e age of 90.  H e was th e youngest 

o f  th e  five  ch ild ren   of  G eorge  N o rrish   w ho  h ad  been  a  ch an d ler  at 

C red ito n   in  D evon.  I t  is  in terestin g   to  record   th a t  tw o  of  G eorge 

N o rris h ’s you n g er b ro th ers,  H a rry  and Jam es, w ere also ph arm acists and 

th e  fact  th a t  G eo rg e’s  and  Ja m e s’s  wives  w ere  sisters  m ay  also  have 

en co urag ed  H e rb e rt  N o rrish   an d  his  only  b ro th e r  G eorge  E d gar  to 

becom e  p h arm aceutical  chem ists.

H e rb e rt N o rrish  m et his first wife,  A m y N o rris,  in R yde,  Isle of W ig ht 

an d   th ey   w ere  m a rried   in  C am b rid ge  in  1896.  R onald  G eorge  W reyfo rd  

N o rrish  was  b o rn   on  9  N o v em b er  1897 w hile  they w ere  living in  P an to n  

S treet,  w hich  adjoins  the  p resen t  U n iv ersity   C hem ical  L ab o rato ry   in 

L ensfield  Road.  T h e ir  second  son  R eginald  becam e  a  surgeon.  In   1905, 

N o rris h ’s  m o th e r  died  and  th ree  years  later  his  fath er  m arried   S usan 

D uff.

In   1908,  N o rrish   w on  a  scholarship  to  the  P erse  School,  C am bridg e 



w here  he  was  m uch  influenced  by  his  chem istry  teacher,  Llew ellyn

379

 on May 24, 2018

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



380

Biographical Memoirs

D avies  (who was  killed  in W orld W ar  I),  and  his  successor A.  S.  M ason. 

N o rrish   recalled th a t w hen  he was  ab o u t  14  years old  he used  to w alk  u p  

and  dow n  outside  the  U niv ersity  C hernical  L ab o ra to ry   and  adm ire  th e 

ap p aratu s  w hich  he  could  see  th ro u g h   th e  w indow s.  H e  also  recalled 

rising very early to do his hom ew ork an d th e n  his share of th e housew ork 

before  going  to  school.  H is  fath er  en couraged  h im   to  b u ild   a  sm all 

laboratory  in  th e  shed  at  th e  b o tto m   o f  the  g ard en   and  p ro v id ed   all  th e 

chem icals  needed.  H e  used  to  en te r  co m p etitio n s  for  th e   analysis  of 

m ix tu res  sent ro u n d  by th e 



Pharmaceutical Journal

 and often w on prizes. 

H is  ap p aratu s  passed  into  th e  possession  o f  J.  G .  A.  G riffiths  w ho 

follow ed  N o rrish   as  a  p u p il  at  th e  P erse  School  and  as  an u n d erg rad u ate 

at  E m m anuel,  becom ing N o rris h ’s  first  research  stu d en t.  T h is  ap p aratu s 

is  now   preserved  in  th e  Science  M u seu m   at  S o u th   K en sin g to n   and   is 

illu strated   in  figure  1.

F

igure

 

1.  (Science  Museum,  Crown  copyright)

U

n d e r g r a d u a t e

 

c a r e e r

In   1915  N o rrish  w on a  F o u n d atio n   S cholarship to E m m an u el  Collegei 

C am bridge,  b u t  add ing  som ew hat  to  his  age  jo in ed   th e  Royal  F ield  

A rtillery  and  served  as  a  L ieu ten a n t,  first  in  Irela n d   and  th e n   on  th e 

W estern  F ro n t.  In   1918,  he  was  c ap tu red   an d   sp en t  six  m o n th s  as  a 

P riso n er of W ar in  G erm any.  A lth o ugh  he had plen ty  of o p p o rtu n itie s to 

study  and  was  well  p rov id ed   w ith   books,  food  was  very  sh o rt  and  he 

recalled taking it in tu rn  to share  ou t th e ration s for six m en,  th e one w ho 

divided  them   being  the  last  to  choose.

C om ing up to E m m an uel in  1919, N o rrish  was a co n tem p o rary  of F.  R. 

Leavis  (who  had  also  been  at  th e  P erse  School  and  w hose  fath er  h ad  a

 on May 24, 2018

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



381

piano  shop  in  C am bridge)  and   o f  R o b ert  H ill  (F .R .S .,  1946).  As  an 

u n d e rg ra d u a te , N o rrish  was n o ted  for his trem en d o u s energy; he played a 

lot  o f te n n is  and  also  d id   m u c h   bicycling  often  in  search  of  rare  plants. 

N o rris h   read  ch em istry ,  physics  and  b o tan y   for  P a rt  I  of  th e  N a tu ra l 

Sciences T rip o s  in w hich he o b ta in ed  a F irst in  1920.  H e fo u n d  it difficult 

to decide betw een these su bjects for P a rt  I I   b u t chose ch em istry  in w hich 

he  d u ly   o b ta in ed   a  F irs t  in  1921.  T h a t  su m m e r he w as  elected  P resid en t 

o f th e  E m m an u el  C ollege  N a tu ra l  Sciences  C lu b   and  it  is  in terestin g   to 

n o te th a t he chose for his p resid en tial add ress to be given at th e b eg in ning  

of  th e  M ichaelm as  T e r m   ‘R adiatio n   an d   chem ical  reactivity*  and  th a t 

th re e  of th e o th e r fo u r C o m m ittee m em b ers  E.  C.  T illey ,  R obin H ill and 

E d m u n d   S to n er  w ere  to  have  d istin g u ish ed   careers  in  m ineralogy, 

b io ch em istry   and  physics  respectively  and  all  to  be  elected  F .R .S .  and 

Fellow s  of E m m anuel.

H ill  an d  N o rrish   h ad  physical  ch em istry   supervisions  w ith   E.  K . 

R ideal  in  T rin ity   H all.  T h e se   w ere  very  stim u latin g   as  R ideal  h ad  ju s t 

re tu rn e d   from   a  year  in  th e  U n ite d   S tates  w here  he  h ad   m e t  am ongst 

o th e rs  I.  L a n g m u ir,  G .  N .  L ew is,  W .  A.  N oyes,  S en.,  R.  C.  T o lm a n  and  

A.  W .  W a sh b u rn .  R ideal  was  full  of  en th u siasm   for  th e  N e rn st  H eat 

T h e o re m ,  and these  sup ervisio n s  m ay  have  been  th e  source  o f N o rris h ’s 

g reat  respect  for  N e rn st  an d  therm o d y n am ics.

S ir W illiam  P ope was P rofessor of C h em istry  at th a t tim e and alth ou g h  

he  d id   n o t  lecture  often,  his  lectures  w ere  always  accom panied  by 

excellent  d em o n stratio n s,  freq u en tly   done  w ith   his  ow n  h and s.  In   later 

life,  N o rris h   regarded  P ope  as  som ethin g  of  a  fath er  figure  and  his  ow n 

in sistence  on  th e  im p o rtan ce  of  good  lecture  d em o n stratio n s  m ay  well 

date  fro m   those  days.  S im ilarly,  his  em phasis  of  th e  n eed   for  precise 

m easu rem en ts  was  p ro b ab ly   fortified  by  C olonel  H eycock’s  lectures. 

D e w a r’s  lectures  on  physical  ch em istry  w ere  usually  delivered  by W .  H . 

M ills,  ap p aren tly   w ith   less  en th u siasm   th a n   for  his  ow n  very  good 

lectures.



S

u b s e q u e n t

 

c a r e e r

In   1921,  N o rrish   started   research  u n d e r  E.  K .  Rideal.  H is  initial 

p ro b lem   involved  m easu rem en ts  of  changes  in  p otential  betw een  a 

ro tatin g  p la tin u m  electrode and a calom el electrode on illu m ination  o f the 

form er;  a  subject  on  w hich  he  encouraged  th e  son  of  H eyrovsky  (the 

fath e r  of  polarography)  w hen  he  w orked  in  N o rris h ’s  laboratory  in  th e 

1960s.  T h e   initial  unsuccessful  experim en ts  involved  the  old  arc  lam p 

fro m  th e  centre of P a rk e r’s Piece w hich  N o rrish  had pu rch ased  from  th e 

police  station  for  about  £ 1 .  H ow ever,  by  using  a  m ercu ry   lam p  w ith   a 

q u artz  envelope he  soon  discovered th e  photochem ical  decom position  of 

p o tassiu m   perm anganate  for  w hich  rate  coefficients  w ere  d eterm in ed  

fro m   th e  rate  of change  of  p H .  T o   carry  o ut  th is  research  N o rrish   first



Ronald  George  W reyford Norrish

 on May 24, 2018

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



382

had  to  clear  o u t  a  lu m b er  room   w here  L iv ein g ’s  papers  an d  ap p aratu s, 

in clu d in g   a  spectroscope,  w ere  sto red   and  th e n   lay  on  gas  an d   w ater 

supplies  him self.  L ate  in  1922  they  w ere  able  to  m ove  into  th e  new  

Physical  C hem istry   L ab o rato ry   in  F ree  School  L an e  established  for 

P rofessor  T .  M .  L ow ry.  A  cen tral  featu re  of  this  co n stru ctio n   was  th e 

preserv atio n   of the walls  and  roof of th e  old  P erse  School  H all,  alth o ug h  

th is  room  was  divided h orizontally by th e  in sertio n  of a m ezzanine  floor. 

T h e   u p p e r  p a rt  of  th e  room   w ith   th e  exposed  ro o f  tim b ers  in  w hich 

N o rrish   took  g reat  d elight  housed  for  ab o u t  30  years  th e  d ep artm en tal 

library  for  physical  chem istry,  th e   co n ten ts  being  freely  available  for 

reference  by  all  staff  and  research  stu d en ts,  and  also  served  for  m any 

years as th e m eeting place of the F acu lty  B oard of Physics and C h em istry  

and  as  D ep artm en tal  T ea -R o o m   in  th e  p ostw ar  years.

N o rrish   found  Rideal  to  be  ‘b u b b lin g   w ith   ideas’;  good  and  bad,  b u t 

not  stro n g  on experim ental  detail,  leaving th e w orking o u t of his  ideas to 

th e  (hopeful)  ingen uity  of  his  stu d en ts,  by  w hom   he  was  m u ch   liked. 

R ideal  w ould  com e  ro u n d   th e  laboratory  m o st  days  to  talk  in  a very  airy 

and stim ulating way, and if one could separate ‘the good from  the b ad one 

got  on  quite  w ell’.  As  N o rris h ’s  later  w ork  show ed  great  ex perim en tal 

skill  and  a  rem arkable  in tu itio n   for  th e  co rrect  in te rp re ta tio n   of results, 

they   w ere  clearly  a  strong   com bination.  T o g e th e r  they  p u b lish ed   five 

papers on th e m echanism  of th e reaction of h y d ro g en  and su lp h u r and th e 

catalytic effects of oxygen and light on th e system .  H ere th ey  succeeded in 

separating  the  gas  phase  and  surface  reactions  and  show ed  by  th e rm o ­

chem ical  and  spectroscopic  arg u m en ts  th a t  th e  rate -d eterm in in g   step  in 

th e  th erm al  hom ogeneous  reaction  involved  th e  slight  dissociation  of  S 2 

to  2S.  T h e y  also related the activation energies of th e surface reactions to 

the  b on d   energies  involved  in th e  in tercon v ersion  o f th e  allotropic  form s 

of  su lp h u r.  N o rris h ’s  lifelong  in terests  in  chain  reactions  began  w ith   a 

p ap er  w hich  he  and  R ideal  p u b lish ed   on  th e  rate  of form atio n   of w ater 

from   its  elem ents  photo sen sitized   by  chlorine.  H ow ever,  it  was  m any 

years  before  the  m echanism   of th is  process  was  fully  elucidated.

A t  this tim e,  N o rrish   carried  o u t his first  in d e p en d en t research,  w hich 

was on the  reaction betw een ethylene  and brom ine.  H e  show ed  th a t this, 

and  the  correspondin g  process  w ith   chlorine,  w ere  heterogeneous  p ro ­

cesses  since  no  reaction  o ccu rred   over  a  perio d   o f  24  h o u rs  in  a  vessel 

coated  w ith  paraffin  wax  b u t  a  very  rap id   reaction  o ccu rred  w hen  th e 

vessel was coated w ith stearic acid.  In  th is stu d y and in th e heterogeneous 

reactions  of  su lp h u r,  activation  was  believed  to  involve  form ation  of  a 

polar  form   resem bling  a  zw itterion.  T h o u g h   no t  often  referred   to 

now adays  this  paper  m ade  considerable  im pact  at  th e  tim e  as  P rofessor 

H .  J.  Em eleus,  F .R .S .,  recalls  ‘T h is   sim ple  direct  approach  m ade  a 

lasting im pression on  m e  and  I  feel th a t  it  also  characterized m u ch  of his 

later  w o rk .’

N o rrish   obtain ed   his  P h .D .  degree  in  1924  and  in  th e  sam e  year  was



Biographical Memoirs

 on May 24, 2018

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



383

elected a R esearch  F ellow  of his ow n college,  a p o st w hich he held for six 

years.  H e  w as  now   in  a  po sitio n   to  launch  his  ow n  b ro ad   p ro g ram m e  of 

w ork sta rtin g  w ith  th e effect of ligh t on chem ical system s. A lth o u g h  m any 

ph o to ch em ical  reactions  w ere  know n  little  was  u n d ersto o d   of  th e ir 

detailed  m ech an ism s and little o f the th eo ry  o f chain reactions, into w hich 

categ ory  m any  of  those  fell,  had  been  developed.  F o r  these  la tter  th e re 

w as also m u ch  disag reem en t over th e characteristics o f the reactions  such 

as  th e  d ep en d en ce  of th e ir  rates  on  th e  ab so rb ed   light  in ten sity   and  the 

co n cen tratio n s  of th e  reagents  and   p ro d u cts.

T h e   skill  w hich  N o rrish   displayed  in  his  attem p ts  to  resolve  som e  of 

these  p ro b lem s  m arked  h im   o u t  am on gst  his  co n tem p oraries  as  an 

u n u su ally  gifted and energ etic ex p erim en talist, capable of m aking signifi­

cant advances in p h o to c h em istry  an d gas kinetics. T h is  early p rom ise was 

recognized  by  his  a p p o in tm e n t  in  1926  as  a  U n iv ersity   D em o n strato r  in 

th e   D e p a rtm e n t  of Physical  C h em istry ,  th e  head  of w hich  was  P rofessor 

T .  M .  L ow ry,  F .R .S .  T w o  years  later he was m ade H .  O.  Jones  L e c tu re r 

in  Physical  C h em istry .  In   th e  early  1930s  N o rris h ’s  p ub licatio n   was  in 

full  spate,  his  w ork  was  held  in  h igh   in tern atio n al  esteem   and  he  was 

a ttra c tin g   able  research  stu d en ts.  W h en   L o w ry   died  un ex pectedly 

N o rrish ,  w ho  h ad  been  elected  to  the  Royal  Society  and  aw arded  his 

C am b rid g e  S c.D .  in  1936,  was  ap p o in ted   to  succeed  him .  Rideal  having 

b een   elected  to  th e  new ly  established  chair  of  C olloid  Science  in  1931. 

N o rris h   occupied  th e  ch air  of  Physical  C h em istry   at  C am b rid ge  from  

1937  u n til  1965.  O ver  all  this  perio d   he  was  a  Professorial  Fellow   of 

E m m an u el  College  and  later  becam e  a  Life  Fellow.

In   1926,  N o rrish   h ad   m arried   A nne  S m ith   w hom   he  had  m et  on  a 

w alking  holiday  in  the  Swiss  A lps.  She  was  th en   a  L e c tu re r  in  C hild 

Psychology  at  U n iv ersity   College,  Cardiff;  they  set  up   house  at  48 

K im b erley   R oad,  C am bridge  w here  th e ir  tw in  d au g h ters  w ere  born .  In  

th e  early  1930s  N o rrish   acquired  the  lease  of 7  P ark  T erra ce,  a  fine  late 

G eo rg ian  sem i-detached  house  overlooking  P a rk e r’s  Piece  and  backing 

on  to  th e  m edieval  wall  of  E m m anu el  College.  N o rrish   took  a  great 

in terest in th e histo ry of C am bridge,  as those w ho atten d ed  his inaugural 

lectures  at  D ep artm en tal  S u m m er  Schools  will  recall,  and  it  was  this 

aspect of his h o u se’s  position m ore th an   its  p ro xim ity  to th e  D ep artm en t 

and  C ollege  w hich  m ade  N o rrish   so  fond  of  living  there.  Ind eed ,  he 

w ould n o t contem plate m oving to a sm aller house on retirem en t although 

he  said  th a t he  and  M rs  N o rrish   w ere  ‘rattlin g   aro u n d   in  it  like  tw o  peas 

in  a  p o d ’.

As  w ell  as  the  generous  and  occasionally  overw helm ing  hospitality 

w hich  he  dispensed  to  his  colleagues,  particularly   those  from   overseas, 

N o rrish   m u ch   enjoyed  m eeting  people  from   different  backgrounds.  H e 

was  an  active  m em b er  of the  Savage  C lu b  and  his  close  friends  included 

several w ell-know n singers and m usic-hall artists;  he was also a p atro n  of 

th e  C am bridge  A m ateu r  O peratic  Society.



Ronald  George  W reyford Norrish

 on May 24, 2018

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



384

Biographical Memoirs

A lth o u g h   N o rris h ’s  life  was  w holly  based  on  C am b rid g e,  he  greatly 

enjoyed travelling ab road  w here he could  relax from  th e cares of ru n n in g  

his  D ep artm en t.  H ere  again  o p p o rtu n itie s  to  m eet  people  fro m   a  w ide 

range  of backgro un ds  and  n o t ju s t  th e  senior  scientists  gave  free  rein   to 

his conviviality.  H is first m ajor jo u rn e y  was to lecture on P h o to ch em istry  

in  L en in g rad   and  M oscow   in  1935  w here  he  m et  and  form ed   lasting 

frien d sh ip s  w ith  N .  N .  Sem enov,  V.  N .  K o n d ratie v   an d  A.  N .  T e re n in . 

H e revisited  R ussia in  1945  for th e celeb ratio ns of th e  220th A n niv ersary  

of  the  U .S .S .R .  A cadem y  of  Sciences  and  again  in  1955  to  lecture,  his 

final  visit  was  in  1966  on  th e  occasion  of  A cad.  N .  N .  S em en o v ’s 

seventieth   b irth d ay .  T h e   p o st-w ar  years  p resen ted   m u ch   g reater  o p p o r­

tu n itie s for travel and altho ug h he visited th e U n ite d  S tates and C anada a 

n u m b e r  of  tim es  in  th e  im m ediate  p o st-w ar  years,  an d  lectu red   to  th e 

C eylon  A ssociation  of  Science  in  1951,  he  trav elled  little  d u rin g   his 

P resid en cy   of  the  F arad ay  Society  (1953-55).  D u rin g   the  1960s  he 

travelled  frequ en tly  to  E u ro p e  visiting  B elgium ,  B ulgaria,  C zechoslo­

vakia,  F rance,  G erm any ,  H o llan d,  H u n g ary ,  Italy,  Sw eden,  S w itzerland  

and  Y ugoslavia to give  lectures  an d  see  laboratories  freq u en tly  as  a  guest 

of  their-  A cadem y  of  Sciences.  O th e r  overseas  visits  w ere  to  receive 

h o n o u rs  of  w hich  th e  first,  the  H o n o rary   D egree  o f  D o cteu r  de 

l’U n iv ersite  from   th e  S o rb o n n e  in  P aris  in  1958,  gave  h im   alm ost  as 

m u ch   pleasure  as  th e  1967  N ob el  P rize  for  C h em istry   (w hich  he  shared 

w ith   M .  Eigen,  F o r.M e m .R .S .  and  G eorge  P o rter,  F .R .S .)  ann o u n ced  

tw o  days  before  his  sev entieth   b irth d ay .

T h e   flood  of invitations  w hich  follow ed  th is  event  gave  N o rrish   a new  

lease of life  and he travelled extensively u n til  he  suffered a stroke in  M ay 

1975  a  fo rtn ig h t  before  a  m eetin g  at  th e  Royal  In s titu tio n   for  the  25th 

A nniversary  of flash  photolysis,  th e  tech n iq u e  w hich  h ad  given  renew ed 

im p etu s to his research th ro u g h  the  1950s. T h is  stroke seriously im p aired  

his  speech  and  w riting   b u t,  u n til  a  few  days  before  his  death   on  7  Ju n e 

1978  from   an o th er  stroke,  his  fam iliar  stocky  figure  could  be  seen 

regularly w alking aro u n d  his favourite p arts of C am b rid g e and visitors to 

7  P ark  T e rra ce  could  be  sure  of a  w arm   and  hosp itab le  w elcom e.



S

c i e n t i f i c

 

w o r k

1



The general pattern

N o rris h ’s  first  researches  w ere  m ainly  p u b lish e d   w ith   E.  K .  Rideal, 

w ho was his P h .D .  supervisor.  T h e y  w ere concerned w ith th e reaction of 

brom ine  and  ethylene  on  surfaces  (7),  the  co m bination   o f h y dro g en   gas 

w ith  su lp h u r  (4 -6,  8)  or  th e  photolysis  of  p otassiu m   p erm an gan ate 

solution  (2,  3).  H is  first  sub stan tial,  in d ep en d en tly   chosen,  research 

program m e  involved  reactions  in itiated   by  the  pho to -disso ciatio n   of 

chlorine  m olecules  and  this  led  him   over  the  years  w ith   th e  help  of

 on May 24, 2018

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



vario u s colleagues,  especially J.  G .  A.  G riffiths and  M o w b ray   R itchie,  to 

u n rav el  th e  m ech an ism   o f th e  p h o to sy n th esis  of  hy d ro g en   chloride,  th e 

effects  on  th is  o f  h y d ro g en   chlo rid e  and   oxygen  and  to  elucidate  th e 

m ech an ism   of  various  ch lo rin e-sen sitized   reactions  such  as  th e 

h y d ro g en -o x y g en   reactio n  and   th e  deco m po sitio n  of  ozone.  H e  also 

becam e  in terested   in  th e  disp lacem en t  by  light  of  th e  eq u ilib riu m  

involving oxygen,  n itric  oxide,  n itro g en   dioxide  and  d in itro g en  tetro x id e 

w hich   in  tu r n   led  h im   in to   his  classical  w ork  on  the  p rim ary   act  in  th e 

p h oto lysis of th e dioxide;  a stu d y  w h ich show ed his  readiness to com bine 

th e  use  of  m o n o ch ro m atic  rad iatio n ,  fluorescence  and  ab so rp tio n   spec­

tro scop y .  In   th is  w ork  he  w as  m u c h   influenced  by   Jam es  F ra n c k ’s 

th e o re tic al w ork on  lig ht  ab so rp tio n  p u b lish e d   a few years  earlier and  he 

was  able  to  p o in t  o u t  th e  relatio n sh ip   betw een  p hotochem ical  and 

fluorescence  th resh o ld s  and  th e  stru c tu re   of th e  ab so rp tio n   spectru m .

T o w a rd s  th e  en d  of  th e  1920s  N o rrish   tu rn e d   his  m in d   to  th e 

p h o to c h em istry   of co m p o u n d s  co n tain in g   th e  carb ony l  g ro u p ,  a  p ro ject 

w h ich  w as to occupy h im  and m any  collab o rators for a decade and w hich 

firm ly  establish ed   th e  essential  m echanistic  features.  T h e se   studies 

in tro d u c e d   N o rrish   to  organic  free  radical  ch em istry   w hich  m ade  h im  

dissatisfied w ith   B one’s  hy d ro x y latio n  th e o ry  o f th e  oxidation of gaseous 

h y d ro carb o n s  and,  im pressed  w ith   the  ideas  em erging  from   N .  N . 

S em en o v ’s  lab oratory  on  th e   th e o ry   of  chain  reactions,  he  decided  to 

stu d y  th e co m b u stio n  of hy d ro carb o n s.  H ow ever,  his e n try  into  th is field 

w as  som ew hat  tan gential.  H e  m ade  use  of  his  ow n  earlier  researches  to 

investigate th e p h o to - an d th erm al-sen sitized  oxidations of h y d ro g en  and 

h y d ro carb o n s before startin g  on a  system atic investigation of th e fast and 

slow   co m b u stio n   o f p u re  alkanes  and  alkenes.  By th e  m id   1930s  N o rrish  

w as estab lished , in d u stry  was beg in n in g  to su p p o rt his w ork and th is m ay 

have p ro m p te d  his decision to investigate th e kinetics and m echanism s of 

p o ly m erization  by  free  radical  and  cationic  m echanism s,  a  p h enom en o n  

of  w h ich   he  was  well  aw are  from   his  experience  of  th e  p ro d u ctio n   of 

p o ly m ers  w hen  som e  substances  w ere  illum in ated .  H e  had,  in  fact, 

already  m ade  a  b rie f excursion  in to  form aldehy d e  polym erization.

T h e se   w ere  th e  m a n o r  them es  w hich  o ccupied  N o rrish   before  W o rld  

W ar I I  b u t th e re w ere also m any m in o r them es.  F o r exam ple, his w ork on 

ketene  and  diazom ethane  led  to  an  in terest  in  th e  m ethylene  radical  and 

th o se  on  th e  photolysis  of ketones  in  paraffins  led h im   to th in k   ab ou t th e 

influence  of  solvent  m olecules  in  im ped in g  th e  im m ediate  separation  of 

reactive  scission  fragm ents  of a  m olecule.  H e  also  m ade  tw o  b rie f sorties 

in to   vacuum   ultraviolet  p h o to ch em istry   and  one  into  the  q uen ch in g   of 

atom ic  resonance  radiation,  an  investigation  in  w hich  it  proved   very 

difficult  to  obtain  reliable  data.

D u rin g   the  w ar  N o rrish   exercised  general  d irection  over  th e  w ork  of 

several  groups  concerned  w ith  th e  w ar  effort  each  of w hich  was  actively 

p ro secu ted  by those few of his colleagues w ho rem ained in C am bridge.  C.

Ronald  George  W reyford Norrish 



Download 0.78 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling