T h e arabs f r o m t h e e a r L i e s t t I m e s t o t h e p r e s e n t


parte—Mu^iammad *Ah' founder of  m o d e m Egypt—Syria—Provincial


Download 7.19 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet2/119
Sana15.03.2020
Hajmi7.19 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   119
parte—Mu^iammad *Ah' founder of  m o d e m Egypt—Syria—Provincial 

administration—Economic declme—Fakhr-al-Dm, enlightened amir of 

Lebanon—The 'Azms in Sj-na—Palestine has its dictators—Bashir 

al-SHhabi—Autonomy of Lebanonintemationally recognized—Al-'Iraq 

—Arabia—^WahhSbis—Ibn-Su'Cd—Intellectual actiwty. 

C H A P T E R  L I I 

T H E  C H A N G I N G  S C E N E :  I M P A C T  O F  T H E  W E S T . . 745 

Cultural penetration: Egypt—Syria and Lebanon—Political penetration 

—The British occupy Egypt—^French and Bntish mandates—An 

Egyptian tefonner—Nationalism—^Trend toward union. 

I N D E X . 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 759 

L I S T  O F  I L L U S T R A T I O N S 

The curtain of the door of the Ka*bah at Makkah . Frontispiece 

Sabaean  t

y

p

e

s

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.  3 1 

Antaent Egyptian representations of Arabians . .  - 3 3 

Semcrkhet, the sixth king of the first dynasty, smiting the chief 

o f the Nomads 

.

.

.



A frankincense tree and a Maliri collector. 

The ruins of Naqab al-Hajar and two lines of inscription which 

furnished Europe with its first sight of South Arabic inscrip-

tion 

.

.

.

.

.

.



A table of alphabets, including Ra's al-Shamrah cuneiform 

Himyarite silver coin 

.

.

.



Himyarite silver coin  .

.

.



Petra; the Palace 

.

.

.



Petra: the Dayr 

.

.

.



Palmyra: the colonnade and triumphal arch 

Nabataean bronze coin 

The Black Stone of al-Ka'bah 

Makkali from the mountain of ahu-Qubays 

Muhammad's journey through the celestial spheres 

T h e Egjptian and Syrian Mahmils on their departure from al-

Muzdalifah to Mina, 1904 

Pilgrims aroimd the Ka'bah performing the Friday prayer, 1908 

North-eastern view of the Ka'bah, 1908 . 

An imitation in gold of a Byzantine coin with .-Arabic inscrip-

tion 

.

.

.

.

.



Copper coin of 'Abd-al-Malik 

A Byzantine weight validated by al-Walid

 (fyis) 


Damascus today, as seen from al-Sa.lihijali 

Interior of the Dome of the Rock . . . 

The Mosque of Makkah seen from the east 

The interior of the Mosque of al-Madinah 

The Dome of the Rock and the Dome of the Chain 

Umayyad Mosque of Damascus: the colonnade and northern 

minaret 

.

.

.

.



Fagade of al-Mushatta 

L I S T  O F  I L L U S T R A T I O N S 

Qusayr 'Amrali from the south-east . . . .  a j o 

Pirtures on west wall of tlie main hall of the Qusayr  ' A m r a h . 272 

'The Haram area from the north-west with the  A q j a Mosque 

i n tlie background 

.

.



.

.

.



. 277 

Anglo-Saxon gold coin imitating an  A r a b dinar of the year 774 316 

^ A twelfth- or thirteenth-century vase from al-Raqqah, once part-

time capital  o f Harun al-Rashid 

.

.

.



. 336 

An astrolabe dated



  A . H .  I O I O  ( A . D .

 J601-2) . , . 374 

The oldest representation of the Caesarean section . . 407 

' A silver portrait coin of al-Mutawakkil . . .  . 4 1 6 

ThcMalwiyah tower of the great Mosque at Samarra, ninth 

Christian century 

.

.



.

.

.



. 418 

Stage towers, ziggurai, of the  A n u - A d a d temple at Ashur . 419 

The monk Bahura recognizing the prophetic mission of  M u -

hammad 


.

.

.



.

.

.



.

. 421 

A scene from al-Haiiri, tnaqdmah 19 . . . . 422 

Dinar  o f Ahmad ibn-Julun, Misr,  A . D . 881  . . . 450 

TheAlhambra and Granada today  .

.

.



.

. 552 

PawKon in the Court of Lions, Alhambra, Granada . . 590 

Cawed ivor}' casket 

.

.

.



.

.

.



. 593 

Interior  o f the great Mosque  o f Cordova 

.

.

.



. 594 

"The Hall of the Ambassadors in the Alcdzar, Seville . . 596 

" Cappella Palatina, Palermo 

.

.



.

.

.



. 608 

An Arabic map of the world , . . .  . 6 1 1 

- TJie cotonation mantle of Roger II, with Ktific inscription on 

the senncircular border  .

.

.

.



. faang 614 

^ ' F l j i m i d carved rock-crj'stal ewer bearing the name of the Caliph 

a!-'Aziz, loth century 

.

.



.

.

.



. 632 

. Qsl'atal-Shaqif (Belfort) 649 

A Prankish dinar struck at  ' A K k a in 1251 . . . 658 

The ancient citadel of Aleppo . . . .  . 6 6 0 

Interior of the Crusaduig church of Notre Dame at Antartus 

(Tortosa, modern TartQs) . . . .  . 6 6 6 

Dinar of the Mamluk Baybars 670 

The Madrasah of Qri'it-Bay, Cairo (exterior) . . . 698 

The Madra«;ah of Qa'it-Bay, Cairo (interior) . .  . 7 0 0 

Thefiagofihe Ottoman Empire . . . .  - 7 0 9 

^ The Tughta, calligraphic emblem, of Sulayman the Magniticent, 

- ' bearing his name 714 



Coin  o f ' A l i Bey  7 „ 

LIST OF MAPS 

Muljammad'Ah, founder of modem Egypt . . • 7=3 

Coin of Ma^mud II . . . . . .  - 7 2 5 

Coin  o f Ma^jmud  I I 

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 7=5 

Coin  o f Sulayman I 

.

.

.

.

.

.

. 7=7 

Fakhr-al-Din al-Ma'ni II, amir of Lebanon 1590-1635 . 73° 

C o i n o f ' A b d - a l - M a j I d l 735 

Muhammad'Abduh, modem Egyptian reformer . .  - 7 5 4 

L I S T  O F  M A P S 

The Moslem world 

.

.

.

.

.

.

. S 

Arabia—land surface features . . . .  . 1 6 

Arabia of the classical authors . • • .  - 4 5 

Ptolemy's map of Arabia Felix . • . •  ' 4 7 

Ancient Arabia—peoples, places and routes (including the chief 

later Moslem towns) 

.

.

.

.

.

.  6 3 

The North Arabian kingdoms before Islam (including the chief 

later Moslem towns) 

.

.

.

.

.

.  6 9 

Al-'Iraq, Khuzistan and part of al-Jazirah between pp. J48 and 149 

Lower Egypt—illustrating the conquest and showing the 

Moslem to%vns . . . . . .  . 1 6 2 

Provinces of the Oxus and Jaxartes between pp. so8 and 209 

India—illustratmg the Moslem conquest and the later kingdom 

of the Ghaznawids . . . ,  . 2 1 1 

Empire  o f the caliphs, far. 750 

.

.

.

.

. 216 

'Abbasid caliphate, nintli century 

.

.

.

.

. 324 

The Iberian Penmsula—^illustrating Moslem occupation . 495 

The Iberian Penmsula—mid-twelfth century . . . 522 

Morocco under the Muwahhids 

.

.

.

.

. 547 

Sicily and Southern Italy—to illustrate Moslem occupation . 603 

Islam and Christianity on the eve of the Crusades . . 634 

Crusading States  o f Syria, ca. 1140 

.

.

.

. 642 

The Mamluk kingdom 

.

.

.

.

.

. 684 

The Ottoman Empire at its height, ca. 1550 between pp. 716 and 717 

P A R T I 

T H E  P R E - I S L A M I C  A G E 

C H A P T E R

 1 

T H E ARABS AS SEMITES 

ARABIA THE CRADLE OF THE SEMITIC RACE 

OF all the lands  c o m p a r a b l e to  A r a b i a in  s i z e ,  a n d of all  t h e cidna 

peoples  a p p r o a c h i n g the  A r a b s  i n historical interest  a n d  i m -  ^ ^ ^ ^ 

portance, no country and no nationality have perhaps received 

so little consideration and study in  m o d e m times as  h a v e  A r a b i a 

and the  A r a b s 

Here is a country that is  a b o u t one-fourth  t h e  a r e a of  E u r o p e , 

one-third the size  o f  t h e  U n i t e d States  o f  A m e r i c a ,  y e t  w h a t  i s 

known about  i t  i s out  o f all proportion  t o  w h a t  i s  u n k n o w n .  W e 

are beginning to  k n o w more,  c o m p a r a t i v e l y  s p e a k i n g ,  a b o u t  t h e 

Arctic and  A n t a r c t i c  r e g i o n s than  w e  d o  a b o u t  m o s t  o f  A r a b i a . 

A s the probable cradle  o f the  S e m i t i c  f a m i l y  t h e  A r a b i a n  p e n -

insula nursed those peoples  w h o later  m i g r a t e d into  t h e  F e r t i l e 

Crescent and subsequently  b e c a m e the  B a b y l o n i a n s ,  t h e  A s -

syrians, the Phoenicians and the  H e b r e w s  o f history.  A s  t h e 

plausible fount of pure  S e m i t i s m , the  s a n d y soil of  t h e  p e n i n s u l a 

is the place wherein the  r u d i m e n t a r y elements of  J u d a i s m ,  a n d 

consequently of  C h r i s t i a n i t y — t o g e t h e r with the  o r i g i n of those 

traits "which later developed into  t h e well-delineated  S e m i t i c 

character-—should be  s o u g h t for. In  m e d i e v a l times  A r a b i a 

gave birth to a people  w h o conquered  m o s t of the then civilized 

world, and to a religion-—Islam—^which still  c l a i m s  t h e  a d -

herence 01 some  l o u r hundred and fifty millions ot people repre-

senting nearly all the races and  m a n v different climes.  E v e r y 

eighth person in our  w o r l d  t o d a y is a follower of  M u h a m m a d , 

and the  M o s l e m call to prayer  r i n g s out  t h r o u g h  m o s t of  t h e 

twenty-four hours of the day,  e n c i r c l i n g the  l a r g e r portion of  t h e 

globc'in its  w a r m belt. 

Around the  n a m e  o f the  A r a b s  g l e a m s  t h a t  h a l o  w h i c h  b e -

longs to the world-conquerors.  W i t h i n a  c e n t u r y after their rise 

tliis people  b e c a m e the masters of an  e m p i r e  e x t e n d i n g  f r o m  t h e 

shores of the  A t l a n t i c  O c e a n to the confines of  C h i n a , an empu-e 



4  T H E PRE-ISLAMIC  A G E  P A R T I 

greater than that of  R o m e at its zenith. In this period of un-

precedented expansion they "assimilated to tlieir creed, speech, 

and even physical type, more aliens than any stock before or 

since, not excepting the Hellenic, the  R o m a n , the  A n g l o - S a x o n , 

or the Russian".^ 

It was not only an empire that the  A r a b s built, but a culture 

as well. Heirs of the ancient civilization that flourished on the 

banks of the  T i g r i s and the Euphrates, in the land of the Nile 

and on the eastern shore of the Mediterranean, they likewise 

absorbed and assimilated the main features of the Greco-

R o m a n culture, and subsequently acted as a medium for trans-

mitting to medieval Europe many of those intellectual in-

fluences which ultimately resulted in the awakening of the 

Western world and in setting it on the road towards its  m o d e m 

renaissance. No people in the Middle  A g e s contributed to 

human progress so much as did the Arabians and the  A r a b i c -

speaking peoples.^ 

T h e religion of the Arabians, after Judaism and Christianity, 

is the third and latest monotheistic religion. Historically it is an 

offshoot of these other two, and of all faiths it comes nearest 

to being their next of kin.  A l l three are the product of one 

spiritual life, the Semitic life. A faithful Moslem could with but 

few scruples subscribe to most of the tenets of Christian belief. 

Islam has been and still is a living force from Morocco to Indo-

nesia and a  w a y of life to millions of the human race. 

T h e  A r a b i c language today is the medium of daily expression 

for some hundred million people. For many centuries m the 

Middle  A g e s it  w a s the language of learning and culture and 

progressive thought throughout the civilized world. Between the 

ninth and the twelfth centuries more works, philosophical, 

medical, historical, religious, astronomical and geographical, 

were produced through the medium of  A r a b i c than through any 

other tongue.  T h e languages of Western Europe still bear the 

impress of its influence in the form of numerous loan-words. Its 

alphabet, next to the Latin, is the most widely used system in the 

world. It is the one employed by Persian,  A f g h a n ,  U r d u , and a 

number of Turkish, Berber and  M a l a y a n languages. 



•  D . G. Hogarth, The Penetration of Arabta (New York, 1904), p. 7. 

* Oa the distisvction betvjeen AiaUons and Arabs (Aitibic-sptaUing peoples) as 

used in tliis book see below, p. 43, n. 3. 

Eraoiy W»!lar  L t d , * . 

6  T H E PRE-ISLAMIC  A G E  P A R T I 

T h e Babylonians, the Chaldaeans, the Hittites, the Phoenicians 

were, but are no more.  T h e Arabians and the Arabic-speaking 

peoples were and remain.  T h e y stand today as they stood in the 

past m a most strategic geographical position astride one of the 

greatest arteries of world trade. Currently their international 

position is importantly medial in the  t u g of cold war between 

East and West. In their soil arc treasured the world's greatest 

stores of liquid energy, oil, first discovered in 1932. Since World 

W a r I these peoples have been nationally aroused and have 

achieved full independence. For the first time since the rise of 

Islam most of the  A r a b i a n peninsula has been consolidated under 

one rule, the Su'udi. Egypt, after experiencing a period of 

monarchy, declared in 1932 in favour of the republican form. 

In this it followed Syria—whose capita! Damascus was once the 

seat of the glorious  U m a y y a d empire—which seven years earlier 

had freed itself from the French mandate.  A l - ' I r a q , after in-

stalling a king in Baghdad, kingless since  ' A b b a s i d days, 

abolished the monarchy and declared itself a republic. Lebanon 

w a s the first to adopt the repubhcan form. Transjordan and a 

part of Palestine developed in 1949 into the Hashimite  K i n g d o m 

of Jordan. In North  A f n c a Morocco, Tunisia, Mauritania and 

A l g e r i a shook off the French and  L i b y a the Italian tutelage in the 

19505 and 1960s.  T h e phoenix, a bird of  A r a b y , is rising again. 

Classical Europe knew southern  A r a b i a : Herodotus, among 

others, mentions its western coast.  T h e chief interest of the 

Greeks and the Romans lay in the fact that the South Arabians 

inhabited the frankincense and spice land and acted as a con-

necting link with the markets of India and Somaliland.  B u t late 

medieval and early modern Europe forgot  A r a b i a in great part 

and had in recent times to discover it anew.  T h e pioneers were 

adventurers, Christian missionaries, traders, French and British 

officers attached to the Egyptian expeditions between  1 8 I t and 



1836, political emissaries and scientific explorers. 

T h e first modern scholar to describe the land was Carsten 

Niebuhr, a member of a scientific expedition sent by the  k i n g of 

D e n m a r k in  1 7 6 1 .  A l - Y a m a n in Soutli  A r a b i a , the part best 

known to classical Europe,  w a s the first to be rediscovered.  T h e 

north-western part of the peninsula, centring m  a l - H y a z , though 

geographically nearer to Europe, was left to the end.  D o w n to 

the present day no more than a dozen Europeans of those  w h o 



C H . i . .  T H E  A R A B S AS  S E M I T E S - , 7 

* . --J . " " 

r

 left records have succeeded in penetrating into this religiously^ 

forbidden

In  l 8 i 2 Johann  L u d w i g  B u r c k h a r d t , a  S w i s s , discovered 

Petra for the learned world, and  u n d e r the  n a m e Ibrah&n  i b n -

'Abdullah visited  M a k k a h and  a l - M a d i n a h .  H i s description  o f 

the places visited  h a s  h a r d l y since been  i m p r o v e d  u p o n .  B u r c k -

hardt's  M o s l e m  t o m b stands today in the  g r e a t cemetery of 

Cairo.  T h e only other  E u r o p e a n until 1925  w h o had a  c h a n c e to 

study  M a k k a h in its normal life  w a s Professor  S n o u c k  H u r -

gronje of  L e y d e n ,  w h o  w a s there in  1 8 8 5 - 6 . In 1845 a  y o u n g 

Finno-Swedish scholar,  G e o r g e  A u g u s t u s  W a l l i n ,  p a i d a visit 

to Najd for linguistic study.  N a p o l e o n  I I I , after  w i t h d r a w i n g his 

troops from  L e b a n o n in 1861,  s o u g h t a  n e w sphere of influence 

in central  A r a b i a and thereinto sent,  t w o  y e a r s later, an  E n g l i s h -

man,  W l l i a m Gifford  P a l g r a v e ,  w h o  w a s a Jew by birth and 

who at that time, as a  m e m b e r of the Jesuit order,  w a s stationed 

at Zahlah,  L e b a n o n .  P a l g r a v e claimed that he covered more 

ground south of  N a j d than he actually did. In 1853  S i r  R i c h a r d 

F. Burton, famous as the translator of T/te Arabian Nights

visited the holy cities as a  p i l g r i m — a l - H a j j  ' A b d u l l a h .  L a d y 

A n n e Blunt, one of  t w o  E u r o p e a n  w o m e n to penetrate north 

Arabia, reached (1S79) Najd on several odd missions,  i n c l u d i n g 

the quest  o f  A r a b i a n horses.  I n 1875  a n  E n g l i s h m a n ,  C h a r l e s  M . 

Doughty, traversed northern  A r a b i a as a  " N a s r a n y " (Christian) 

and  " E n g l e y s y " .  H i s record of the journey, Travels in Arabia 



Deserta^ has become a classic of  E n g l i s h literature. T. E. 

Lawrence's Seven Pillars of Wisdom  h a s been  g r e e t e d as a  w o r k 

of special merit in the literature of the first  W o r l d  W a r .  A m o n g 

the latest explorers  m a y be mentioned a  C z e c h o s l o v a k ,  A l o i s 

Musil,  w h o specialized on the northern territory; and  a m o n g the 

recent travellers, the  L e b a n e s e - A m e r i c a n  A m e e n  R i h a n i ,  w h o 

interviewed all the  k i n g s of the peninsula, and  E l d o n Rutter,  w h o 

visited  M a k k a h and  a l - M a d i n a h in  1 9 2 5 - 6 . A special reference 

, should be made to the brave feat of  B e r t r a m  T h o m a s ,  t h e  y o u n g 

English orientalist,  w h o in Januarjf 1931 crossed for the first  t i m e 

- the great southern desert of  A r a b i a ,  a l - R a b ' al  K h a l i , and bared 

one of the largest  b l a n k spots left on the world's  m a p His  a d v e n -



r ture,\vas matched by H. St.J B. Philby, al-Hajj  ' A b d u l l a h . 

^ who, starting at al-Hufuf tiear the Persian  G u l f on  J a n u a r y 7, 

crossed  i i i - R a b '  a l - K h a l i from east to  w e s t in ninety  d a y s . 

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   119




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling