Stanislavsky factory business and cultural masterplan


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JOHN McASLAN + PARTNERS | A B DEVELOPMENT

STANISLAVSKY FACTORY

BUSINESS AND CULTURAL MASTERPLAN

MOSCOW

SPINE




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THE STANISLAVSKY FACTORY WON THE 2012 CIVIC TRUST AWARD. THE 



JUDGES COMMENDED THE SCHEME AS: ‘AN EXEMPLARY INNOVATION 

IN REGENERATION, ACTING AS A CATALYST FOR FURTHER HIGH QUALITY 

REGENERATION IN MOSCOW’S CENTRAL HISTORIC QUARTERS.’

IN 2011, THE STANISLAVSKY FACTORY WAS THE FIRST PROJECT IN 

RUSSIA TO WIN A PRESTIGOUS RIBA INTERNATIONAL AWARD.

THE PROJECT WAS ALSO HIGHLY COMMENDED AT THE UK LANDSCAPE 

INSTITUTE AWARDS. THE JUDGES COMMENTED: ‘A STRONG DESIGN 

CONCEPT, OFFERING A TRULY URBAN DESIGN SOLUTION. THE LIMITED 

PALETTE WORKS WELL ACROSS ALL THE SPACES, LINKING THEM BOTH 

VISUALLY AND PHYSICALLY.’ 



“We started work on the Stanislavsky Factory early in 2005 and it was one of our first projects in 

Moscow for Sergey Gordeev. 

The owner of Horus is Sergey Gordeev, who is a highly respected and cultured patron of Russian 

architecture and art. It was really pure luck that we found him or he found us. Either way he and 

his colleague Alexey Blanin, the Chairman of A B Development, remain very much at the centre of 

our relationship with the City.

  

To a London-based practice with an international portfolio, Moscow appeared a mysterious place 

and we were intrigued by its unique social, historic and physical context. It has a completely 

different urban scale to many European Cities and it now has the great potential to repair, 

regenerate and rediscover its remarkable history.

In this regard, although we admired many of the great historic and modernist buildings in the 

Moscow, we felt International architects have struggled to read the City and many recent buildings 

have been realised as “quick fit” commodities rather than rooted in a thoughtful analysis of the 

local context and need. At Stanislavsky, we arrived with no pre-conceptions, no solutions and a real 

intent to listen and understand and what followed was the creation of a unique place in a unique 

city. It is a small but important part of Moscow’s continuing Renaissance as a truly great world 

city.”

Aidan Potter

Design Director, John McAslan + Partners

 

1.0 INTRODUCTION 



| 5

2.0 SITE LOCATION 

| 6

3.0 HISTORIC CONTEXT 



| 8

4.0 THE STANISLAVSKY FACTORY: MASTERPLAN 

| 10

5.0 STANISLAVSKY RESIDENTIAL 



| 14

6.0 THE HISTORIC STANISLAVSKY FACTORY 

| 42

7.0 THE MUSEUM AND BUSINESS CENTRE 



| 44

8.0 THE MUSEUM COURT 

| 52

9.0 THE STANISLAVSKY THEATRE 



| 54

10.0 THE THEATRE SQUARE 

| 56

CONTENTS


“This year has seen further fruitful collaboration between Development Solutions and John 

McAslan + Partners - the completion of the Olympia Park  business campus in Moscow, which 

also features an impressive sports centre with a 50-meter pool. Ongoing projects include the 

new-build Electro office development in St Petersburg and a brown-field regeneration project 

which draws on our joint experience in the regeneration of inner-city former industrial sites.  Our 

successful partnership has already delivered the RIBA award-winning transformation of the former 

Stanislavsky Factory in Moscow, a mixed-use masterplan including commercially successful 

offices and 60 luxury apartments, now recognised as one of the finest contemporary residential 

developments in Moscow.”

Alexey Blanin

Chief Executive, A B Development





 5

1.0 INTRODUCTION

The Stanislavsky scheme has invented 

a new strategy for sensitive regenerative 

interventions within half a mile of 

the Kremlin and Red Square, in a 

city planning climate that lacks a 

comprehensively detailed approach to 

most forms of urban development. There 

is no urban planning Best Practice to 

refer to and, until the completion of the 

Stanislavsky Centre redevelopment, no 

innovative contemporary regeneration 

project for planners or architects to cite. 

The regulatory situation is volatile and 

the city’s judgement of redevelopment 

proposals as “good” or “bad” remains 

relatively random. The preservation or 

thoughtful regeneration of Moscow’s 

historic fabric is usually fought for 

by beleaguered heritage groups, and 

a handful of historically sensitive 

developers. Moscow’s planners, in 

search of “World City” status, are more 

interested in instant western-style urban 

architectural makeovers. Significantly, 

Sergey Gordeev, the Stanislavsky 

project’s developer, has supported the 

preservation of threatened Modernist 

architectural icons such as the Melnikov 

House. 

At the Stanislavsky Factory, one word 



– complexity – sums up the challenge 

to transform the site so that it retained 

its historical gravitas, yet became a 

distinct and pioneering mixed-use 

environment in Moscow. John McAslan 

+ Partners’ scheme is based on a series 

of architectural and spatial contrasts 

tied together by a landscape scheme 

that has brought coherence to an 

almost implacably cluttered site. It was 

notable that, as the main interventions 

took shape, urban parcels opposite the 

main street-facing range of Stanislavsky 

buildings, became subject to copy-

cat regeneration schemes by other 

developers.

Even a bullet-point history of the 

Stanislavsky site demonstrates the 

complexity of the existing architecture 

and site plan that confronted JMP’s 

Urban Design Director Aidan Potter. 

By the end of the 18th century, the 

Aleksayev family’s mercantile success 

included a gold and silver thread factory 

that was re-planned at the end of the 

19th century by Konstantin Stanislavsky, 

whose equal interest in theatre led to 

the construction of the so-called 1912 

Building, cable and tungsten filament 

factories, and the Moscow Arts Theatre 

on the site. In the Soviet era, three more 

industrial buildings were built. Apart 

from the Theatre, and the proprietors’ 

classically styled 19th century private 

homes along the main street edge, the 

site is dominated by industrial buildings 

set out in a crudely ad hoc way. When 

bought by the client in 2004, it was 

mostly derelict; even the theatre, 

where Method Acting was invented by 

Konstantin Stanislavsky, was ruinous; 

parts of the site – and many of the 

interiors – recalled scenes from Crime 

and Punishment.  





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2.0 SITE LOCATION

access. The regeneration treatments for 

the six buildings included re-cladding 

three of them; converting the decrepit 

19th century houses into a restaurant and 

hotel complex; and designing newbuild 

apartment blocks of an elegant but 

restrained architectural manner on the 

edge of the site facing an historic church. 

Because of the ad hoc development of 

the site over time, with no two buildings 

parallel, the site had no  formal logic. 

This made JMP’s landscaping scheme 

crucial to the way the scheme was held 

together internally, in particular so that 

its commercial and domestic elements 

remained strongly connected with the 

theatre’s iconic cultural presence. The 

internal garden tableaux are refreshing 

focal-points in a coolly graphic paving 

scheme that has not only added colour and 

texture at key points, but brought a  return 

of bird’s, bees and other insects to the 

heart of the Stanislavsky Factory.  

“The client was completely committed 

to doing something different, something 

intuitive, something not done before in 

Moscow,” explained Aidan Potter. “They 

shared with us an emotional commitment 

to the history of the site, and in the idea of 

the 19th and 21st centuries living together. 

Even the main lobby of the 1912 building, 

now offices, became a gallery and 

museum about the history of the site. 

The client was incredibly patient, and 

when we advised them, for example, 

that whole sections of facing bricks on 

the theatre facade were useless, they 

had many hundreds of them carefully 

chipped out by hand and replaced.” 

The Stanislavsky Factory scheme 

is now regarded by both Moscow 

planners and heritage groups as an 

exemplary innovation in regeneration, 

and the scheme has generated further 

comparable projects by the same 

client, and by other developers – the 

beginning of a critical mass of high 

quality regeneration in Moscow’s 

central historic quarters. The ambition 

of the Stanislavsky project has already 

demonstrated one important form of 

sustainability: its occupation, and space-

values, remained untouched by the 

effects of the 2008 economic crash, and 

it is considered a signature mixed-use 

development, whose occupants in 2009 

range from professionals and wealthy 

Muscovites, to multinationals such as 

Panasonic.

AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF MOSCOW

WHICH ILLUSTRATES THE LOCATION OF THE STANISLAVSKY FACTORY

JMP’s interventions were developed 

and construction began, at a time 

when labour was plentiful and cheap in 

Moscow: it would have been relatively 

easy to clear most of the site, apart from 

the 1912 Building and the Theatre, 

and treat it as an urban tabula rasa on 

which to import “instant” contemporary 

architecture; The city planners might 

well have preferred this approach, 

not least because public consultation 

is not the norm in most heritage or 

regeneration projects in Moscow. But 

JMP’s Client wanted to achieve a great 

deal more than that – a regeneration in 

which the history of the site remained 

evident. This demanded a mixture of 

restoration, repair, reprogramming, and 

newbuild, retaining and re-using existing 

buildings as offices, apartments, or 

restaurants; it required the testing and 

subsequent decontamination of land on 

the site; and, perhaps most interestingly, 

the theatre was revived as a premier 

Arts Centre – which, by 2009, had again 

became a reactor core for radical theatre 

productions. 

JMP’s first step was to establish a 

masterplan for services, parking, 

landscaping, and public and private 

ULITSA ST

ANISLASKOGO

ULITSA ALEKSANDRA SOLZHENITSYNA

SADOVOYE KOL

’TSOR


ULITSA ZEML

YANDY V


AL

MAR


TYNOVSKIY PEREULOK

ST MARTIN’S 

CHURCH

TAGANSKAYA

MARKSISTSKAYA

STANISLAVSKY 

FACTORY

RED SQUARE





 9

3.0 HISTORIC CONTEXT



THE STANISLAVSKY FACTORY: 

MOSCOW IN 1854

The original factory at Stanislavskogo 

Street,  was established in 1854-56 

and was a family business which 

manufactured gold and silver thread. 

The business had been established in 

1746 by Aleksy Petrov in Moscow and 

it flourished providing materials to the 

Aristocracy and the Church. 

The establishment of the new factory 

was followed with the birth in 1863 

of Alexsey Petrov’s great grandson 

Konstantin Sergeyevich Alekseyev who 

later changed his name to Konstantin 

Stanislavsky. Konstantin was educated at 

home and entered the family business 

in 1882 working on the shop floor, 

studying  the machinery and basics 

of metallurgical production. During 

this period, the young Stanislavsky 

established the Moscow Art Theatre 

located in a Reading Room in The 

Factory with an assembled theatrical 

troupe consisting of factory workers.

At that time in Moscow, the foundation 

of a theatre was not supported by the 

authorities which suppressed civil and 

cultural liberties, to avoid censure 

therefore the theatre was created under 

the title “ Rogozhskvoe Department of 

first Moscow Society of Soberness”

The first performances were reported 

in all the main newspapers and their 

popularity led to the construction of 

the original theatre on the site in 1900 

designed to seat 250 people at a cost 

of 50,000 rubles. The theatre closed 

in 1909 and Stanislavsky moved on 

to create the Maly Theatre Group and 

was to establish himself with a world 

reputation as a director and acting 

theorist.



STANISLAVSKY AND 

THE STANISLAVSKY METHOD

As founder of the first acting “system”, 

co founder of the Moscow Art Theatre 

(1897-), and an eminent practitioner 

of the naturalist school of thought, 

Konstantin Stanislavsky unequivocally 

challenged traditional notions of the 

dramatic process, establishing himself 

as one of the most pioneering thinkers in 

modern theatre.

Stanislavsky coined phrases such as 

“stage direction”, laid the foundations of 

modern opera and gave instant renown 

to the works of such talented writers 

and playwrights as Maksim Gorki and 

Anton Chekhov. His process of character 

development, the “Stanislavsky Method”, 

was the catalyst for method acting-

arguably the most influential acting 

system on the modern stage and screen. 

Such renowed schools of acting and 

directing as the Group Theatre (1931-

1941) and the Actors Studio (1947-) 

are a legacy of Stanislavsky pioneering 

vision.

Using the Moscow Art Theatre as his 



conduit, Stanislavsky developed his 

own unique system of training wherein 

actors would research the situation 

created by the script, break down the 

text accordingly to their character’s 

motivations and recall their own 

experiences, thereby causing actions 

and reactions according to these 

motivations. The actor would ideally 

make his motivations for acting identical 

to those of the character in the script. 

He could then replay these emotions 

and experiences in the role of the 

character in order to achieve a more 

genuine performance. The 17th Century 

melodrama Tsar Fyodor was the first 

productions in which these techniques 

were showcased.

Stanislavsky clearly could not separate 

the theatre from its social context. He 

viewed theatre as a medium with great 

social and educational significance. 

During the civil unrest leading up to 

the first Russian Revolution in 1905, 

Stanislavsky courageously reflected 

social issues on the stage. Twelve years 

Konstantin Stanislavsky’s 

great-grandfather 

Alekseyev (1724-1775) 

comes to Moscow and 

establishes trading 

business.

1785 - Stanislavsky’s 

great-grandfather (1751-

1823) Semion Alekseyev 

establishes a gold and 

silver thread factory in 

Yakimanka district of 

Mosocw. The business 

is successful providing 

materials to the court of 

Katherine the Great.



1746

1805

1814

1835

1856

1862-63

Semion Alekseyev 

becomes merchant of 

the first guild in Moscow 

and was given surname 

Serebrenikov (Russion for 

silver).

Factory burnt down in 

great Moscow fire of 

1814 and Alekseyev 

opens new factory in 

Taganskaya district of 

Moscow. The business 

continues to grow 

supplying gold and 

silver thread to the 

church.

After Semion Alekseev’s 



death his wife Vera 

oversees business which 

enters international 

market and by 1843 

the factory annual 

production reached 500 

thousand roubles.

The business passes to 

Stanislavsky’s grandfather 

and the factory moves to 

Malaya Alekseyevskaya 

street. Sales increase 

after coronation of 

Alexander II.

Vladimir Alekseyev dies 

but business wins medal 

of honour at international 

exhibition London.

1863- Konstantin 

Alekseyev is born

later uses stage name 

“Stanislavsky”

 Educated at home 

participates in amateur 

theatricals at home.

later, during the Red October of 1917, 

Bolshevism had swept  through Russia 

and the Soviet Union was established. 

In the violence of revolution, Lenin’s 

personal protection saved Stanislavsky 

from being eliminated along with 

Czardom. The USSR maintained 

allegiance to Stanislavsky and his socially 

conscious method of production and 

his theatre began to produce plays 

containing Soviet propaganda.

In 1918, Stanislavsky established the 

First Studio as a school for young actors 

and in his later years wrote two books, 

My Life in Art and The Actor and His 

Work. Both have been translated into 

over 20 languages. Throughout his 

earnest professional and educational 

leadership, Stanislavsky spread his 

knowledge to numerous understudies

leaving a legacy that cannot be 

overstated.

1898

1938

2004

2008-10

1917

1904

Stanislavsky starts 

Moscow Art Theatre 

using Assembled 

troupe of factory 

workers. 

First productions were 

given in reading room 

of factory.

Grand opening of factory 

theatre and play “Forest” 

directed by Stanislavsky

1907

Gold and silver business 



declines and factory 

changes to manufacture 

of copper for telephone 

line


After Russian revolution 

factory is Nationalised 

in United Copper 

Manufacturing Factories

1918

Stanislavsky establishes 



first studies as school for 

young actors and writes 

My Life in Art and The 

Actor


And His Work

He visits America and 

becomes founder of new 

‘realist’ school of drama

Stanislavsky dies in 1938 

just before WWII. The 

factory continues and 

is amalgamated into 

“Elektroprovod” industries.

Horus Capital aquires 

factory buildings when 

business is transferred 

to town of Ivanteevka

2008-2010 

All phases of 

Stanislavsky 

Masterplan 

completed

In 1938, just before the World War II, 

Stanislavsky died holding on to the ideal 

of a peaceful, socially responsible world. 


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1. THE RESIDENTIAL HOUSE The residential 

development is a new exclusive living 

quarter within the overall masterplan. 

The complex consists of five villas varying 

in height from three to six storeys and 

contains fifty apartments with a variety of 

layouts and panoramic views of local and 

distant Moscow landmarks. The buildings 

are finished in limestone and brickwork 

and are designed to fit comfortably in the 

historic context of the district. 

2. THE HOTEL 

In the historical architectural monument of 

1840 belonging to the Stanislavsky Factory 

a hotel for 26 rooms is situated. The hotel 

recreates the spirit of the Stanislavsky 

era with an inimitable atmosphere of 

a boutique-hotel. The four-star hotel is 

equipped to accommodate guests from 

all over the world and touring theatrical 

troupes on daily basis





3. THE RESTAURANT

An exclusive 170 seats restaurant is 

located in the historical building namely 

architectural monument of the 19th 

century which was reconstructed.

4. THE THEATRE 

In 1898 the famous Moscow Artistic 

Theatre founded by K. S. Stanislavsky 

and V. I. Nemirovich-Danchenko was 

opened. After only a few months, amateur 

performances with the participation of 

workers and Stanislavsky were held on 

The Gold and Silver Thread Factory. In 

1904 the building with a permanent stage 

and containing all the latest improvements 

of technology was constructed. One 

hundred years later the theatre is being 

revived! After a reconstruction the 

historical building preserved in good 

condition until nowadays is ready to 

welcome the theatre-goers. The new 

stage with 200 seats will host most of the 

popular Moscow theatres.



5. THE MUSEUM 

Refurbishment of an iconic building 

converted into a combined museum and 

lobby, a café, and a business centre. 

4.0 THE STANISLAVSKY FACTORY: MASTERPLAN

STANISLAVSKY FACTORY - AERIAL VIEW

1

1

1

2

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Ultra modern, multimedia installation and 

general design of the Museolobby will 

present an account of Stanislavsky’s life 

and personality, highlighting for visitors 

that The Gold and Silver Thread Factory 

which belonged to Stanislavsky’s family 

was located in this unique building many 

years ago.

6. THE BUSINESS-CENTRE 

Another part of the Stanislavsky Factory 

consists of office building dating 

from 1980s. This building is carefully 

reconstructed, creating an integral 

architectural ensemble of two distinct 

epochs.

STANISLAVSKY FACTORY 



MASTERPLAN

RETAIL


PARKING

HOTEL


THE STANISLAVSKY THEATRE

STANISLAVSKY RESIDENTIAL

PUBLIC REALM

CAFE+RESTAURANT

GARDENS

MUSEUM


THE BUSINESS CENTRE

5

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4.0 THE MASTERPLAN

The Stanislavsky Factory has an 

extraordinary context. It is a complex 

miscellany of different buildings from 

different periods located  in a large 

urban block approximately 38,395m², 

(3.84ha.) to the south west of the City 

core and the Garden Ring.

Originally an industrial complex, the site 

is dominated by the original factory built 

in 1912 and the original Stanislavsky 

Theatre, birthplace of Konstantin 

Stanislavsky’s original theatre ensemble 

and the School of Method Acting.

Directly adjacent to the site there is also 

the fabulous St Martin’s Church, built 

in 1788 by Rodion Kazukov, which is 

one of the city’s finest Neo-Classical 

buildings, justly famous for its simplicity 

and elegance.This span of nearly two 

hundred years of architecture and 

culture anchors the site in the history of 

the city - a proper respect for the setting 

and significance of these cultural icons 

is at the heart of our masterplan.

The initial brief at Stanislavsky was to 

create elevational proposals for the 

re-cladding of existing rather poor 

commercial buildings constructed 

in the 1950’s. This was an odd 

commission in isolation but it quickly 

became a larger project to produce a 

unifying masterplan with proposals for 

landscape, refurbishment of existing 

historic  buildings and the design of new 

buildings within the entire estate.

There is no unifying geometry within the 

development and without intervention 

the sense of enclosure and spatial 

definition is fractured and incomplete. 

This circumstance led us to design a 

new landscape within the site with its 

own geometry and order to bring an 

identity to its interior spaces. It is not 

an urban space but rather a series of 

linked gardens and the “greening” of 

the masterplan was an important theme 

throughout the project.

These gardens are actually integrated 

into a complex series of internal car 

parks, routes and building entrances 



COMPUTER-GENERATED IMAGE OF RESIDENTIAL COURTYARD

and the greatest challenge of the 

landscape plan was resolve the 

operational demands of these functions 

without compromising the bigger vision. 

Stanislavsky is much richer than just a 

landscaped car park and this human 

quality comes from the setting of a series 

of landscape set pieces which provide 

places to sit, chat with friends or simply 

enjoy the plants and wildlife.

RESIDENTIAL COURTYARD GARDENS

KEY:

1. RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

2. HOTEL

3. RESTAURANT

4. THEATRE

5. THE FACTORY: MUSEUM, CAFE, LOBBY, AND OFFICES

6. OFFICES

7. BOILER HOUSE

8. THE PAVILLION

STANISLAVSKY FACTORY - SITE PLAN 

MUSEUM

COURTYARD

GARDENS SQUARE

THEATRE SQUARE

7

6

4

1

1

1

2

3

5

6

8


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WEST ELEVATION

The most challenging part of the 

masterplan was the design and 

integration of the new residential 

buildings which are directly adjacent 

to Kazukov's St Martin's Church. The 

concept for these buildings has been to 

create a series of linked villas which step 

down the significant  slope of the site  

offering a varied silhouette and giving a 

natural ascendancy  and setting for the 

Church. The style is understated and 

simple. The essence of the architecture 

is the quality of the materials and the 

proportion of individual parts within 

the composition. The buildings are 

finished in a crisp white limestone 

THE RESIDENTIAL DESIGN - CONTINUITY AND CHANGE

5.0 STANISLAVSKY RESIDENTIAL

and a contrasting semi-vitrified brick. 

This considered essay of textures, 

light and the creation of simple cubic 

volumes to articulate the buildings is 

really the essence of the design. The 

buildings are arranged around a series 

of stepping gardens and are linked 

through a dramatic ramped sequence 

to the Theatre Square and Cherry 

Orchard. The residences at Stanislavsky 

are modern but also timeless, properly 

respectful to Kazukov's masterpiece 

but also demonstrating a real individual 

confidence and connection to the wider 

masterplan.

“The concept for these buildings has been to create a 

series of linked villa’ which step down the significant slope 

of the site, offering a varied silhouette and giving a natural 

ascendancy and setting for the Church.”

SOUTH ELEVATION

ST MARTIN’S CHURCH

R. KAZAKOV 1788

“In the creation of neoclassical Moscow, Matvei Kazacov was joined 

by younger architects such as Rodion Kazakov (no relation), who 

distinguished himself above all in the design of churches. The largest 

among them is the church of Martin the Confessor (1782-93) in 

the Taganka district, a monumental exercise in column and mass, 

that despite its luxury projects a cold monochromatic impression  - 

particularly  in comparison with the polychrome of the seventeenth-

century churches in the same area. The appearance of this superbly 

constructed church might suggest that Russian Orthodoxy had 

indeed become the captive of the bureaucratic formalism of the Holy 

Synod and of wealth without a popular spiritual following.”

William Craft Brumfield



A History of Russian Architecture

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SECTION BB

SECTION AA

SECTION AA

SECTION BB

RESPONDING TO SITE 

TOPOGRAPHY 

The development sits on three levels of 

extensive basements providing dedicated 

parking to all the apartments. The 

formation of these basements and the 

provision of stepping landscaped decks 

between the buildings was a significant 

technical and engineering challenge. The 

articulation of the site topography and the 

resolution of multiple movements between 

levels was a key design feature of the 

development. 



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5.0 STANISLAVSKY RESIDENTIAL 



STANISLAVSKY RESIDENTIAL - GROUND FLOOR PLAN

STANISLAVSKY RESIDENTIAL - TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN

PHOTOGRAPH OF COMPLETED RESIDENTIAL 

COURTYARD LOOKING THROUGH THE 

RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS TOWARDS ST 

MARTINS CHURCH

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5.1 STANISLAVSKY RESIDENTIAL INTERIORS

The apartments are very high value, 

reflecting the excellent location and 

quality of the setting of the masterplan. 

The studies below illustrate the key living 

spaces within the development many of 

which will enjoy fabulous views of the 

local and distant Moscow landmarks. 

The approach has been to create 

modern living spaces to suit the demand 

for contemporary open plan design.

The apartments have high ceilings and 

full height windows which maximise the 

admission of natural light and the views 

towards Moscow.





STANISLAVSKY RESIDENTIAL TYPICAL HOUSING BLOCK

1 - LIVING ROOM SPACE OF PENTHOUSE

2 - DINING SPACE OF PENTHOUSE

3 - RECEPTION SPACE

4 - TYPICAL DINING SPACE OF THE TWO BEDROOM FLATS

5 - LIVING SPACES OF TWO BEDROOM FLAT

6 - TYPICAL BATHROOM 

7 - TYPICAL MASTER SUITE



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NEXT PAGE: PHOTOGRAPH 

OF COMPLETED RESIDENTIAL 

BUILDING FACADE 

(WEST ELEVATION)

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PREVIOUS PAGE: PHOTOGRAPH OF COMPLETED RESIDENTIAL COURTYARD

ADM TECHNICAL DRAWINGS OF BUILDINGS 

ELEVATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION

The facades were constructed from 

limestone and semi-vitrified Wittmunder 

bricks imported from Germany. Although 

the elevation language is very simple the 

buildings required detail coursing and 

brick setting out construction drawings to 

ensure alignment between the stone and 

brickwork variants.

The above technical drawings 

prepared by the executive architect 

ADM in Moscow were part of their 

comprehensive suite of production 

information which was developed in a 

close and highly successful collaboration 

with the JMP team in London. ADM 

provided a well resolved and crafted 

interpretation of the detail design intent 

drawings and made all the statutory 

submissions directed by the client team 

and AB Development.

PHOTOGRAPH OF COMPLETED RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS, COURTYARD FACADE (EASTERN ELEVATION)

TYPICAL BAY - STONE

TYPICAL BAY - BRICK


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5.2 STANISLAVSKY RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION

These photographs show the extensive 

basement construction that is located 

beneath the residential buildings. These 

basements provide secure car parking 

for the apartments which minimises 

the area of car parking at grade which 

created more space for landscape. There 

was a significant engineering challenge 

to stabilise deep basements and 

maintain continuity of services across 

the site. 

RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT UNDER CONSTRUCTION 2007-2008 – MAIN CONTRACTOR: MEBE CONSTRUCTION

The basement construction also had to 

accommodate the increased loadings 

required for extensive tree planting and 

landscaping. The building frame and 

structure were concrete offering flats 

slabs throughout thewaces.


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ADM TECHNICAL DRAWINGS OF BRICK FACADE 

SHOWING DIFFERENT TYPES OF BRICKS USED 

AND THE LAYOUT ARRANGEMENTS

PHOTOGRAPH OF COMPLETED FACADE 

SHOWING THE TWO MAIN MATERIALS: 

STONE AND BRICK

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5.3 THE RESIDENTIAL COURTYARD

The residential courtyards are linked to 

the main landscape spaces within the 

masterplan with a series of ramps and 

stairs. The significant changes in level 

are articulated with planted retaining 

walls to moderate the scale and provide 

outlook from the lower apartments.  

The landscaping within the courts was 

designed to provide colour and form 

throughout the years seasons with 

particular attention paid to the gardens 

in winter and the impact of extensive 

snow cover.


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5.4 THE PAVILLION

This small timber building sits on the 

extreme corner of the site adjacent to St 

Martin’s Church by Kazukov. 

The site was originally occupied by a 

single storey timber heritage building 

and the initial condition of the planning 

consent for the residential buildings, 

involved the reconstruction of an exact 

heritage facsimile on the site. 

Further negotiations with the authorities 

allowed this to be replaced with a 

contemporary timber building which has 

the same plan form and section but is a 

modern construction. 

The resulting building is a characterful 

modern statement which defers to the 

scale of St Martin’s but offers a vivid 

and abstract counterpoint to its setting. 

The building is to be occupied by a 

health club and is part of an animated 

ground floor of retail activities within the 

development.



PREVIOUS PAGE:

PHOTOGRAPH OF COMPLETED PAVILLION IN 

TIMBER (WEST ELEVATION)

PHOTOS OF SOUTH-WEST ENTRANCE TO 

THE RESIDENTIAL COURTYARD ADJACENT TO 

THE PAVILLION

WEST ELEVATION

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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6.0 THE HISTORIC STANISLAVSKY FACTORY

These photographs show the condition 

of the original historic properties at 

Stanislavsky at the commencement of 

the project in 2005. Many of the existing 

brick facades were badly damaged 

where successive years of neglect and 

the harsh climate had caused significant 

spalling of the brickwork surface.

An exact condition survey was 

undertaken and a brickwork repair 

methodology prepared that structured 

a major fabric repair contract. In many 

respects the transformation of the 

historic buildings is the real triumph of 

Stanislavsky and it offers a paradigm of 

adaptive reuse in the city.



REPAIR

PARTIAL REBUILD

RENDER

CLADDING

RESTORATION STRATEGY

Part rebuild  brickwork 

Repoint with lime mortar mix

Repair brickwork

Seal/paint brickwork



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7.0 THE MUSEUM AND 

  THE BUSINESS CENTRE 

 

The Stanislavsky Estate contains 



many existing historic buildings with 

different qualities and from different 

periods. The centre piece is the original 

factory constructed in 1912 located on 

Stanislavskogo Street. This confident 

four storey brick building is distinguished 

by 24 bays of a grand architectural 

order of vertical pilasters which give 

an impressive scale and presence to 

the Building. The strategy that was 

adopted for the partial reconstruction 

of the business building adjacent 

to the factory was to reproduce the 

strong vertical rhythm but to express 

it in a more abstract contemporary 

language. This has created a modern 

but contextual building that defers 

to the setting of the original factory 

whilst providing a great new identity 

for modern business units within the 

masterplan.  


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7.1 THE MUSEUM AND THE BUSINESS CENTRE 

  MAIN LOBBY

 

Many of the historic interiors within the 



existing buildings have been retained 

and refurbished. They often contain 

bold and muscular structures which 

are a vivid memory of the industrial 

legacy of the Estate. These features 

have been carefully integrated into the 

new commercial uses and the resulting 

volumes are dramatic and also highly 

flexible.

In the main entrance lobby of the 

original factory building double height 

“gold” metal mesh screens evoke 

the original manufacturing output of 

the factory and provide a wonderful 

introduction to the masterplan.

The interior lobby of the main 

building was designed by Casson 

Mann Architects and was themed to 

be a celebration of the life and work 

of Stanislavsky arranged within a 

dramatic double height interior volume 

which forms the entrance to the office 

development.

ENTRANCE LOBBY INTERIORS BY CASSON MANN ARCHITECTS


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7.2 THE BUSINESS CENTRE 

  BUILDINGS

In the heart of the estate there were a 

series of elemental industrial buildings 

built in the 1950’s. These buildings had 

interesting steel structures but were 

completely dilapidated in terms of their 

original external fabric and services.

The masterplan involved the adaptive 

re-use of these ‘structures’ to create 

characterful commercial space. The 

building illustrated on this page was 

transformed to provide a multi-volume 

atria within which were located floating 

platforms of meeting rooms and 

breakout spaces. 


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7.2 THE BUSINESS CENTRE 

  LANDSCAPE GARDENS 

The landscape is the glue that unifies 

the parts of Stanislavsky into one 

continuous spatial experience. The real 

intent was to reintroduce “nature” into 

the heart of the development with colour, 

textures, wildlife and a registration of the 

change of the seasons and time. 

The key concept that structures 

this approach is the use of a strong 

organising geometry to provide a 

framework for each of the linked 

green spaces within the plan. This 

sliding arrangement of linear planes 

of alternating hard and soft landscape 

provides an identity to the often 

discordant internal geometries within 

the development and allows a “human 

measure” to be introduced into the 

large anonymous spaces between the 

existing buildings. Although there was a 

functional requirement for large parking 

and hard landscape areas for servicing 

and congregation the fundamental 

objective has been to ‘green’ and soften 

the internal space through extensive 

tree planting and the introduction of 

contrasting evergreen shrubs and 

biannual planting. 

The resulting landscaping is very much 

a series of linked gardens. It offers a real 

sanctuary to the workers, visitors and 

residents of the local neighbourhood 

and is a setting and back drop for 

all activities that occur within the 

masterplan.



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7.2 THE BUSINESS CENTRE 

  LANDSCAPE GARDENS 

acer autum blaze

panicum vergatum 

heavy metal



amelanchier lamarckii

veronica spicata glory

wild cherry

acer saccharinum

cornus stolonifera

honey locust red

prunus avium plena

euonimous europaeus

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8.0 THE MUSEUM COURT 

 

The courtyard space is located directly 



adjacent to the Theatre Square. The 

original brickwork facades were very 

badly damaged and were simply 

refurbished using insulated render. This 

gives a different character to the spaces 

and the white finish allows for more 

daylight to be reflected into the narrow 

confines of the courtyard. The court is 

“softened” through the use of a timber 

seating deck which links the court to the 

Theatre Square and provides a lunch- 

time destination for the office workers.



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9.0 THE STANISLAVSKY THEATRE   

 

The conservation and repair of historic 



properties is a key part of the masterplan 

at Stanislavsky Factory.

At the heart of masterplan is the 

refurbishment of the original Stanislavsky 

Theatre and the creation of a new 

public space dedicated to its setting and 

access.

The Theatre is the primary cultural 



centre piece and destination within the 

scheme. It is also a beautifully repaired 

historic building and its adaptive reuse 

both as building and as a new theatre is 

the very soul of the development. 

THE THEATRE SQUARE 

AND ADAPTIVE REUSE 

OF HISTORIC STRUCTURES

The approach has been to repair fabric 

but also to ensure that all historic 

buildings are brought back into active 

reuse. This has given vitality to the 

project as History comes alive and the 

counterpoint between new buildings and 

new uses adjacent to old buildings and 

new uses is a wonderful quality of the 

development. In this regard Stanislavsky 

is a highly sustainable project where 

every part of the existing fabric has been 

re-used whenever possible to minimise 

waste and costs of reconstruction.



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10.0 THE THEATRE SQUARE

The timber decking in the Theatre 

Square features informal seating during 

the working day and provides a focus for 

this public space - an area for external 

performances, events and exhibitions.

The key landscape spaces feature  

extensive use of timber decks and 

pergolas. The intention was to soften the 

predominantly hard landscape spaces 

with a natural material and colour. 

Particular attention was given to the 

selection of native species of birch trees 

which have been integrated amongst 

the seating to add a naturalistic setting, 

reinforcing a sense of continuity with the 

overall masterplan.



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10.0 THE THEATRE SQUARE



All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women 

merely players: They have their exits and their 

entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, 

His acts being seven ages.”

William Shakespeare 

(from As You Like It 2/7)


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“Love art in yourself and not yourself in art.”

Konstantin Stanislavsky (in My Life in Art)

JOHN M

C

ASLAN + PARTNERS

7-9 William Road

London NW1 3ER

United Kingdom 

T +44 (0)20 7313 6000 

F +44 (0)20 7313 6001 

E mailbox@mcaslan.co.uk 

www.mcaslan.co.uk



DESIGN ARCHITECT + MASTERPLANNER

EXECUTIVE ARCHITECT

DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

ADM ARCHITECTS

121360, Russia, Moscow, 

Petrovka Street, 17, stroenie 2 

T +7(495) 625-27-79 

+7(495) 628-49-50 

+7(495) 621-14-77 

+7(495) 625-24-89 

E ADM@ADM-arch.ru



MAIN CONTRACTOR

MEBE CONSTRUCTION

109 004 Moscow, Russia 

ul. Stanislavsky, 21, Building 2, 

Floor 6


T +7 (495) 580-70-35 

F +7 (495) 580-70-36

E info@mebecons.com 

www.mebecons.com



AB DEVELOPMENT 

125047, Russia, Moscow, 

White Square, 

Lesnaya str. 5, bld. C, 2nd floor

T +7(495) 287 0777

F +7(495) 287 0775

E general@abdevelopment.ru

www. abdevelopment.ru

The redevelopment of the historic Stanislavsky factory and 

theatre site in Moscow has unquestionably been 

John McAslan + Partners’ most unusual and challenging 

city centre regeneration project. Within a 4ha area of 

thoroughly degraded building stock and urban junk-space, 

it required a meticulous stitching together of building repair, 

new landscaping, and newbuild to create a now vivid mixed-

use environment that is unique in the city.




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