Stuart F. Bruny, P. E. Orsanco commissioner


Download 107.73 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
Sana08.06.2018
Hajmi107.73 Kb.

Stuart F. Bruny, P.E. 

ORSANCO Commissioner  



Established 1948 

 



Authorized by Congress 



 

Eight signatory States (IL, IN, NY, KY, OH, PA, VA, 



WV) 

 



“Pledge cooperation” to abate interstate water 

pollution in Ohio River valley compact district 

 



Created ORSANCO to coordinate and implement 



 

3/state (gubernatorial appointments); 3 federal 

(Presidential appointments) 

 



State EPA director ex-officio 

 



One federal is EPA Regional Administrator 

 



Budget:  $2.5 million from states & USEPA  

 



Staff – 23 

 


981 Miles from Pittsburgh to 

Cairo 

 



Drinking water source for 5 

million people (33 intakes) 

 



120+ species of fish; rich in 



mussels 

 



230 million tons of cargo 

transported annually; 20 

locks and dams 

 



Recreational water resource 

38 power generating 



plants 

Regulatory – establish Ohio River Pollution 

Control Standards 

 



Monitoring (lots of it) & assessment 

 



Spill Detection/Response (monitoring, 

communications) 

 



Clean Water Act/Safe Drinking Water Act 



implementation coordination (TMDLs, NPDES, 

etc…) 


 

Applied research (pharmaceuticals, mercury) 



 

Public Involvement programs (volunteer 



monitoring, River Sweep, mobile aquarium) 

Referred to as 305(b) report 

ORSANCO completes for Ohio River. 



Recommendation for states’ 303(d) Lists of 

waters requiring TMDLs. 

Based on ORSANCO monitoring data. 



2012 Impairments 

All 981 miles impaired for PCBs and dioxin based on 



historical high volume water quality data. 

 



630 miles impaired for contact recreational use based on 

exceedances of E. coli &/or fecal coliform criteria. 

 



Recent previous assessments have temperature and 



dissolved oxygen impairments in lower river. 

Commission initiated study to characterize total 

dissolved solids (TDS) and its primary 

constituents in the Ohio River and selected 

tributaries. 

Weekly sampling conducted at 11 Ohio River 



sites and on 5 tributaries for a suite of 

parameters. 

Sampling effort ran for 1 year (Dec 2011 – Dec 



2012). 

Data assessment is ongoing. 



Final report to be completed June 20

13. 

 


Dissolved Solids Analytes 

1.

Sodium 



2.

Potassium 

3.

Magnesium 



4.

Calcium 


5.

Lithium 


10.

Bicarbonate 

11.

Total Dissolved Solids 



Supplemental Parameters 

pH 



Conductivity 

Temperature 



Stream flow 

Coordinate THM 



sampling when possible

 

6.



Chloride 

7.

Sulfate 



8.

Bromide 


9.

Fluoride 



TDS 

Standard  

500 mg/L 

Highest levels 



observed during 

low-flow period in 

Aug/Sept. 

 



Levels on the Ohio 

River did not 

approach the 500 

mg/L standard 

(max observed 368 

mg/L) 


 

TDS was higher on 



tributaries, 

particularly the Big 

Sandy and 

Muskingum Rivers 

 

 


Mission (per Compact) has been 

focused on water quality 

 



Growing importance of integrating 

quality and quantity management 

 



Droughts and shortages…not just a 



“west of the Mississippi” issue 

anymore 


 

2009 Strategic Planning Workshop 



Outcome: ORSANCO should become more 

“holistic” in its services to the states 

 

ORSANCO and Water Resources 



Committee Role: 

To study, discuss and evaluate water resources issues of 



concern or interest to the Commission and basin states 

Provides a forum for states and federal agencies to discuss 



water resources issues (meets 3 times annually) 

Current membership includes: 



 

 

 



 

 

   



Committee must be financially self-supporting 

States 

Indiana 


Kentucky 

New York 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania 



Tennessee 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

Federal 


Tennessee Valley Authority 

US Army Corps of Engineers 

US Geological Survey 


Effort funded by private foundation grants 

 



Initial focus to complete three water resource 



characterization studies 

1.

Water resources  inventory and characterization 



Characterize current water resources issues (i.e. water use, inter-

basin transfers, climate change, E-flows)  

2.

Examination of laws and regulations 



Comparison of existing state and federal rules/regs governing 

water resources 

3.

Evaluation of Commission role in water resources 



management 

Define appropriate role for Commission and develop funding 



mechanism for future WR activities 

 



Timeline 

Reports #1 and #2 to be completed 2013 



Report #3 to be completed 2014 

 


Methyl Mercury fish tissue data was collected 

in hybrid striped bass samples. 

40% of samples exceeded ORSANCO’s MeHg 



fish tissue criterion of 0.3 mg/kg. 

Hybrid striped bass considered “worst case” 



scenario. 

ORSANCO’s Technical Committee decided 



river would remain “unassessed” until fish 

tissue data from other commonly consumed 

species was collected and evaluated. 

Some states have listed Ohio River for 



mercury impairments.  OEPA does not include 

Ohio River in any listings.  

 


ORSANCO prohibition on mixing zones for 

bioaccumulative chemicals of concern 

(mercury). 

Effectively will require discharges to meet 



0.012 ug/L for total mercury at end of pipe. 

PPG requested and received a variance from 



this prohibition. 

Ironton has requested a variance from 



ORSANCO – has already received variance 

from OEPA. 

ORSANCO is developing formal variance 



procedure.  

 


Objective: 

•Project at Hannibal L&D in 

area of mercury discharge 

variance request by PPG 

Inc. Natrium, WV mile 120 

 

•A single site-specific 



bioaccumulation factor for 

methyl Hg 

 

•Calculated from direct 



measurement of methyl 

mercury in water and 

methyl mercury in tissue 

 


12 Equal Discharge Increment (EDI) 

composite water samples (1 year/Monthly) 

Analysis for total and methyl mercury, filtered and 



unfiltered 

Known methylation factors: DOC, D SO4,  



  Chlorophyll-a 

12 composite fish tissue analyses: 



4 TL4 composites 

4 TL3 composites 



4 TL2 composites 

4 sediment samples 



Objectives: 

 



Create inventory of FGD systems and ash ponds 

on the Ohio River (FGD type, installation date, 

discharge location). 

 



Characterize total and methyl mercury discharges 

from FGD systems. 

 



Data will be used in conjunction with mercury 



trend analyses to investigate potential impacts 

from these discharges. 



Four sample events (quarterly) at four  

  coal-fired power generation facilities 

 



Three sample locations per facility:  

Upstream baseline or raw inflow 



FGD wastewater post treatment 

Fly/bottom ash pond final discharge 



 

Analytical parameters to be monitored: 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

•Filtered total Hg 

•Unfiltered total Hg 

•Filtered methyl Hg 

•Unfiltered methyl Hg 

•Selenium 

•Bromide 

•Dissolved Organic Carbon 

•Dissolved Sulfate 

•Total Dissolved Solids 

•pH/Specific  Conductance 


2012 revisions of bacteria criteria for protection 

of recreational use. 

Fecal coliform criteria removed. 



Numeric E. coli criteria revised as follows: 

130 cfu/100mL as 90-day geometric mean. 



Previously 30-day. 

240 cfu/100mL in more than 25% of samples. 



Previously single sample max. 

Max. Temperature criterion of 110 deg F added 



for protection of human health from body 

contact exposure. 



USEPA Region 5 is completing a bacteria TMDL for 

the entire Ohio River. 

About 2/3 of the river is listed as impaired. 



ORSANCO has been involved: 

Monitoring to generate data to support the modeling effort. 



Provide technical expertise on the Ohio River. 

Collection of other necessary  data. 



Army Corps of Engineers HEC-RAS model being 

utilized. 

There will be a continued public involvement 



process (one set of meetings held in 2009). 

See ORSANCO’s website for additional info.  



 

 

 



Fish Community 1957-present 

Macroinvertebrate Community 1964-present 



Fish Tissue Contaminants 1970-present 

Supplemental Data Collections 



Mussel Community 2012 

Periphyton Community 2007-2012 



Water & Sediment Chemistry 2007-present 

Mobile Aquarium Displays ~2001-present 



 

 


Lockchamber Rotenone 1957-2005 

Long term trends analysis 



 

Night-time Boat Electrofishing 1990-present 



Aquatic Life Use Assessments [305(b)] 

Uses Modified Ohio River Fish Index (mORFIn) 



Probabilistic Pool Surveys (15 sites/pool) 

18 Riverwide Fixed Stations (sampled annually since 2004) 



 

Benthic Trawling 2006-2008 



Exploration as supplement to EF 



Collected at electrofishing sites 

Methods  



Rockbaskets 1964-1971 

Hester-Dendy (HD) 1968-present 



Shallow (2-3’ of water) & Deep (10’) 

D-Frame Net Kicks (Kicks) 2004-present 



Recently developed multi-metric index 

Uses combination of Deep HD & Kicks 



Draft numeric index has been developed and will 

be evaluated over the next couple years. 

Initial results seem to compare reasonably with 



fish surveys. 

   


Objectives: 

 



Monitor contaminants levels & track trends 



Provide information to states to support fish 

consumption advisories (

www.orsanco.org/fca



Provide information for 305(b) assessment of Fish 



Consumption Use 

Analytes 



PCBs 


Mercury (total & methyl) & other metals 

DDTs, Chlordanes, and other pesticides 



PBDEs, PFCs, Dioxins, etc on occasion 

Fish tissue contaminants of concern include 



PCBs and mercury 

Mussel Community 2012 

Initial explorations for use as bio-indicators 



Periphyton Community 2007-2012 

Draft diatom multi-metric index recently completed 



Water & Sediment Chemistry 2007-present 

Used to create condition gradients for biotic data 



* All collected at electrofishing zones 

2200 Gallon Mobile Aquarium  

Set-up at various events along river 



Approximately 10-12 events April-October 

Filled at event with  



   water & fish 

Generally 20-30 species 



 

In May 1977, the Commission voted to expand it’s 



monitoring capabilities to include volatile organics (VOC’s), in 

response to an ongoing Carbon Tetrachloride release into 

Kanawha River that February.   

6 downstream water utilities were unprotected and vulnerable with no 



ability to detect volatile organics routinely; water quality was 

compromised and communities were served contaminated water for 

over a week.     

ODS is designed to be a Spills Detection Network. 



Samples collected from Ohio River at 14 drinking water 

utilities (one on Kanawha River).  

At least 1 source water sample is analyzed per day from each 



site.  

In 2012, nearly 4,200  VOC samples were collected from ODS 



locations and analyzed.  

Less than 2% of the time, reportable detections found–(that’s a good thing!)  



Most common detections are Chloroform, (THM’s), Benzene, 

  1,1-Dichloroethylene, and TCE. 

 

 



Continued partnerships with water utilities, the 

Water Users Advisory Committee (WUAC), and 

industry has kept ODS operational for 34 years.   

In kind services provided by ODS host sites over the past 



two years totals over $1.4M.   

Operational and maintenance costs are estimated 



to be over $200,000 annually when renovation is 

completed. 



Methylene Chloride   

1,3 Dichlorobenzene 

1,1 Dichloroethylene



 

1,4 Dichlorobenzene 

1,1 Dichloroethane   



1,2 Dichlorobenzene 

Chloroform   



 

1,1,1 Trichloroethane   

Acrylonitrile  



 

Carbon Tetrachloride   

1,2 Dichloroethane   



Benzene 

 



trans-

1,2 Dichloroethylene  Trichloroethylene 

cis-


1,3 Dichloropropene 

1,2 Dichloropropane   

trans-


1,3 Dichloropopene  Dichlorobromomethane 

Hexachloro-1,3-butadiene  Toluene 



 

1,1, 2,2 Tetrachloroethane  Tetrachloroethylene 



1,1,2 Trichloroethane 

Dibromochloromethane  

Trichlorofluoromethane 



Ethylbenzene 

Napthalene   



 

Chlorobenzene 

Styrene (co-elutes with o,p xylenes) 



Bromoform 



Water Utility 

Early 90’s technology 

CMS5000 process GC 

GC/MS technology 

ODS MONITORING LOCATIONS 


In 2008-2010 ORSANCO was able to obtain 

$4.4 Mil in funding to support a network wide 

renovation and upgrade.  The Renovation will 

allow the ODS to:   

 



Use automated sample injection to increase 

frequency of analysis to 4-6 times daily 

Reduce analysis time 



Increase number of VOC’s that can be identified 

Increase number of monitoring sites 



Involve and educate public with interactive website 

 


Project began with Electric 

Power Research Institute 

2008 feasibility study. 

Power plants compliance cost 



ranged from $20-180 per lb 

of nitrogen 

Typical farmer BMP cost $2-4 



per lb 

Project funding to date 



from project partners and 

grants:  $5 Million 

Advisory groups from 



Power Industry, Agriculture, 

WWTP’s, Environmental 

Groups. 

WWTP advisory group from 



NACWA 

Project Partners 





Electric Power Research Institute 



American Electric Power 



Duke Energy 



Hoosier Energy 



Tennessee Valley Authority 



American Farmland Trust 



Ohio Farm Bureau Federation 



ORSANCO 



Hunton & Williams 



Kieser & Associates  



US EPA 



USDA 

 


An option for compliance with permit limits. 

A permitted source of nutrients with a high 



compliance cost pays a non-point source 

with a lower reduction cost to install nutrient 

best management practices. 

Non-point source reductions must be new. 



Full Scale Program 

38 Power plants 

230,000 Farmers 

Thousands of WWTP 

Millions of Pounds of Nutrients 

 


Pilot phase will test out procedures developed 

for the program 

Pilot Trading Plan signed by Ohio EPA, 



Indiana DEP, Kentucky DEP August 9, 2012 

$100,000 will be spent on BMP’s in each 



State. 

Projects are currently being scoped 



Installation of BMP’s this spring/summer 

First credits for sale in September 2013 



Project will go full scale in 2015. 

 


Problem: 

Nutrients are one of the most common causes of 



impairments to water in the U.S. 

USEPA has directed all States to develop numeric 



nutrient criteria 

Objective:  



Collect a long term dataset for development of numeric 

nutrient criteria. 

Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) 



Some algae cause taste and odor problems with drinking 

water.  These issues have become more common on the 

Ohio River. 

Some algae can produce toxins which are harmful to humans 



and animals.   

Parameters: total 

phosphorus, 

nitrate/nitrite, TKN, 

ammonia, 

phytoplankton algae 

identification,  

chlorophyll 

a.

  



Frequency: 2/month.  

12 months/year for 

nutrients.  9 

months/year for algae. 

 

 

 



 

7locations 



West View, PA   ORM5 

Wheeling , WV  ORM87 



Huntington, WV

 

ORM306 


Northern KY

 

ORM463 


Louisville, KY

 

ORM600 


Evansville, IN

 

ORM792 


Paducah, KY

 

ORM936 


 

 


EPA has mandated that states develop numeric 

nutrients criteria. 

Criteria development for the main stem of the Ohio 



River began in 2002. 

Development of numeric criteria have proved to be a 



difficult task. 

There are not obvious cause-effect relationships 



between concentrations of nutrients and impairments 

caused by nutrients. 

There are occasional algae blooms and drinking water 



taste & odor problems that are associated with 

nutrients.  

Continuing to look at other indicators such as 



changes in macroinvertebrate communities resulting 

from nutrients. 



Unknown as to when numeric criteria may be 



proposed. 

 


Download 107.73 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling