T h e arabs f r o m t h e e a r L i e s t t I m e s t o t h e p r e s e n t


  T H E  P R E - I S L A M I C  A G E PART I


Download 7.19 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet3/119
Sana15.03.2020
Hajmi7.19 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   119

8  T H E  P R E - I S L A M I C  A G E PART I 

T h e Himyarite inscriptions which afforded us the first oppor-

tunity to hear what the South Arabians had to say about them-

selves were discovered by a Frenchman disguised as a Jewish 

b e g g a r from Jerusalem, Joseph Haldvy, 1869-70, and by an 

Austrian Jew, Eduard Glaser, between 1882 and 1894 (see below, 

p. S  l ) .  T h e copious but late and not fully authentic Islamic litera-

ture in  A r a b i c , the sporadic Greek and Latin references and the 

few hieroglyphic and cuneiform statements in the annals of the 

Pharaohs and the kings of Assyro-Babylonia, supplemented by 

the recently deciphered Himyarite material and by the reports 

of the modern travellers and explorers, constitute our chief 

sources of knowledge of ancient  A r a b i a . 

Ethnic Of the two surviving representatives of the Semitic people, 

ship"'the Arabians, in a larger measure than the Jews, have preserved 

Semites the characteristic physical features and mental traits of the 

family. Their language, though the youngest among the Semitic 

group from the point of view of literature, has, nevertheless, 

conserved more of the peculiarities of the mother Semitic tongue 

—^including the inflection—^than the Hebrew and its other sister 

languages. It therefore affords the best key for the study of the 

Semitic languages Islam, too, in its original form is the logical 

perfection of Semitic religion. In Europe and  A m e r i c a the word 

" S e m i t e " has come to possess a primarily Jewish connota-

tion, and that on account of the wide dispersion of the Jews 

in these continents  T h e "Semitic features" often referred to, 

including the prominent nose, are not Semitic at all.  T h e y are 

exactly the characteristics which differentiate the Jew from 

the Semitic type and evidently represent an acquisition from 

early intermarriages bet%veen the Hittite-Hurrians and the 

Hebrews.^ 

T h e reasons which  m a k e the  A r a b i a n  A r a b s , particularly the 

nomads, the best representatives of the Semitic family biologic-

ally, psychologically, socially and linguistically should be sought 

in their geographical isolation and in the monotonous uniformity 

of desert life Ethnic purity is a reward of the most ungrateful 

and isolated environment, such as central  A r a b i a affords.  T h e 

A r a b i a n s call their habitat Jaztrat al-Arab,  " t h e Island of the 

A r a b s " , and an island it is, surrounded by water on three sides 



' George A 'Bixnon, Scmtlic and J/amtltc On^ni {VlnXaiiiphiti., 1934), pp 85-7, 

Ignacc J. Gelb, Humans and Suianatu (Chicago, 1944), pp. 69-70 

CH.i I  T H E  A R X b S as SEMilTES

 "

 ' ^ ^9 

and by sand^on  t h e fourtH.  T h i s  " i s l a n d " furnishes an  a l m o s t 

unique'example  o f uninterrupted relationship  b e t w e e n  p o p u l a c e 

^and soil; If any immigrations  h a v e ever  t a k e n  p l a c e thereinto 

resulting In successive  w a v e s of settlers ousting or  s u b m e r g i n g 

one another—as in the case of  I n d i a , Greece,  I t a l y ,  E n g l a n d  a n d 

tbe United States—history has left tis no record thereof.  N o r do 

we know of  a n y invader  w h o succeeded in  p e n e t r a t i n g the  s a n d y 

barriers and establishing a  p e r m a n e n t foothold in this land.  T h e 

people of  A r a b i a  h a v e remained  v i r t u a l l y the  s a m e  t h r o u g h o u t 

all the recorded ages.^ 

T h e term Semite comes from  S h e m in the  O l d  T e s t a m e n t 

(Gen.  1 0 :  i )  t h r o u g h the  L a t i n  o f the  V u l g a t e .  T h e traditional 

explanation that the so-called Semites are descended from the 

eldest son of  N o a h , and therefore racially  h o m o g e n e o u s , is no 

longer accepted.  W h o are the Semites then? 

If we consult a linguistic  m a p of  W e s t e r n  A s i a we find  S y r i a , 

Palestine^  A r a b i a proper  a n d al-'Iraq  p o p u l a t e d at  t h e present 

time by  A r a b i c - s p e a k i n g peoples. If we then  r e v i e w  o u r ancient 

history we  r e m e m b e r that  b e g i n n i n g  w i t h the  m i d d l e of the 

fourth miilennium before our era the  B a b y l o n i a n s (first  c i l l e d 

Akkadians after their capital  A k k a d u ,  A g a d e ) , the  A s s y r i a n s  a n d 

' later the Chaldaeans occupied the  T i g r o - E u p h r a t e s  v a l l e y ; after 

^ "2500 B.C. the  A m o r i t e s and  C a n a a n i t c s  ( i n c l u d i n g the  P h o e n i -

cians) populated  S y r i a ; and about 1500  B . C . the  A r a m a e a n s settled 

in Syria and the  H e b r e w s jn Palestine.  D o w n to the nineteenth 



r century the medieval  a n d  m o d e m  w o r l d did not realize that all 

fhe$e peoples  w e r e closely related.  W i t h the  d e c i p h e r m e n t of the 

^ Cuneiform  w r i t i n g in the middle of the nineteenth centurj'  a n d 

the comparative study of the  A s s y r o - B a b y l o n i a n ,  H e b r e w , 

Aramaic,  A r a b i c and Ethiopic  t o n g u e s  i t  w a s found  t h a t those 

languages  h a d strilcing points of similarity and  w e r e therefore 

cognates. In the case of each one of these  l a n g u a g e s the  v e r b a l 

^ stem is fcriconsonantal; the tense has only  t w o forms, perfect  a n d 

'itapeifeet; the conjugation of the  v e r b follows the  s a m e  m o d e l . 

The elements of  t h e  v o c a b u l a r y ,  i n c l u d i n g the personal pro-

'nouns, nouns  . d e n o t i n g blood-kinship,  n u m b e r s  a n d certain 

"names of  m e m b e r s of the body,  a r e ' a l m o s t alike. A scrutiny of 



J ,thc social institutions and religious beliefs and a comparison of 

' Bertratn TJiotnus in The Kear Sasl and India CLondon, Nov. i, 1928), 

" PP;S«o-i5;.G,  R a t I i j e n s i n / & a r « o / c c x v . No 1 (1929), pp 141-55 j 

l o  T H E PRE-ISLAMIC AGE  P « T I 

the physical features of the peoples who spoke these languages 

have revealed likewise impressive points of resemblance.  T h e 

linguistic kinship is, therefore, but a manifestation of a well-

marked general unity of type.  T h i s type was characterized by 

deep religious instinct, vivid imagination, pronounced individu-

ality and marked ferocity.  T h e inference is inescapable: the 

ancestors of these various peoples—Babylonians, Assyrians, 

Chaldaeans, Amorites, Aramaeans, Phoenicians, Hebrews, 

Arabians and Abyssinians—before they became thus differen-

tiated must have hved at some time in the same place as one 

people. 


Arabia, Where was the original home of this people? Different hypo-

rf

^r'^''



 theses have been worked out by various scholars. There are 

Semites those who, considering the broad ethnic relationship between 

Semites and Hamites, hold that eastern Africa was the original 

home; others, influenced by Old Testament traditions, maintain 

that Mesopotamia provided the first abode; but the arguments in 

favour of the Arabian peninsula, considered in their cumulative 

effect, seem most plausible  T h e Mesopotamian theory is vitiated 

by the fact that it assumes passage of people from an agricultural 

stage of development on the banks of a river to a nomadic stage, 

which is the reverse of the sociological law in historic times.  T h e 

African theory raises more questions than it answers. 

T h e surface of  A r a b i a is mostly desert with a narrow margin 

of habitable land round the periphery.  T h e sea encircles this 

periphery.  W h e n the population increases beyond the capacity 

of the land to support it the surplus must seek elbow room. But 

this surplus cannot expand inward because of the desert, nor 

outward on account of the sea—a barrier which m those days 

was well-nigh impassable.  T h e overpopulation would then find 

one route open before it on the western coast of tlie peninsula 

leading northward and forking at the Sinaitic peninsula to the 

fertile valley of the Nile.  A r o u n d 3500  B . C . a Semitic migration 

followed this route, or took the east African route northward, 

planted itself on top of the earlier Hamitic population of  E g y p t 

and the amalgamation produced the Egyptians of history. These 

are the Egyptians who laid down so many of the basic elements 

in our civilization. It was they who first built stone structures 

and developed a solar calendar. At about the same time a parallel 

migration followed the eastern route northward and struck root 


' cil't '  T H E  A R A B S AS  S E M I T E S ' ' ^ - ^ u 

in the  T i g r o - E u p h r a t e s  v a l l e y ,  a l r e a d y  p o p u l a t e d by a  h i g h l y 

avilizcd community,' the Sumerians.^  T h e  S e m i t e s  e n t e r e d . t h e 

valley as barbarian  n o m a d s ,  b u t learned from tlie  S u m e r i a n s , 

the originators of the  E u p h r a t e a n civilization,  h o w to build  a n d 

hve in. homes, how^ to irrigate the land  a n d  a b o v e all  h o w to 



vmtc.  T h e  S u m e r i a n s  w e r e a  n o n - S e m i t i c  p e o p l e .  T h e  a d m i x t u r e 

of tlie two races here  g a v e us the  B a b y l o n i a n s ,  w h o share  w i t h  t h e 

Egyptians the honour  o f laj'ing  d o w n the  f u n d a m e n t a l s  o f  o u r 

cultural heritage.  A m o n g other innovations, the  B a b y l o n i a n s be-

queathed to us the arch and tlie  v a u l t  ( p r o b a b l y of  S u m e r i a n ^ 

origin), the wheeled cart and a system of  w e i g h t s and  m e a s u r e s . 

A b o u t the middle of the third  m i l l e n n i u m before  C h r i s t 

another Semitic  m i g i ation  b r o u g h t the  A m o r i t e s into the Fertile 

Crescent  T h e component elements  o f the  A m o r i t e s included  t h e 

Canaanites (who occupied western S3ma and Palestine after 

2500 B c.) and the coastal people called by  t h e  G r e e k s  P h o e n i -

cians These Phoenicians  w e r e tlie first  p e o p l e to  p o p u l a r i z e an 

exclusively alphabetic  s y s t e m of  w r i t i n g ,  c o m p r i s i n g  t w e n t y - t w o 

signs, properly styled the greatest invention of  m a n k i n d (cf. 

below, p.  7 1 ) . 

Between 1500 and 1200 B.C. the  H e b r e w s  m a d e  t h e i r  w a y into 

southem Syria, Palestine, and the  A r a m a e a n s  ( S y r i a n s ) into  t h e 

north, particularly Coele-Syria.^  T h e  H e b r e w s , before  a n y  o t h e r 

people, revealed to  t h e world  t h e clear idea of  o n e  G o d ,  a n d their 

monotheism became the Origin of Christian  a n d  M o s l e m belief. 

A b o u t 500 B.C. the  N a b a t a e a n s established themselves north-

east of the Sinaitic peninsula.  T h e  h e i g h t to  w h i c h their civiliza-

tion later attained under  R o m a n influence  m a y  b e  g a u g e d  b y  t h e 

magnificent ruins of their  r o c k - h e w n capital,  P e t r a . 

T h e seventh century of our era  s a w a  n e w  a n d final  m i g r a t i o n 

under the banner of  I s l a m , in the course of  w h i c h the  d a m  b r o k e 

and not only the lands of the Fertile Crescent,  t h e  r e g i o n  f o r m -

ing an krc between the head of  t h e Persian  G u l f and the south-

^ east coriier of the  M e d i t e r r a n e a n  S e a ,  b u t even Eg>'pt, northern 

Africa, Spain, Persia and parts of central  A s i a were flooded.^ 

This last migration,  w h i c h  t o o k  p l a c e within the full  h g h t of 

' history, is cited as an historical  a r g u m e n t by the supporters of 

I Cf. a Leonard WooUey, TAe'Sunmefis (Oxford, 1929), pp. 5 6. 

Holloa-Sj-na, modem al-Biqa", between the two Lcbanons. 

' Wmckler, TAc Mstery cf iiabyhma and Assj-na, tr. James A. Craig 

(New Yori, 1907), pp. 18-22. 


12  T H E  P R E - I S L A M I C  A G E PART l 

the theory of  A r a b i a as the Semitic home; they further reinforce 

their case by the observation that the Arabians have preserved 

the Semitic traits more purely and have manifested them more 

distinctly than any other members of that racial group, and that 

their language is most nearly akin to what scholars believe the 

primitive form of Semitic speech to have been. 

A comparative examination of the dates quoted above sug-

gested to certain Semitists the notion that in recurrent cj'cles of 

approximately one thousand years  A r a b i a , like a mighty reser-

voir, became populated to the point where overflow  w a s inevit-

able. These same scholars would speak of the migrations in 

terms of  " w a v e s " . It is more likely, however, that these Semitic 

movements partook in their initial stages more of the nature of 

the European migrations into the New World: a few persons 

would start moving, others would follow, then many more would 

go, until a general popular interest  w a s aroused in the idea of 

going. 


T h i s transplantation en masse or in bands of human groups 

from a pastoral desert region to an agricultural territory con-

stitutes a common phenomenon m the Near East and provides 

an important clue to the understanding of its long and checkered 

history.  T h e process by whicli a more or less migratory people 

imposes itself upon a people which has become rooted in the soil 

usually results in the invaders assimilating to some degree the 

main features of the previously existing civilization and in 

infusing a certain amount of its blood, but hardly ever in the 

extermination of the indigenous population.  T h i s is exactly 

what happened in the ancient Near East, whose history is to 

a certain extent a struggle between the sedentary population 

already domiciled in the Fertile Crescent and the nomadic 

A r a b i a n s  t r y i n g to dispossess them. For immigration and colon-

ization are, as has been well said, an attenuated form of invasion. 

It should be noted in connection with these migrations that 

in almost every case the Semitic tongue survived.  T h i s is a de-

termining factor. If in Mesopotamia, for example, the aggluti-

native Sumerian language had survived it would have been 

difficult for us to classify the people of the valley as Semitic. In 

the case of the ancient Egyptians a Semito-Hamitic language 

evolved, and we cannot very well include the Egyptians among 

the Semites.  T h e term  " S e m i t e " , therefore, has more linguistic 


CH.'t  T H E  A R A B S  A S  S E M I T E S  1 3 

than ethnological implication, and the  A s s y r o - B a b y l o n i a n ,  A r a -

maic, Hebrew, Phoenician,  S o u t h  A r a b i c ,  E t h i o p i c  a n d  A r a b i c 

languages should be  v i e w e d as dialects  d e v e l o p i n g out of one 

common tongue, the Ursemiiisch. A parallel  m a y be found in  t h e 

case of the  R o m a n c e  l a n g u a g e s in their relation to  L a t i n ,  w i t h 

the exception that some form of  L a t i n has survived, in literature 

at least, to the present day,  w h e r e a s the  S e m i t i c  a r c h e t y p e ,  o n l y 

a spoken  l a n g u a g e , has entirely passed  a w a y ,  t h o u g h its general 

character  m a y be inferred from  w h a t e v e r points are found 

common to its  s u r v i v i n g daughters. 

Accepting  A r a b i a — N a j d  o r  a l - Y a m a n — a s the  h o m e l a n d  a n d 

distributing centre of the Semitic peoples does  n o t  p r e c l u d e  t h e 

possibility of their  h a v i n g once before, at a  v e r y  e a r l y date, con-

stituted with another  m e m b e r of the white  r a c e , the  H a m i t e s , 

one community  s o m e w h e r e in eastern  A f r i c a ; it  w a s from this 

community that those  w h o  w e r e later termed  S e m i t e s crossed 

over into the  A r a b i a n peninsula, possibly at  B a b  a l - M a n d a b . ^ 

This would  m a k e  A f r i c a  t h e  p r o b a b l e  S e m i t o - H a m i t i c  h o m e and 

Arabia the cradle of the Semitic people and the centre of their 

distribution.  T h e Fertile Crescent  w a s the scene of the  S e m i t i c 

civilization, 



1 BflKon, p. ay 

C H A P T E R n 

T H E ARABIAN PENINSULA 

Tlie ARABIA is the south-western peninsula of  A s i a , the largest pen-

seitmgof insula on the  m a p . Its area of 1,027,000 square miles holds an 

ic stage estimated population of only fourteen millions. Su'udi  A r a b i a , 

with an area (exclusive of al-Rab' al-Khali) of 597,000 square 

miles, claims some seven millions;  a l - Y a m a n iive millions; al-

K u w a y t , Qatar, the trucial shaykhdoms,  ' U m a n and Masqat, 

A d e n and the  A d e n protectorate the rest. Geologists tell us 

that the land once formed the natural continuation of the 

Sahara (now separated from it by the rift of the Nile valley and 

the great chasm of the Red Sea) and of the sandy belt which 

traverses  A s i a through central Persia and the Gobi Desert. In 

earlier times the Atlantic westerlies, which now water the high-

lands of Syna-Palestine, must have reached  A r a b i a undrained, 

and during a part of the Ice  A g e these same desert lands must 

have been pre-eminently habitable grasslands. Since the ice sheet 

never extended south of the great mountains in  A s i a Minor, 

A r a b i a  w a s never made uninhabitable by glaciation. Its deep, 

dry wadi beds still bear witness to the erosive powers of the rain-

water that once ilowed through them.  T h e northern boundary 

is ill-defined, but  m a y be considered an imaginary line drawn 

due east from the head of the  G u l f of  a l - ' A q a b a h in the Red 

Sea to the Euphrates. Geologically, indeed, the whole Syro-

Mesopotamian desert is a part of  A r a b i a . 

T h e peninsula slopes  a w a y from the west to the Persian Gulf 

and the Mesopotamian depression. Its backbone is a range of 

mountains running parallel to the western coast and rising to a 

height of over 9000 feet in Midian on the north and 14,000 in 

a l - Y a m a n on the south.*  A l - S a r a h in al-Hijaz reaches an eleva-

tion of 10,000 feet. From this backbone the eastern fall is gradual 

and  l o n g ; the western, towards the  R e d Sea, is steep and short. 

T h e southern sides of the peninsula, where the sea has been 

' Tlie lughcst measured point: Carl Rathjens and Hermann v. Wissmann, 

Sitdorahms Retse, vol ni, Landeskundhche Ergrbntssc (Hamburg, 1934), p 2 

'4 


CB. 11 i, ' r' '  ' T H E  A R A B I A N  P E N I N S U L A 15 

receding from the coast at a fate  r e c k o n e d at  s e v e n t y - t w o feet 

peryear, are fringed  b y  l o w l a n d s , the  T i h a m a h s ,  N a j d ,  t h e  n o r t h 

central plateau, has a  m e a n elevation of 2500 feet. Its  m o u n t a i n 

^ range, Sharamar, lifts one red granite  p e a k ,  A j a ' , 5550 feet  a b o v e 

the sea-level. Behind  t h e coastal  l o w l a n d s  r i s e  r a n g e s  o f  v a r i o u s 

heights on all three sides. In  * U m a n , on the eastern coast,  t h e 

summits of al-Jabal al-Akh

forming one notable  e x c e p t i o n to the  g e n e r a l  e a s t w a r d decline of 

the surface of the land. 

With the exception  o f the  m o u n t a i n s  a n d  h i g h l a n d s  j u s t  d i s -

cussed the land consists  m a i n l y of desert  a n d steppe.  T h e steppes 

(sing, darah) are circular plains between hills  c o v e r e d  w i t h  s a n d 

and embosoming subterranean  w a t e r s .  T h e so-called  S y r i a n 

desert, Badiyat  a l - S h a ' m , as well as the  M e s o p o t a m i a n desert,  a r e 

mostly steppfeland.  T h e southern part of the  S y r i a n desert is  c o l -

loquially  k n o w n  a s  a l - y a m a d .  T h e southern  p a r t  o f  t h e  M e s o -

potamian steppeland is often referred to as  B a d i y a t  a l - ' I r a q or 

al-Samawah. 

Of the desert land three varieties  m a y be distinguished: 



I .  T h e great  N u f u d , a tract  o f white  o r reddish  s a n d  b l o w n 

into high  b a n k s or dunes and  c o v e r i n g a vast  a r e a in  N o r t h 

A r a b i a .  T h e classical term is al-bddiyak,  s o m e t i m e s al-dahnd*. 

Though dry except for an occasional oasis,  a l - N u f u d receives in 

some winters  e n o u g h rain to cover it with a  c a r p e t of  v e r d u r e 

.and convert it into a paradise for the  c a m e l s  a n d sheep of  t h e 

wandering  B e d o u i n .  A m o n g the  f i r s t  o f the  d o z e n  E u r o p e a n s  w h o 

have succeeded in  t r a v e l i n g the  N u f u d are the French  A l s a t i a n , 

CharlesHuber(i878); the Englishdiplomatist  a n d poet,  W i l f r i d S , 

•Blunt(i879),- and the  S t r a s s b u r g o r i e n t a l i s t , Julius  E u t i n g ( i 8 8 3 ) . 

1.  A l - D a h n a ' (the red land), a surface of  r e d  s a n d ,  e x t e n d s 

from the great Nufud in  t h e north to  a l - R a b '  a l - K h a l i in the 

soutli, describing a great arc to  t h e south-east  a n d stretching a 

, distance of over  s i x hundred miles. Its western part is sometimes 

' „

'is-usually indicated as  a l - R a b '  a l - K h a l i (the  v a c a n t  q u a r t e r ) . 

When  a l - D a h n a ' receives seasonal rains, it  a b o u n d s in  p a s t u r a g e 

attractive to the Bedouins  a n d tlieir cattle for several  m o n t h s a 




Download 7.19 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   119




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling