T h e arabs f r o m t h e e a r L i e s t t I m e s t o t h e p r e s e n t


Download 7.19 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet1/119
Sana15.03.2020
Hajmi7.19 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   119

H I S T O R Y 

OF 

T H E ARABS 



F R O M  T H E  E A R L I E S T  T I M E S 

T O  T H E  P R E S E N T 

PHILIP K. HITTI 



r a O F E S S O R  E M E R I T U S  O F  S E M I T I C  U T E R A T t T R E 

F R I K C E T O K DNIVERSmr 

T E N f H  E D I T I O K 

M A C M I L L A N 



H I S T O R Y  O F  T H E  A R A B S 

M a c m i l l a n  I n t e r n a t i o n a l  C o l l e g e  E d i t i o n s  ( M I C E ) are 

authoritative paperback books covering the history and cultures 

of the developing worldj and its scientific, technical.

 Social

 and 


economic development.  T h e  M I C E programme contains many 

distinguished series in a wide range of disciplines, some titles 

bemg regionally biassed, others more international. Library 

editions will usually be published simultaneously with the 

paperback editions 

Related Macmillan Titles 

Macmillan African and Caribbean Htstortes Senes 

J. H. Parry and P. Sherlock- A Short Historj' of the-West Indies 

D. W. Phillipson: African Prehistory 

B. Freund: A History of Africa since 1800 

F. Furedi: A History of  M o d e m East Africa 

R. Smith:  T h e Lagos Consulate 

B. O. Oloruntimehin: State and Society in Francophone West 

Africa 


Macnnllan Asian Histories Series 

D. G. E. Hall: A History of South-east Asia 

R. Jeffrey (ed):  A s i a — T h e Winning of Independence 

M. Riddefs; A History of  M o d e m Indonesia 

B. W. Andaya and L. Y.  A n d a y a : A Historj' of  M o d e m Malaysia 

D. Chandler: A History of  M o d e m Indo-China 

R. C. Majumdar- An Advanced History of India 


From tira/iim Jti/'al, "Mir'at at Haramay" 

T H E  C U R T A I N  O F  T H E DOOR  O F  T H E KA'BAH  A T  MAK KA H 

Beanng koranic inscriptions which include surahs i, io6 and iiz 

The prominent inscription above the centre is the first part of surah 4S,%erse 27 

[Frontxsptect 

© Philip K. Hitti 1970 

All rights reserxed No reproduction, cop} or transmission 

of this publication may be made wthout  w t t c n permission. 

No paragraph of this publication may be reproduced, copied 

or transmitted save with written permission or in accordance 

with the provisions of the Copyright Act 1956 (as amended), 

or under the terms of any licence permitting limited copying 

issued by the Copyright Licensing Agencj', 33—4 Alfred Place, 

London WCIE 7DP. 

Any person who docs any unauthorised aa m relation to 

this publication may be liable to criminal prosecution and 

dvil claims for damages. 

First edition 1937 

Second edition 1940 

Third edition 1943, reprinted 1946 

Fourth edition 1949 

Fifth edition, enlarged 1931, reprinted 1953 

Sixth edition 1956, repnntcd 1958 

Seventh edition 1960, reprinted 1961 

Eighth edition 1963 

Ninth edition 1967, repnnted 1968 

Tenth edition 1970. twelfth reprint 1989 

Published by 

MACNiTLLAN EDUCATION LTD 

Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire RG21 2XS 

and London 

Companies and representatives 

throughout the world 

Printed in Hong Kong 

ISBN  0 - 3 3 3 - 0 6 1 5 2 - 7 (hard cover) 

ISBN  0 - 3 3 3 - 0 9 8 7 1 - 4 (paperback) 

P R E F A C E  T O  T H E  T E N T H  E D I T I O N 

T H E year 1970  m a r k s the thirty-third anniversary  o f  t h e  p u b -

lication of History of the Arabs  a n d  w i t n e s s e s its tenth edition 

T h e initiative for its  w r i t i n g  w a s  t a k e n  b y  M r .  D a n i e l  M a c m i l l a n , 

•who, as early as 1927, -wrote to  t h e author  s u g g e s t i n g a  b o o k 

comparable to  A m e e r  A l i , A Short History of the Saracens, first 

published  b y  M a c m i l l a n and  C o .  i n igoo.  T h e  o c c u r r e n c e  o f  t h e 

•word  " S a r a c e n s " in the title left no  d o u b t  a b o u t the obsolete 

character of the  w o r k . 

In my youthful enthusiasm I signed a contract in 1927  a g r e e -

ing to deliver the  m a n u s c r i p t in  t h r e e  y e a r s . (A representative of 

Macmillan,  w h o  w a s then  t o u r i n g the  A r a b  w o r l d ,  s u g g e s t e d  a n 

A r a b i c version of  t h e  b o o k  a n d I  t h o u g h t I could do that in a 

couple of subsequent years.)  W h e n the  b o o k at last  a p p e a r e d , in 

1937, the  N e w  Y o r k publisher (before  S t .  M a r t i n ' s Press)  a s k e d 

my opinion as to the  n u m b e r of copies to be imported  a n d  w h e n 

I offhand suggested a hundred, he shot  b a c k ,  " W h o is  g o i n g to 

buy that  m a n y ? " 

As a matter of fact  t h e  A m e r i c a n  p u b l i c ,  e v e n at its  e d u c a t e d 

level, was then almost iili'terate so far as  t h e  A r a b s and  M o s l e m s 

Were concerned.  T h e rare courses in this field  w e r e limited to a 

few graduate schools and offered as subsidiary to  S e m i t i c studies 

and as contributorj' to  p h i l o l o g y or linguistics.  N o w h e r e  w e r e 

such courses  g i v e n for their  o w n  s a k e or as a  k e y to further in-

vestigation  o f  A r a b history,  I s l a m and Islamic culture.  T h i s  i v a s 

substantially  t h e situation until the second  W o r l d  W a r . It  w a s not 

until then that the  A m e r i c a n  g o v e r n m e n t  a n d  p u b l i c  w e r e 

awakened to the fact that here are millions of  M o s l e m s  a n d tens 

o f thousands  o f  A r a b s  w i t h  w h o m  t h e y  h a d  t o deal and  o f  w h o m 

they should  h a v e some understanding. 

T h e demand, subsequent  t o the  a p p e a r a n c e  o f the  f i r s t  E n g l i s h 

edition, for translation rights—not only into  A r a b i c  b u t into 

varied  A s i a n and  E u r o p e a n  l a n g u a g e s — l e f t no  d o u b t  a b o u t  t h e 

timeliness of the  w o r k  a n d its  c a p a c i t y to meet the  n e e d . It is 

gratifying to note that since  t h e publication of  t h e ninth edition 


vi PREFACE 

four years ago new versions have appeared in Italian, Serbo-

Croat and Polish. 

In this edition, as in earlier ones, an effort was made to take 

into consideration the results of new researches, to update the 

material in text and footnote, and to plug that seemingly in-

exhaustible supply of errors—otherwise called typographical. 

A b o u t sixty sheets, including four maps, have been thus treated. 

P .  K .  H . 

fanuary, 1970 

P R E F A C E  T O  T H E  N I N T H  E D I T I O N 

IN the first four editions of this book, appearing 1937 to 1949, 

the story ended with the Ottoman conquest of the  A r a b East in 



1517. Beginning with the fifth edition an attempt has been made 

to cover the  m o d e m penod down to the year of publication. This 

attempt to keep the story up to date in an area undergoing 

changes with a rapidity unparalleled m its history, and at the 

same time subjected to intensified research by Western as well 

as Eastern scholars on a scale hitherto unattained necessitated 

many reprints and new editions. In each case revision has in-

cluded correcting factual and typographical errors, adding new 

data, and replacing references to footnotes with more recent and 

critical ones. In the present edition no less than seventy pages 

and eight maps have been thus affected. 

Meanwhile the widening spread of the ecumenical spirit m a 

shrinking world and the heightening awareness of the desir-

ability if not necessity of intercultural understanding have en-

couraged the translation of this volume into a number of 

European and Asian languages beginning with Spanish and 

ending with  U r d u and Indonesian. 

August, 1966 

P .  K .  H . 



P R E F A C E  T O  T H E  E I G H T H  E D I T I O N 

P R E F A C E  T O  T H E  S E V E N T H  E D I T I O N 

POPULAR interest in the  A r a b  p e o p l e s  a n d  l a n d s — a s  m e a s u r e d 

by space  c o v e r a g e in the daily press—as  w e l l as  s c h o l a r l y interest, 

evidenced by the  v o l u m e of  b o o k  o u t p u t , are still  m o u n t i n g . In 

the last four  y e a r s , since the sixth edition  w a s issued,  m o r e  w o r k s 

dealing, with the history, culture, literature  a n d  v a r i e d aspects 

of the life "^of the  A r a b i a n s and  A r a b i c - s p e a k i n g peoples  h a v e 

appeared  t h a n  p r o b a b l y in any  e q u i v a l e n t  p e r i o d in their entire 

existence.  T h e output has been featured  b y the  a b u n d a n c e  o f 

-sdiolarly  w o r k s  i n  A r a b i c and  b y  A r a b s . 

,  T h e autlior  h a s  m e a n w h i l e endeavoured to  k e e p  a b r e a s t of  t h e 

progress in research in this field. He  h a s also  u n d e r t a k e n repeated 

Journeys to all the major countries treated^'n  d i e  b o o k .  T h r o u g h -

out, he bore in mind the possibilities of  i m p r o v e m e n t of the 

material therein. 





 ' ^ ' . . 

> VJI 


P O L l T I C A l -

  c h a n g e s of historical  i m p o r t  h a v e  m a r k e d  t h e last 

three years  i n  A r a b  l a n d s .  M a u r e t a n i a  a n d  A l g e r i a  w e r e freed 

from France, and  a l - K u w a y t — w i t h reservations—from  G r e a t 

Britain.  S y r i a  b r o k e off from  t h e  U n i t e d  A r a b  R e p u b l i c , and 

al-Yaman followed suit. Political  c h a n g e s  g e n e r a l l y reflect social 

and economic  u p h e a v a l s  a n d in turn  r e a c t on  t h e m . As a  m a t t e r 

of fact, the entire area has been and  r e m a i n s in a state of 

transition. 

In tliis edition an attempt  h a s been  m a d e to  m a k e  r o o m for 

references—brief as they are—to these  m o m e n t o u s  c h a n g e s in 

the hope that tliey  w o u l d  e n h a n c e the usefulness of this  b o o k to 

both student and  g e n e r a l reader.  M e a n w h i l e  a d v a n t a g e  w a s 

taken of the opportunity to clarify certain  a m b i g u o u s  p a s s a g e s 

and correct hitherto-undetected slips in  t e x t , footnotes  a n d  m a p s . 

P . K.  H . 

December, 1962 


viii  P R E F A C E 

As in the earlier editions, statistical and other data that became 

obsolete have been brought up to date, new editions of books 

referred to in the footnotes have replaced old ones, and mis-

statements have been corrected Careful consideration has been 

given to all suggestions for improvement from teachers, students 

and readers in all parts of the world  T h e result, it is hoped, will 

enhance the value and increase the usefulness of the book as a 

text and as a general work of reference. 

P .  K . H 



March, 1962 

P R E F A C E  T O  T H E  S I X T H  E D I T I O N 

As in earlier editions—the fifth excepted—alterations in the 

sixth edition consisted largely of correcting misprints and minor 

errors, bringmg certam statements and references to books up 

to date and introducing changes m the light of new researches. 

D u e consideration has been given to reviews of the book in 

learned magazines, including reviews of translations of the work 

particularly into Arabic, Spanish and  U r d u . Scholarly interest 

in the Arabic-speaking peoples and their lands has been so in-

tensified—in both East and West—in the last few years that the 

alterations necessitated in this edition exceed those of any pre-

ceding one; only few pages escaped some treatment. One radical 

change relates to the pre-Islamic kingdoms of South  A r a b i a 

(pages 52-5), where new explorations have been recently made. 

Of the maps several received additional place names occurring 

in the text, while one, page 684, had the boundaries adjusted. 

In thf case of the fifth edition the main change involved the 

addition of a new part, Part  V I , under the title Ottoman Rule, 

which brought the history down to the present time. 

T h e author acknowledges his indebtedness to students, col-

leagues, readers and friends, too numerous to name,  w h o have 

personally and generously communicated their views and sugges-

tions to him for improving the usefulness of the  w o r k . 

November, 1955 

P.  K .  H . 



P R E F A C E  T O  T H E  F I F T H  E D I T I O N 

IN response to requests from reviewers  a n d readers this edition  h a s 

been enriched  b y the addition  o f a  n e w part,  P a r t  V I ,  U n d e r the 

Ottoman  R u l e , thus  b r i n g i n g the story sketchily to the present 

time.  T h e new part benefited by criticism  f r o m my  c o l l e a g u e  P r o -

fessor  L e w i s  V .  T h o m a s and the old  b y several  r e v i e w s , the 

longest  a m o n g  w h i c h  w a s that  o f Professor  R i c h a r d  N .  F r y e  i n 



Spmdum, vol.  x x i v (1949),  p p . 582-7. Of the  m a n y students  w h o 

oitercd fresh suggestions and critical  r e m a r k s , special  m e n t i o a 

should  b e  m a d e  o f  R i c h a r d  W .  D o v m a r and  H o w a r d  A .  R e e d . 

Several  m a p s  w e r e revised.  T h a t on  p a g e 5 (the  M o s l e m  W o r l d ) 

was brought up to date,  a n d  t h e one on  p a g e 495  w a s  r e d r a w n  a n d 

made to  c h a n g e places  w i t h the one  o r i g i n a l l y on  p a g e 522. 

P .  K .  H . 

July, 1950 

P R E F A C E  T O  T H E  F O U R T H  E D I T I O N 

THIS edition has benefited by fresh studies in  w h i c h the  a u t h o r 

has for some time been  e n g a g e d in connection  w i t h the  p r e p a r a -

tion of a  v o l u m e on the history of  S y r i a and  L e b a n o n , as well as 

by visits he  m a d e in the summers of 1946 and 1947 to almost all 

lands  o f the  A r a b and  M o s l e m  E a s t .  W h i l e  i n  S u ' i i d i  A r a b i a  h e 

had  a n opportunity  t o discuss  w i t h  T h o m a s  C .  B a r g e r the results 

o ( surveys  m a d e  b y the  A r a b i a n  A m e r i c a n  O i l  C o m p a n y ; tlie 

discussion  w a s of assistance in  r e v i s i n g several  p a r a g r a p h s  d e a l -

ing with  t h e  g e o g r a p h y of that land. 

As in the past,  s u g g e s t i o n s from students, teachers and readers 

in different parts of the world led to the emendation of a  n u m b e r 

of passages in the text.  S p e c i a l mention should be  m a d e of the 

contribution  o f a student  i n  m y  g r a d u a t e seminar,  H a r r y  W . 

Hazard.  I t  m a y  b e  w o r t h noting that the  l o w dates  w h i c h  m a r k 

the publication of several  A r a b i c texts cited in the footnotes 

-belong to the  M o s l e m calendar,  w h i c h  b e g a n A.r>. 622,  a n d 

whose  y e a r is lunar. P K H 

Apri!, 1948 


P R E F A C E  T O  T H E  T H I R D  E D I T I O N 

IN preparing copy for this edition careful consideration was 

given to all available reviews of the second edition as well as to 

communications made privately to the author by students, 

teachers and other readers of the book.  T h e products of recent 

researches appearing in learned journals and new publications 

were also fully utilized.  T h i s resulted in several corrections of 

inconsistencies or minor errors and in the clarification of certain 

ambiguities in the text.  T h e footnotes  r e c d v e d further treatment 

involving the addition of newly published sources and reference 

works and the replacement of earlier editions by more recent 

and critical ones. In this coimection it must be noted that when-

ever a  w o r k is cited for the first time in a footnote, the full title, 

including name of author and place and date of pubhcation, is 

given; after that the title is abbreviated.  W h e n a biography of 

an  A r a b author is sketched in the text and reference is made 

to his major work, that reference usually comprises full title 

supplemented by a reference to any existing scholarly translation 

into a Western European language, particularly if English. 

T h e third edition, like its two predecessors, owes not a little 

to my graduate students and to members of the Summer 



Seminar in  A r a b i c and Islamic Studies. 

P .  K .  H . 



Apnl, 1942 

P R E F A C E  T O  T H E  S E C O N D  E D I T I O N 

IN this edition an effcrt  h a s been  m a d e to  b r i n g the  m a t e r i a l 

up to date and to introduce  n e c e s s a r y  e m e n d a t i o n s .  D u e 

consideration  w a s givtn to critical  c o m m e n t s  w h e t h e r  p r i v a t e l y 

communicated or  p u b l i s h e d as  r e v i e w s ,  a m o n g  w h i c h that of 

Professor  G e o r g e  L e v i della  V i d a in the Journal of the American 

Oriental Society,  v o l u m e 59 (1939),  w a s the  m o s t  c o m p r e h e n s i v e . 

Into the footnotes  w e r e incorporated certain items of the selected 

bibliographies  w h i c h  o r i g i n a l l y  w e r e to be  a p p e n d e d to  e a c h 

chapter of the  b o o k . 

O f those  w h o contributed  t o the first edition  D r .  E d w a r d 

J . Jurji and  D r .  N a b i h  A .  P a r i s  h a v e  m a d e further contribution 

to the present one;  a n d of my  g r a d u a t e students  G e o r g e F. 

Hourani offered several  s u g g e s t i o n s on the  B y z a n t i n e relations 

and Floris L.  F e r w e r d a collaborated in  r e c o n s t r u c t i n g  t w o of-the 

maps.  D r .  A .  R .  N y k l ,  o f  M a d r i d ,  r e a d the  c h a p t e r s  o n  S p a i n . 

T h e servnces of all these  g e n t l e m e n  a n d the co-operation of 

my -wife are herewith gratefitliy  a c k n o w l e d g e d . 



P. K  H . 

Stpumler, 1939 

P R E F A C E  T O  T H E  F I R S T  E D I T I O N 

CoRLEAR  B A Y  C L U B 

L A K E  C H A M P L A W ,  N E W YORK 

P .  K .  H . 



T H I S

 is a modest attempt to tell the story of the Arabians and the 

Arabic-speaking peoples from the earliest times to the Ottoman 

conquest of the early sixteenth century. It represents many years 

of study and teaching at Columbia University, the American 

University of Beirut and Princeton University, and is designed 

to meet the needs of the student as well as the cultivated layman. 

T h e field it covers, ho\^ ever, is so extensive that the author can-

not claim to have carried his independent researches into every 

part of it. He therefore had to appropriate in places the results 

of the investigation of other scholars in the East and in the 

West, to  w h o m his indebtedness would have been more apparent 

had the selected bibliographies appended to each chapter in the 

manuscript appeared in the printed book. 

While in preparation certain chapters of the book were sub-

mitted to various scholars for their criticism.  A m o n g those who 

made a distinct contribution were Professor A. T. Olmstead, of 

the University of  C h i c a g o ;  D r . Walter L.  W r i g h t , Jr., now 

president of Robert College, Istanbul;  D r . Costi  Z u r a y q , of 

the  A m e r i c a n University of Beirut, Lebanon; and two of my 

colleagues, Professor Henry L.  S a v a g e and Professor Albert 

Elsasser, of the Department of English. 

For several years the manuscript was made the basio of a 

graduate course, and it benefited considerably from suggestions 

and criticisms offered by my students.  A m o n g these special 

mention should be made of George C. Miles, now of  R a y y , 

Persia; Butrus  ' A b d - a l - M a l i k , of Assiut College,  E g y p t ; Edward 

J. Jurji, of  B a g h d a d ; Harold W. Glidden; Richard F. S. Starr; 

and  N a b i h A. Paris, of Jerusalem.  D r . Faris rendered further 

service by collaborating in sketching the maps, reading the 

proofs and compiling the index. 

To all these gentlemen, as well as to my wife, who co-operated 

in typewriting the manuscript and proposed several improve-

ments, my hearty thanks are due. 



C O N T E N T S 

P A R T I 

T H E  P R E - I S L A M I C  A G E 

C H A P T E R I 

exati 

T H E  A R A B S  A S  S E M I T E S :  A R A B I A  T H E  C R A D L E  O F  T H E  S E P T I C 

R A C E * 3 

Claims on our interest—Modem explorations—Ethnic relationship: 

ths Semites—Arabia, the cradle of the Semites. 

C H A P T E R  I I 

T H E  A R A B I A N  P E N I N S U L A 

.

.

.

.

.



1



The sO&np, of the stage—Climatic conditions—VegetatiDn—^The date-

palm—Fauna—The Ajabian hoisc—The camel. 

C H A P T E R  I I I 

B E D O U I N  L I F E 

.

.

.

.

.  • >  « 3 

The nomad—Rasria— Religiousness—The clan—'j4fait^'aA~Thc sheikh. 

C H A P T E R  I V 

E A R L Y  I N T E R N A T I O N A L RkLATioNS . .  . 3 0 

South Arabians—i. Relations •with Egypt—Sinaitic copper—^Frankin-

cense—2. Relaiions vnth the Sumcrians and Babylonians—3. Assyrian 

penetration—4. Neo-Babylonian tmd Persian relations; Tayma*— 

5. Contacts with the Hebre-ws—^Biblical association: Old Testament 

references—6. In classical literature—Roman expedition—^Tho aromatic 

l a n d - G o l d . 

C H A P T E R V 

T H E  S A B A E A K  A N D  O T H E R  S T A T E S  O F  S O U T H  A R A B I A  4 9 

The South Arabians as merchants—South Arabic inscriptions—r.  T h e 

Sabacan Hagdoni—Ma'rib dam—2.  T h e Minacjui kingdom—3. Qata-

ton and JJa^ramawt—4.  T h e first Jlimj-arite kingdom—The Semitic 

origin of the Abyssinians—The castle of Ghumdan—The Romans 

displace the Arabians in maritime trade—5.  T h e second Himyarite 

Kingdom—C-Hristianity and Judaism in a!-Yaman—The period of 

Abyssinian rule—Tlie breaking of  H a ' r i b dam—The Persian period, 

sin 

xiv  C O N T E N T S 

C H A P T E R  V I 

T H E  N A B A T A E A N  A N D  O T H E R  P E T T Y  K I N G D O M S  o r  N O R T H 

A N D  C E N T R A L  A R A B I A 

.

.

.

.

.

.  6 7 

I. The Nabataeans—The Sinai tic origin of the alphabet—Petra--2. Pal-

myrena—Odaynath and ?enobia—3. The Ghassilnids—^The Syfo-Arab 

kingdom at its height—Al-Mundhir, son of al-Hanth—Fall of the banu-

Ghassan—4. The l..ikhmids—Al-IJirah at the height of its power—The 

royal family Christianized—S- Kindah. 

C H A P T E R  V I I 

A L - H I J X Z  O N  T H E  E V E  O F  T H E  R I S E  O F  I S L A M . .  8 7 

The Jaluliyah days—The "days of the Arabians"—The Basils War—The 

Day of Dahis—North Arabic in its influence as a language—The heroic 

age—Poetry—The ode in the classical period—The Mu'allaqSt—The 

pre Islatnic poet—Bedouin character as manifested, in poetry—Bedouin 

heathenism—Solar aspects—Jinn—The daughters of Allah—The Mak-

kan Ka'bah—Allah—The three cities of al-Hijaz: al-Tu'if-Makkah— 

Al Madinah—Cult iral influences In al-Hijaz: I. Saba*—2. Abyssuiia— 

3. Persia—4 Ghas.anland—5 The Jews. 

P A R T  I I 

T H E  R I S E  O F  I S L A M  A N D  T H E  C A L I P H A L 

S T A T E 

C H A P T E R  V I I I 

M U H A M M A D  T H E  P R O P H E T OF  A L L A H .

 . . . iix 

C H A P T E R  I X 

T H E  K O R A N  T H E  B O O K  O F  A L L A H . . , • X23 

C H A P T E R X 

I S L A M  T H E  R E L I G I O N  O F  S U B M I S S I O N  T O  T H E  W I L L  O F  A L L A H 128 

Dogmas and beliefs—The five pillars: 1. Profession of faith—2 Prayer— 

3. Almsgiving—^4. Fasting—5. Pilgrimage—Holy War. 

C H A P T E R  X I 

P E R I O D  O F  C O N Q U E S T ,  E X P A N S I O N  A N D  C O L O N I Z A T I O K ,  A . D . 

632-61 139 

The orthodox caliphate: A patriarchal age—^Arahia conquers itself— 

The economic causes of the expansion. 

C O N T E N T S .:• ; ; . • XV 

C H A P T E R ' X l i 

T H E ' . C O N Q U E S T OF  S Y R I A . : . . . .  . 1 4 7 

- Kha'id's perilous marcli—The  d e d s i v c battle of Yarinuk—TlieadminU- ' 

-itraSon of the new territory. 

C H A P T E R  X i n 

AL-'IRXQ  A N D  P E R S I A  C O N Q U E R E D . - .  . 1 5 5 

C H A P T E R  X r V 

~ E G V F r , , T R I P O L I S  A N D  B A R Q A H  A C Q U I R E D . . - l6o 

- • .1116 hbrary of Alexandria. 

C H A P T E R  X V 

T H E A D . M I N I S T R A T I O N  O F  T H E  N E W PossEssiioNS . . 169 

Ji-.'J.'U'mar's constitution—The  a i m y ^ T h e so-cafled  A r a b dvtUration— 

?v • Character and achievements of the orthodox caliphs. 

C H A P T E R  X V I 

; - T H E . ' S T R U G G L E  B E T W E E N  * A I . I  A N D  M U ' A W J Y A H  F O R  T H E 

;  C A L I P H A T E . . .  . 1 7 8 

The elective caliphite—^The caliphate of 'Ali;—^Periods of the great 

caliphates—Thecaliphate, a pre-eminently political office. 

. P A R T  I I I 

T H E  U M A Y V A D ' A N D  ' A B B A S I D  E M P I R E S 

C H A P T E R  X V I I 

T H E  U I A A Y Y A D  C A L i P H A T E i / M U ' A W I Y A H  E S T A B L I S H E S a 

DiNASTY . 

.

.

.  - ; . . - . . 189 

, r,: The .claimants to the caliphate disposed of—Mu'awiyah, the model 

vAmbsoYeraBn. 

C H A P T E R  X V I I I 

H O S T I L E  R E L A T I O N S  . W I T H THs  B Y Z A N T I N E S . . .  . 1 9 9 

xvj  C O N T E N T S 

C H A F F E R  X I X 

rxcc 

T H E  Z E N I T H  O F  U M A Y Y A D  P O W E R . . .  . 2 0 6 

An energetic •rfcerojr. al-^ajjaj—Conquests "beyond the river"—Con-

quests in India—Against the Byzantines—Conquests in northern Africa 

and south-western Europe—Nationalizing the state—Fiscal and other 

ttfonns—Architectural monuments. 

C H A P T E R  X X 

P O L I T I C A L  A D M I N I S T R A T I O N  A N D  S O C I A L  C O N D I T I O N S  U N D E R 

T H E  U M A Y Y A D S 

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 324 

Military organization—Royal life—The capital—Society—Clients— 

Dhimmis—"The covenant of 'Umar"—Slaves—Al-Madihah and 

Makkah. 

C H A P T E R  X X I 

I N T E L L E C T U A L  A S P E C T S  O F  L I F E  U N D E R  T H E  U M A Y Y A D S . 240 

Al-Ba?rah and al-Kufah—Arabic grammar—Religious tradition and 

canon law—History-wnting—St. John of Damascus—Kharijites— 

Murji'ites—The Shrah—Oratory—-Correspondence—Poetry—Educa-

tion—Sdence—^Alchemy—Architecture—The Mosque of al-Madlnah— 

Early mosques in the provinces—The Dome of the Rock—The Aqsa 

Mosque—The Umayyad Mosque—Palaces. Qufayr 'Amrah—^Painting 

—^MusJc 

C H A P T E R  X X I I 

D E C L I N E  A N D  F A L L  O F  T H E  U M A Y Y A D  D Y N A S T Y . . 279 

Qays verm Yaman—^Thc problem of succession—The partisans of 

'Ali-'Abbasid daimants—The Khurasanians—The final blow. 

C H A P T E R  X X I I I 

T H E  E S T A B L I S H M E N T  O F  T H E  ' A B B A S I D  D Y N A S T Y . . j88 

Al-Maii5ur, the real fomader of the dynasty—Madmat al-Sal5m—A Persian 

vizirial famiily. 

C H A P T E R  X X I V 

T H E  G O L D E N  P R I M E  O F  T H E  ' A B B A S I D S . . , 297 

Relations vrith the Franks—With the Byzantines—The glory that was 

Baghdad—Intellectual awakening—India—Ptrsia—Hellcnism—Trans-

lators—ljunayn ibn-Isijaq—ThSbit ibn-Qurrah. 

C H A P T E R  X X V 

T H E  ' A B B A S I D  S T A T E . . . . .  . 3 1 7 

The 'AbbSsid caliph—Viar—Bureau of taxes—Other governmental 

bureaux—Judidaladministration—Militaryorganization-Thegovenior. 

C O N T E N T S JOT 

C H A P T E R  X X X I 

T H E  C A L I P H A T E  D I S M E M B E R E D :  P E T T Y  D Y N A S T I E S  I N  T H E 

W E S T 

r> In Spain—I. The Idrisids—3. The Aghlabids—4. The TQlunids— 

Public worU—s. The Iklishidids—A negro eunuch—6. The H&mdaiiida 

'—Literary dHorcscence—^Raids into "the land of the Romans". 

4S0 

C H A P T E R  X X V I 

' A J 3 B A S I D  S O C I E T Y 

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 332 

Home life—Baths—^Pastimes—Slaves—Economic life: commerce— 

Industry—Agriculture—Dhimmis: Christians—Ncstorians~-Jews— 

§ahians—Magians and other dualists—The Islamization of the empire 

—^Thc conquest of Arabic. 

C H A P T E R  X X V I I 

S C I E N T I F I C  A N D  L I T E R A R Y  P R O G R E S S 

.

.

.

. 363 

Medicine—'Ali al-Tabari—AI-Razi—AI-Majasi—Ibn-Sina —Philo-

sophy—Al-Klndi—^Al-Furabi—The Brethren of Sincerity—Astronomy 

and mathematics—Al-Battani—Al-BIruni—'Umar al-Khayyam— 

Astrology—^The Arabic numerals—^Al-Khwarizmi—^Alchemy—^Al-JS^z 

— Lapidaries—Geography—Greek antecedents—"World cupola"— , 

Literary geographers—Yaqilt—^Historiography—^Early formal historians 

—Al-Tabari—AI-Mas'udi—^Theology—The science of hadith—The sis 

canonical books—^Jurisprudence—The four orthodox sdiools—Ethics— 

Literature—Belles-lettres—TAe Arabian Nighls—^Poetry. 

C H A P T E R  X X V I I I 

E D U C A T I O N 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 408 

Elementary—Institutions of higher education—Adult education— 

Libraries—Bookshops—Paper—General level of culture. 

C H A P T E R  X X I X 

T H E  D E V E L O P M E N T  o r  F I N E  A R T S 

.

.

.

. -416 

Ardiitecture — Painting— Industrial Arts — Calligraphy — Music — 

Musical theorists. 

C H A P T E R  X X X 

M O S L E M  S E C T S  , 4 2 9 

Rationalism versus orthoddxy—Moslem inquisition—The

 AHli'.irite 

s>-stem prevails — Ai-Ghazrali — Suiism—Ascctidsm—Mysticism— 

Theosophy—Pantheism—Mystic poetry and philosophy—Fraternal 

orders—The rosary—The cult of saints—Shi'ah—Isma'lUtes—Bati'n-

^ , ilcs—Qarmajians—The Assassins—Nu-saj-ns—Other ShTite hetero-

doxies. 

xviii  C O N T E N T S 

C H A P T E R  X X X I I 

rAca 

S U N D R Y  D Y N A S T I E S  I N  T H E  E A S T 

.

.

.

. 461 

1. The Jahirids—2. Tlie Saffarids—3. The Samanids—4. GhaznaWids— 

MahmQd of Ghaznali—The imperial guard—A servile war—The amtr 

al-umard' in power—5. The Buwayhid dynasty—'A(Jud-al-DawIah— 

6. The Saijiiqs—TUBII"' power—Alp Arslan—SaljQq power at its 

2cm'th—An illustrious vizir: Nifam-al-Mulk—Disintegration of the 

Saljuq realm—Baghdad unmindful of the Crusades—The shahs of 

Khwarizm—Enter Cliingiz Khan. 

C H A P T E R  X X X I I I 

T H E  C O L L A P S E  O F  T H E  ' A B B A S I D  C A L I P H A T E .  . , 484 

Hulagu in Baghdad—Last champions of Islam. 

P A R T  I V 

T H E  A R A B S  I N  E U R O P E :  S P A I N  A N D  S I C I L Y 

C H A P T E R  X X X I V 

C O N Q U E S T OF  S P A I N . . . . .  - 4 9 3 

Gothic kingdom destroyed—Mflsa crosses the strait—A triuinphal 

procession—Musa falls from grace—The conquest explained—Beyond 

the Pyrenees—The battle of Tours—Civil wars—The amirate. 

C H A P T E R  X X X V 

T H E  U M A Y Y A D  A M I R A T E IN  S P A I N . . . • . 505 

A dramatic escape—Cordova captured—Moslem Spain consolidateil and 

pacified—A matdi to Charlemagne—An independent amirate—Treat-

ment of Christians—Renegades in arms. 

C H A P T E R  X X X V I 

C I V I L  D I S T U R B A N C E S . . . . . • 51a 

The "slaughter of the ditch"—Race for martyrdom—Flora and Eulogius 

—^Provinces in revolt—^Ibn-^af^Qn. 

C H A P T E R  X X X V I I 

T H E  U M A Y Y A D  C A L I P H A T E  O F  C O R D O V A , . . 520 

Caliph 'Abd-al-Rabman al-Najir-Al-Zahra". 

C O N T E N T S  S I X 

P A R T V 

T H E  L A S T  O F  T H E  M E D I E V A L  M O S L E M 

S T A T E S 



C H A P T E R  X L I I I 

A  S H I ' I T E  C A L I P H A T E  I N  E G Y P T :  T H E  F A T I M I D S . . 617 

^ 'Istna'ihte propaganda—The enigmatic  S n ' i d -  T h e first Fafimid—The 

"fleet—^3 he commnnder Ja^s bar—rajimid power at its  h e i g h t — A de-

- tahgcdcaliph—Decadence—Fall. 

C H A P T E R  X X X V I I I 

FACn 

PoLiTJCAL,  E C O N O M I C  A N D  E D U C A T I O N A L  I N S T I T U T I O N S . 526 

Cordova—Governmental institutions—Industry—Agriculture—Trade— 

H i e caliph in Ms glory—Educational activity—'Amirid  d i c t a t o r s h i p -

Collapse of TJmoyyad pov?er. 

C H A P T E R  X X X I X 

P L T T V  S T A T E S :  F A L L  O F  G R A N A D A . . .  . 5 3 7 

The 'Abbadids of Seville—Al-Mu'tamid—The  M u i u b i t s — C o i n a g e -

Persecution—The would-be Arabs—My Cid tlie Challenger—Collapse 

of the^Murabits—^The Muwati^ids—Founder of the Muwah^lld 

dynasty—Al-Manjur—Banu-Na^r—Alhambra—The last days of 

Granada—Morisco persecution, 

C H A P T E R  X L 

I H T E L L E C T U A L  C O N T R I B U T I O N S . . . .  - 5 5 7 

Language and literature—Poetry—MuwashsAahs—Education—Books 

—Paper—Historiography—Geography—Travels—Influence over the 

(West—Astronomy and mathematics—Botany and mediane—Ibn-al-

Bay(ar—Medidne—^Al-Zahrawi—Ibn-Zuhr—^Transmission to Europe— 

Philosophy—Ben-Gabirol—Ibn-Bajjah—Ibn-Rushd—  I b n - M a y m u n — 

Ibn-'AraVi, the mystic—Toledo, centre of translauon. 

C H A P T E R  X L I 

A R T " A N D  A R C H I T E C T U R E . , , . .  . 5 9 1 

Minor arts—Ceramics—Textiles—Ivories—Architecture—Alhambra— 

The arch—Music—Influence in Europe. 



C H A P T E R  X L I I 

I

N  S I C I L Y 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 602 

-Contjutsl—In Italy—Across the Alps—Withdrawal from Italy—The 

Sialian amirate—Norman conquest—Arab Norman culture—A!-Idrisi 

^ —Ercdenck H—Sicily's place ra transmitting thought—Via Italy. 

XX  C O N T E N T S 

C H A P T E R XLTV 

L I F E 

I

N  F A J I M I D  E G Y P T 

.

.



.

.

. 6as 

High hfc—Administration—Scientific and literary progress—Hall of 

Science—Astronomy and optics—^The royal library—Art and architec-

ture—^Decorative and industrial arts. 

C H A P T E R  X L V 

M I L I T A R Y  C O N T A C T S  B E T W E E N  E A S T  A N D  W E S T :  T H E 

C R U S A D E S 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 633 

Saljuqs of Syria—Complexity of causation and motivation—i. Period of 

conquest—The Byiantincs recover Asia Mmor—First Latin prind-

pahty—Annoch reduced—^Jerusalem captured—Italian fleets reduce 

seaports—^Baldvan I, king of Jerusalem—The third Prankish princi-

pality established—Social contacts—2. Moslem reaction- The 2angids 

and Nurids-Enter Saladin—Hittm—Siege of "Akka—3. Period of civil 

and petty wars The Ayyubids—The prankish camp—Egypt, the centre 

of interest—St. Louis—The Ayyubids give way to the Mamluks—^The 

last blows- Baybars—Qalawun—'Akka. 

C H A P T E R  X L V I 

C U L T U R A L  C O N T A C T S . . . . -  - 6 5 9 

Nurid contnbutions—Ayyubid contnbutions—In science and philo-

sophy—In letters—In military art—Gunpowder—In architecture— 

Agnculture and industry—\Vater-whecIs—Trade—Compass—Racia

admixture. 

C H A P T E R  X L V n 

T H E ^ A I A M L U K S ,  L A S T  M E D I E V A L  D Y N A S T Y  O F  A R A B  W O R L D 671 

Dynasty estabhshed—Bahri and Burji MamlQks—Ayyubids and 

Tartars repelled—Bajbars—The caliphal episode—Qalawun and the 

Mongols—His hospital—Al Ashraf—Mongols repulsed—Egypt at its 

cultural height—Pamme and plague—^The downfall of the Bahns. 

C H A P T E R  X L V i n 

I N T E L L E C T U A L  A N D  A R T I S T I C  A C T I V I T Y . .  . 6 8 3 

Scientific contribution—Medicine—^Jew]<;h physiaans—Diseases of the 

ej c—Medical history—Soaal science—Biography—History—IsJamics 

and hnguistics—Story-telling—Shadow play—Architecture—Art— 

Illumination—Luxurious hving. 

C H A P T E R  X L I X 

T H E  E N D  O F  M A M L U K  R U L E . . . .  - 6 9 4 

Speamcns of Burji sultans—Desperate economic situaUon^lndian 

trade lost—Monumental -aorks—Foreign relations—Cyprus conquered 

—Timur-Timunds—Ottoman Turks-—$afawids—The dcasive battle 

of Marj Dabiq—Egypt conquered—The Ottoman cahphate. 

C O N T E N T S - XX) 

P A R T  V I 

O T T O M A N  R U L E  A N D  I N D E P E N D E N C E 

C H A P T E R L 

»ACB 

T H E  A R A B  L A N D S  A S  T U R K I S H  P R O V I N C E S . . , 709 

North Africa—Pirate ttates—The splendour that was Constantinople— 

Ottoman culture—The imperial set-up—Inherent elements of weakness— 

The loss of North African states. 

C H A P T E R  L I 

E G Y P T  A N D  T H E  A R A B  C R E S C E N T . . .  . 7 1 9 

Mamlufcs remam in control—^Ali Bey decliured sultan—Napoleon Bona-



Download 7.19 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   119




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling