Section 1 The World War I years


Download 2.93 Mb.
Sana10.01.2019
Hajmi2.93 Mb.



Section 1 The World War I Years

  • Section 1 The World War I Years

  • Section 2 Changes in Black Society

  • Section 3 The Harlem Renaissance







For centuries Western nations controlled colonies around the world; practice of imperialism gave powerful nations control of weaker nations

  • For centuries Western nations controlled colonies around the world; practice of imperialism gave powerful nations control of weaker nations

  • Ruling countries benefited economically

    • Colonies supplied valuable raw materials—such as metals, cotton, and timber—for European factories
    • Colonies served as a market for European goods
  • Late 1800s and early 1900s saw new wave of imperialism

    • Western nations sought out more colonies with Africa a chief target; European nations raced to gain access to natural resources
















When U.S. entered World War I in 1917, only three African American commissioned officers in the entire U.S. military

  • When U.S. entered World War I in 1917, only three African American commissioned officers in the entire U.S. military

  • As black troops joined the military, black leaders protested discrimination against black officers

  • Black leaders argued that the government should not deny “the right of our best [Negro] men to lead troops of their race into battle”

  • May 1917 the U.S. Army finally established a training camp in Iowa for black officers

  • By war’s end, this camp commissioned more than 600 black officers; most assigned to black labor battalions behind the front

















Demand for war equipment and supplies surged with war; northern factories booming, but work force fighting overseas

  • Demand for war equipment and supplies surged with war; northern factories booming, but work force fighting overseas

  • Many northern businesses looked to the South for workers; African Americans from the South moved north in search of better lives

  • Chicago, Pittsburgh, and Detroit held the promise of steady jobs

  • African American newspapers such as the Chicago Defender played key role in encouraging black southerners to move north

  • Black southerners hoped to escape the segregation, poverty, and racial violence they often faced in the South, where many had little choice but to work as sharecroppers or in low-paying jobs

  • Economic troubles—during the war, farmers and laborers suffered from damaged crops, poor harvests, and a sharp drop in wages































Thousands of African Americans flocked to New York City during the Great Migration

  • Thousands of African Americans flocked to New York City during the Great Migration

  • Many migrants to New York settled in the neighborhood known as Harlem; located in the northern portion of Manhattan Island, Harlem a popular neighborhood for African Americans since end of 1800s

  • After World War I, Harlem center of black social and cultural life and activism

  • African Americans living in Harlem felt a strong sense of racial pride and identity

    • Attracted talented African American artists, writers, thinkers, and musicians
    • Community shared their experiences; encouraged greater creative heights
  • Common theme resistance to white prejudice and a pride in African American culture and heritage

    • Harlem home to the first branch of the NAACP and Marcus Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association





































Download 2.93 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling